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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  February 13, 2018 2:00pm-5:00pm GMT

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hello, you're watching afternoon live. i'm simon mccoy. today at 2pm... the charity commission begins a statutory inquiry into oxfam following the scandal involving aid workers in haiti. jacob zuma still clings to power. the anc says it has decided to sack him as south africa's president — and they expect a decision from him tomorrow. cheering going tartan barmy — meghan and harry on their first joint visit to the scottish capital. elise christie crashes out of the women's 500 metre speed skating final. so we've seen the pictures, and that's the main sports story from the winter olympics coming up this afternoon on afternoon live. she is not happy? that is an understatement? that's right, she says she is struggling to live with this feeling. the context was three disqualifications four years ago in sochi and now she has to come to terms with this, but at least there
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are three more chances for elise christie to claim this elusive medal. chris has the weather. we will cast our nets further afield and bring you the very latest on what cyclone peter has done to tonga. talk to you later, chris. is it time to stop clowning around? are pranksters and creepy clowns changing the face of an age old entertainer? hello, everyone. this is afternoon live. i'm simon mccoy. it isa i'm simon mccoy. it is a crisis hitting at the very heart of oxfam's appeal, with questions raised by the government millions of individual donors about whether the charity deserves their money. the charity commission has taken the most serious action it can against oxfam, and begun a statutory inquiry into its procedures. it will investigate the handling of claims that oxfam staff used
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prostitutes as they carried out disaster relief in the aftermath of the earthquake in haiti in 2010. matt cole reports. this crisis has already claimed one senior figure, 0xfam's now former chief executive penny lawrence, but her resignation has far from drawn a line under the matter, with the organisation now facing the most serious form of investigation the charity commission can undertake, a statutory inquiry which could lead to the suspension of trustees or the freezing of bank accounts. and there is more pressure from the government. i take these things very seriously. i know people will be worried about the charity, worried about the money. as 0xfam fights for its future, there are some claiming it had ample opportunity to avoid this scandal. helen evans spent three years at 0xfam's head of safeguarding, but says as she unearthed the scale of the problem, the charity failed to respond with sufficient resources. we had one in ten saying they had experienced unwanted sexual touching, sexual assault. this was staff on staff.
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we went to beneficiaries who received aid from us. “ we —— we hadn't even gone out to beneficiaries who received aid from us. i was extremely concerned by those survey results. 0xfam says it has new safeguarding measures in place, better checks now, but the biggest fight it might face is to maintain public confidence, that most precious commodity that if lost severely hampers its ability to raise money and help those most in need. the labour mp peter kyle was formerly an aid worker. he worries people with an agenda to oppose international aid spending might exploit the situation. i am deeply concerned. let's not beat around the bush. this scandal could bring 0xfam to its knees. the organisation could implode, and the people who will suffer the most through this will be the people who depend, the thousands of people, who are extraordinarily vulnerable, who depend on the work that organisations like 0xfam does. as 0xfam waits to learn more
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details of the statutory inquiry into its failings, it at all other aid agencies are being told by the government they must step up and provide statements of assurance about the policies and procedures. what is being dubbed a significant conference is also being planned. all major charities will discuss how the sector as a whole will face these problems. and matt is live outside 0xfam's headquarters in oxford. the reputational damage of all of this, it seems to be getting worse by the day? indeed. the leaders of 0xfa m by the day? indeed. the leaders of 0xfam behind us now havejust until the end of the week to give guarantees to the secretary of state, penny mordaunt, who we heard from, that they have a handle on the way any future allegations might be dealt with. that is not a lot of time. as they think about how they
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deal with future allegations, more are coming in. helen evans, who we heard from in my report, has also made uncorroborated, as yet uncorroborated, allegations that there has been abuse in the uk too. young volunteers, she said, faced abuse in charity shops on the high streets of this country. very serious complaints to be dealt with here. along with other members of the wider aid agency sector, they are being told by the government to step up and offer assurances that all of our policies and procedures are up to scratch. the charity commission is launching a statutory investigation, what sanctions do they have at their behest? this is they have at their behest? this is the toughest type of inquiry that the toughest type of inquiry that the charity commission can launch. there could be sanctions likejustis being suspended, bank accounts being frozen. this could seriously impact
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on the work 0xfam can do and the help that is recognised by the government to be good all around the world could impact on them. the secretary of state, penny mordaunt, said she would think that —— think very long and hard before taking that drastic step, but the threat is there, as is a similar thread from there, as is a similar thread from the european union commission which gives around £30 million a year to 0xfa m gives around £30 million a year to 0xfam to help its work. it is making the same pledge, if things are not up the same pledge, if things are not up to scratch and 0xfam's houses not in order, it might take it away. thank you. joining me now via webcam is liesl gerntholtz, executive director for women's rights at the charity human rights watch. is there a concerned that what is happening with 0xfam, the sense that the government and individual donors are rethinking what the role of charity is and whether they are worth contributing? it seems that is one of the themes that has emerged
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from these scandals surrounding 0xfam. i would strongly, strongly urge particular the british government, who has been an important player in aid, one of the few government is that is really focused on evidence —based programming, they have been an incredibly important voice on gender equality, women in parliament, i would strongly urge them not to step away for their commitments or to reduce the amount of aid but also focus on ensuring this kind of thing does not happen again and there are really strong policies in place, both on the prevention side and in the response when this kind of misconduct occurs. aren't we beyond the point that this cannot happen again, it is quite clear it happens rather a lot before, not just clear it happens rather a lot before, notjust add 0xfam but this isa before, notjust add 0xfam but this is a much bigger problem? i think the allegations against 0xfa m i think the allegations against 0xfam are particularly egregious, andi 0xfam are particularly egregious, and i think people feel outraged because they are happening in a place where people are working with
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incredibly vulnerable women and girls, often displaced, often women who have experienced sexual violence already, often in conflict situations. at 0xfam is by no means unique, in the humanitarian and human rights sector all generally. 0ne human rights sector all generally. one only has to look at the #metoo movement to realise sexual harassment is pervasive in all sectors and workplaces. recent research suggested up to 85% of women and girls have experienced some form of sexual harassment during their employment careers. 0xfa m during their employment careers. 0xfam is not unique in this sense. you're saying this is a #metoo moment for the charitable sector?|j am moment for the charitable sector?” am saying it is certainly connected to the #metoo moment and if the charitable sector has not already begun looking inwards, this is the moment for us to do so. thank you very much forjoining us. the governing african national
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congress in south africa has decided to recalljacob zuma from the position of president. the party's secretary general said mr zuma had agreed in principle to resign, but that talks were continuing. jacob zuma has come under mounting pressure to resign following several corruption scandals. we engaged and we are looking forward to an amicable solution. we will then see what president zuma's response is. it is obvious that we wa nt response is. it is obvious that we want our comrades come in as of south africa. pumza fihlani is injohannesburg. it seems everybody knows what happens next, except forjacob zuma? well we have a decision from the
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african national congress it is very much up to jacob zuma himself to give an indication of whether he is willing to roll over. he is not a man who has not put up resistance in the past. he has survived numerous votes of no confidence in parliament brought by opposition parties, but this time the people trying to push him his own comrades. it is a wait—and—see game in south africa for now. how much time is therefore that? these the option of him deciding to go quietly tomorrow, or a vote of no confidence, or impeachment. there are several ways and some could take some time? correct. 0n the sidelines of the anc process , pressure correct. 0n the sidelines of the anc process, pressure is mounting not just within the party but from members of the public and opposition parties who say they have run out of patience. they are threatening to table their own no—confidence motion on the 22nd of february, they have
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started the process of getting a date to start that process in parliament and effectively saying if you do not want to get rid of him, we will do it ourselves. the african national congress has been trying to abide this. they are feeling pressure not just abide this. they are feeling pressure notjust within the party but from all sides. so we wait until tomorrow, once ain? so we wait until tomorrow, once again? now we're waiting until tomorrow. it has been said that he believes the president will give some sort of statement tomorrow, that was said by a close ally of the president for years, so he must speak on good authority. thank you so speak on good authority. thank you so much for that update from johannesburg. and you find steyn, a former anc mp, joins us from cape town. wattel jacob zuma be thinking about as he is held up, presumably waiting to make a decision? —— what willjacob zuma? he will be thinking about how he can get out of the situation in the best legal shape possible. jacob
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zuma faces a myriad of corruption charges. there were corruption charges. there were corruption charges brought against him and then set aside by a prosecutor. the setting aside of those charges has itself been overturned by the courts. so zuma faces legal tribulations dating back from 1999, 2000, all the way to the present. he will be thinking about how can i be best placed to avoid landing up in court as possible, but if in court, how do i avoid jail? that will really be worrying him at the moment. it is not only about him, it is about one of his sons, a number of his nephews and other members of his immediate family. the threat of court action is serious, i think you expect to give evidence against him yourself, should that happen? correct. i was an anc member of parliament, i investigated as the ranking member of the public accounts committee in
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parliament a hugely corrupt arms deal concluded in 1999. jacob zuma's financial adviser was found guilty of corrupting jacob zuma in relation to that deal. i was approached for the first time in many years about 34—macro months ago by the national prosecuting authority in south africa to find out first whether i was still alive and second whether i would be willing to give evidence againstjacob would be willing to give evidence against jacob zuma. i would be willing to give evidence againstjacob zuma. i obviously responded in the affirmative, as i believe did a number of other witnesses. it is quite possible that that old case which involves 783 cou nts that old case which involves 783 counts of fraud, corruption and racketeering, could be brought back into the courts a matter of weeks afterjacob zuma leaves office. so of course the nature and timing of his leaving are going to be of great concern to him. and to the police, presumably he could drive out of there are no longer as president and
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just be arrested? quite correct. there are certainly sufficient charges againstjacob there are certainly sufficient charges against jacob zuma there are certainly sufficient charges againstjacob zuma to there are certainly sufficient charges against jacob zuma to have him arrested immediately, in addition to which there are a number of ongoing investigations into what has broadly been described as state ca ptu re. has broadly been described as state capture. this is effectively the looting of the south african state bya looting of the south african state by a couple of with very, very close links to jacob zuma and many of his more senior people in government. as cyril romm oppose it was announced as the new anc president a few weeks ago, the national prosecution authority froze some of the assets of some of the people involved and started to search the offices of others, including the current anc general secretary who made the announcement about jacob zuma today. we are at quite a remarkable moment in south africa's democratic history where not only could a former state
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president to be arrested very soon after his departure from office, but senior party office bearers who have recently been elected to their positions could also find themselves in the firing line in relation to the law. thank you very much. thank you. you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines: the charity commission begins a statutory inquiry into 0xfam — following the scandal involving aid workers in haiti. the anc says it has decided to sackjacob zuma as south africa's president, and it expects a decision from him tomorrow. and prince harry and his fiancee meghan markle visit edinburgh in their firstjoint visit to scotland's capital. in a moment, our diplomatic correspondent has a flipping big success in the parliamentary pancake race. james landale will be showing off his medal, and also talking about the future of the commonwealth. he was laughing at that! and in sport: more 0lympic agony for elise christie. she falls in the final of 500 metres
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short track speed skating in pyeongchang, finishing fourthand in tears. ben stokes will fly out tomorrow tojoin his england team mates in new zealand. after appearing in court today he'll be available for the one day series which starts later this month. but he won't be able to help england resurrect their hopes in the t20 tri series. another defeat today to new zealand means their chances of reaching i will have more on those thatjust after 2:30pm. prince harry and meghan markle are visiting edinburgh this afternoon as part of their public engagements in the run—up to their wedding in may. they've been at the city's castle, and heard the one o'clock gun fire at the garrison. 0ur royal correspondent daniela relph is in edinburgh. ta rta n tartan barmy, she is wearing a
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rather apt coat? that is read, she is wearing a black watch tartan coat made by burberry, we are told, very appropriately dressed for her visit to scotland. i know you always want to scotland. i know you always want to know what prince harry is wearing, iam to know what prince harry is wearing, i am afraid that information has not been passed on the meghan markle was in that tartan burberry coats. they have had a very warm welcome on a chilly day in edinburgh. this is theirfirst official visit to scotland, they are spending the afternoon here in this city, starting at one of its most famous landmarks, the castle. this is the part of their day that involved interacting with the public and being able to talk to members of the public here in scotland. they spent probably around half an hour talking to all the people gathered here in front of edinburgh castle, probably a few hundred year, we think. lots of schoolchildren, union flags everywhere, somebody handed meghan markle a valentine ‘s card, we're told, ahead of tomorrow. it
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was a chance for them to speak to the people of edinburgh and lots of tourists who came out to see them. they have a number of engagements across the rest of the afternoon. they have moved from here and been ata they have moved from here and been at a cafe called social bite, a social enterprise business whose big ambition is to end homelessness. again, givena ambition is to end homelessness. again, given a very loud, warm welcome at social bite cafe. they saw the type of work being done by that organisation to end homelessness. the food being distributed and the fact they have taken on a number of people who have experienced homelessness to work up the project. that was the charity aspect of their trip to scotland this afternoon. they have moved to hollywood has for a reception celebrating achievements of young people. the flavour of the day is set in terms of what they do. we have seen visits to nottingham, london, cardiff and in edinburgh. they have an element where they can
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interact with the public, they do some charity work and there is an informal reception. i think it gives a real flavour of the informal reception. i think it gives a realflavour of the kind of informal reception. i think it gives a real flavour of the kind of work and interests that meghan markle will do and embark on together once they are married. daniela relph, it looks like you no longer pose a threat to the public and they are taking your pen away! we will rejoin you later! you're watching afternoon live. bbc news has learned that the commonwealth has begun considering who might succeed the queen as the head of the organisation. member states could choose anyone as the ceremonial leader, as the role is not hereditary. the bbc has been told 53 member states have established a high level group to look at how the commonwealth is governed. it will meet for the first time today in london. 0ur diplomatic correspondent james landale is here with more. so when the queen dies, it's not a given that prince charles takes this on? it is not an automatic hereditary role, which means there
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isa hereditary role, which means there is a debate. now, if this happened tomorrow, then the commonwealth heads of government would meet, discuss and decide who should succeed the queen as head up the commonwealth. it is not written down, there is no formal procedure. what is happening now is that within the commonwealth, minds are beginning to turn to what should happen. that is the debate is beginning to start. when the commonwealth started the whole point was everyone is equal, presumably there are some countries who are saying that the head of the british monarchy should not necessarily be in charge any more? there has always been that debate, is the commonwealth sealers too anglo centric, too white, old commonwealth. there are now 53 members, should it be a rotate and presidency, should that the elections for the ceremonial head, a grand former president of a country,
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to make it less anglo centric? people say who and nobody agrees. if you ask most people within the commonwealth, within the hierarchy, what is the most likely option, they would say there is no reasonable, practical, plausible alternative to the prince of wales succeeding his mother. we know what she thinks about the commonwealth, it is her raison d'etre in many ways, does he share that passion for it? he has displayed every interest in it, if you look at his website there is an awful lot about his focus on the commonwealth. he has visited well into the 40s of the 53 countries, a lot of them in the last 12 months. crucially, last november he went to visit prime minister modi of india, which is the big member of the commonwealth, almost half the commonwealth, almost half the commonwealth population lived in india, one of the biggest economies in the commonwealth. the prince of wales is very focused
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on the commonwealth and i think would be very keen to succeed. but he will be quite busy if he is king. what about william, is there thought it might skip a generation? people can have those thoughts, i have yet to speak to anybody in a position of authority to contemplate that in any plausible way. let's talk about you. and today. you have been flipping marvellous at the house of commons. i thank you, i thank you acclamation this is our diplomatic correspondent doing what he does best. talk as through it. this is the annual parliamentary pancake race, when the media race against mps and peers just outside parliament. it is to raise money for a head injuries charity. it always gets lots of support. it is pretty brutal. 0f gets lots of support. it is pretty brutal. of cheating goes on.” gets lots of support. it is pretty brutal. of cheating goes on. i saw some shoving. a lot of people do not
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toss their pancakes quite as often as the rules state. it is pretty tough stuff. it sounds quite serious. there should be a parliamentary inquiry into the tossing. but you won. and this is what you get, a little medal, i don't know if the cameras can see that. a little medal with the pa nca kes that. a little medal with the pancakes on. i don't know anybody who eats that many pancakes, not the ones we were using. all your years of training, there it is. we have been training for weeks, i assure you. i was thinking more of your journalism career exploration not thank you. it shows you can have your pancake and eat it.” thank you. it shows you can have your pancake and eat it. i saw you rehearsing that over there! thank you. very diplomatic. london city airport has reopened. it was closed yesterday after a 500 kilogram second world war bomb was found. the device was discovered at the king george the fifth dock on sunday, during planned work.
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all flights were cancelled yesterday as an exclusion zone was put in place, affecting up to 16,000 passengers and some local people who had to be moved out of their homes. the bomb has been taken to the essex coast and will be safely two teenagers have been arrested on suspicion of murder after a six—week—old baby died in southampton. police were called to a home in the peartree area on sunday after reports of a baby boy needing medical attention. the child was taken to southampton general hospital and was pronounced dead a short time later. the england cricketer ben stokes has indicated a not guilty plea, after being charged with affray, following a fight outside a nightclub in bristol last september. jon kay is at bristol magistrates court. five months after that alleged incident outside inequity in bristol, ben stokes return to this city to appear at the magistrates‘ court. it was a very short hearing, only lasted about 12 minutes. during the hearing the england all—rounder was asked to stand behind a sheet of
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glass and asked how he would be the leading to a single charge of affray. he answered not guilty. two men charged alongside him, ryan hale and ryan ali, both in their 20s and from bristol, also charged with affray, they said they would also plead not guilty to the same code. the men were told by the judge they would all three go to trial at bristol crown court with an initial hearing in the middle of next month, march 12. just moments after ben stokes left, the england and wales cricket board issued a statement saying they had been told he would not have too attend that next hearing in person, he does not out to be caught in the middle of march, so tomorrow he can fly to new zealand to join his england team—mates. we are told initially it will be for training, there are no plans at the moment for him to play in the twenty20 tri— series, but the decision will be up to the england management. ben stokes himself left this court, made
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no comment to the press and journalists waiting outside. elections are under way for a new president for the world‘s clowns — with a briton amongst the front runners. the campaign comes at the end of what has been a turbulent year for the world‘s clowns — with a briton amongst for the clown community: a new clown horror movie and sightings of so—called "killer clowns" lurking on streets, have only added to a feeling amongst some, that the long history of clowning is under threat and they are falling out of fashion. this space is old—fashioned, in a way, now. over the years, clone numbers have dropped in the shows. — — plowman numbers have dropped in the shows. —— plowman numbers. joining me now in studio is dan lees, comedian and clown with the clowns without borders uk. 0ur klawans‘ 0ur klawa ns‘ days
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0ur klawans‘ days numbered? our klawans' days numbered? cloning is vibrant, i teach cloning, lots of people are interested. how do you teach clowning. you would have to come to one of my workshops. some people think i have been clowning for years. is the make—up crucial? no, the make—up was developed when there was not electrical lighting, in these big circus tents you needed to see the face of the performers, this make—up made that very clear. you could see them from a distance. in the modern day the make—up is not necessary , in the modern day the make—up is not necessary, many people choose to use it but many, if not more, choose not to. what makes a good clown? number one, very funny. byrne, playful, open, a good clown you are yourself, there is no mass, you are an idiot. like a child, in a way. is it a
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career? people do very well out of it, there are clowns who are very successful. do you worry at the perception that there is something slightly more sinister about clowning than they used to be, given the film genre which profiles particularly these very scary masks? i suppose mcdonald‘s had their main advertising idea to use a clowns for 30 years, so clowns could not have been scary. then there was a number of horror films been scary. then there was a number of horrorfilms in been scary. then there was a number of horror films in the 80s, i think it was one of them. it created the idea of a scary clown. tommy cooper isa idea of a scary clown. tommy cooper is a great example of a clown you might not consider to be a clown. the make—up is not essential, it for clowning. when you vote for a new president of the clowning association... i work with a
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charity, clowns without borders, we entertain refugees in refugee camps, places where children are having a very ha rd places where children are having a very hard time and are very stressed, we hopefully give them a moment where they can be children again and entertain them. there must bea again and entertain them. there must be a moment that sticks in your mind where you realised what a positive thing you do? absolutely. with the example of going to refugee camps, for instance, in greece and in serbia. you arrive and go around the camp, it is not a great place. things are bad. the children are playing with rocks sometime. there is nothing to do for them. we survey the situation, bring out instruments, start playing, gather the children and families, it is a beautiful moment. the atmosphere changes. most people do not know that goes on. absolutely. you don't
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have make—up, just a red nose?‘ that goes on. absolutely. you don't have make-up, just a red nose? a red nose, phone, silly clothing. like you are wearing now? something like this, yes. thank you for coming in and good luck. the weather is coming up and good luck. the weather is coming up injusta and good luck. the weather is coming up injust a bit, but first... the weather is coming up but first — let me show you these pictures from the united states. this is a robot from boston dynamics opening a doorfor its this is a robot from boston dynamics opening a door for its friend. this is a robot from boston dynamics opening a doorfor its friend. the footage has been viewed 5 million times. keep these pictures for a moment, we have to c at opening the door! we finished the pictures. we will show you that in a full later. now the weather. that looks like australia. that looks like australia. that is cycling detour, we talked
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about it yesterday. it has hit tonga and hit it hard. this was a category four cyclone. according to the uk met office, or wind reached 2a mph it has caused all kinds of damage, flattening buildings widely and tearing roofs off. damage coming in, reports coming in, orfairly widespread, we have seen fairly widespread, we have seen fairly widespread flooding as well, due to the huge amounts of rain falling. and the last photograph want to show you is this. that is tonga parliament, or what is left of it. it has been completely flattened. has it now passed? it will skirt down to the south of fiji. what has driven it to be so powerful is cool water in the pacific, the warm water
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sloshes across the cooler water of the south pacific, and that has powered the storm. that is why it is so nasty here. closer to home, it is not dole here. another day when we have seen plenty of wintry weather. this is a weather watcher picture, 0 moloney and bus with snow falling down, curtains of snow cake in the landscape. initially across the northern half of the uk, further south it has been rain falling. hill snow has been easing eastwards. it is slowing down. across east anglia and southern india, it will be with us into the evening time, making it feel cool. further west, feeling cold as well. 0vernight tonight, cloudy for a time in eastern areas, the weather front hanging around for a while, but the sky is clear. light winds and temperatures taking a
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dive. we will get a widespread frost developing, leading to icy stretches on an treated services into wednesday. wednesday, another area of low pressure will spin in off the atlantic, tightly packed isobars ahead of the system, so windy. as it bumps into the cold air and rain, snow is on the way. how much? across the highlands of scotland, perhaps more than this, perhaps 10—12 building in centimetres. creating transport disruption. further south, rain is falling. the start to the day, bright with sunshine, things clouding over. windy everywhere, gusts of 50 — 60 mph. eventually, it will turn milder in the west with temperatures in the double figures. cold across northern and eastern
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parts of the uk. looking ahead to thursday‘s weather, the weather system is out of the way, building a ridge of high pressure across england and wales. the weather will settle down. for most, a dry day with sunshine, feeling milder as well. further north and west, still cold. we will have sunshine, but also a number of wintry showers with snowfall on ground. temperatures quite mild across southern areas, ten or 11, cold air hanging on across parts of scotland. what about friday and the weekend? there is a trend for the weather to become drier and milder as well. temperatures reaching double figures. the mild weather will last into next week. but there are signs that we could see something much colder towards the end of february. we will keep you updated on that. that‘s your weather. this is bbc news.
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our latest headlines: the charity commission begins a statutory inquiry into 0xfam following the sex scandal involving its workers in haiti seven years ago. south africa‘s ruling anc party have decided to recall jacob zuma as president amidst corruption allegations. they expect a decision from him tomorrow. prince harry and his fiancee meghan markel visit edinburgh as part of their public engagements in the run up to their wedding on 19 may. british speed skater elise christie misses out on an olympic medal after crashing out of the woman‘s 500 metre final in pyeongchang. that is where we are going to pick
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up that is where we are going to pick up with hugh ferris in the sports centre. we need to state, four years of work going like that. no wonder she was upset. you can sense the frustration with all the people that don‘t necessarily complete the race or com plete necessarily complete the race or complete the event. we saw it yesterday with aimee fuller with the wind, and today with elise christie. she looked so good at sea went through the rounds, breaking the big record in her heat. the result in the semifinal, they pushed her out to lay four, and had a bad start. she struggled to keep pace. attempting to get into bronze medal position, she fell on this corner, sliding out and crashing into the wall. the race eventually won by the italian. christie got up to finish fourth after the tumble on that corner. proving again that speed skating is an incredibly unforgiving sport, physically on the eyes, and
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mentally afterwards trying to come to terms for elise christie, it is not the first time it has happened to her. that is right, the spectre of sochi. it is true. maka good years ago and three disqualifications for elise christie for her. she had all manner of twitter abuse as a result of one of twitter abuse as a result of one of the three disc one of occasions four years ago. she had to find a way bend to over come the difficulties she has face. she is well number one and world champion. but after the preparation, four yea rs but after the preparation, four years in the waiting again, it left her distraught. i was knocked over, you know, i didn't fall on my own. in a final, it doesn't give you any benefit when someone gets a penalty. it's just tough, i worked so hard for the 500, it's been taken away from me.
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even in the semifinal, i crashed. i ended up in lane four, and... i know it's short track and i'm supposed to be prepared for this, but it still hurts, you know? two more chances for elise christie again, she returns to the ice on sunday. eight medals in all today. you can see where they went. you can get all the results from day 4 of the winter olympics on the bbc sport website. that‘s bbc.co.uk/sport. let‘s move away from longchamp. —— pyeongchang. ben stokes will fly out tomorrow to new zealand tojoin up with the england cricket team. he entered a plea of not guilty to charges of affray at magistrates in bristol this morning. his case was adjourned to bristol crown court on march 12th but he will not be required to appear in person, allowing him to appear in the remainder of england‘s winter tour. the ecb say: which is of note, because they could
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do with their talisman all rounder right now. because they‘ve just suffered their third successive t20 defeat, this time at the hands of new zealand. the tourists came up 12 runs short, as adam wild reports. english cricket‘s long winter tour has finally made its way to new zealand, the countdown for the t20 final getting ever closer. but now, a new opposition to get their head around, something the black cats seemed to be doing very nicely. martin guptill and kane williamson quick to find the measure of england‘s quicker bowlers, their frustrations continue. there was a little something to cling onto, chrisjordan little something to cling onto, chris jordan here little something to cling onto, chrisjordan here showing how it‘s done. that aside, england failed to get a firm grip as new zealand reached 196. but this is an england side with a reputation for revelling
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in the thrill of the chase. alex hales, for a time, made it seem possible. but for that to happen, they needed their big hitters in the middle, and that, in this series, has been england‘s undoing. dawid malan, too, offered some hope, but this was england falling short. england may have reached new zealand, but they brought their t20 problems with them. adam wild, bbc news. that‘s all the sport for now. i‘ll have more for you in the next hour. the hearing from westminster magistrates‘ court that a warrant for the arrest of julian magistrates‘ court that a warrant for the arrest ofjulian assange has been upheld. a judge for the arrest ofjulian assange has been upheld. ajudge at for the arrest ofjulian assange has been upheld. a judge at the court ruled it is in the public interest to pursue julian assange ruled it is in the public interest to pursuejulian assange for failing to pursuejulian assange for failing to surrender. this is over breach of bail, and this is the second day of hearings. looking at several points
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againstjulian assange, he tweeted 23 minutes ago, "not looking good so far. thejudge defending uk state actions." that was julian assange tweeting 20 or so minutes ago. the judge at the magistrates‘ court ruling that he should have a warrant stand. thejudge ruling that he should have a warrant stand. the judge said, ruling that he should have a warrant stand. thejudge said, "he should have courage to come to court." that is the latest from westminster. american government investigators have been appointed to examine the grand canyon helicopter crash which killed seven people, including three british tourists. 27—year—old becky dobson, her boyfriend stuart hill and his brother jason died in the crash. their parents have described the siblings as "wonderful sons" and "inseparable". the four survivors, who include the pilot, are still in hospital in las vegas. james cook reports. stuart hill, a car salesman in brighton, died celebrating his 30th birthday along with his girlfriend, becky dobson, who was 27.
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stuart‘s brother, jason hill, a lawyer in the 20, also died. stuart‘s brother, jason hill, a lawyer in milton keynes, also died. he was 32 years old. his girlfriend, jennifer barham, survived. so did newlywedsjon udall and ellie milward, seen here on the left at their wedding with becky and stuart. the helicopter, a eurocopter ec130 operated by tour firm papillon airways, crashed in the grand canyon just before sunset on saturday. bad weather meant it was nearly nine hours before the three surviving passengers and pilot could be flown to hospital in las vegas. family and friends have now arrived here, along with investigators. the purpose during the on—scene investigation is to gather perishable information, that‘s information that will no longer be available to us once the wreckage has been disturbed. so our plan at this time is to continue to document the wreckage in situ before it‘s recovered to a secure facility in arizona. the focus here is on treating the survivors, not just for their physical injuries, but also trying to help them with the trauma they‘ve endured.
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but there are also questions for the helicopter company and the tour operator about why three passengers were apparently unable to escape. james cook, bbc news, las vegas. more than 200 people have become the first to fly on a british package holiday to tunisia, since the terrorist attack in the country in 2015. the foreign office advised against all but essential travel to tunisia after 38 people, 30 of them british, were murdered by an islamist gunman on a beach. but that advice has now been eased, and this morning, a flight took off from birmingham airport. john maguire reports from there. with its idyllic white beaches and pristine mediterranean coastline, tunisia was a hugely popular draw for british tourists, attracting around 430,000 a year. but then came the attack injune 2015, when a gunman killed 30 britons and another eight holiday—makers on a beach. so—called islamic state said it was
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behind the shootings by a tunisian student in sousse, which came just three months after 22 people were killed in the capital tunis. tunisian officials say it has made huge steps in counterterrorism since the attacks. almost three years on, tour operator thomas cook has for the first time resumed its package holidays, travelling to the resort hamamet, one hour north of sousse. this morning 220 passengers were the first to return on an early—morning from birmingham. we were staying in the hotel down the road when the last attack happened, but we love the country, so as soon as we knew there was another flight going, we decided to come back. if we had been bringing our children, we probably wouldn't be going, but as it isjust the two of us, we didn't feel it was a concern.
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it's probably more dangerous staying in london than it is going out there. well, this first package holiday will take people to a country that has worked extremely hard over the last couple of years with international help to make itself as secure as possible for tourists. it is a country that will be very pleased to see visitors back in large numbers once again. and industry experts say that tunisia has been desperate to see britain‘s travel restrictions lifted. the authorities were getting frustrated. what do we have to do to get holiday—makers back? eventually, of course, they can the government here that they would be able to make things as safe as possible for british holiday—makers, and that‘s why you have got hundreds of people heading back in from today. we have also customers from our german, belgium and french operations who have remained, because their countries did not impose any restrictions, so
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it was interesting to go out and get a feel for what was happening on the beaches, we re customers aware of the situation, did they feel safe and secure? two flight have arrived today. departures from birmingham and manchester, with other uk airports to follow. 0ne survivor from the sousse attacks says british holiday—makers are badly needed, and will be hugely welcome. they were forming human shields in front of people they didn‘t even know, and they are such wonderful, open, kind—hearted people, and we couldn‘t have been better looked after. these travellers who have chosen to go back today are stoic, optimistic, and also being warned by the foreign office to be vigilant. tunisia remains in a state of emergency, and its tourism industry a long way from recovery. john maguire, bbc news, birmingham airport. let‘s get more on the news the
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arrest forjulian let‘s get more on the news the arrest for julian assange let‘s get more on the news the arrest forjulian assange has been upheld. charlotte gallagher is there. tell us what happened. the judge didn‘tjust there. tell us what happened. the judge didn‘t just uphold there. tell us what happened. the judge didn‘tjust uphold this arrest warrant, she also forensically went through his legal team‘s argued as to why this warrant should be lifted, and rejected each one of them. she was actually very critical ofjulian assange, them. she was actually very critical of julian assange, saying them. she was actually very critical ofjulian assange, saying he should come to court and face justice, and he only wants... charlotte, i am sorry, sorry to you, too, it was clear what was wrong, we were losing the sound. we will return to charlotte later on. now, it is time to catch the business news. but let‘s bring you the afternoon headlines. the charity commission begins a statutory inquiry into 0xfam following the scandal involving aid workers in haiti. the anc says it has decided to sackjacob zuma as south africa‘s president — and it expects a decision from him tomorrow.
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prince harry and his fiancee meghan markle visit edinburgh in their firstjoint visit to scotland‘s capital. here‘s your business headlines on afternoon live: average prices in the uk are still rising by 3% according to the latest inflation figures. that‘s the same level as december. it‘s still close to the six—year high of 3.1% set in november. it raises pressure on the bank of england to increase interest rates sooner than many may have expected. tour operator thomas cook will resume flights to tunisia, three years after a terrorist attack on a beach, that killed 38 people. three planes, each carrying 220 passengers, will land in the country this week after the foreign office eased its travel advice. network rail has published its five—year plan for the railways with spending on the network set to reach £47 billion over the period through to 202k. money set aside for day—to—day
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improvements will go up by 25% to cope with an expected rise in passenger numbers and train services. so inflation, why are we talking about it today? it was 3.1% in november, but 3%. we hoped it would come down more. the reason it came up in the first place over the last couple of years, of course, the devaluation of the pound, making imported goods more expensive. we were hoping, it was well over a year ago now. we were hoping to see that work out. at the moment, wages are lagging behind the inflation rate. if they were to start to catch up with the inflation rate, that would prove slightly inflationary. therefore, you are looking forward to what is happening with interest rates, will the bank of england put up interest rates? we thought two times this year, it may
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be more and faster. we spoke to lucy martins at hsbc to ask her about what she expected to happen with inflation. we've been at 3% or above 3% for the last five months now, and really, that's continuing to reflect that big fall in the value of sterling that we had post the referendum. we think that path through takes some time and will continue to be felt over the coming months as well, so unfortunately, no, inflation will remain elevated for the next few months. she is liz martins, i called her lucy martins. oil prices are coming down, what is going on? it is very interesting, it is in a stage where it is one of those pressure valves, the more pressure you put in, the more the valve takes steam out. this pressure valve is operated by the shale producers. really, the higher the price goes, the more excited they become, the more production they become, the more production they put out and therefore the price
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comes down again. you get it hovering between $60 and $70. at the moment, it is coming down. some interesting figures have come out, going tojoe interesting figures have come out, going to joe miller interesting figures have come out, going tojoe miller in the united states, the iea has been coming out with some fairly dramatic thoughts about what is going to happen to oil production over the next few years, can you give me some insight into what they are saying? absolutely. what they are saying is, by 2019 or sometime in 2019, the united states, due to the shale extraction you were talking about before, will overtake saudi arabia and russia to become the largest oil producer in the world, which would be good news, but as you say, because of the lack in supply and the quite weak demand, it's not great news for the oil price. i think the us would have rather reached the record when the demand was high and priced rising
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rapidly. as the price comes down, it is less attractive for shale producers, and some may run into trouble if it drops to $55 an hour. they ran into trouble if you years ago around 2014. the oil price drop rapidly. at that time, they had to really shut down many, many fracking sites in texas and new mexico, because they could no longer support the price. they got very good at cost—cutting and made it work at this price. if we were to see the oil price drop to around $30, i think you'd see us shale in trouble. i don't think they are popping the champagne corks yet. at the moment, what do we think the prizes going to at the moment? what is generalfeeling? prizes going to at the moment? what is general feeling? —— prizes going to at the moment? what is generalfeeling? —— price is going to. we are still looking around $60 or $70 a barrel. this
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news, it is very much expected. i don't think it will move market too much. if we see the iea forecasts for how much more supply we get from us shale underestimated, we see a lot more than expected, you can see a big hit to the oil price. 0n current estimates, we will see something around $60 or $70. that is what the market is expecting. thanks very much. markets? very boring. i shouldn‘t say that. a little bit stronger, heading towards 1.40.m that because the oil rights is coming down? it is more about worries to the uk economy. remember, let‘s think about this, 3-4 remember, let‘s think about this, 3—4 weeks ago, you could get about
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1.43 dollars for every pound. if you went off and spent £100, now you can only get £138. is that what it means? that is what it means. you looked a bit blank. that is every hour, nothing unusual... ! the ups and downs of life — like a failed relationship, the death of a loved one, or being a victim of crime, can affect how we feel about our life and our mental health. now an online experiment, run in conjunction with the bbc, is trying to find out whether it‘s possible to predict how you might cope with those big life events. here‘s our health correspondent, dominic hughes. working with friends, doing something useful, all on a sunny winter‘s day. jane found the stress of herjob as a primary school teacher overwhelming. now, working as a volunteer to restore a local park, she‘s found the perfect antidote. sometimes i might not have had a great morning, but i might not have told anyone. but for just them being themselves, they might have made
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me smile or laugh. and then again, i‘m back on the right track and i‘m feeling positive. it‘s a mixture of being outside, doing something great for nature, and also the people and the social side of it as well. volunteering is the sort of activity that ticks lots of boxes when it comes to boosting our mental well—being. it‘s an outdoor activity, and on a glorious day like today what could be better than that? it‘s physical, it‘s social, and for those researching what makes us happy, this is the sort of thing that they say can really help. untangling the different factors, positive and negative, that make up our sense of well—being or happiness could help prevent mental health problems from developing. we're trying to learn more about what it's like to have depressive thinking styles... that‘s the aim of the online survey being launched today, in particular to explore the links between how we deal with life‘s ups
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and downs and our mental health. being involved in a crime or losing ourjob, failing an exam, how that would impact on whether or not we get anxious or depressed. and i'm interested in that both because i think that we might be able to explain a bit more about why people become anxious and depressed, but also because we can do something about it. artist raul gutierrez loya knows exactly how dwelling on past experiences affected the man he is today. the bullying he experienced as a child led to anxiety and panic attacks as an adult. i didn‘t have the courage to say to people i‘m struggling. but with the help of his therapist he changed the way he thought with dramatic results. one key thing was, like, think about a good thing before go to sleep, and that changed everything. unlocking the secrets of happiness and how they relate to good mental health could be key in understanding how to keep us all happy and to identify those at risk
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and in need of better help. dominic hughes, bbc news. headlines coming up at 3pm. time for a look at the weather, here‘s chris fawkes. hello there. some of us have seen another dose of wintry weather out and about. this was one of our weather watcher‘s scenes, showing a thundercloud bringing some snowfall to the hills on the island of lewis in the outer hebrides. it has been quite a wintry day across northern parts of the uk. the radar picture picking up where we have seen the snowfall in the white colour here. generally, further south, it has been rain falling for much of the day. the weather front becomes slow moving across east anglia and south—east england as we get towards the evening time. so a damp and to the day. behind that, the skies clear, and those clearing skies are likely to cause one or two problems overnight, because temperatures are expected to fall away pretty sharply. there‘ll be a widespread frost with a risk of icy surfaces to take us into the first part of wednesday. now, wednesday sees another area of low pressure moving its way
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in off the atlantic. this area of low pressure, well, it‘s got some relatively mild air mixed in with it towards southern parts of the uk. further north, the air is that bit colder. as the weather front moves in, we will see the rain again turned to snow. mostly over the hills of scotland, where we could be looking at two centimetres to five centimetres across higher parts of the highlands, the southern uplands. we could see localised transport disruption here, but further southwards, it‘s predominantly rain that‘ll fall across south wales, the midlands and southern counties of england. the rain tending to turn heavier late in the day. after a bright start across east anglia and south—east england, we will see the cloud thickening through the course of the afternoon. eventually, it will turn milder across western areas, temperatures finishing up at around 11 in plymouth, but still quite chilly further north in scotland, where temperatures will be around 5 degrees or so to take us through the afternoon. thursday‘s weather chart sees a ridge of high pressure building
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in particularly towards the south of the uk. that means we should have a largely dry day with increasing sunshine in england and wales, however, further north for scotland and for northern ireland, a day of sunny spells and some wintry showers. some of those could be heavy, bringing snowfall particularly over the hills at times. temperatures, quite a range. mild in the south, ten or 11, colder further north, temperatures about five in scotland. what about the weekend weather prospects? it looks like the weather should become dry for most of us, and it will turn milderfor most with temperatures, for many of us come into double figures. that‘s your weather. say hello, say you‘re watching afternoon live. i‘m simon mccoy.
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today at 3pm... the charity commission begins a statutory inquiry into 0xfam following the scandal involving aid workers in haiti. jacob zuma still clings to power. the anc says it has decided to sack him as south africa‘s president — and they expect a decision from him tomorrow. hitting the skids, britain‘s first medal hope, elise christie, kurt is out of 500 metre speed skating final in pyeongchang. coming up in sport, more on that. the disappointment. she is a very emotional woman. we saw that four years ago, elise christie and now again today. she has two more chances, but she is struggling to live with the feeling of more disappointment. more from her later on. chris fawkes with the weather. we have had more snow around today, but we will cast our net further
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afield and bring you the latest on what cyclone gita has done to tonga. also coming up, going tartan barmy. meghan and harry on their first joint visit to the scottish capital. i crisis hitting at the heart of 0xfam‘s appeal with questions raised by the public and whether the charity deserves money. the charity commission has taken the most serious action it can against 0xfam, and begun a statutory inquiry into its procedures. it will investigate the handling of claims that 0xfam staff used prostitutes as they carried out disaster relief in the aftermath of the earthquake in haiti in 2010. matt cole reports. this crisis has already
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claimed one senior figure, 0xfam‘s now former chief executive penny lawrence, but her resignation has far from drawn a line under the matter, with the organisation now facing the most serious form of investigation the charity commission can undertake, a statutory inquiry which could lead to the suspension of trustees or the freezing of bank accounts. and there is more pressure from the government. i take these things very seriously. i know people will be worried about the charity, worried about the money. as 0xfam fights for its future, there are some claiming it had ample opportunity to avoid this scandal. helen evans spent three years at 0xfam‘s head of safeguarding, but says as she unearthed the scale of the problem, the charity failed to respond with sufficient resources. we had one in ten saying they had experienced unwanted sexual touching, sexual assault. this was staff on staff. we hadn't even gone out to beneficiaries who received aid from us.
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i was extremely concerned by those survey results. 0xfam says it has new safeguarding measures in place, better checks now, but the biggest fight it might face is to maintain public confidence, that most precious commodity that if lost severely hampers its ability to raise money and help those most in need. the labour mp peter kyle was formerly an aid worker. he worries people with an agenda to oppose international aid spending might exploit the situation. i‘m deeply concerned. let‘s not beat around the bush. this scandal could bring 0xfam to its knees. the organisation could implode, and the people who will suffer the most through this will be the people who depend, the thousands of people, who are extraordinarily vulnerable, who depend on the work that organisations like 0xfam does. as 0xfam waits to learn more details of the statutory
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inquiry into its failings, it and all other aid agencies are being told by the government they must step up and provide statements of assurance about the policies and procedures. what is being dubbed a significant conference is also being planned. all major charities will discuss how the sector as a whole will face these problems. earlier, matt is live outside 0xfam‘s headquarters in oxford. the leaders of oxfam behind us now have just until the end of the week to give guarantees to the secretary of state, penny mordaunt, who we heard from, that they have a handle on the way any future allegations might be dealt with. that‘s not a lot of time. as they think about how they deal with future allegations, more are coming in. helen evans, who we heard from in my report, has also made uncorroborated, as yet uncorroborated, allegations that there has been abuse in the uk, too.
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young volunteers, she said, faced abuse in charity shops on the high streets of this country, too. very serious complaints to be dealt with here. along with other members of the wider aid agency sector, they are being told by the government to step up and offer assurances that all of our policies and procedures are up to scratch. the charity commission is launching a statutory investigation, what sanctions do they have at their behest? this is the toughest type of inquiry that the charity can launch into this. there could be sanctions like justice being suspended, bank accounts being frozen. this could seriously impact on the work 0xfam can do and the help that is recognised by the government to be good all around the world could impact on them. the secretary of state,
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penny mordaunt, said she would think very long and hard before taking that drastic step, but the threat is there, as is a similar thread from the european union commission which gives around £30 million a year to oxfam to help its work. it is making the same pledge, if things are not up to scratch and 0xfam‘s houses not in order, it might take it away. the president of haiti has condemned the actions as outrageous and dishonest, accusing them of using the earthquake in 2010 to sexually exploit people in need. we‘ll grant is in the capital and has been talking to former 0xfam employees in the country. a girl, a street corner, a part car, buying sex is easy. it is a common seen on any given night in haiti, girls, some just teenagers risking their lives for a feudal bills. 0rdinarily, international aid agencies help tackle the problem. 0xfam, however,
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is now embroiled in it. we have spent the past few days speaking to former 0xfam employees in haiti. most are too scared to show their face on camera, fearful of retribution for speaking out. they left 0xfa m retribution for speaking out. they left 0xfam in 2011, and its disgraced country director. cousins some come to help, others come to party and look for girls. it was theirjob and they were told to do it. another former security guard claimed young and underage girls we re claimed young and underage girls were among the victims. translation: i continue for sure there were sex parties at house. young people would often come to the office looking for the director, and i'm sure these people weren't there for work. for its part, the haitian government confirmed to bbc it is prepared to open a full
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investigation into the allegations. it may be what happened at 0xfam is just the tip of the iceberg, they said. it. with the 0xfam allegations investigation into ngos operating in haiti. 0thers agree that the problems go beyond 0xfam alone. after the earthquake, organisations, international organisations, they see a lot of money, i do not see zero. but you cannot see the result. 0xfa m zero. but you cannot see the result. 0xfam is facing perhaps the biggest challenge of its history. its international reputation in serious jeopardy. if it‘s going to take time to rebuild its name in the united kingdom, in haiti, it may never fully recover. the governing african national congress in south africa has decided to recalljacob zuma from the position of president. the party‘s secretary general said mr zuma had agreed in principle to resign, but that talks were continuing. jacob zuma has come under mounting pressure to resign following several
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corruption scandals. we engaged and we are looking forward to an amicable solution. we will then see what president zuma‘s response is. it is obvious that we want our comrades to come in as of south africa. i asked about the reasons about jacob zuma holding onto power. what he will be thinking about is how he can get out of this situation in the best legal shape possible. jacob zuma faces a myriad of corruption charges. there were corruption charges. there were corruption charges. there were corruption charges brought against him and set aside by a prosecutor.
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that setting aside of those charges has itself been overturned by the courts. jacob zuma is facing a number of legal jubilation is dating back to 1999, 2000 and all the way up back to 1999, 2000 and all the way up to the present. he will be thinking, how can i be better placed to avoid landing up in court if possible. but if in court, how do i avoid jail? that will be what will be worrying him at the moment, and it is not only about him. it is about one of his sons, a number of nephews, and a number of members of his family. the threat of court action is a serious one. you expect to give evidence against him should that happen. that's correct. i was an anc the ball parliament. why was investigated as the ranking member, a hugely corrupt arms deal was concluded in 1999. jacob zuma‘s financial adviser was actually found guilty of corrupting jacob zuma in
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relation to that deal. i was approached for the first time in many years about 3—4 months ago by the national prosecuting authority in south africa to find out first if i was still alive and, second, or would i give evidence againstjacob zuma. i obviously is bonded in the affirmative, as i believe a number of other witnesses did. it is quite possible that the old case, which involves 783 counts of fraud corruption and racketeering could be brought back into the courts a matter of weeks afterjacob zuma leaves office. so of course, the nature and timing of his leaving are going to be of great concern to him. and to the police, because presumably, he could drive out of there no longer as resident and just be arrested. quite correct. there are certainly sufficient old charges againstjacob are certainly sufficient old charges against jacob zuma to have are certainly sufficient old charges againstjacob zuma to have him
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arrested immediately. but in addition to which, there are a number of ongoing investigations into which can only be ascribed as state capture. this is looting of the south african state by a couple of business people that have very, very close links to jacob zuma, and many of the more senior people in government. as cyril ramaphosa was announced as the new anc president a few weeks ago, the national prosecuting authority actually throws some of the assets of some of the people involved, and started to search the offices of others, including the anc‘s current general secretary, who made the announcement about jacob zuma today. we are at quite a remarkable moment in south africa‘s democratic history. not only could a state president he arrested very soon after his departure from office, but senior party office bearers, who have recently been elected to their
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positions could also find themselves in the firing line in relation to the law. prince harry and meghan markle are visiting edinburgh this afternoon as part of their public engagements in the run—up to their wedding in may. they‘ve been at the city‘s castle, and heard the one o‘clock gun fire at the garrison. 0ur royal correspondent daniela relph is in edinburgh. what else have they been up to? they have done a number of things this afternoon in scotland, simon. it is their first official visit to scotland. they started here at perhaps edinburgh‘s most famous landmark, the castle. it was a chance for them to meet the public. it was an element of their planned visit this afternoon that allowed them to engage with many of those that came out to see them. 200—300 people, possibly more on the esplanade in front of edinburgh castle to see prince harry, but most wanting to see meghan markle. they got a really warm welcome and some pretty chilly weather in edinburgh. there were union flags put up,
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banners with pictures of harry and meghan on. meghan markle even got a valentine ‘s card at one point. it was a chance to meet and talk to people here. it is part of this wider uk visit they have been doing over the past few months, the idea is that meghan markle gets a chance to know the uk and meet people here. they have done these type of visits in london and nottingham, they have been to cardiff, and now to edinburgh as well. it is part of preparing herfor life as edinburgh as well. it is part of preparing her for life as a royal wife and bright coming up. when they finished here at edinburgh castle, they moved to a different kind of engagement, to a place called social bite, a social enterprise business. it isa bite, a social enterprise business. it is a cafe, but it also has a big ambition to end homelessness. cafe provides a lot of food to people that are homeless, but also employs
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people that have experienced homelessness over the years. prince harry and meghan markle had a to meet the founders, they went into the kitchens to see how that worked as well, and got a flavour of how the business will work. it is just that kind of organisation, that kind of project, which will interest them asa of project, which will interest them as a couple as they go on with their charity projects and work after their wedding. they are finishing up here in scotland now. they are at holyrood house for an engagement involving young people and the achievements of young people. what we see in the visits here, starting at the castle, through to social bite, to holyrood house, it gives us a hint in terms of what they are going to be interested in as a royal couple when they embark on charity work together. it is these kinds of projects that involve young people, enterprise and taking on society‘s big challenges. you can sense the excitement building. there is not
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long to go. not long to go, 19th made. we are getting very excited, i am sure you are, simon. this week, we got more information about the wedding itself, midday, st george ‘s chapel at windsor castle, and on the wedding day there is this element of prince harry and meghan markle wanting to make sure that people, the public, can experience their wedding day to a degree. there will bea wedding day to a degree. there will be a procession through windsor, members of the public can join be a procession through windsor, members of the public canjoin in the celebrations, i suppose, on 19th may. kensington palace have an idea for the procession, and a party in the evening. we are gradually getting more detail in terms of the timetable of that day. with visits like this to scotland. the kinds of issues that interest them and will continue to interest them once they are married. you‘re watching afternoon live, these are our headlines: the charity commission begins a statutory inquiry into 0xfam following the scandal involving aid
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workers in haiti. the leadership south africa‘s governing national congress has confirmed it has asked jacob zuma to stand down. and prince harry and his fiancee meghan markle visit edinburgh in their firstjoint visit to scotland‘s capital. and in sport: more 0lympic agony for elise christie. she falls in the final of 500 metres short track speed skating in pyeongchang, finishing fourth and in tears. ben stokes will fly out tomorrow tojoin his england team mates in new zealand. after appearing in court today, he‘ll be available for the one day series which starts later this month. france crop a number of players that went out in edinburgh after six nations defeat against scotland. that includes teddy tom arthur. the city watchdog — the financial conduct authority — has been criticised by mps
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for ‘completely losing control‘ of a report into how rbs mistreated small businesses. the findings of the report have been leaked online, and mps say if the fca doesn‘t publish it by friday. they‘ll do it as soon as they can. our business presenter jamie robertson is here. what is the background? the financial conduct authority, the financial ready later, back in 2013, was commissioned to do an investigation into the global restructuring group, the gr g of royal bank of scotland. royal bank of scotland, of course, just a year after it was bailed out by the government. it seemed to have been, basically, abusing, mocking, threatening small businesses, to which it had lent money, trying to get them to restructure. they were even freshening with closing them down. there were a massive number of complaints about this and an investigation was launched. however,
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the financial conduct authority has not released this, has not published it. it says it can only publish it if it has the permission of the people who are quoted, who were being investigated. however, there has been a stand off with the treasury ‘s committee, who says it wa nts to treasury ‘s committee, who says it wants to see it, and now says it wa nts wants to see it, and now says it wants it published. it has given it until friday to publish. if it is not published, they will have to hand it over. the treasury select committee have a meeting on tuesday, on the 20th, when they will discuss the matter further. but on the 20th, when they will discuss the matterfurther. but it on the 20th, when they will discuss the matter further. but it has been a stand—off between these two forces, as it were, the treasury select committee, with the chair nicky morgan, and the financial conduct of warranty. it sounds like an unusual move. it sounds as though rbs could be in trouble over this. yes. well, the sca, rbs, yes. the global restructuring group got
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itself a bad name, infamous in some people‘s opinion. the treasury select committee said, "this is about a government regulate, a version of the reported in the public domain. a lot people know about it. the sca has completely lost control of the publication process. if the sca does not publish or provide the report by friday, it will reach an order by the house of commons." and stuff. more formulator. in the past half hour a judge has upheld the uk arrest warrant for the wikileaks founder, julian assange. the warrant was was issued more than five years ago when mr assange broke his bail conditions during a battle against extradition to sweden, and took refuge in the ecuadorian embassy in london. that is the scene now. there is a chance he may come out onto the balcony and have a word. 0ur correspondent charlotte gallagher is at westminster magistrates court for us now. strong words from the judge, weren‘t
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there? the judge didn'tjust uphold this arrest warrant, she went through julian assange‘s this arrest warrant, she went throuthulian assange‘s legal team‘s argument as to why this should be lifted and rejected each one forensically. she said," julian assange‘s treatment was not disproportionate. he himself impeded justice by staying in the ecuadorian embassy. she said he could leave at any point. he can use a computer and social media. she said that comparing position to prison was wrong. she denounced these arguments put forward by julian wrong. she denounced these arguments put forward byjulian assange. she said he should have the courage to come forward and come to court to a nswer come forward and come to court to answer this case for himself, and she said he only seemed to want justice on his terms. strong words from thejudge justice on his terms. strong words
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from the judge today. is that it or does he still have a legal claim? i think the saga is far from over. julian assange, we heard on twitter, before we went into court, "no matter what the ruling was, the legal team have further argues to put forward." they have 14 days to apply for a judicial review of this decision. that could go to a higher court, depending on if thejudicial review is successful. we don‘t know if there is a us extradition process as well. even if the arrest warrant was lifted, there is a chance he could be extradited to the us over his wikileaks website. that is one of his main demands for staying in the ecuadorian embassy. he says that if he leaves, he could be extradited or rendered to the us, which would be completely unfair will stop charlotte gallagher, thank you very much. two teenagers have been arrested on suspicion of murder after a six—week—old baby
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died in southampton. police were called to a home in the peartree area on sunday after reports of a baby boy needing medical attention. the child was taken to southampton general hospital and was pronounced dead a short time later. the england cricketer ben stokes has indicated a not guilty plea, after being charged with affray, following a fight outside a nightclub in bristol last september. jon kay is at bristol magistrates court. five months after that alleged incident outside a nightclub in bristol, ben stokes returned to this city to appear at the magistrates‘ court. it was a very short hearing, it only lasted about 12 minutes. during the hearing, the england all—rounder was asked to stand up behind a sheet of glass and asked how he would be pleading to a single charge of affray. he answered, "not guilty." two men charged alongside him — ryan hale and ryan ali, both in their 20s and from bristol — also charged with affray, they said they too would plead
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not guilty to the same charge. the men were told by the judge they would all three go to trial at bristol crown court with an initial hearing in the middle of next month, march 12th. however, just moments after ben stokes left, the england and wales cricket board issued a statement saying they had been told he would not have to attend that next hearing in person, he does not have to be in court in the middle of march, so tomorrow he will fly to new zealand tojoin his england team—mates. we are told initially it will be for training, there are no plans at the moment for him to play in the twenty20 tri—series, but the decision will be up to the england management. ben stokes himself left this court, made no comment to the press and journalists waiting outside. bbc news has learned that the commonwealth has begun considering who might succeed the queen as the head of the organisation. member states could choose anyone as the ceremonial leader,
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as the role is not hereditary. the bbc has been told 53 member states have established a high level group to look at how the commonwealth is governed, and it‘s meeting for the first time today in london. earlier, i spoke to our diplomatic correspondent james landale who gave us this update. it is not an automatic hereditary role, which means there is a debate. now, if this happened tomorrow, then the commonwealth heads of government would meet, discuss and decide who should succeed the queen as head up the commonwealth. but it‘s not written down, there is no formal procedure. what‘s happening now is that within the commonwealth, minds are beginning to turn to what should happen. that‘s the debate that‘s beginning to start. when the commonwealth started, the whole point was everyone is equal, presumably there are some countries who are saying that the head of the british monarchy should not necessarily be in charge any more? there has always been that debate,
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is the commonwealth seen as too anglo—centric, too white, old commonwealth. there are now 53 members, should it be a rotate and presidency, should that the elections for the ceremonial head, a grand former it less anglo—centric? people say who and nobody agrees. if you ask most people within the commonwealth, within the hierarchy, what is the most likely option, they would say there is no reasonable, practical, plausible alternative to the prince of wales succeeding his mother. we know what she thinks about the commonwealth, it is her raison d‘etre in many ways, does he share that passion for it? he has displayed every interest in it, if you look at his website there is an awful lot about his focus on the commonwealth. he has visited well into the 40s of the 53 countries, a lot of them
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in the last 12 months. crucially, last november he went to visit prime minister modi of india, which is the big member of the commonwealth, almost half the commonwealth population lived in india, one of the biggest economies in the commonwealth. the prince of wales is very focused on the commonwealth and i think would be very keen to succeed. but he will be quite busy if he is king. what about william, is there thought it might skip a generation? people can have those thoughts. i have yet to speak to anybody in a position of authority to contemplate that in any plausible way. let‘s talk about you. and today. you have been flipping marvellous at the house of commons. i thank you, i thank you! this is our diplomatic correspondent doing what he does best. or not.
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talk us through it. this is the annual parliamentary pancake race, when the media race against mps and peers just outside parliament. it is to raise money for a head injuries charity. it always gets lots of support. it‘s pretty brutal. a lot of cheating goes on. i saw some shoving. a lot of people don‘t toss their pancakes quite as often as the rules state. it‘s pretty tough stuff. that sounds quite serious. there should be a parliamentary inquiry into the tossing. but you won. we won. and this is what you get, a little medal, i don‘t know if the cameras can see that. a little medal with the pancakes on. i don‘t know anybody who eats that many pancakes, not the ones we were using. all your years of training, there it is. we have been training for weeks, i assure you. i was thinking more of yourjournalism career! thank you.
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it shows you can have your pancake and eat it. i saw you rehearsing that over there! thank you. the weather is coming up. but first, let me show you these pictures from the united states. this is a robot from boston dynamics opening a door for its friend. the footage has been viewed 5 million times. 84 centimetres tall, they weigh 30 kilograms and have 17 joints to help them move around. this does look very dramatic. a lot of you suggesting it looks scary as well. they are looking for you and they are coming for you. remarkable. chris forbes has the forecast for
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us. the weather front that brought a mixture of rain today is still around, damp weather around, mixture of rain today is still around, damp weatheraround, but mixture of rain today is still around, damp weather around, but the skies were clear. it will allow to bridges to fall away quickly and we are looking at a widespread fog developing and a risk of icy stretches on an untreated roads and services. that takes us into wednesday morning when we have another atalanta front bumping into the cold air, and again, we will see it turn to snow across parts of scotla nd it turn to snow across parts of scotland and higher parts of northern england as well. snow expected across the highlands and southern uplands, further transport disruption here. further south, a bright start to the data —— across the country. it will turn heavy as we go through wednesday afternoon across wales and south—west england. it will turn milder across western areas, but quite a chilly afternoon in prospect across parts of
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scotland. that‘s your weather. this is bbc news — our latest headlines: the charity commission begins a statutory inquiry into 0xfam following the sex scandal involving its workers in haiti seven years ago. south africa‘s ruling anc party have decided to recall jacob zuma as president amidst corruption allegations. they expect a decision from him tomorrow. prince harry and his fiancee meghan markel visit edinburgh as part of their public engagements in the run up to their wedding on 19th may. british speed skater elise christie misses out on an olympic medal after crashing out of the woman‘s 500 metre final in pyeongchang. hugh has the sport. yes, particularly unforgiving, the speed
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skating result of the morning resulting in christie losing out on a medal. she was actually pushed out to lane four and having a bad start was only the first of her problems. she struggled to keep pace with the top three and attempted this move, stumbled a little and off she went, crashing into the wall. she did get up crashing into the wall. she did get up to finish fourth in a race won by the italian, which is not a good sign if you are into omens. four yea rs sign if you are into omens. four years to the day when christie was disqualified at the winter games in sochi after tangling with, yes, the same italian skater. she has two more chances this time around. those blades are more chances this time around. those b! is es are a if you can a member credit card, if you can a member that. keeping your balance is
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incredibly difficult, bearing in mind the speeds as well. elise christie has broken world record since the difficult time in sochi and she has become a three—time champion as well. she actually broke the olympic records twice in the heats and the finals in pyeongchang, but since that she has received all sorts of difficult abuse on social media because of the tangling in the disqualifications four years ago and she was particularly upset about how things wet and we are a member speaking to her after that - in things wet and we are a member speaking taggei—‘afterthat’ in she still chances to win gold later in the has chances to win gold later in the games but it is clear the nature of what took place today really took its toll. i was knocked over, you know. but it doesn't give you any benefit in the final, when someone gets a penalty. yeah, it is just. final, when someone gets a penalty. yeah, it isjust. iworked final, when someone gets a penalty. yeah, it isjust. i worked so hard for the 500, and it hasjust been,
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you know, taken away from me, and even in the semifinal, i got crashed, ended up in laying four. i know it is short track and i am supposed to be prepared for this, but it still hurts, you know. yes, elise christie, saturday is when she is back on the ice here and you can get on the —— all the details on the eight awarded gold medals on the bbc sport website, bbc.co.uk/sport, as ever. let‘s move away from pyeongchang. england are now relying on other results to go their way in the t20 tri series if they‘re to make the final of the tournament. they slumped to their third defeat in a row, this time to new zealand. losing by 12 runs in wellington. meanwhile ben stokes will fly out to new zealand tomorrow
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to join up with the team. he entered a plea of not guilty to charges of affray at magistrates court in bristol this morning. his case was adjourned to the crown court on march 12th... but he will not be required to appear in person, allowing him to play in the remainder of england‘s winter tour, although not in the current t20 series. france head coach jacques brunel has dropped a number of players who went out in edinburgh after the six nations defeat by scotland on sunday. scottish police questioned players at edinburgh airport after a report of a sexual assault during the night out, but found no crime had been committed. six nations top try—scorer teddy thomas is among those left out of the squad for the italy game on the 23rd february. the french rugby union described the players‘ behaviour as "inappropriate". "they did not respect their status as international players." footballer ryan mason has been forced to retire from the game at the age ofjust 26. the hull midfielder suffered a head injury in a match against chelsea in january last year, and has since taken specialist medical advice before deciding that it would be too
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risky to continue. mason started his career at spurs and won one england cap in 2015. arsenal striker alexandre lacazette will be out for up to six weeks after having an operation on a knee injury. the procedure was described as a "success" by the gunners. the french internatoinal has scored nine goals so far in his first season ath the emirates. finally, don‘t forget the knock—out stage of the champions league begins tonight. there are five premier league clubs in the last 16. tonght manchester city are in switzerland for their first leg agains basel. tottenham are also away. they‘re in turin to take on juventus, and are without defender toby alderweireld who‘s being eased back into the side after injury. you can listen to live commentary of that match on radio 5 live from 7 o clock this evening. that is all your sport for now. we will have more with other hugh in
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the next hour. studio: there is only one! laughter the rate of inflation held steady last month, with the consumer prices index unchanged from december, at 3%. the rate, reported by the office for national statistics, is close to the six year high of 3.1 percent set in november. most economists were expecting to see a small fall. a further rise in interest rates could now happen in the coming months, as our economics correspondent andy verity reports. if you go down to the shops today, beware of the odd surprise — like fruit, up 7.2%. orcoffee, up 7.5% compared to a year ago. more recently, those food prices have started to fall, but not by enough to slow down the overall rise in the cost of living for ordinary households. i think people are digging deeper into their pockets now and thinking carefully about what they are spending their money on. everything's gone up, hasn't it? just everything's so expensive. you're working all these hours in the workplace and everything, and for what? by the time you've paid your wages and everything, and you pay your rent, your gas, your bills, your electric, you're left with nothing. the difficulty is, prices have gone
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up, but my wages haven‘t. i haven‘t had a pay increase in line with inflation for about six years. the buying power of the average income has barely risen in the last decade — the worst for living standards in 200 years. so, when will that squeeze come to an end? so the squeeze on living standards is going to start to recede this year as inflation comes down. and then from 2019 onwards, the obr is forecasting that the increase in wages will actually exceed the general increase in the price levels, so you should start to see real wages beginning to increase from 2019 onwards. prices are still rising faster than the bank of england would like. the price of goods went up by 3.2%. the price of services rose by 2.8%.
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but there are signs that that inflationary pressure is easing. the cost of raw materials which make the goods that we buy in the shops rose by 3.5%. that‘s the lowest it‘s been in 18 months. oil is bought and sold in dollars, and the pound‘s been strengthening against the dollar, which has helped to slow down price rises at the pumps. but against other currencies, the pound hasn‘t grown as strongly, so import prices won‘t stop rising just yet. the sterling has strengthened against the dollar, but that‘s largely because the dollar‘s been weak. and if we look at sterling against the euro — which is much more important in terms of where we get our imports from in the uk — it hasn‘t strengthened nearly so much. so, no, we think that exchange rate impact is going to continue for a few months more. in the city, they‘re now betting the bank of england will raise interest rates again in the next few months. it is expected by most to happen in may. andy verity, bbc news. american government investigators have been appointed to examine the grand canyon helicopter crash which killed seven people, including three british tourists. 27—year—old becky dobson, her boyfriend stuart hill and his brotherjason died in the crash — their parents have described the siblings as "wonderful sons" and "inseparable". the four survivors, who include the pilot,
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are still in hospital in las vegas. james cook reports. stuart hill, a car salesman in brighton, died celebrating his 30th birthday along with his girlfriend, becky dobson, who was 27. stuart‘s brother, jason hill, a lawyer in milton keynes, also died. he was 32 years old. his girlfriend, jennifer barham, survived. so did newlywedsjon udall and ellie milward, seen here on the left at their wedding with becky and stuart. the helicopter, a eurocopter ec130 operated by tour! firm papillon airways, crashed in the grand canyon just before sunset on saturday. bad weather meant it was nearly nine hours before the three surviving passengers and pilot could be flown to hospital in las vegas. family and friends have now arrived here, along with investigators. the purpose during the on—scene investigation is to gather perishable information, that‘s information that will no longer be available to us once the wreckage has been disturbed. so our plan at this time is to continue to document the wreckage in situ before it‘s
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recovered to a secure facility in arizona. the focus here is on treating the survivors, not just for their physical injuries, but also trying to help them with the trauma they‘ve endured. but there are also questions for the helicopter company and the tour operator about why three passengers were apparently unable to escape. james cook, bbc news, las vegas. here, two men have been arrested after a car was driven into the front of a school in sheffield this morning. nobody was injured at fir vale school which has been closed for the day. mark ansell reports from the scene. as the students were arriving for school, this black bmw was driven at speed around the school car park and then smashed into the front entrance, causing noticeable damage. thankfully, no one was hurt. one resident said his cousin who goes to the school was nearly hit by the car. that upset me at first, the screams of our young children as the children were coming out, slowly coming out, we saw some of them upset and crying. i asked my cousin what happened and she has said basically the vehicle hit the main gate and had gone into the reception
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and tried to hit the reception on two occasions, causing extensive damage to the vehicle and the reception area. two men aged 20 and 23 both from the sheffield area have been arrested on suspicion of dangerous driving and causing criminal damage. we‘re trying to piece together what the motive is. that will be happening over the next few hours. we have arrested two individuals who are currently in custody at the moment, and interviews will take place later this afternoon. on the school‘s website a statement says they have asked all students to go home, but any that can‘t do that are being looked after by staff at the school. there is no indication when the school will reopen. mark ansell, bbc look north, sheffield. the government has revealed new software that it claims can detect and immediately block onlinejihadist videos. the home secretary, amber rudd, has travelled to silicon valley in california to discuss the tool with technology companies,
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as well as other efforts to tackle extremism. dave lee reports from san francisco. created by an artificial intelligence company based in london, and funded with more than £500,000 of government money, the tool draws upon a vast database of material posted online by the so—called islamic state. we have two videos — one of which is legitimate news content, the other is terrorist propaganda. now, to my naked eye, i actually can‘t tell the difference between the two. but fortunately, down at the bottom, this is very low probability of being terrorist content. but this one is much higher. now, what that means is, if you were to be in charge of some kind of video upload platform, you could use this when anyone
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clicks to upload a video, and flag this video for review, and let this one through without any problems. using this technique, the software creators believe they can spot up to 94% of is content posted online, with an accuracy of 99.995%. anything the software is unsure about is flagged for human review. i‘ve had a demonstration of it, and i know a lot of other people have as well. and it‘s a very convincing example of the fact that you can have the information that you need to make sure that this material doesn‘t go online in the first place. the home secretary says this is a tool to help small companies, ones which may not have the resources to tackle extremism properly. but if they don‘t want the goverment‘s help, they may soon be forced to take it. we‘re not going to rule out taking legislative action if we need to do it. but i remain convinced that the best way to take real action, to have the best outcomes, is to have an industry—led form like the one we‘ve got. this has to be in conjunction, though, of larger companies working with smaller companies. advocates of an open internet often
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push back against this kind of software because it can lead to false positives — that‘s content being blocked when it shouldn‘t be. yet it is estimated that more than 400 different web services were used to spread propaganda in 2017 — and so the task is less about blocking jihadis online today, but instead predicting where they might be on the internet tomorrow. dave lee, bbc news, silicon valley. and script and will be bringing you the business, but first a look at the business, but first a look at the headlines on afternoon live —— james isjust the headlines on afternoon live —— james is just finishing his script. the charity commission begins a statutory inquiry into oxfam following the sex scandal involving its workers in haiti seven years ago. south africa‘s ruling anc party have decided to recall jacob zuma as president amidst corruption allegations. they expect a decision from him tomorrow. prince harry and his fiancee meghan markel visit edinburgh as part of their public engagements in the run up to their wedding on 19th may. here‘s your business headlines on afternoon live: average prices are still rising by 3% according to the latest inflation figures.
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that‘s the same level as december. it‘s still close to the six—year high of 3.1% set in november. and it raises pressure on the bank of england to increase interest rates sooner than many may have expected. network rail has published its five—year plan for the railways with spending on the network set to reach £47 billion over the period to 2024. money set aside for day—to—day improvements will go up by 25% to cope with an expected rise in passenger numbers and train services. the treasury committee has used its parliamentary powers to order the financial conduct authority to publish its report into rbs‘s global restructuring group and its treatment of small businesses. the fca has been given a deadline of 16th february 2018. tour operator thomas cook is resuming flights to tunisia, three years after a terrorist attack on a beach that killed 38 people — 30 of whom were british. they are not the first. the germans,
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belgians, french, they have been sell wood sending out planeloads for the last two years so we have been fairly slow at this. but there were 38 victims... yes, today still the warnings, however, from the foreign office. not for somebody who feels cautious about their travelling. they say down the whole of the south and west of tunisia, they are advising people should not go there at all, and they also say there is a heightened risk of terrorism —— say that a heightened risk of terrorism begets aviation and terrorists are still likely to carry out attacks in tunisia. joining us now is the independent travel consultant, simon calder. why has thomas cook changed their minds on this? last july, when the foreign office decided, 0k, we can ta ke foreign office decided, 0k, we can take tunisia off the no go list, they thought, what can we do? and
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they thought, what can we do? and they have decided to stick a very very small toe in the water. previously there were about 30 flights per week from the uk to tunisia, and this month there will be just three, one from birmingham, one from manchester and one from gatwick, but the signs are that the demand is pretty strong. how much that has to do with the fact that prices are extraordinarily low remains to be seen. i wasjust checking, for example, a month today you can fly from birmingham and spend a week in an all inclusive for £276. not that far away, exactly the same holiday will cost you £200 more, so same holiday will cost you £200 more, so some same holiday will cost you £200 more, so some bargains to be had and what the tour operators hope in the long—term is they can rebuild their business, and to the same sort of scale as before which means they can offer more choice, they are getting higher margins than crucially have been getting recently in spain, and they have a lot more happy customers. let's hear what thomas
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cook has to say about this. we have a clip. obviously we have operated in tunisia for the last two years but it is a destination our customers have frequently asked for in the two years we have not operated there. a number of customers contact us a lot. it is a quality destination and it is also an all year—round destination as well, something that has been missing from the market. that was carolyn mackenzie. what are your thoughts about the situation with the whole of north africa? is it slowly coming back to being a tourist destination, or are people still very cautious, and it is only really tunisia and possibly egypt? morocco is doing all right, not as well as it would do if people were not sensitised to the risk of a terrorist attack. egypt, the numbers are pretty much almost where they we re are pretty much almost where they were before the ban on flying to charm shake, which came two years ago now and that of course happened
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immediately after the crash involving a russian jet, immediately after the crash involving a russianjet, 224 people sadly died after a bomb was placed on board at sharm el sheikh airport, but people are going elsewhere, and turkey is also doing extremely well. it had a terrible year last year but in terms of visitor numbers it had actually by its standards are very good year in terms of attacks, or rather the lack of them, so people are coming back in big numbers. that is good because spain had a ridiculous year last year, far too many tourists, prices far too high, margins for the tour operators far too low, but in spain they call them borrowed tourists, people a bit too worried about the eastern mediterranean and north africa but they are now tentatively going back. 12 hours ago i was at birmingham airport, not normally seen of jubilation at ten to four in the
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morning but it was today because lots of people who have been desperate to get back to tunisia we re desperate to get back to tunisia were able to step on board the very first flight. thanks very much, simon calder. sexual harassment in the workplace. the launch of an inquiry? yes, the employment committee is launching the investigation. there have been surreally appalling statistics. it is not just surreally appalling statistics. it is notjust the big—name the harvey weinstein cases which are really worrying the committee. it is much more the low—level, the everyday workplace, which they are beginning to worry about. how easy is it for people to come forward and to complain, make their complaints heard, and not be... things like these non—disclosure agreements whereby people come to an agreement and say, ok, we won‘t do any more complaining, we will get the money but you can‘t say anything, it is illegal. all of that, it discourages people from coming forward or punishes them, in many ways. we
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spoke to the chair of the committee, maria miller, and cheadle us what the committee was trying to achieve.” think the problem we have seen over the last couple of months is sexual harassment has been painted as an issue that really only does occur in places like hollywood and the corridors of power, when all of the research shows it occurs every day of the week in offices, factories and shops up and down the country. sol and shops up and down the country. so i think accepting that this is a problem that is much broader for society, and then looking at how we can improve the way that businesses handle themselves, but also how the tribunal system handles this, and how the legal system deals with that as well. i think it will provide some really concrete recommendations, not just to observe there is a problem but actually do something about it. maria miller there, the chair of the committee doing this investigation. the
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markets. yes, the ftse 100, doing this investigation. the markets. yes, the ftse100, really not significant, the pound against the euro, looking pretty weak, down about half of them, not so much, but looking at it against the dollar, the pound looking a little weaker. jamie, thank you very much. see you later on. the ups and downs of life — like a failed relationship, the death of a loved one, or being a victim of crime — can affect how we feel about our life and our mental health. now an online experiment, run in conjunction with the bbc, is trying to find out whether it‘s possible to predict how you might cope with those big life events. here‘s our health correspondent, dominic hughes. working with friends, doing something useful, all on a sunny winter‘s day. jane found the stress of herjob as a primary school teacher overwhelming. now working as a volunteer to restore a local park, she‘s found the perfect antidote. sometimes i might not have had a great morning, but i‘ve not actually told anyone.
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but for just them being themselves, they might have made me smile or laugh. and then again i‘m back on the right track and i‘m feeling positive. it‘s a mixture of being outside, doing something great for nature, and also the people and the social side of it as well. volunteering is the sort of activity that ticks lots of boxes when it comes to boosting our mental well—being. it‘s an outdoor activity, and on a glorious day like today what could be better than that? it‘s physical, it‘s social, and so for those researching what makes us happy, this is the sort of thing that they say can really help. untangling the different factors, positive and negative, that make up our sense of well—being or happiness could help prevent mental health problems from developing. we are trying to learn more about what it‘s like to have depressive thinking styles... so that‘s the aim of the online survey being launched today, in particular to explore the links
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between how we deal with life‘s ups and downs and our mental health. being involved in a crime or losing ourjob, orfailing an exam, how that would impact on whether or not we get anxious or depressed. and i‘m interested in that both because i think that we might be able to explain a bit more about why people become anxious and depressed, but also because we can do something about it. artist raul gutierrez loya knows exactly how dwelling on past experiences affected the man he is today. the bullying he experienced as a child led to anxiety and panic attacks as an adult. i didn‘t have the courage to say to people, i‘m struggling. but with the help of his therapist he changed the way he thought with dramatic results. one key thing was think about a good thing before going to sleep, and that changed everything. unlocking the secrets of happiness and how they relate to good mental health could be key in understanding
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how to keep us all happy and to identify those at risk and in need of better help. dominic hughes, bbc news. time for a look at the weather. we can get that with chris. hello. some of us has seen another dose of wintry weather about. this was one weather watcher scene showing thundery clouds bringing snow to the hills of lewis in the outer hebrides. a wintry day across northern parts of the uk with the radar picture picking up where we have seen this novel, the white collars here. generally further south rain has been falling for much of the day. across east anglia and south—east england, a damp end to the day. behind that big sky is clear and the clearing skies are likely to cause one or two problems overnight because temperatures are expected to fall pretty sharply, there will be a widespread frost and a risk of some it services to take
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us a risk of some it services to take us into the first part of wednesday. —— a risk of some icy surfaces. some relatively mild air mixed in here towards southern parts of the uk further north, however, it is that bit colder. the rain then turns again to snow. mostly over the hills in scotland where we could be looking at around 2—5 centimetres across higher parts of the highlands, the southern uplands. we could see some localised transport disruption here, but further south it is predominately rain that will fall across wales, the midlands and southern counties of england, with the rain tending to turn heavy later in the day. after a bright start across east anglia and south—east england we will see that cloud generally the coming through the course of the afternoon. eventually it will turn a bit milder across western areas, temperatures finishing around 11 degrees implement, but still chilly further north in scotland where temperatures
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will be around 5 degrees or so to ta ke will be around 5 degrees or so to take us through the afternoon. the first weather chart sees high pressure building and particularly to the south of the uk which means we should have a largely dry day with increasing sunshine for engin than wales, however further north for scotland and northern ireland, a day of sunny spells and some wintry showers, some of which could be heavy bringing snow for particularly over the hills at times. a range of temperatures. mild in the south, ten or11, temperatures. mild in the south, ten or 11, cold temperatures. mild in the south, ten or11, cold in the temperatures. mild in the south, ten or 11, cold in the north, about five in scotland. what about the weekend? it looks like the weather should become dry for most of us and it will turn milder, with temperatures for many of us into double figures. hello, you‘re watching afternoon live. we are getting verdict in the trial of former football coach barry bennell, then andone is there for us. good afternoon. the jury has
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come back and started returning verdicts, we have three verdicts in so far. count one, guilty. count two, guilty. verdict involving a young man at the time, who was a boy aged between 11 and 13. he played for a team aged between 11 and 13. he played fora team in aged between 11 and 13. he played for a team in derbyshire. he described how he was abused by barry bennell at the time, a very respected football coach, but a man who was a serial predatory paedophile. this took place at a house, a flat, in fact, that barry bennell owned in the high peak area of derbyshire. he described to the court more than 100 assaults against him. however, in this case, thejury was asked to consider only specimen charges. we have had more verdicts while i am talking to you. counts three, four, five and six, all guilty. these relate to another young footballer who played for the samejunior young footballer who played for the same junior team in derbyshire, young footballer who played for the samejunior team in derbyshire, and then started playing for a feeder
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tea m then started playing for a feeder team associated with manchester city football club. he described abuse that took place in barry bennell‘s mercedes car. he described barry bennell, saying that he stayed at his homes in furness vale, the one i described, and another house later in derbyshire as well. he said barry bennell‘s method was to get boys to watch horror films with bennell‘s method was to get boys to watch horrorfilms with him, at which point, after that, the abuse would begin. some verdicts not returned yet, some counts where the jury returned yet, some counts where the jury is still going to deliberate beyond this. there are some limits of in what we can say legally. we can only report at the moment counts that are in. as far as this jury is concerned, they have deliberated for several days here, and they indicated to thejudge several days here, and they indicated to the judge they had
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something on the counts. during the giving of verdicts, barry bennell is not in court, he watches via a video link from another jail where he not in court, he watches via a video link from anotherjail where he is held. he is wearing a grey top and has been shaking his head as the verdicts are delivered. there are a total of 48 charges, although the judge has instructed thejury total of 48 charges, although the judge has instructed the jury they have to return not guilty verdicts on three counts. we are waiting for a total of 45 charges to be gone through. that will clearly take some time. at the moment, we are up to come 14, guilty on 12, 13, 14 and 15. these relate to the same victim, the fourth alleged victim, who at the fourth alleged victim, who at the time was aged between 11 and 12. he again played for a feeder side, a junior side links to manchester city football club. he described how the abuse started with inappropriate touching in barry bennell‘s car. this victim told the jury in court
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that the abuse led to him going off for all, not wanting to be involved in the sport, and he said it led him also to take to drink. some of these witnesses have told the jury how this abuse affected them in later life. more verdicts for you, counts 15, 16, 17, all guilty. count16 to 18, all guilty. they were late to another victim, who was at the time aged 11—14. he told the jury, there we re aged 11—14. he told the jury, there were hundreds of assaults over a four year period. he played for anotherjunior side four year period. he played for another junior side associated with manchester city football club. he told the jury he was the main target. when the abuse took place, often at barry bennell‘s, often there were boys there. this was a highly respected man, a talent scout and coach. boys were sent to his home to learn, supposedly, because they hope of a football career,
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perhaps a glittering career playing for a big club. perhaps a glittering career playing fora big club. he perhaps a glittering career playing for a big club. he was associated, barry bennell, with clubs across the north—west of england, manchester city, and crewe alexandra as well. more verdicts for you on counts 17, 18,19, guilty. no verdict on count 20. another guilty verdict on count 21. these all relate to the same victim, who told the jury that when he went to stay at barry bennell‘s home, it became expected that he would share barry bennell‘s bed. his mother was also given a job in a video shop alone the flat where barry bennell used to live and where the abuse used to be carried out. he described that often they would sit in the lounge and a video would be put on, the lights would be turned off and the abuse would begin. more verdicts on count 23 and 24,
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two guilty verdicts. this is against victim number six, who played for a derbyshire side again, but also was taken to train at the grounds, the training ground is used by manchester city at the time at platt lane in manchester. this victim told thejury lane in manchester. this victim told the jury that he worked unpaid at the jury that he worked unpaid at the bobby charlton soccer school. he said he only spent 2—3 nights with barry bennell or at barry bennell‘s house, and said to the jury that the experiences and what happened to him asa experiences and what happened to him as a young boy, he was only 11 or 12 when this abuse took place in the midnight in 80s, in his case 1982-84. he said," it midnight in 80s, in his case 1982—84. he said," it made me question my own sexuality." counts 25, 26 and question my own sexuality." counts 25,26 and 27, all guilty again. these relate to the same victim i was telling you about. more guilty verdicts in relation to another victim, counts 20 is open and 28, guilty. this young man, again at the time, he was from plymouth, a very,
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very good footballer. he played for the age—appropriate junior england side at the time and went to the fa school. he says that after the abuse... before the abuse took place, he rejected overtures from barry bennell. at which point, barry bennell started playing him out of position and dropping him from the youth side from which he was in. at that point, the abuse began and it continued. this was in 1984—86. another count, count 30 is guilty. this is the eighth victim, giving evidence in this case against barry bennell, a crewe youth player. he would stay at the house owned by barry bennell in dove hold. he also would go on a trip to butlins that barry bennell was involved in. other victims alleged abuse took place there. more guilty verdicts on cou nts 31 there. more guilty verdicts on counts 31 and 32, again relating to the same victim, who said he had
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been inappropriately touched in the front of a team minibus on a journey to and from wales. he said he was abused on one occasion in the changing rooms at crewe fc. another guilty verdict, count 32. count 33 is one of those that the judge ordered thejury had is one of those that the judge ordered the jury had to acquit on. we know that will be a not guilty verdict. we are waiting for more verdicts to come through. am, as i said, verdicts not returned yet. it limits what we can say, because the jury limits what we can say, because the jury will be sent home tonight and return to court tomorrow to deliberate on those particular counts. count 34, guilty again, relating to the crewe youth player who said he was aged between 10—12. because he came from plymouth, his pa rents would because he came from plymouth, his parents would drive him long distances to derbyshire to stay at barry bennell‘s house, hoping that their son‘s clear potential as a footballer could be fulfilled. they we re footballer could be fulfilled. they were driving him a long way,
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com pletely were driving him a long way, completely trusting barry bennell. one of the issues around this story is the amount of trust placed in this coach by the parents. one of the boys, whose counts have been returned as guilty, his mother was given thejob in returned as guilty, his mother was given the job in the video shop below the flat where barry bennell used to live. more guilty verdicts on count 35 and count 37. count 37 isa on count 35 and count 37. count 37 is a guilty verdict relating to the ninth victim. he, at the time, was aged 13. the abuse to ways in 1984-85. he, too, aged 13. the abuse to ways in 1984—85. he, too, was from plymouth, was boarded by crewe and was with the club between 12 and 18. he told the club between 12 and 18. he told the court that the first attack was christmas 1984. he said he watched the film a nightmare on elm street at barry bennell‘s flat. that is when he started to touch. guilty on count number 40. when he started to touch. guilty on count number40. again,
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when he started to touch. guilty on count number 40. again, the same victim, victim number nine, who also said that a on previous occasions, because he didn‘t speak up, he felt guilty when he heard of abuse allegedly having to other boys. that is something thejury allegedly having to other boys. that is something the jury heard during the course of the trial. more verdicts on the tenth victim, who at the time was aged 12—13, a little later, 1985—87. these counts are given in chronological order of the alleged incidents. guilty on three more counts. this victim was someone that played for ace cool team in runcorn. —— a school team. he was dropped off at aribo no‘s house by his father. on occasions, barry bennell would put banknotes in his underwear, and described an occasion when he was attacked in the dark with the tv on, showing only pages from ceefax. he told the jury that what happened to him, the abuse that
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took place led to him losing his love for the game of football. this is an indication ofjust how devious barry bennell could be that this boy‘s father was barry bennell‘s best man when he got married. that was an indication of the level of trust, perhaps, that the parents of these boys were putting in barry bennell at the time. moving on now, if you more, getting close to the end now, count 44, that was not guilty on the order of the judge. count 45, guilty. count 46, guilty. count 45, guilty. count 46, guilty. count 47, guilty. this relates to the 11th victim abused between 1988 and 1990. aged between 12—13 at the time, he was scouted by barry bennell and joined the juniors at crewe alexandra. he told the jury he was in awe of barry bennell, who was widely was active at the time, and seen as a gifted soccer coach, someone whose patron it could lead toa someone whose patron it could lead to a successful footballing career.
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he remembered a trip to the united states in which the abuse words and —— worsened. he said barry bennell had a gift to reassure parents, even when they expressed concerns. he said he kept quiet about the abuse at the time because he was worried it would hurt his parents because they had such trust in barry bennell. we have now had the verdicts we will get today. there we re verdicts we will get today. there were quite murmurs of yes in the public gallery, there was some cry ying among those in court, some of the victims have come to court for the victims have come to court for the verdicts, to see what happens. we went be able to hear from them this evening because, at the moment as far as we know, the jury still have six or seven counts outstanding that they may be asked to return to. what could happen is, they will be asked in the morning or later this evening whether they are likely to reach verdicts on those counts, if not, they may be discharged. but thatis not, they may be discharged. but that is better nation, we don‘t
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know. i am that is better nation, we don‘t know. iam being that is better nation, we don‘t know. i am being told that the jury is to return at 10:15 tomorrow to continue deliberation. we have a round—up of the verdicts today, guilty on many counts faced by barry bennell, but still, thejury deliberating on some counts, which means we are limited in what we can say. ok, the 48 counts, seven no verdicts, three directed not guilty, 38 guilty verdicts so far. people joining us all the time when their phone goes off and tells them a story is breaking, so in a nutshell, explain what has happened in the last half hour. thanks for rounding the numbers up for me, that was very helpful indeed. as you said, 38 counts, 38 guilty verdicts in a total of 45 that we were waiting for. ore bilal faced 48 charges, the judges directed the jury to return verdicts of not guilty on three. verdicts of
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guilty on 38 of them. they reflect abuse that spanned a number of years through the 1980s and into 1990. —— barry bennell faced 48 charges. it was alleged barry bennell abused schoolboy footballers, he was a gifted coach, parents and clubs trusted him to look after these boys, but they would go and stay at his houses in derbyshire, one in furness vale, one at uphold. when the boys stayed, one victim estimated he was abused on more than 100 different occasions. i should say that, on some of these charges, they are specimen charges that reflect far greater criminality. and he denied all the charges. what did his barrister sadie"? barry bennell denied the charges —— say in court.
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his barrister suggested that the reason these victims were coming forward now was because they were doing it for money. they wanted some form of compensation. during evidence, some of the victims received compensation. some clubs, manchester city, crewe alexandra and stoke city have all got investigations going on. manchester city have made it clear they are cooperating with this investigation. they have engaged a qc to carry out their own independent enquiry into what happened. crewe alexandra, too, investigating the allegations. both clu bs say investigating the allegations. both clubs say that at the time they had no knowledge at all of what was going on and what barry bennell was doing, and the level of abuse he was carrying out on this enormous scale, these boys who were going to stay with him almost coming abused as a matter of course. as i say, one victim described how it was expected
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he would sleep in barry bennell‘s head. that was often when abuse would take place. these are serious sexual assaults taking place two boys aged eight to 14, allegedly hundreds of occasions. 38 different cou nts hundreds of occasions. 38 different counts here, all found guilty over a period of time from the early 80s to 1990. ajury of five men, seven women and the judge urging them to try to take the emotion out of this. that‘s what judges try to take the emotion out of this. that‘s whatjudges do say to juror ‘s. it is incredibly difficult to put yourself in the position of a juror ina put yourself in the position of a juror in a case at this, remaining dispassionate. we had to be very careful what goes on in the jury room is something we are not allowed to know, juror ‘s are not allowed to talk about it. we are certainly not supposed to report on it. we can imagine how difficult it must be to hear that kind of evidence they after day, and the trial has been going on now for four weeks, after day, and the trial has been going on now forfour weeks, and put out of their mind any of the
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revulsion they may feel, quite understandably you might say. and find a way to forensically examine this, listen to the witnesses, listen to the accused if they give evidence, and come to a verdict dispassionately as the judge will have instructed them to do. it is normalfor have instructed them to do. it is normal for the judge have instructed them to do. it is normalfor thejudge to have instructed them to do. it is normal for the judge to thank the jury normal for the judge to thank the jury at the end of a case like this, but we must bear in mind, at the moment, we have 36 guilty verdicts, not verdicts on all accounts, the jury not verdicts on all accounts, the jury is coming back tomorrow at 10:14 to continue deliberating on the outstanding counts, so we need to respect that, understand that and mind what we say. of course. barry bennell, as you say earlier, wasn‘t actually in court. no, that's right. he is being kept at a prison in milton keynes. there are medical reasons for that. he has been attending court, if you like, by video link. that is something that can happen. it is not ideal, of course, but it is something that can
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ta ke course, but it is something that can take place from time to time. one of the reasons for the slight delay coming to these verdicts was we were waiting and court was waiting for him to be brought from his place in prison to a place where the video suite is for him to see what happened. what i can tell you is he was wearing a grey top. as verdicts we re was wearing a grey top. as verdicts were given, he shook his head. he denied what had happened. his barrister said on his behalf that victims were coming forward because they wanted compensation. clearly, jury they wanted compensation. clearly, jury decided that was nonsense. they believed the accusers on many accou nts believed the accusers on many accounts against barry bennell and decided he did abuse these boys in the way that they said. before we leave you, seven no verdicts yet. three directed not guilty, and 36 guilty. that is what has happened in the last hour? yes, that seems to be the last hour? yes, that seems to be the way the numbers are stacking up. that makes sense arithmetically. it
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is difficult to tell, and we need to double check which are which, but yes, 36 counts. we have verdicts in. the only three not guilty ones were insisted on by thejudge. for legal reasons. as you said, there are some cou nts reasons. as you said, there are some counts where, at the moment, they haven‘t returned verdicts, they are deliberating and will continue deliberating and will continue deliberating tomorrow. sorry to interrupt, we are getting something from a justice city, who say, "boast importantly, following today‘s events at billable crown court, "no one can remove the suffering for those that suffered sexual abuse as children after their involvement in football. all victims were entitled to expect full protection from the kind of harm they endured." that underlines what was said through a trial that he was in a position of trust and these young boys were
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there to be coached in a sport they loved. absolutely. he was completely ina loved. absolutely. he was completely in a position of trust. that, perhaps, more than anything is what has come out of it. thinking back to the 1980s, there were more respect for authorities. parents were unwilling to ask questions, they felt perhaps that barry bennell was ina felt perhaps that barry bennell was in a position where he was widely respected in the game. his football coaching abilities, i think, are not in doubt at all, but he used that position to completely abuse his position to completely abuse his position of trust, and sexually assault these boys for his own gratification. that is absolutely clear. manchester city‘s statement is clear, complete sympathy for the victims of the trauma they went through. as i said, manchester city have launched their own investigation, led by a qc, they are saying they will do all they can to ensure it is all transparent, it is
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independent, and any information they receive is suitable will forward to the police. this has been a huge investigation for cheshire police. a huge amount of manpower, a huge amount of resources, as you might imagine. again, we can talk more about that perhaps when the verdicts are in, but it has been a major investigation. with the verdicts we have so far, it is clear that barry bennell was a paedophile that barry bennell was a paedophile that preyed on many, many young boys over an extended period. we will leave it for now. back to you later on for the latest from liverpool crown court. thanks very much. let‘s move crown court. thanks very much. let‘s m ove o nto crown court. thanks very much. let‘s move onto other news. it‘s a crisis which is hitting at the very heart of oxfam‘s appeal with questions being raised by the government and millions of individual donors about whether the charity deserves their money. the charity commission has taken the most serious action it can against oxfam, and begun a statutory inquiry into its procedures. it will investigate the handling of claims that the charity‘s staff used prostitutes, as they carried out disaster
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relief in the aftermath of the earthquake in haiti in 2010. matt cole reports. this crisis has already claimed one senior figure, oxfam‘s now former chief executive penny lawrence, but her resignation has far from drawn a line under the matter, with the organisation now facing the most serious form of investigation the charity commission can undertake, a statutory inquiry, which could lead to the suspension of trustees or the freezing of bank accounts. and there‘s more pressure from the government. i take these things very seriously. i know people will be worried about the charity, they‘ll be worried about the money. as oxfam fights for its future, there are some claiming it had ample opportunity to avoid this scandal. helen evans spent three years at oxfam‘s head of safeguarding, but says as she unearthed the scale of the problem, the charity failed to respond with sufficient resources. we had one in ten saying they had experienced unwanted sexual touching, sexual assault.
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this was staff on staff. we hadn't even gone out to beneficiaries who received aid from us. i was extremely concerned by those survey results. oxfam says it has new safeguarding measures in place, better checks now, but the biggest fight it might face is to maintain public confidence, that most precious commodity that if lost severely hampers its ability to raise money and help those most in need. the labour mp peter kyle was formerly an aid worker. he worries people with an agenda to oppose international aid spending might exploit the situation. i‘m deeply concerned. let‘s not beat around the bush. this scandal could bring oxfam to its knees. the organisation could implode, and the people who will suffer the most through this will be the people who depend, the thousands of people, who are extraordinarily vulnerable, who depend on the work that organisations like oxfam does. as oxfam waits to learn more details of the statutory
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inquiry into its failings, it and all other aid agencies are being told by the government they must step up and provide statements of assurance about the policies and procedures. what‘s being dubbed a significant conference is also being planned. all major charities will discuss how the sector as a whole can face these problems. the governing african national congress in south africa has decided to recalljacob zuma from the position of president. the party‘s secretary general said mr zuma had agreed in principle to resign, but that talks were continuing. jacob zuma has come under mounting pressure to resign, following several corruption scandals. we engaged and we‘re looking forward to an amicable solution. we will then see what president zuma‘s response is. but it‘s obvious that we want comrade ramaphosa to come
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in as the president of south africa. more on that in a moment. but two other news. prince harry and meghan markle are visiting edinburgh this afternoon, as part of their public engagements in the run—up to their wedding in may. they‘ve been at the city‘s castle, and heard the one o‘clock gun fire at the garrison. our royal correspondent daniela relph is in edinburgh. we are getting much more than a sense of these two as they meet more and more people. that is right. that is what these tours around the country are all about, just a couple of days after announcing their engagement, print harry said he wa nted engagement, print harry said he wanted meghan markle to get to know the uk and its people. that is what these visits have been about, there have been visits to london, nottingham and cardiff, and here today to lead, looking right and beautiful, starting off at the city‘s most famous landmark, edinburgh castle. it was a chance
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for them to meet the public, which again, is something they want to do ahead of their wedding. they had, probably, a good half hour or so on the esplanade here in front of edinburgh castle chatting to the people that came out to see them today. maybe 200—300, perhaps more, out with union flags, banners and bunches of flowers, even balla ntyes day cards, chatting to them about wedding. meghan markle told somebody that hen do plans were underway, apparently, and she was looking forward to it. a lot of toing and froing, chatting about the wedding and getting a chance to meet people and getting a chance to meet people and chat to people here at edinburgh castle. once they were done here at the castle, they moved to a different kind of engagement, much smaller and much more intimate, to a place called the social bite. it is a cafe and social enterprise project. it is aimed at eradicating
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homelessness. that is its big ambition. what the couple did was meet the founder of the project, they heard how they combined running a business and doing charity work. they went into the kitchens and met staff there, many of whom had experienced homelessness themselves. again, it was a project very much aimed at social challenges in modern society, focusing on young people. in keeping with that theme, they finished their day in scotland at holyrood house, attending a reception, again looking at the achievements of young people and what they were able to do and some of the challenges they face. all of this gives us a sense ahead of their wedding in may of the kind of projects they i interested in. and what they want to work on when they get married together. let‘s get more on the south african situation, the ruling national african congress asking jacob zuma to resign for the sake of the
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country. let‘s go tojohannesburg. 2-1 country. let‘s go tojohannesburg. 2—1 joins me, who is a journalist. —— verashni pillay joins 2—1 joins me, who is a journalist. —— verashni pillayjoins me. why is he clinging on as he appears to be? jacob zuma is a chess player and the kind of person who fight even harder with his back against the wall. he has become quite emotional, digging his heels in and has said to his own party, make me go. he is refusing to resign. why? it is not clear. the game is up. the game is up, but rather being emotional, he may be frightened. if he resigned as president, he could be arrested when leaving the compound.” president, he could be arrested when leaving the compound. i think part of it is the delay, trying to get some sort of amnesty. what the anc has said on record is that he also agreed to a six—month notice period. that would have been to shore up his
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interest in that time. they declined that and said it is not good enough and too shorten the notice period. they have said he has to go. no amnesty has been put out there. what has been announced today, outstanding charges against him may be reinstated. the prosecution team has ten days to decide if they will reinstate the charges. on top of that, he may face charges relating to an enquiry happening interstate ca ptu re. to an enquiry happening interstate capture. jacob zuma is not as as he might have been if his deputy had not won control of the party. up until now, this has felt a unified siege, verashni pillay, with waiting until tomorrow, then the next day. it is beginning to look ms. until tomorrow, then the next day. it is beginning to look msw really is. perhaps too dignified. the anc on social media, people feel they are being soft in its approach to jacob zuma, asking him to step down when the constitution clearly
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is states they are within their power to remove him. they can use their parliamentary majority to oust their parliamentary majority to oust the president. let's look at the options, they can force him to go, which we will talk about, there could be a vote of no—confidence, there could be impeachment. which is there could be impeachment. which is the most likely outcome now? the least likely is the impeachment, because that has never been done in our democracy. they need to set up certain rules before that can happen. it takes a few months to set up happen. it takes a few months to set up that process. it requires a two third majority, which the anc does not have. the motion of no—confidence has come several times againstjacob no—confidence has come several times against jacob zuma and no—confidence has come several times againstjacob zuma and failed, but it has always been bought by opposition figures that do not have a majority in the house. this is an anc sponsored motion of no confidence, they would win that. that is decreasingly likely. the most dignified option is for him to
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resign. they have come to the point where they have asked him to resign and given him until tomorrow to do that. if he refuses to do that, it will go to a motion of the confidence in all probability. verashni pillay, thank you for joining us. time for a look at the weather. here‘s chris fawkes. we have been tracking the cycling, haven‘t we. a very powerful cyclone has been moving across the island of tonga. this wiggling around is the date late and i think it will have skipped forward by a day, because of on that side of the planet they are behind... and here they are a day ahead, so it is all very confusing. but there it is, very powerful cyclone, category four when it hit and according to the uk met air force and offers the winds were around 124 mph, making it the
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strongest cyclone that tonga has seenin strongest cyclone that tonga has seen in well over 60 years. the damage pretty extensive, notjust rose been torn off button the flooding, and another picture, the damage, this is the tonga parliament building, would you believe it? so they have had big trouble —— not only in roofs being torn. and closer to home, other parts of the country suffering a bit? yes, in the next 24 hours we are looking at another speu hours we are looking at another spell of hills nor particularly across parts of scotland and northern england where we‘re already seen snow today. this is one weather watcher picture showing curtains of snow coming down and the radar picture you can see the white bits, where we have been seeing the snowfall. in the south by a large it has largely been rain. through this evening, our weather front becomes very slow moving across eastern england so it will be a damp and cold end to the day. behind the front the skies clear and with these clearing skies the winter light for
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the time being, allowing temperatures to plunge. it will be a cold night with a widespread frost developing, the blue shades on the map. a risk of ice developing into wednesday morning. wednesday is self, another weather system will be working its way in off the atlantic, here it is —— wednesday itself. as this band of rain works into the cold air, just like today it will start to turn to snow. the heaviest following of snow will be across the highlands of scotland where we could be looking at up to 12 centimetres, but combined with the strong winds there will be blizzard conditions high up, and quite a lot of snow for the southern uplands, so the potential for some travel disruption. whereas further south by and large the rain will be moving into wales and south—west england, a bit wintry for a time perhaps over snowdonia and the brecon beacons but the mail there will then be working in. after a bright start in east, we will see the cloud moving and
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eventually outbreaks of rain, turning heavier later in the day across wales and south—west england and eventually turning milder across south—west areas but still chilly in the north and east. thursday, our front is moving out of the way and is replaced by this ridge of high pressure. what that will do across england and wales is settled weather down to most areas after a cold start will have plenty of winter sunshine from dawn until dusk. further north, a little more u nsta ble further north, a little more unstable so we will have some showers working and across the north scotla nd showers working and across the north scotland and those will have a wintry zero, so expect snow over the high ground. temperatures 5 degrees in the north and quite chilly but in the south relatively mild, ten or 11 celsius and that is a theme as we look at the weather through to the end of the week. things generally becoming quieter, more settled, so a bit more dry weather and road and it will become milder, at least for a time, while there are sent in science that was the end of this month the weather could turn very cold. —— there are certain signs that the weather could turn very cold. watch this space for more
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details. this is bbc news — our latest headlines: former—football coach barry bennell has been found guilty of multiple sex offences against boys in the 1980s. the charity commission begins a statutory inquiry into oxfam following the sex scandal involving its workers in haiti seven years ago. south africa‘s ruling anc party have decided to recall jacob zuma as president amidst corruption allegations. they expect a decision from him tomorrow. prince harry and his fiancee meghan markel visit edinburgh as part of their public engagements in the run up to their wedding on 19th may. sport now on afternoon live, with hugh woozencroft. we journalists are pretty rotten. poor elise, four years of training down the skid and then they put a microphone in front of her. yes, of
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course great disappointment today. but it is just those small margins. imagine the 200 metres at our summer olympics, for example, but when going round the bend, instead of being in your own lane, as you can see, all bunched up together, and she was left fighting for a place in the top three in the final of the 500 metres, and they are, knocked off, out. christie did get up to finish fourth in a race won by the italian in the end but it is four yea rs italian in the end but it is four years to the day since she was disqualified from the final at sochi, after tangling with the same skater, arianna fontana, who went on to win the gold today. disappointment for elise christie but she will be back. yes, a feeling of deja vu, sochi. yes, well, she has broken the world record since then and since then become a three—time olympic champion and she broke the olympic record already in
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pyeongchang. she is getting really well at the moment so will be really disappointed with that. she received abuse on social media after that sochi exit and is obviously upset again at how things went today. even though she has a really good chance to win gold in both other races, it is clear what happened today really took its toll on her. i was knocked over, you know. ididn't i didn't follow my own. but it doesn't give you any benefit in the final, when someone gets a penalty. yeah, it isjust tough. i've worked so hard for the 500, and it hasjust been, you know, taken away from me, and even in the semifinal, i got crashed, ended up in lane four. i know it is short track and i am supposed to be prepared for this, but it still hurts, you know. yes, a few goes for her to gather
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her thoughts before she goes again. you can get all of the results and details and eight gold medals awarded on the bbc sport website, bbc.co.uk/sport, and on the app as well. now to cricket... england are now relying on other results to go their way in the t20 tri series if they‘re to make the final of the tournament. they slumped to their third defeat in a row, this time to new zealand, losing by 12 runs in wellington. meanwhile ben stokes will fly out to new zealand tomorrow to join up with the team. he entered a plea of not guilty to charges of affray at magistrates court in bristol this morning. his case was adjourned to the crown court on march 12th, but he will not be required to appear in person, allowing him to play in the remainder of england‘s winter tour, although not in the current t20 series. france head coach jacques brunel has dropped a number of players who went out in edinburgh after the six nations defeat by scotland on sunday. scottish police questioned players at edinburgh airport after a report of a sexual assault during the night out, but found no crime had been committed.
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six nations top try—scorer teddy thomas is among those left out of the squad for the italy game on the 23rd february. the french rugby union described the players‘ behaviour as "inappropriate". they said, "they did not respect their status as international players." footballer ryan mason has been forced to retire from the game at the age ofjust 26. the hull midfielder suffered a head injury in a match against chelsea in january last year, and has since taken specialist medical advice before deciding that it would be too risky to continue. mason started his career at spurs and won one england cap in 2015. arsenal striker alexandre lacazette will be out for up to six weeks after having an operation on a knee injury. the procedure was described as a "success" by the gunners. the french internatoinal has scored nine goals so far in his first season at the emirates. finally, don‘t forget the knock—out stage of
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the champions league begins tonight. there are five premier league clubs in the last 16. tonght manchester city are in switzerland for their first leg against basel. tottenham are also away — they‘re in turin to take on juventus, and are without defender toby alderweireld who‘s being eased back into the side after injury. you can listen to live commentary of that match on radio 5 live from seven o clock this evening. from seven o‘clock this evening. that is all your sport for now. i will be back in the next hour. now on afternoon live let‘s go nationwide — and see what‘s happening around the country, in our daily visit to the bbc newsrooms around the uk. catherine morrison is in belfast, where bbc newsline has been investigating the paedophile hunter groups which operate in northern ireland.
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we will be with her in just a moment. also in a moment i‘ll be talking to dave guest in salford about the uk‘s first robotic heart surgery which took place last week, as well as a new exhibition in liverpool celebrating the beatles time in india. but first to catherine in belfast. so this is an investigation into these self—styled paedophile hunter groups in northern ireland? yes, simon. we have a special report on bbc newsline into the activities of paedophile hunters in northern ireland. we find in spite of recent criticism from the police the number of groups operating here is on the rise. they work in secret using false identities, confronting people they claim are paedophiles and filming their targets live on social media. our correspondent has been looking into how they operate, and for the first time we will be revealing who are behind some of the groups and trying to hold them to account. there's been a sharp increase in the activities of these so—called paedophile hunter groups
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in recent months, but who are they accountable to? who is behind them? i would like to ask you a few questions. close the door! what authority do you have? do you appreciate the police believe you're doing more harm than good? do you appreciate the police believe you are contaminating evidence? bbc news. i would like to ask you quantity my questions if i could, about your role as a self appointed paedophile hunter? are you a vigilante? are you serious? get out of my sight, leave me alone, stay away from anybody, anybody, that i have previously worked with... remind experts who know what they are talking about say that you are interfering with the legal process. is that true? we have a kevin mcgeary of the bbc... what i would say -- we have kevin magee. get out of my space right now! why can't you
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justify your actions? it is quite clear from that clip that the people behind these groups are not co mforta ble behind these groups are not comfortable about being questioned about what they have been doing. that‘s right. as you saw not keen to talk at all. as part of his investigation kevin has also spoken to former police officer and child protection expert who says he believes most of the activities carried out by these paedophile hunters are actually criminal in themselves, but these gangs say they have no intention of stopping what they do, saying they are making our streets safer. out of the hundred or so alleged paedophiles they have targeted, not one has resulted in a prosecution, and we will have the full report on bbc newsline at half past six this evening, on bbc one northern ireland, but of course you can also watch it on bbc newsline‘s facebook page. katherine morrison, great to speak to you. thank you very much. —— catherine. let‘s cross now to dave guest who is in salford. this is a first for the uk — heart surgery done by robots?
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slightly squeamish viewers may want to look away now. a world first. that's right, and with a price tag of more than a million times these robotic surgeons don‘t come cheap but liverpool‘s heart and chest hospital believes it is money well spent because the robot should reduce the risk of infection and complication during surgery, but don‘t run away with the idea of the robots are marching around the operating theatre. they are an extension of the human‘s arms, who is it using hand and foot controls to accurate mimic every movement the human makes while accurately removing tremors. not good for the squeamish but fascinating nonetheless. for patients like owen, seem here, these involve smaller incisions, less blood loss, less pain, less risk of a smaller stay in hospital. and i feel really really good. are bit dazed and tender and sore, but other than that i've been walking, up and down walking the hallways, going to get my cups of tea. yeah, amazing.
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it does look stunning. 50 years ago the beatles went to india and there is an exhibition at liverpool to celebrate this? yes, 1968, the year after the famous summer of love, when the beatles went to india to find peace, spiritual enlightenment, to escape the limelight for a while, but a young canadian photographer there to escape a broken heart got to know them and he allowed them to photograph them, and the picture is featured at the beatles museum in liverpool. clearly the famous four found inspiration in india and george harrison ford is most famous song well he was there and with him was his wife of that time, patti boyd. he was always rather curious about how this boy from liverpool suddenly, well, not suddenly, although it seems suddenly, was world—famous. i think he really wanted the answer to that, as if there was an answer. fascinating. 50
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yea rs there was an answer. fascinating. 50 years ago, when you and i were very very young! or very young. dave, great to see you. thanks very much. more in north west tonight, and 5335s '3 72.54“; 25%; t3355; £39 catherine, - to talk to flt? i lfifibfif e533; fiiéifll'fiis eeuee'ee eee eeeeeeleeeefleeee". the leadership of south africa‘s governing african national congress has confirmed that it‘s asked
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presidentjacob zuma to stand down. here‘s your business headlines on afternoon live: average prices are still rising by 3% according
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