Skip to main content

tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  February 16, 2018 2:00pm-5:00pm GMT

2:00 pm
hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm ben brown. today at 2. president trump is to visit florida as students mourn the deaths of those killed in the deadly school shooting. knowing that everything has been cleaned up, like everything, you can almost imaginejust cleaned up, like everything, you can almost imagine just blood on the walls and bodies on the floor. no one is going to be able to walk through that building, no one. a dramatic fall in home ownership — new figures show only one in four young people on middle incomes succeed in buying a property. scientists say using cleaning sprays can be as harmful to your lungs as smoking 20 cigarettes a day. oxfam has set up an independent commission to investigate allegations of exploitation by its staff. a medal gb in the
2:01 pm
a medal- gb in the winter olympics? yes, it has been a little bit in the coming. a bronze in the men's skeleton courtesy of dom parsons. there could be another at least in the women's event with lizzie yarnold and laura deas in contention half way through their competition. details later. we will see you later on. and stav has the weather. a decent weekend ahead? clear skies has the weather. a decent weekend ahead ? clear skies across has the weather. a decent weekend ahead? clear skies across the country today. there are some changes as it later. join me later for details. also coming up this afternoon... building bridges — the team from chester zoo helping the endangered orangutans of borneo move around their habitat. hello, everyone — this is afternoon live.
2:02 pm
i'm ben brown. president trump is expected to visit the scene of the florida high school shooting in the next few days. police say a former pupil who was expelled from the school has now confessed to the massacre, which left 17 people dead. last night, thousands of people attended a candlelit vigil in parkland, florida. from there, nada tawfik reports. they came to mourn the lives lost and the live scarred by this senseless attack. neighbours, friends and the students of stoneman douglas high comforted one another as best they could. jet was among the students who ran in the panic once the first shots were fired. he doesn't know if he can handle returning to the halls where his classmates' lives were cut short. i don't know if i'll be able to just cope with walking through the bottom floor of the freshman building, knowing that everything has been cleaned up. you can almost imagine just blood on the walls,
2:03 pm
bodies on the floor. no one is going to be able to walk through that building. no one. all 17 victims have now been identified. among them talented students, star athletes and aaron feis, a beloved football coach and security guard. he has been called a hero for shielding children from the gunman‘s bullets. nikolas cruz appeared in court briefly on 17 charges of premeditated murder. his lawyer said he was sad and remorseful and described him as a broken human being. the sheriff's office said he confessed to opening fire on his former school. he told authorities he bought a drink at subway and stopped at mcdonald's after the rampage. on social media, cruz often posed with guns. and, in one post, he wrote he would be a professional school shooter. those who knew him were troubled by his behaviour. i saw him in the backyard and he had like a, i wouldn't say a bb gun,
2:04 pm
i wasn't exactly sure. and i was pretty young so i told my mom and i said, mom, it looks like he is shooting at something. and the people who are behind us have chickens and he was shooting at the chickens, so my mom called the cops. he would steal other neighbours' mail. the cops were always at his house. he egged my car one time and we went to go and find out who did it and he was hiding under a bush and he started pelting eggs at my friend and we were chasing him down. he hasjust always been causing trouble. these terrifying scenes of students completely helpless and trembling with fear have shaken the nation. and they have reignited the debate on gun control. people here are in a state of shock that someone in their own community could be capable of such killing, and that their city nowjoins the long list of america's school shooting tragedies. the president said he plans to visit soon. never one to shy away from controversial decisions in the name of safety and security for americans, many wonder
2:05 pm
if he will come with new ideas, and if he will remain silent on gun control. and nada tawfik is in parkland in florida for us now. we saw from your report, the community they are still coming to terms with the utter horror of what has happened. yes, absolutely. today, many students and families also preparing for the funerals of their loved ones. i have with me several of the students. she was in the building where the shooting happened. gabriela and valentino we re happened. gabriela and valentino were in the other building. just starting with you, if you can fit into words, how are you feeling? right now, i don't even know howl
2:06 pm
am feeling. i am grateful that i made it out alive. but my heart aches for those 17 innocent children who lost their lives and their families who sent their schools —— kids to school that day. everyone was happy, it was valentine's day. it was a normal day. the bell was about to ring, we were ready to leave, new nat —— nobody knew anything was happening. it was so skinny. it felt like a movie. that is what we have been healing, how surreal the source. valentina, you knew one of the victims. you will be going to her funeral. knew one of the victims. you will be going to herfuneral. you were talking about how difficult it is after speaking to her every single day. we became very close in geography, we did a project together. we spoke every single day. finding out that she got shot was
2:07 pm
horrible and then finding out she passed away is heartbreaking knowing that you know someone like that. it is my first loss of a friend. ijust cannot believe what her for —— family are going through. her mother has been rallying for the country to come together and to do something, seeing how she hopes her daughter's wave has not been lost in vain. this isa wave has not been lost in vain. this is a local tragedy that the nation ‘s mourning with you all. it has turned to the debate on gun control and mental health. honestly, there has to be changes on gun control. knowing someone with such problems in the past where he has been expelled and he has killed animals can get hold of a gun and do something like this, it's... it is... there are no words that i can describe foreign. but more thanjust security, we need to change people.
2:08 pm
if there are people who want to do harm to the community, then it is notjust gun harm to the community, then it is not just gun control that will stop them. we have to change the mindset of the people and help them get their mental help they need to be happy in the community and bring us together. gabriela, how do you feel about the fact that there were warning signs in this case?” about the fact that there were warning signs in this case? i feel like their work a little too late. they were definitely too late. people that knew him, knew he had strange behaviour. that he thought all these things, he had all these pictures on instead ram and posting a comment on youtube video saying that he is going to be a professional school shooter, the warnings were too late. we did not think of them at that moment. we thought it was anotherjoke, another tea m thought it was anotherjoke, another team saying that he was going to kill people. when in reality will was telling the truth. in a place we
2:09 pm
we re was telling the truth. in a place we were feeling safe and one of the cities that are safest in general. how has this made you feel about the community? everyone came together. everyone thought he is going to break the community apart. last night we realised, not only was marker to united as one, everyone from all over our area came together at this one candle lighting ceremony to honour all the dead. —— parkland. and sheriffs to. and the swat team who fought to keep us safe and not have more than 17 victims.|j who fought to keep us safe and not have more than 17 victims. i know this is a difficult time for all of you. thank you so much first meeting with us. then, as you heard there, the emotion still very raw here today. thank you so much. and thank you to all your guests there. the number of young people in the uk
2:10 pm
who own their own home has fallen dramatically over the last 20 years. research by the institute for fiscal studies shows that the proportion of middle—income earners aged 25 to sa who own a property dropped over that period from two—thirds — tojust over a quarter. our personal finance correspondent, simon gompertz, reports. i've been living here a couple of years now. aged 30, keen to buy, but shut out of the market. so this is my room. tom bourlet says renting here in brighton is money down the drain. but the house prices beyond him. it's completely out of reach. there is not a chance i will be able to get the deposit. it's such a cost and with utility bills, with the cost of trains going to london, with my rent prices, it is just unachievable. and my friends, they are all around the same age and none of us are on the property ladder yet.
2:11 pm
the institute for fiscal studies looked at young people aged 25 to sa on middle—incomes, at the moment, between 22,000 and 30,000 for a household after tax — in most cases, couples with children. two decades ago, 65% of those on middle incomes owned their own homes. that's dropped to just 27%. most the are forced to rent. the huge increase in house prices is the reason why it has become so difficult. 20 years ago, a young family would need four times their income in order to buy. now, it's more like eight times, so, for increasing numbers, buying a home isjust a nonstarter. the government's help to buy scheme is helping people afford more, particularly new homes, and first—time buyers have had their stamp duty cut. but the problem is also one of supply. councils complained that developers are sitting on planning permission is for more than 400,000 homes that haven't been built, and that is aggravating the shortage.
2:12 pm
it's really hard to see how we can make this better when we are still seeing huge demand for housing and that housing demand is not being met with the right number of houses. so i think it is all coming down to the individual now. they are having to make the choices, they are having to decide for themselves — do i want to rent and have the flexibility but pay more for it, or do i want to make a lot of difficult decisions and get on the housing ladder sooner? my mum always says she got on the property ladder around 25, 26, and she tells me the deposit price and how cheap it was. tom's agrieved he is missing out — part of a generation in which most people, like it or not, are stuck with renting. simon gompertz, bbc news, brighton. joining me now is henry gregg, member relations director at the national housing federation — the voice of affordable housing in england.
2:13 pm
are you surprised by this result and the scale of the problem it unveils? these statistics show how difficult it is for young people across the income spectrum to get on the housing ladder, that is because we are not building in forms. house prices and rent prices are spiralling out of control. and people cannot get on the ladder. what are your ideas for possible solutions? housing associations are building thousands of affordable homes. we want to do more but we need access to land. with that land we can build shared ownership which allows young people to buy a share of their own, which means they can get on the ladder at more affordable prices. there are a lot of applications for building, that are still waiting to go through, potentially hundreds of thousands of homes that could be built that are not being built. part of that is for local people to start supporting house—building in bigger numbers. we have seen a tipping point now. the
2:14 pm
majority support house—building and a vast majority support affordable house—building. but we need local people to call for house—building in the area so we can people to call for house—building in the area so we can as people to call for house—building in the area so we can as all of the young people who desperately need these homes. there are some quite imaginative help to buy schemes at the moment. would you like to see more of that kind of thing, do you have more ideas on how that can be done? the government has put in -- money into help to buy and shared ownership. it allows young people to stay in the area. some people will a lwa ys stay in the area. some people will always say when they hear figures like this, this is a country that are slightly obsessed with home ownership. in other countries in europe, people tend to rent more than buy. what is the problem? that is right. the problem with renting in this country is it is not stable. you have short—term tenancies and
2:15 pm
can mean people are kicked out more easily. we need more stability and more affordable prices to make sure people know what they can be and they can afford to stay in those houses. and some people see renters throwing away money. whereas if they invest money in their own home, they expect that money to grow as an investment. we are a nation of home owners, we have a high level of home ownership. at all different levels, whether you are renting shared ownership or buying, that it is affordable for young people and that young people can stay in the areas they are and contribute to the economy and find things that they can economy and find things that they ca n afford economy and find things that they can afford in the market. good to talk to you. henry greg there. and to see where you might be able to afford to live — go to the bbc website to try our housing calculator. you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines.
2:16 pm
president trump is to visit florida as students mourn the deaths of those killed in the deadly school shooting. a dramatic fall in home ownership — new figures show only one in four young people on middle incomes succeed in buying a property. scientists say using cleaning sprays can be as harmful to your lungs as smoking twenty cigarettes a day. in a moment... britain's first medal at the winter olympics is a bronze. lizzy yarnold when the women's event four years ago. the medals will be decided tomorrow. laura deas is behind lizzy yarnold in fourth position. alex mcleish admits he is fortunate to be
2:17 pm
given the scotland job for the second time. he replaces gordon strachan 11 years after holding the position last time around. the head of oxfam international has announced what she's calling a comprehensive plan, including an independent commission, to deal with claims of abuse involving its staff. winnie byanyima said the revelations of sexual misconduct, in haiti and other countries, were a stain on the charity that will shame it for years. our diplomatic correspondent james landale reports. the earthquake that struck in 2010 reduced much of haiti to rubble. but the after—shocks are still being felt by oxfam. in her native ugandan, oxfam's global head said sorry for the sexual exploitation carried out by some of her staff in haiti, something she told me she only found out about last week. i'm inviting anyone who has been a victim of abuse to come forward, we're going to do justice,
2:18 pm
we'll atone for the past. right now thousands and thousands of oxfam staff doing the right thing in the most dangerous places in the world. she promised a new independent commission to investigate oxfam's handling of past cases, tougher new checks on staff work references and more cash for safeguarding vulnerable people. isn't that going to be seen as marking your own hallmark?“ isn't that going to be seen as marking your own hallmark? if you are paying for this? this will be women of integrity and men of integrity who facilitate to do a job for us. they will make their own
2:19 pm
plan. she could not guarantee there we re plan. she could not guarantee there were no sexual predators still working for oxfam but she said more staff would be found accountable if they are found to have mishandled past cases. what hurts me most is that out there in haiti are in another country that there are some poor another country that there are some pool’ woman another country that there are some poor woman who another country that there are some pool’ woman who were another country that there are some poor woman who were abused and to have not received justice. for me to deliver justice for those people have not received justice. for me to deliverjustice for those people is more important than say the reputation of oxfam. this problem though is not limited to charities. united nations agencies and peacekeepers have a similar accusations of sexual misconduct and the organisation secretary general promised he would take action. this isa very promised he would take action. this is a very important matter. it will not be won in two or three days. we need consistent commitment for gender equality and zero tolerance to sexual exploitation. what went on
2:20 pm
in haiti has cost oxfam donations, partly trust and celebrity ambassadors. but it has shone a spotlight on an industry which until now has kept much of its behaviour in the shadows. if you have any thoughts or comments on that story are any of the other stories today, you can letters know what you think. don't forget — you can let us know what you think tweet us using the hashtag afternoon live. all the ways to contact us on screen right now. some of the men who were abused by barry bennell when he was a youth football coach have told the bbc they will seek compensation from the clubs he was with when he committed the crimes. yesterday the predatory paedophile was found guilty of another seven counts of sexually abusing boys; next week he'll be sentenced for a total of fifty offences over two decades. our sports correspondent richard conway reports. no child should suffer the way we did. for the survivors of barry bennell‘s
2:21 pm
reign of abuse, the pain and memory of their ordeals will never fade. they are left instead to reflect on how one of britain's most prolific paedophiles was allowed to get away with his crimes for so long. he got away with it because he was so good at what he did in terms of football. his ability and skills. he groomed the parents. a perfect storm, almost. until we grew into men and stood up to him and put him where he should be now. speaking today, some of those subjected to barry bennell‘s abuse said they will now pursue civil claims against the club connected to the case — crewe alexandra and manchester city. he ruined my life. if there is any compensation or damages, of course i am going to take it. i do want an apology to start off with. from bennell? from the clubs he was involved with. yes, he has ruined my life.
2:22 pm
should i get something for it? i think i should. with hundreds of potential victims, it could prove costly to the clubs involved. we need to consider the impact on their lives, potential psychiatric and physical injuries they have suffered, looking at potential therapy costs for them, their children, their partners. and also looking at the lost prospects in respect of education and employment as professional footballers. meanwhile, in a statement, crewe alexandra said... the club would like to reiterate it was not aware of any sexual abuse by mr bennell, nor did it receive any complaint about sexual abuse by him either before or during his employment with the club. but one former director said he warned senior officials about bennell‘s relationship with young boys in the late 1980s, but the coach was allowed to stay in hisjob. there was so much banter around the dressing rooms and around the football club about it. you know, odd remarks getting made here and there. if you did not know about it,
2:23 pm
god knows where you were. you weren't at crewe. dario, will you stop and answer questions for the bbc? do you have a message for the victims? dario gradi, crewe's former manager and the man who brought bennell to the club has said previously he knew nothing about the abuse and has maintained a silence on the issue this week. barry bennell will be sentenced on monday and is facing the prospect of facing the rest of his life in prison. this particular case may be over, but the questions continue. we will have more on the impacts of his crimes in the next hour here. the heads of the three largest european intelligence agencies have made an unprecedented joint appearance to emphasise the necessity of international co—operation. it comes as theresa may is in berlin to discuss the impact of brexit on security. the agencies, including mi6, say even after the uk's exit from the eu cross—border
2:24 pm
information sharing is needed on international terrorism, illegal migration and cyber attacks. our security correspondent, gordon corera, is with us. is there a sense then that they need to work on co—operation more than ever because of brexit?” to work on co—operation more than ever because of brexit? i think there's a sense that the threats that you do it now faces require more cooperation than that was seen in the past. those are threats like foreign fighters from iraq and syria trying to get back to european countries, crossing borders quite easily. cyber attacks, sometimes for criminalgroups, easily. cyber attacks, sometimes for criminal groups, sometimes from the russian state, also crossing borders with ease. so the view of the european intelligence chiefs is that over the last few years, they have had to cooperate more, they have had to share information more. most of
2:25 pm
thatis to share information more. most of that is bilaterally. but i think the senseis that is bilaterally. but i think the sense is that that needs to not stop with brexit, that that brett process needs to continue if they are going to continue about doing their work and keep you safe. we have seen exa m ples of and keep you safe. we have seen examples of syrian terror suspects coming into europe, able then to move freely around the schengen zone, the paris attacks, deb russell attacks. just highlighting the need for as much cooperation as possible. —— the brussels attack. for as much cooperation as possible. -- the brussels attack. the sense here is that breaks it doesn't pass to alter that. because so much of the cooperation is bilateral. if britain sees something threatening in france, is she directly with france. it does not go through the european union. in that respect, brave that will not hold a risk to those relationships. unless there was turbulence around brexit which meant some of these intelligence
2:26 pm
chiefs withdrew some of their cooperation. one more technical issueis cooperation. one more technical issue is data—sharing. the sharing of personal data across borders, pa rt of personal data across borders, part of security and counterterrorism. that is one area where there might be some risk with brexit because there will need to be some kind of deal that information can be shared quickly and freely well dealing with privacy concerns. if there is a divergence in the ways in the way they define pregnancy with in britain and the eu. the message with in britain and the eu. the m essa g e yet with in britain and the eu. the message yet i think from the spy cheesemaking was very unusualjoint appearance and a joint statement was cooperation is important and must continue, breaks that are not. —— spy continue, breaks that are not. —— spy chiefs were making. they are some of the largest countries in terms of intelligence gathering in europe? that's right. they are three
2:27 pm
of the biggest intelligence services in europe. see that wiltshire, irrespective of brexit, britain and germany will be sharing information across border threats and that will continue to be the case. there is a sense then there is a lot of ground which you might not have seen in the past between these intelligence agencies. the fact that the chiefs wa nted agencies. the fact that the chiefs wanted to issue a joint statement is telling and as a sign that they want this cooperation to continue. gordon, many thanks indeed. our security corresponded in berlin. a new study is warning that chemicals in many cleaning products, as well as perfume and paint, are now a major source of air pollution. a study by researchers in america found women who worked as cleaners suffered damage to their lungs equivalent to smoking 20 cigarettes a day, although the effect did not seem to occur in men. some surprising results there.
2:28 pm
time for a look at the weather. i want to be capped either week has been. we started off with wintry conditions. this is a picture of snow lead in fields. i had loads of pictures of scotland and blizzard conditions in weather watchers folders. this one was... this was a north yorkshire. heavy snow, northern ireland, scotland and northern england. it was notjust disruptive snow and ice, we had some gale force winds of 50—60 mph. things have been gradually changing. we have seen sunshine. if anything, the next couple of days it will be mild and even springlike. the
2:29 pm
flowers are blooming. this lovely picture of crocuses in the sunshine. and for the meeting, things may be ina and for the meeting, things may be in a sense even malcolm. next week will be milder. —— milder. still a bit of uncertainty to it, but if it does materialise, it could be significantly cold for a while. but a decent weekend ahead for everyone? yes. we will see a lot of sunshine to start, then things are cloudier into sunday. it is a weekend of a tale of two halves. we have is some sunshine today. sunday is looking milder, but a lot cloudier with outbreaks of rain. this is the satellite picture from earlier on. you can see the clear skies across the east and south east. plenty of sunny spells up north as well. but look at this blanket of cloud moving in. at weather fronts look at this blanket of cloud moving in. at weatherfronts moving in bringing outbreaks of rain to
2:30 pm
northern ireland and into western scotland, some of it will perhaps be heavy and wintry over the scottish mountains. for central and eastern areas, it is looking fine to stay dry throughout the day. as we head to the evening, noticed the rain peps up to the evening, noticed the rain peps upa to the evening, noticed the rain peps up a bit as it pushes eastwards, could see some snow over the pennines and parts of scotland. further east it will not reach eastern england until we head on into... it will be a cold start again, some frost under clear skies, maybe some mist and fog well. here is the weather fronts, across saturday morning. through saturday morning there will be cloud and a few showers across southern scotland, and the band of cloud will move away. we should see some sunshine. showers will follow on from behind and for west of scotland primarily, some may be heavy. maybe some snow on the hills. but in the south, not a bad day apart from the odd shower. we should see good sunny
2:31 pm
spells. mild and cool in the north. this is saturday night into sunday. this is saturday night into sunday. this is saturday night into sunday. this is the feature that will bring the cloud and milder air in from the west, it is a warm front, introducing cloud and rain. behind it the orange colours pushing in from the atlantic, this is the very mild air. it will be noticeable for all areas. we could start off bright for eastern ‘s scotland and eastern england for the well and then the cloud and rain across the west will move to all areas. could be some heavy bursts of rain in the west as well. temperatures around 9—12d. that mild a stays with us into the start of next week. there could be rain at times, monday may be into tuesday, then it will become drier and brighter. there is the potential of something much colder moving in across the country from the east. more details on that and we will keep you up—to—date. this is bbc news. our latest headlines:
2:32 pm
president trump is to visit the scene of this week's deadly school shooting in florida, as the community mourns the 17 students and staff who died in the attack. the number of young people buying houses has fallen — just over a quarter of 25 to sa—year—olds on average incomes now own their home. regular use of cleaning sprays could be as harmful to your lungs as smoking 20 cigarettes a day, scientists have warned. oxfam is to launch an independent commission to investigate claims of sexual exploitation and misconduct against its workers. and we hear from the team at chester zoo helping endangered orangutans move about one of their main habitats — on the island of borneo. sport now on afternoon live with hugh ferris. britain has got its first medal at
2:33 pm
the winter olympics. courtesy of don parsons. he is 30 years old. he is studying for a ph.d. parsons. he is 30 years old. he is studying fora ph.d. . he makes sleighs and races on them. the things you find out about somebody when they win a medal! he was not actually a strong medal hope coming into these games. the training runs gave us into these games. the training runs gave us a into these games. the training runs gave us a clue. he was fastest in one of them. he was third after three and after that final run you just saw he thought he had lost it because of a mistake. but another mistake from one of the favourites that succeeded him meant the medal was hers. it was a dramatic ending to the contest. skeleton is very much a sport of fine margins. you can bump into a wall even slightly and lose tenths of a second and more. and here he is, a very
2:34 pm
relieved and very emotional british athlete. it is the third to mend's skeleton medal for britain athlete. it is the third to mend's skeleton medalfor britain in some 70 years. —— first men's. the first for the men since 19118. 70 years. —— first men's. the first for the men since 1948. it took yea rs of for the men since 1948. it took years of trying but we got there! well done to him. what about the women's event? they have the history. lizzy yarnold won it four yea rs history. lizzy yarnold won it four years ago in sochi. she has not had the best of times since. she took a year out and then return to competition but not hitting the heights in the run—up to the competition. but the start of this particular track seems to favour british competitors. she proved once again her real quality. leading after the first run but not by much. 81 hundredths of a second. remember the fine margins. she lost time. third overall. i am athlete that
2:35 pm
loves to compete in these big events when everybody is bringing their best. i think i am still well in the mix. so yes, that is the big goal, which is frightening to say sometimes but to be the first british woman olympian to retain my title. it has not been easy. it has been hard but i hope i can do it for everyone here who has supported me. a lot of competition including from her patriot laura dees, the other britain in the event. she improved, second run. but she satjust one place behind lizzy yarnold in fourth overall. the decision between three and four will be tomorrow lunchtime. second defeat of the curling competition for the men. they were trailing sweden with one to go, 8—6. they could not in the end provide a specialfinish they could not in the end provide a special finish needed to take it to extra time. they have one two and
2:36 pm
lost two in the round robin stage. alex mcleish said becoming scottish managerfor a second alex mcleish said becoming scottish manager for a second time alex mcleish said becoming scottish managerfor a second time is alex mcleish said becoming scottish manager for a second time is a tremendous honour. he was confirmed in thejob 11 years tremendous honour. he was confirmed in the job 11 years after leaving the first time. he replaces gordon strachan on a deal until 2020. absolutely ecstatic to be back as the national coach. and of course, it goes without saying, but i will say it anyway, the goals are to win the nation 's league, and to get to the nation 's league, and to get to the euros in 2020. no question i am up the euros in 2020. no question i am up for the challenge. i believe i am the right man for the job. liam plu nkett the right man for the job. liam plunkett has been ruled out of the rest of the limited overs tour of new zealand. he has a hamstring injury. the aggravated an injury suffered in the one—day series in australia last month when he returned for the tri— series match against new zealand on tuesday. england could still have a final to
2:37 pm
play in that game after australia completed a record run chase to defeat new zealand by five wickets in auckland. they reached a target of 244 with seven balls left. if england win against new zealand on sunday, they could go through. that is all your sport for now. more in the next hour. thank you very much indeed. to bring you up—to—date with a statement we had in the last couple of minutes, visit from west bromwich albion, in the premiership, the club can confirm four senior players were involved in an incident during this week's midwinter training trip in spain. the club say they have instigated an investigation of their own into the incident and the players will be subject to the full rigours of our internal disciplinary procedures. they did not say who the players are or what the incident was while they we re or what the incident was while they were on this training trip in spain. but the club say until such time as their investigation is completed,
2:38 pm
they will not make any further comment. west bromwich albion confirm four senior players were involved in what they call an incident during the midwinter training trip in spain and they have started an investigation into that. more about that as it comes was. —— as it comes to pass. earlier this week, a rowing crew broke three world records by crossing the atlantic in 60 days. sharon magrath and di carrington, from shropshire, and elaine theaker, of tredegar, left the canary islands in december and got to antigua on tuesday. di carrington became the oldest woman to cross the ocean by rowing aged 62 and they set a record for the fastest female trip across it. thank you for being with us, ladies. in your own words, why did you want to do it and how do you feel about having accomplished such an incredible feat? we wanted to do
2:39 pm
it... it was suggested to me by a friend we do something crazy. it seemed a crazy idea. and it was part ofa team. seemed a crazy idea. and it was part of a team. and i spoke to elaine and sharon... we did not know each other at the start but we got to know each other very intimately over the coming days. talk us through the highs and lows of that very long journey. it has been the fiercest weather and the most phenomenal sized waves and the windiest race they have ever had. we have been facing 40 foot waves, 40 knot winds, whereas in previous years it has been much calmer. it has been hard in terms of facing the weather. we are looking at some of the pictures i think of you training. how hard did you had to train for this? we
2:40 pm
trained very hard. sharon and i had to learn rowing. we put a lot of weight on which we have lost. we had to build muscle and insurance, which we worked very hard at, almost a year and we worked very hard at, almost a yearand a we worked very hard at, almost a year and a half plus. it was very ha rd year and a half plus. it was very hard but there was also a little preparation to do to get the boat ready and get everything organised to do the whole challenge. we had a theory training, as well. we spent nine orten theory training, as well. we spent nine or ten days doing theory training ready for it as part of the theory test. doing all the navigation and exams. yes, sharon is right. it has been a phenomenal journey of almost two years and preparation before we even got to the start line. two of you actually crossed the atlantic in this picture. i think you are wearing sa nta picture. i think you are wearing santa hats. why is that? well, we
2:41 pm
we re santa hats. why is that? well, we were out there at christmas. we started on the 14th of december. we we re started on the 14th of december. we were out there for christmas and new year and di's birthday when she was 62 and sharon's birthday, she became 55. so some little milestones to celebrate while we were out there. fantastic. di, people will be saying 62 is quite an age to be rowing across the atlantic. how did you feel physically? i am not going to ask you if it was easy. obviously it wasn't. did you feel it was a strain on the body? yes. i put on a lot of weight sol on the body? yes. i put on a lot of weight so i could handle it and strengthened myself up. about three or four weeks strengthened myself up. about three orfourweeks in strengthened myself up. about three or four weeks in after not managing to eat i could feel the weight dropping off and my muscles being used up. i could feel myself getting weaker. i was also aware of my body
2:42 pm
collapsing, because our feet were wet and everything was wet, so the body was starting to collapse, skin was coming off our feet and hands. and the joints. our fingers are still swolle n and the joints. our fingers are still swollen and really painful. to get going in the morning we had to stretch them and massage them and pull them apart so we could bend them enough to get around the yours. sounds like absolute torture! why would anybody want to put themselves through it? because we are three completely crazy women. we have got pictures of you are in antigua. talk us pictures of you are in antigua. talk us through that moment. that must have been so fantastic, to actually see the end. the relief, we had a very eventful last 24 hours of the race, where we capsized twice in half an hour. and we had seen the most phenomenal, colossal ways you
2:43 pm
could ever imagine. that is why we capsized. —— waves. we had to summon up capsized. —— waves. we had to summon up the courage to go on through the night even though we were all terrified. we were only 37 nautical miles from antigua when it all happened. we still did not know if we would finish. after we capsized we would finish. after we capsized we had to get back on deck and get the talkies out and get everything straight to get going again. that was probably the first time i really did not want to get on the deck. i wanted to stay in the in. and we just did not want it but we knew we had to. and we had some significant injuries as well within the crew, from the size. but when we approached the finish line, about a mile to go, i think we started, only then to realise we were going to
2:44 pm
finish and be saved and see our families again. because at that point until then we were not entirely sure, were we? it is an amazing achievement. can i ask what you are planning next? dare i ask?|j am you are planning next? dare i ask?” am taking up knitting and tiddlywinks. | am taking up knitting and tiddlywinks. i am keen to write a book and i really appreciate life and all the sympathies i took for granted before. i am going to go back to law work. i am going to... my son is actually interested in doing this. i think he is going to think it is payback time and putting me through torture that i have put my family through. you are an absolute inspiration. many congratulations to all three of you. sharon mcgrath di harrington and
2:45 pm
elaine seeker. congratulations from all of us. great. let's bring you another story. it is quarter to three. a tea m story. it is quarter to three. a team from chester zoo is trying to halt a massive fall in the number of orangutans in borneo. the study found in16 orangutans in borneo. the study found in 16 years the population has been halved. researchers sadie for a station and hunting are largely to blame, as victoria gill reports. hanging on to survival. programmes like this help preserve small populations of orangutans but in the wilds they are being pushed rapidly towards extinction. the rainforest home continues to be cleared for agriculture and mining. a 16 year study has revealed borneo's orangutans are disappearing from areas where the forest is untouched. they are being targeted by hunters. even in the areas we think they are safe we are losing them. in some of
2:46 pm
the large populations where we measured the loss, it is 50% over 16 yea rs. measured the loss, it is 50% over 16 years. it is an astonishing decline of the population level. even without animals deliberately killed, scientists estimate deforestation alone could wipe out another 45,000 orangutans here in the next three decades. this bridge building project is a much—needed sign of hope. where the forest is fragmented by agricultural drainage ditches, a tea m by agricultural drainage ditches, a team from chester zoo and a malaysian charity is physically reconnecting it with tough polyester stra ps reconnecting it with tough polyester straps will stop this remarkable dash. this footage is the first sign of the project's success. ——. dash. this footage is the first sign of the project's success. --. they move around, they move at height and they swing in the forest canopy. they rely upon that in the wild. the zoo they rely upon that in the wild. the zoo has learned from that to build bridges to reconnect the habitat
2:47 pm
just like the ones here in the zoo in closure. to see them using them and moving more freely across the habitat which is so fragmented is really positive. this is very much a short—term solution. the long—term solution is reforesting the area. this makes its way into a large variety of our food and other projects. consumers are urged to make sure it is sourced sustainably. scientists say are choices could decide if there is a future for these critically endangered apes. ina in a moment the latest business news. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live. president trump is to visit florida as students mourn the deaths of those killed in the deadly school shooting. a dramatic fall in home ownership — new figures show only one in four young people on middle incomes succeed in buying a property. scientists say using cleaning sprays
2:48 pm
can be as harmful to your lungs as smoking twenty cigarettes a day. in the business news... retail sales saw only a slight pick—up injanuary — as rising prices continued to dampen shoppers' spending. uk sales volumes rose byjust 0.1% injanuary from the previous month. the office for national statistics said the longer term picture showed a slowdown. the extent to which young people are locked out of the british housing market has been revealed in new figures from economists. according to the institute for fiscal studies, the biggest decline in home ownership in the last 20 years has been among middle—income 25 to 34—year—olds. balfour beatty is part of a consortium that's just won a near £1.4 billion contract.
2:49 pm
it is to build a new transport system at los angeles international airport. let's pick up my housing story. so many young people are just not able to get onto the housing ladder. these are new figures from the institute for fiscal studies which really reveal a stark reality of how difficult that problem is. really staggering statistics, actually. 65% of this age group, the tween 24 and 34—year—old, they owned a home. between 2015 and 2016, only 27%. a dramatic drop. we are seeing real income not keeping up at the same pace as house prices. house prices rose about seven times higher than real income. that is considerable. we are finding young people really struggle to get their foot on the ladder. there have been regional
2:50 pm
differences. the south—east took the biggest hit in terms of ownership. this is jonathan biggest hit in terms of ownership. this isjonathan cribbed from the iss today. in the regions and the nations of the uk, apart from london and the south—east, over the last ten yea rs and the south—east, over the last ten years there has been relatively little growth in house prices when compared to income. you might think the fall would continue slowing down in those regions. but in london and the south—east house prices continue to outstrip income growth. we might continue to see falls for those regions. that was housing. coca-cola next. they will use smaller bottles but charge higher prices. coca-cola fa ns but charge higher prices. coca-cola fans will not be happy. the sugar taxes coming into effect in april, affecting various fizzy drinks companies because they had to change pricing and charge more for higher
2:51 pm
levels of sugar. coca—cola are one of those companies. the cost of some price marked packs in convenience stores could or will go up by more than 10%. a considerable increase. they had their results out today. we can talk to our correspondent at the new york stock exchange. the results look pretty good. they are adapting their strategy and trying to aim at this healthy drinks market. how will they do that? well, yes. their report today has been to bolster expectations although they have shown a loss, primarily down to a one—time tax payment they need to make here in america. what they had been doing over the last few years, because they have been aware that more and more people are choosing not to drink very sugary drinks, in places like the uk you have a sugar tax and you have it in some states of the us. one of the ways they have tried to get around it, as you
2:52 pm
mentioned earlier, having smaller drink sizes, changing the packaging, but the other way, especially in the last four years is by diversifying their portfolio. going beyond sugary drinks and into things like sparkling water, bottled water, coconut water and plant —based drinks. late last year coca—cola are quite a mexican sparkling water company. that is essentially how they have tried to overcome what appears to be a drop in sales in their home market, north america. we have seen more healthier habits. what do you think their biggest challenges are in the year ahead? i was asking what do you think the biggest challenges are for coca—cola? biggest challenges are for coca-cola? i can't hear anything. don't worry. thanks forjoining us. never mind! let's ask you about the latest markets. looking pretty good.
2:53 pm
in positive territory across europe. a pretty good week considering a sharp sell—off last week. the pound against the dollar is slightly down. it had been doing quite well against the dollar. but the retail sales out today were worse than expected and it has really hit sterling today. otherwise a pretty good week. then. thank you very much indeed. we will see later. chemicals in paint are thought to be a major source of air pollution. a study has shown that women who worked as cleaners suffered damage to their lungs equivalent to smoking 20 cigarettes per day. but that affect does not seem to have occurred in men. we can speak to the co—author of the report for birmingham university. thank you for being with us. some surprising
2:54 pm
results. can you just explain exactly the science behind this? yes... thank you for having me, by the way. the science behind it... it seems that women, the results from women, when you are either cleaning your home or working as a professional cleaner, you lose a bit more lung function than you would normally do. this adds up as the years go by. and to sum it up it is bad for your health, your lung health, actually. why would this affect women more than men, do you think? that is a question... we did not find, just to say, we were not able to find any effect in men that
2:55 pm
doesn't conclude that men are not affected, we just could not find any effect in our study. two different things there. it might have something to do with how the study was conducted. how we were comparing occupational groups, for example. but... sorry... earlier studies have suggested that women might be more susceptible to harmful effects compared to men. what is your advice? should people stop using cleaning products? what are you saying? well, for some cleaning tasks when you are cleaning the toilet, you would need something stronger. most purposes, luke warm
2:56 pm
water and microfibre cloth, they would probably do the job. that simple? that simple. good advice, good advice. just a microfibre cloth and a bit of water. why bother with all the other stuff? many thanks for being with us. now the weather. plenty of sunshine across the country. clouds gathering across northern and western areas with outbreaks of rain. into the week it looks like saturday will see the best of the sunshine. sunday looking cloudier with outbreaks of rain. as we head through friday evening we will have outbreaks of rain pushing from the west and spreading east. not reaching central and eastern areas. it is going to be another
2:57 pm
cold night with frost and also patchy mist and fog. this weather front continues to move east and might introduce one two showers across the centre and the north of the on saturday afternoon, pushing into the west and wintry over the high ground in scotland but we should have good sunny spells, tebbit is between seven and ten or 11. -- tebbit is between seven and ten or 11. —— temperatures. milderairand this is going to bring a lot of cloud around and outbreaks of patchy rain, especially in western areas where we also see local out but it will be much milder. —— we also see local out. —— low cloud. hello, you're watching afternoon live. i'm ben brown. today at 3pm: president trump is heading to florida today as students mourn the deaths of those killed in the deadly school shooting. knowing that everything has been cleaned up... you can almost imagine
2:58 pm
the walls blown, bodies on the floor, no one is going to be able to walk through that, really. no one. a dramatic fall in home ownership — new figures show only one in four young people on middle incomes succeed in buying a property. scientists say using cleaning sprays can be as harmful to your lungs as smoking 20 cigarettes a day. oxfam has set up an independent commission to investigate allegations of exploitation by its staff. coming up on afternoon live, all the sport with hugh ferris. a medalfor team a medal for team gb a medalfor team gb at a medal for team gb at the winter olympics. that's right, today it's all about the skeleton. britain's first medal of the games. contention
2:59 pm
in the women's com petition with their medals to come tomorrow. much more on that later. thanks hugh, and we'll bejoining you for a full update just after half—past. stav danaos has all the weather. not like it's a glorious, sunny afternoon for many of us. the question is, will it last into the weekend? join me later when i'll have all the details. building bridges — the team from chester zoo helping the endangered orangutans of borneo move around their habitat. hello, everyone. this is afternoon live. president trump is expected to visit the scene of the florida high school shooting in the next few days. police say a former pupil who was expelled from the school has now confessed to the massacre,
3:00 pm
which left 17 people dead. last night, thousands of people attended a candlelit vigil in parkland, florida. from there, nada tawfik reports. they came to mourn the lives lost and the lives scarred by this senseless attack. neighbours, friends and the students of stoneman douglas high comforted one another as best they could. jet was among the students who ran in a panic once the first shots were fired. he doesn't know if he can handle returning to the halls where his classmates' lives were cut short. i don't know if i'll be able to just cope with walking through the bottom floor of the freshman building, knowing that everything has been cleaned up. you can almost imagine just blood on the walls, bodies on the floor. no one is going to be able to walk through that building. no one. all 17 victims have now been identified. among them talented students,
3:01 pm
star athletes and aaron feis, a beloved football coach and security guard. he has been called a hero for shielding children from the gunman's bullets. nikolas cruz appeared in court briefly on 17 charges of premeditated murder. his lawyer said he was sad and remorseful and described him as a broken human being. the sheriff's office said he confessed to opening fire on his former school. he told authorities he bought a drink at subway and stopped at mcdonald's after the rampage. on social media, cruz often posed with guns. and, in one post, he wrote he would be a professional school shooter. those who knew him were troubled by his behaviour. i saw him in the backyard and he had like a, i wouldn't say a bb gun, i wasn't exactly sure. and i was pretty young so i told my mom and i said, mom, it looks like he is
3:02 pm
shooting at something. and the people who are behind us have chickens and he was shooting at the chickens, so my mom called the cops. he would steal other neighbours' mail. the cops were always at his house. he egged my car one time and we went to go and find out who did it and he was hiding in a bush and he started pelting eggs at my friends and we were chasing him down. he hasjust always been causing trouble. these terrifying scenes of students completely helpless and trembling with fear have shaken the nation. and they have reignited the debate on gun control. people here are in a state of shock that someone from their own community could be capable of such killing, and that their city nowjoins the long list of america's school shooting tragedies. the president said he plans to visit soon. never one to shy away from controversial decisions in the name of safety and security for americans, many wonder if he will come with new ideas, and if he will remain silent on gun control. we have been talking to some of
3:03 pm
those pupils and students affected by the shootings and we were sent this update in the last hour. today, many, this update in the last hour. today, any this update in the last hour. today, many, many students and families preparing for the funerals of their loved ones. i have with me several of the students. the skull was in the building where the shooting happened, and the others were in the school's other building. all of them have been speaking to me. just starting with you, how can you, if you can put into words, how are you feeling? right now! you can put into words, how are you feeling? right now i don't even know how i'm feeling. i'm grateful that i made it out alive, but my heart aches for all of those 17 innocent children who lost their lives, and their families who send their kids to school that day. it was such a
3:04 pm
normal day at school. it was valentine's day. it was a normal day. the bell was about to ring. we we re day. the bell was about to ring. we were ready to leave, nobody knew what was coming. it was so scary. it wasn't real. it felt like a movie. and that is what we have been hearing for a lot of people, has a real love this was. that when the now, you knew one of the victims and you are all going to her funeral now, you knew one of the victims and you are all going to herfuneral in underan you are all going to herfuneral in under an hour's time. you were talking about how difficult it is, you spoke to her every day. talking about how difficult it is, you spoke to her every daym talking about how difficult it is, you spoke to her every day. it was. we became really close and your coffee, we did a project together. we talk every single day. i had friends who were friends of hurt, too. finding out that she got shot was horrible, and finding out that she passed away was heartbreaking. knowing that you know someone, and it's my first loss, especially of a friend. i can't imagine what her
3:05 pm
family is going through, her mum has been so brave. her mother has been rallying for the country to come together and do something, saying that she hopes her daughter's life hasn't been lost in vain. catherine, this is obviously a local tragedy that the nation is mourning with you all, but it has inevitably turned to the debate on gun control and mental—health. the debate on gun control and mental-health. there are definitely has to be changes on gun control. knowing that someone with such problems in the past, where he has been expelled, has killed animals, and said he can get hold of a gun, it's outstanding. there are no words that i can describe for it, but more thanjust the that i can describe for it, but more than just the security, that i can describe for it, but more thanjust the security, we need to change the people. if there are a bunch of people wanting to do harm to the community, it's notjust gun control that will stop them, so we need to change the mindset of people and help them get the mental help
3:06 pm
they need to be happy in the community and bring us together. gabriella, how do you feel about the fa ct gabriella, how do you feel about the fact that there were warning signs in this case? i feel like they were a little too late. they were definitely too late. people that knew him and he had strange behaviour, that he thought of these things, he had allthese behaviour, that he thought of these things, he had all these pictures on insecure and and posting a comment ona insecure and and posting a comment on a youtube video saying i'm going to bea on a youtube video saying i'm going to be a professional school shooter. the warnings were too late. we didn't think of them at that moment. we thought it was just a joke. another high school teen saying he doesn't want to be in school and he doesn't want to be in school and he doesn't like people. it was real. in a place where we are supposed to be feeling safe, in a city that is one of the safest in our county and florida in general. canisters made you feel about the community? everyone came together, everyone
3:07 pm
thought he would break the community apart, but in reality, last night, we realise that not only was parkland united as one, but also everyone from all over the area came together at this one candlelit ceremony to honour the dead hand on the shirts, too. —— the sheriffs and swots who came together to keep us safe so that we didn't have any more than 17 victims. talking to some of the pupils at parkland school in florida were 17 pupils were shot dead earlier this week. the number of young people in the uk who own their own home has fallen dramatically over the last 20 years. research by the institute for fiscal studies shows that the proportion of middle—income earners aged 25 to 34 who own a property dropped over that period from two—thirds — tojust over a quarter.
3:08 pm
our personal finance correspondent, simon gompertz, reports. i've been living here a couple of years now. aged 30, keen to buy, but shut out of the market. so this is my room. tom bourlet says renting here in brighton is money down the drain. but the house prices beyond him. it's completely out of reach. there is not a chance i will be able to get the deposit. it's such a cost and with utility bills, with the cost of trains going to london, with my rent prices, it is just unachievable. and my friends, they are all around the same age and none of us are on the property ladder yet. the institute for fiscal studies looked at young people aged 25 to 34 on middle—incomes, at the moment, between 22,000 and 30,000 for a household after tax — in most cases, couples with children. two decades ago, 65% of those on middle incomes owned their own homes. that's dropped to just 27%.
3:09 pm
most the are forced to rent. the huge increase in house prices is the reason why it has become so difficult. 20 years ago, a young family would need four times their income in order to buy. now, it's more like eight times, so, for increasing numbers, buying a home isjust a nonstarter. the government's help to buy scheme is helping people afford more, particularly new homes, and first—time buyers have had their stamp duty cut. but the problem is also one of supply. councils complained that developers are sitting on planning permission is for more than 400,000 homes that haven't been built, and that is aggravating the shortage. it's really hard to see how we can make this better when we are still seeing huge demand for housing and that housing demand is not being met with the right number of houses. so i think it is all coming down to the individual now.
3:10 pm
they are having to make the choices, they are having to decide for themselves — do i want to rent and have the flexibility but pay more for it, or do i want to make a lot of difficult decisions and get on the housing ladder sooner? my mum always so she got on the property ladder around 25, 26, and she tells me the deposit price and how cheap it was. tom's agrieved that he is missing out — part of a generation in which most people, like it or not, are stuck with renting. simon gompertz, bbc news, brighton. joining me from coventry is gavin smart, deputy chief executive at the chartered institute of housing, the professional body for those working in the housing profession. thank you for being with us. what is the answer to this? is it a question of building more houses?” the answer to this? is it a question of building more houses? i think supplies a big part of the problem. for a long time now, we simply haven't built the numbers of homes that we need to. the government has
3:11 pm
set a very ambitious target of 350,000 homes a year, but the latest figures show we are building about 220,000. there is a big gap to fill their and it's not only about building homes for people to buy, but we need them for people to rent at affordable prices. it's a complicated problem and we need to do better. we need to do better, but how can we do better? we had a night reported that there could be hundreds of thousands of homes built, but at the moment there is a log jam in getting planning permission is through. planning as part of the problem, but we are also quick to say that the problem. it's going to be more public at it than that. we have to ask yourself the question about how realistic it is to assume that the current companies building homes for protest can actually left the numbers of homes that they build the levels we need,
3:12 pm
whether or not we need to see more new entrants historically, when rates were higher, we had emerged larger number of small and medium—sized companies building new homes which has two secured now. we need to be thinking about supplying affordable housing, because not only does it housed people who are excluded from the market, giving them a decent place to live, whilst they can't afford to buy, simply raising the number of homeowners helps raise house prices overall. we are seeing young people whose pa rents were are seeing young people whose parents were able to buy and get on the housing ladder in their mid—20s or early 30s, but they are the same age nowjust cannot do that. it's a significant change. the pattern we have come to expect is that each generation has more opportunity and ability to get on in life than their appearance, and the current crisis
3:13 pm
of affordability driven by huge increases in house prices compared to very modest increases in income has turned that is turned on its head. —— get on in life than their pa rents. head. —— get on in life than their parents. we head. —— get on in life than their pa rents. we really head. —— get on in life than their parents. we really need to do more to think about how we can lift overall the numbers of homes we are building and make sure that actually we are building the right homes in the very places that people can afford, which also means thinking about homes for renting and affordable renting as well as homes for people to buy. you say to cause for people to buy. you say to cause for concern, but in some european countries, most people do just rent homes. we are a nation who has a lwa ys homes. we are a nation who has always been very keen on all new homes. we have relatively high levels of home ownership compared to some places in europe, but that tends to be a little bit exaggerated. in germany, a significant proportion of homes are
3:14 pm
owned and the do better in terms of building the homes that their nation needs. arguments about renting or buying are in one sense second to the fact that we simply aren't building the number of homes we need to build. the government has the ambition to build 350,000 homes per year, but we are some way short of that ambition and we need to look at what we can do to push up the number of homes where building. not in one effort, we need to consistently build larger numbers of homes in the long—term. that's a problem we can use self with concerted action in the long term. thank you, gavin. and to see where you might be able to afford to live, go to the bbc website to try our housing calculator. that's bbc.co.uk/news. a czech man has been found guilty of murdering a scottish tour guide in lapland in northern finland. rebecca johnson,
3:15 pm
from fife, died after being stabbed ten times in the chest in december. karel frybl denied murder, claiming he had a temporary mental breakdown when he stabbed her but after evaluation was found to be in full control of his actions. anyone found guilty of murder in lapland receives a mandatory life sentence in prison. you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines: president trump is to visit florida as students mourn the deaths of those killed in the deadly school shooting. a dramatic fall in home ownership — new figures show only one in four young people on middle incomes succeed in buying a property. scientists say using cleaning sprays can be as harmful to your lungs as smoking 20 cigarettes a day. and sport, but‘s first medal at the winter olympics is a bronze. dom
3:16 pm
parsons in a dramatic skeleton competition. the medals will be decided tomorrow at 40 women's competition. alex mcleish admits he is incredibly fortunate to be given the scotland job for the second time. he replaces gordon strachan 11 yea rs time. he replaces gordon strachan 11 years after leaving the wall first time around. —— leaving the role. some of the men who were abused by barry bennell when he was a youth football coach have told the bbc they will seek compensation from the clubs he was with when he committed the crimes. yesterday the predatory paedophile was found guilty of another seven counts of sexually abusing boys. next week he'll be sentenced for a total of 50 offences over two decades. our sports correspondent richard conway reports. no child should suffer the way we did.
3:17 pm
for the survivors of barry bennell‘s reign of abuse, the pain and memory of their ordeals will never fade. they are left instead to reflect on how one of britain's most prolific paedophiles was allowed to get away with his crimes for so long. he got away with it because he was so good at what he did in terms of football. his ability and skills. he groomed the parents. a perfect storm, almost. until we grew into men and stood up to him and put him where he should be now. speaking today, some of those subjected to barry bennell‘s abuse said they will now pursue civil claims against the clubs connected to the case — crewe alexandra and manchester city. he ruined my life. if there is any compensation or damages, of course i am going to take it. i do want an apology to start off with. from bennell?
3:18 pm
from the clubs he was involved with. yeah, he has ruined my life. should i get something for it? i think i should. with hundreds of potential victims, it could prove costly to the clubs involved. we need to consider the impact on their lives, potential psychiatric and physical injuries they have suffered, looking at potential therapy costs for them, their children, their partners. and also looking at the lost prospects in respect of education and employment as professional footballers. meanwhile, in a statement, crewe alexandra said... but one former director said he warned senior officials about bennell‘s relationship with young boys in the late 1980s, but the coach was allowed to stay in hisjob. there was so much banter around the dressing rooms and around the football club about it.
3:19 pm
you know, odd remarks getting made here and there. if you did not know about it, god knows where you were. you weren't at crewe. dario, will you stop and answer questions for the bbc? do you have a message for the victims? dario gradi, crewe's former manager and the man who brought bennell to the club has said previously he knew nothing about the abuse and has maintained a silence on the issue this week. barry bennell will be sentenced on monday and is facing the prospect of facing the rest of his life in prison. this particular case may be over, but the questions continue. the head of oxfam international has announced what she's calling a comprehensive plan, including an independent commission, to deal with claims of abuse involving its staff. winnie byanyima said the revelations of sexual misconduct, in haiti and other countries, were a stain on the charity that
3:20 pm
will shame it for years. our diplomatic correspondent james landale reports. the earthquake that struck in 2010 reduced much of haiti to rubble. but the after—shocks are still being felt by oxfam. in her native ugandan, oxfam's global head said sorry for the sexual exploitation carried out by some of her staff in haiti, something she told me she only found out that last week. i am inviting anyone who has been a victim of abuse to come forward. we are going to do justice. we will atone for the past. right now, thousands of oxfam staff are doing the right thing in the most dangerous places in the world. she's promising tougher new checks on staff references, three times more money spent on internal safeguarding procedures, and a new arm's—length commission to investigate oxfam's handling of past cases. members of this commission will be well—respected, well—known, experienced women's rights leaders,
3:21 pm
or human rights leaders. isn't that going to be seen as marking your own homework? if you are paying for this? they will be women and men of integrity, who will facilitate to do a job for us. they will make their own plan. she couldn't guarantee there were no sexual predators still working for oxfam, but she said more staff would be found accountable if they are found to have mishandled past cases. what hurts me most is that, out there in haiti or in another country, that there are some poor who are abused and who haven't received justice. for me, to deliverjustice for those people is more important than, say, the reputation of oxfam. this problem though isn't limited to charities.
3:22 pm
united nations agencies and peacekeepers have faced similar accusations of sexual misconduct, and the organisation's secretary—general promised he would take action. this is an important battle which will not be won in two or three days. we need consistent commitment to gender parity, gender equality and, at the same time, to zero tolerance in relation to sexual harassment and sexual exploitation. what went on in haiti has cost oxfam donations, public trust, and celebrity ambassadors. but it's also shone a spotlight on an industry which, until now, has kept much of its behaviour in the shadows. james landale, bbc news. a new study is warning that chemicals in many cleaning products, as well as perfume and paint, are now a major source of air pollution. a study by researchers in america found women who worked as cleaners suffered damage to their lungs equivalent to smoking 20 cigarettes a day, although the effect did not seem
3:23 pm
to occur in men. a team from chester zoo is trying to halt a massive fall in the number of orangutans on the island of borneo. a study has found that within 16 years, the population there has halved. the researchers say deforestation and hunting are largely to blame. victoria gill reports. hanging onto survival. zoo programmes like this preserve small populations of bornean orangutans. but, in the wild, they are being pushed rapidly towards extinction. their rainforest home continues to be cleared for agriculture and mining, but a 16—year—long study has now revealed that borneo's orangutans are disappearing from areas where the forest is untouched. they are being targeted by hunters. even in the areas where we think they're safe, we are losing them. and in some of the large populations where we have measured this loss, it's 50% over 16 years. it is an astonishing decline at the population level.
3:24 pm
even without animals being deliberately killed, another 45,000 orangutans here in the next three decades. but this bridge—building project is a much—needed sign of hope. where the forest is fragmented by agricultural drainage ditches, a team from chester zoo and the malaysian charity hutan is physically reconnecting it with tough polyester straps. this remarkable footage captured by a tourist is the project's first sign of success. when these animals use their arms, they move around, they move that height, they swing in the forest canopy and that's what they rely on in the wild. the zoo has learned from that to build bridges that will reconnect that habitat, just like the ones in the zoo enclosure. to actually see them using them and moving more freely
3:25 pm
across this habitat, that is so fragmented, is a really positive sign. this is very much a short—term solution. the long—term solution is to reforest the area. palm oil grown here makes its way into a huge variety of our food and other products, so conservationists are urging us consumers to check it's sourced sustainably. our choices, scientists say, could decide whether there is a future for these critically endangered apes. victoria gill, bbc news. let's check the weather. plenty of sunshine across the country today, although we will start to see clouds gathering across northern and western areas. into the weekend, saturday seeing the best of the sunshine, sunday cloudy with outbreaks of rain. as we head through the course of friday evening, outbreaks of rain. not
3:26 pm
reaching central and eastern areas. another cold made with frost and patchy mist and fog. this weather front will continue to move its weak oestrogens, introducing one or two showers across central and northern parts of the country. some good sunny spells around. for sunday, we have a weather front moving in, introducing milder air, have a weather front moving in, introducing milderair, bringing cloud and outbreaks of patchy rain particularly across western areas where we will also see some cloud, but it will be much milder. this is bbc news. our latest headlines: president trump is to visit the scene of this week's deadly school shooting in florida, as the community mourns the 17 students and staff who died in the attack. new figures show the number of young people buying houses has fallen — just over a quarter of 25 to 34—year—olds on average
3:27 pm
incomes now own their home. regular use of cleaning sprays could be as harmful to your lungs as smoking 20 cigarettes a day, scientists have warned. oxfam is to launch an independent commission to investigate claims of sexual exploitation and misconduct by its workers. and we hear from the team at chester zoo helping endangered orangutans move around one of their main habitats on the island of borneo. let's get the latest sport on afternoon live. let's talk about the winter olympics. the skeleton event seems to have been a reliable source of medals for team gb. it is one of the ones we tend to focus on when it comes around every four years. the winner in's competition has given
3:28 pm
them two gold medals in two game. —— women's competition. dom parsons is the first man in the skeleton for britain in17 the first man in the skeleton for britain in 17 years to win a medal. he was not a strong hope going into the games. the training before the competition gave us a clue. he was fourth after two runs overnight and third after three. and in this run which you can watch now, he thought he had lost it. he was slightly behind the people that had completed their run. but a mistake by one of their run. but a mistake by one of the people that followed him meant the people that followed him meant the medal was his. he has got brains and brawn, making slaves and raising them. he is also doing a ph.d., as well, would you believe? the lows and highs of sport. and what about the women's event? they have won two gold medals in two games. lizzy
3:29 pm
yarnold has not had the best time since sochi, taking one year out of the sport. she has returned three yea rs the sport. she has returned three years ago and has been struggling a little bit by her high standards. but the start on this track seems to favour british competitors. it seems to be very much a strength of their sliding. lizzy yarnold proving that is the case, leading after the first run. but not by much. eight 100ths ofa run. but not by much. eight 100ths of a second. small margins. if you bump intoa of a second. small margins. if you bump into a wall slightly you can lose ten the road—macro of a second. lizzy yarnold lost time and sat third overall. —— tens. lizzy yarnold lost time and sat third overall. -- tens. i love to compete at these big events when everybody is bringing their best. yes, i think i am still well in the mix. yes, that is the big goal, it is frightening to say sometimes, to
3:30 pm
be the first british woman olympian to retain my title. it has not been easy. it has been hard but i hope i can do it for everyone who has supported me. she had a lot of competition from her cum patriot laura dees, she improve on the second run. —— can patriot. second fastest on the second run, just behind herfriend fastest on the second run, just behind her friend and team—mate lizzy yarnold, fourth overall. medals are decided with run three and four tomorrow lunchtime. the british men have suffered their second defeat in the curling competition, trailing sweden with one to go, they could not provide the finish needed to go to extra time. 8—6 defeat against sweden earlier today. they have lost two but one two in the round robin stage. alex mcleish has become scottish manager for stage. alex mcleish has become scottish managerfor a stage. alex mcleish has become scottish manager for a second time and said it is a tremendous honour. he is confirmed in thejob 11 years
3:31 pm
after leaving it the first time. he replaces gordon strachan on a deal until 2020. i am replaces gordon strachan on a deal until2020. i am absolutely replaces gordon strachan on a deal until 2020. i am absolutely ecstatic to be back as the national coach. and of course, it goes without saying, but i am saying it anyway, the goals are to win the nation league group and to get into the euros in 2020, no question. i am up for the challenge and believe i am the right guy for the job. west bromwich albion are investigating after four senior players were involved in an incident on their training trip to spain this week. the club said the players would be subject to the full rigours of disciplinary procedures. they play southampton in the fa cup tomorrow and are bottom of the premier league. leeds rhinos thoroughly defeated by melbourne storm in the world club challenge this morning. they qualified after winning the super league grand final. melbourne we re super league grand final. melbourne were the winners of the nrl. the rhinos missed out on a record
3:32 pm
equalling fourth world club challenge victory, losing 38—4 in australia. that is all your sport for now. damian johnson australia. that is all your sport for now. damianjohnson has more for you in the next hour. have a good afternoon, many thanks. britain's bus network has shrunk to levels last seen in the late 1980s, that's according to a bbc investigation. rising car use and cuts to public funding are being blamed for a loss of 134—million miles of coverage over the past decade alone. "the campaign for better transport" says the scale of the miles lost is a sign that buses are on course to be cut to the same extent railways were in the 1960s. paul lynch from the bbc shared data unit, which carried out this analysis, joins me now. thank you for being with us. give us more detail about this and the shrinking bus network. let's put this into context first. local councils across
3:33 pm
the country, when a bus travels, they collect that data and the journey distance, sending that to the department for transport which goes into a huge spreadsheet. the findings have been quite stark. we found big regional differences between london and the rest of the country. the northwest for example in the last ten years has lost 45 million miles in terms of coverage. but london on the other hand has increased. london has increased so much one quarter of all bus journeys in the uk take place within london. not quite beaching just yet but some campaigners are afraid we are getting close. what are the main reasons for this reduction in the number of bus miles around the uk? we spoke to a number of experts in the course of this project. they gave us a variety of different reasons. one principal one is councils have in the past ten years
3:34 pm
cut bus subsidies. but it is not as simple as that. one academic said commercial companies have got a burden here as well. he said they are becoming more risk averse. they are becoming more risk averse. they are not taking those unpopular routes which maybe do not have as many passengers but serve important social functions. that takes us to the question of people in rural areas in particular. will they effectively end up cut off? that is the argument. funnily enough metropolitan areas are in fact hardest—hit in terms of miles lost. but in rural areas, where there are morphine —— where there are cuts felt more keenly, we spoke to some people in shropshire in distant priors, where they had not had a bus service in 2012. in cumbria north yorkshire, a group of volunteers rallied around to get national
3:35 pm
lottery funding and set up their own bus services. and in fact on that bus services. and in fact on that bus services. and in fact on that bus service local methodist preachers drive some of the buses. in somerset we spoke to a lady that has a ten mile journey to the local hospital. she has to take her there. it takes three hours because the connections are so bad. it is the same length of time it took to walk. what the industry saying? the bus industry are saying, there is a body representing commercial operators and they totally dispute this claim that they are not taking risk averse routes. they say actually they have a number of companies willing to ta ke a number of companies willing to take on journeys that are not very well travelled and reach harder to reach rural areas. they are surprised at this statement about routes becoming unviable and sound
3:36 pm
decisions need to be taken on many operators continue to operate in an economic services, so there you go. thank you, paul lynch, in birmingham. —— non—economic services. scientists from edinburgh are among a team who've developed a major breakthrough in diagnosing lung infection. they've invented a probe that goes inside the lung — and can find and identify infection for the first time. details have been unveiled in austin, texas. our science correspondent pallab ghosh sent this report. shrunk down to microscopic size, a submarine team in the 1960s movie fantastic voyage enter the body of a patient to find the source of his illness. can you see it, captain? yes, i see it now. 50 years on, inspired by that film, doctors in edinburgh are sending a probe inside a patient‘s lung. journeying through the tiny airways, they come across bacteria, which you can see in white. the bacteria have been sprayed
3:37 pm
with a chemical that makes them visible when light is shone on them. it's the very first time it's been possible to see infection inside the human body. the real advantage here is we are imaging and detecting where the disease is in the patient‘s lungs. and we are giving a diagnosis or decision—making power within minutes or seconds. that's a big difference. the team are using it to test if critically ill people are developing pneumonia. patients in intensive care are given powerful antibiotics as a matter of course, just in case they develop an infection. that there is a huge downside — complications can arise, and it's thought tens of thousands of people worldwide die as a result. there is a huge overuse of antibiotics in intensive care units. clinicians simply do not have the answers at their fingertips when they are administering broad—spectrum antibiotics, but this technology could give
3:38 pm
them more information about what they are trying to treat. the same technique is also being used in texas to develop a new test for malaria. the scientists shine a light on a blood sample and straightaway, they can see if a patient is infected. you can transmit it, if you need a doctor or clinician's input. the aim is to shrink the setup to the size of an ipad, so it can be used in poor and remote areas. the main global need is the diagnosis of malaria in the field. it will have a huge impact, particularly for infants and the elderly, who are dying at a tremendous rate in these underserved areas. perhaps, as hollywood predicted, very soon miniature probes will be able to locate, identify and treat a wide range of diseases. pallab ghosh, bbc news, austin, texas. the prince of wales is in south yorkshire this afternoon to officially reignite a previously
3:39 pm
mothballed steel furnace, marking a turnaround in the steel industry. the electric arc furnace at liberty speciality steels in rotherham was shut down during the steel crisis two—and—a—half years ago, but today's re—start is part of a multimillion—pound investment, which is creating hundreds ofjobs. here is our correspondent. good news for the town. it certainly is. if you had asked anyone here too and a half years ago when the furnace was mothballed if it would ever be started again, i think it would've been a categoric no. this is seen as a vote of confidence for the steel industry by liberty. they have invested £20 million and created 300 newjobs as invested £20 million and created 300 new jobs as well as invested £20 million and created 300 newjobs as well as protecting the hundreds of workforce here at the time. the furnace recycles scrap
3:40 pm
metal and turns it into steel, then used in the aerospace and automotive industry. it makes uk's liberty the biggest melter of recycled steel in the uk. the prince has reignited the furnace. it has been an exciting day for the workforce here. i am joined by tony bentham. did you expect this day would happen?” by tony bentham. did you expect this day would happen? i did not foresee this coming at all. i think everybody thought the decline in the industry, that is the way it was going and that is how the future is going to be. i think people thought the jobs were not going to be safe any more. and that was it, end of the industry in this area. now we have had this vote of confidence and hundreds of additional jobs. have had this vote of confidence and hundreds of additionaljobs. are you feeling more secure in the industry? definitely. i think people at the time thought theirjobs were going.
3:41 pm
liberty has come in and obviously invested heavily in the industry and i think people think theirjobs are more secure i think people think theirjobs are more secure now. steven hirst, you we re more secure now. steven hirst, you were involved in recommissioning this equipment and other bits of equipment. what is this steel used for? aerospace and automotive gearboxes. yes... prince charles has been here today. has it been important to have that symbol for the industry? to have him coming along and adding to what has been a vote of confidence by liberty?m along and adding to what has been a vote of confidence by liberty? it is very good prince charles sees this place as one of the bigger producers in the country and has come and seen us all. obviously a lot of the lads at the time were very worried. we have got a lot of new guys starting here. it is now being seen as an
3:42 pm
industry which has got a future. yes. i think for the whole area it is obviously, they invested heavily in the furnace here, which will create more jobs for the area and the surrounding industry. it will be good for them as well as the people employed here. these gentlemen desperate to get back inside because prince charles has turned up and they very much would like to meet him. liberty house say they hope brexit could be a fantastic reason for the steel industry having a future in this country. they say the potential re—shoring of the automotive industry could mean this industry has got a lot more customers in years to come. danielle, thank you very much indeed for that. in a moment, the business news with vishala sripathma. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live... president trump is to visit florida as students mourn the deaths of those killed
3:43 pm
in the deadly school shooting. a dramatic fall in home ownership — new figures show only one in four young people on middle incomes succeed in buying a property. scientists say using cleaning sprays can be as harmful to your lungs as smoking 20 cigarettes a day. here's your business headlines on afternoon live. retail sales saw only a slight pick—up injanuary — as rising prices continued to dampen shoppers' spending. uk sales volumes rose byjust 0.1% injanuary from the previous month. the office for national statistics said the longer term picture showed a slowdown. the extent to which young people are locked out of the british housing market has been revealed in new figures from economists. according to the institute for fiscal studies, the biggest decline in home ownership in the last 20 years has been among middle—income 25 to 34—year—olds.
3:44 pm
balfour beatty is part of a consortium that's just won a near £1.4 billion contract. it is to build a new transport system at los angeles international airport. let's pick up on one of those stories which really does affect a lot of people, the housing ladder and the inability of the younger generation to get on the housing ladder. it is really hard. these statistics are very start. only 27% of people between the age of 27 and 34 own houses compare to the same age group 20 years ago. part of the reason is because house prices have risen incredibly, seven times income at the moment, making it really hard to get on the ladder. let's talk to ishaan malhi, chief executive of trussle. you have got an interesting story.
3:45 pm
you have got an interesting story. you are looking to get on the housing ladder and the trouble you came across inspired you to start this company. tell us about your journey to try and find a house.” aspire to own my own home at some point and going through thatjourney i was overwhelmed by how difficult that process was full stop i was told different things by different people. ——. iwas told different things by different people. ——. i was told different things by different people. ultimately what should have been one of the happiest and most enjoyable experience of my life was overshadowed by painful mortgage experiences to the extent i did not get the mortgage. that inspired me to find the first online mortgage broker, trying to strip out the complexity and hassle from the end to end mortgage process, trying to democratise home ownership and act asa democratise home ownership and act as a solution to some of the problems discussed. for those people watching this and thinking that i am
3:46 pm
finding it really hard to get on the housing ladder and get a mortgage, what is your advice to them? there are several factors. the demand and supply. for anybody looking to buy a home and aspiring to own a home, you need to start the journey early. even though the first—time buyers have been at an 11 year high since the crisis, it has still fallen considerably from the parent's generation and the average age is a lot longer. it does help to plan ahead. there are alternative options, saving in the form of a lifetime isa or pairing up with three orfour lifetime isa or pairing up with three or four people has is available with a mortgage with mns bank. in terms of the market more broadly, there has been a slowing down in the growth of house prices. we have seen a meteoric rise in the south—east. what do you recommend?
3:47 pm
is it south—east. what do you recommend? isita south—east. what do you recommend? is it a good time to wait or should you get stuck in straightaway? you said start early. i was referring to the planning process of budgeting and putting money aside and being disciplined regarding saving enough to put down a deposit. with regard to put down a deposit. with regard to where to buy and the trajectory of house prices, i think we have seen of house prices, i think we have seen the uncertainty that has happened and would not like to forecast. house prices have been up around 5% over the last year but towards the end of last year they have started to flatten. ons data predicts it to be stagnant over the next few years. it will be an interesting time in terms of what further demands and policies come out from the government in terms of what they have already done with stamp duty and help to buy. but also on the supply side, there are around 400,000 new homes that have planning permission but have not been built. it is important the government makes enough of another attempt to balance
3:48 pm
that for the next generation. —— enough of an attempt. there is a demand locally and of course globally, especially in some areas, like the south—east. globally, especially in some areas, like the south-east. thanks very much forjoining us. talking about the housing market, now let's talk about the markets. they are all up. these house—builders are doing quite well today, up by 6%, considerable for a company. they had some good results out today. the markets in general doing very well. you compare it to last week and it was very red. they have bounced back. positive territory as well. sterling not doing great against the dollar. they had a pretty good week so far but after the retail sales figures came out, it did impact upon the pound and it has fallen against the dollar today. did they fall too far, do you think? in terms of the markets in general, there was a lot of response to monetary policy. we had the
3:49 pm
trajectory of interest rates and a change in the chair of the governor. that was a response to that. there isa that was a response to that. there is a lot of speculation as to why we are back in the green. a lot of it is because of varied political reasons in europe. a lot of it is down to interest rates and a whole compilation of factors. the mystery of the market. thank you very much indeed. let's get more now on the former football coach, barry bennell, who'll be sentenced next week for a total of 50 sex offences against 12 boys. he's been convicted of forty three, and he admitted seven. some of those who were abused by bennell say they'll be in court to see him jailed. the former managing director of crewe alexandra, hamilton smith, who called a special board meeting because of the rumours surrounding bennell‘s behaviour, has paid tribute to those men who've spoken out about what happened to them. it really was a part of the problem. i could not start to imagine what
3:50 pm
this poor lad had gone through. it was horrible. it was horrible. and i thought... he's a victim. i have got lee dickson now. and i said —— i have got a victory now. i am going to support this lad as much as i can. “— to support this lad as much as i can. ——i to support this lad as much as i can. —— i have gota to support this lad as much as i can. —— i have got a victim. to support this lad as much as i can. —— i have gota victim. he to support this lad as much as i can. —— i have got a victim. he was a guy that i had waited to hear. andy woodward. not only did he help clear my conscience, he helped all these other people, all of these other players. i do not think andy woodward realises what he actually did and how many people he helped. i don't think he's got the scale of that. that's what i think about it. and these other players that came
3:51 pm
out and appeared on television and the press and so on, it is such a brave thing to do. really, these people... when i go back and say i had a choice to make, sit back and don't do anything or come out and help. they didn't have a choice. they were abused. they didn't have a choice. hamilton smith, former managing director of crewe alexandra. it is four minutes to four. now the weather. there was a lot of sunshine across the country but also showers on higher ground, particularly scotland. lots of sunshine today after a cold start. this picture shows how much sunshine in london for a time shows how much sunshine in london fora time in shows how much sunshine in london for a time in the afternoon. going into the weekend i think saturday probably the brighter day. more
3:52 pm
clout and patchy rain had mild conditions on sunday. we started with clear skies across many central, southern and eastern areas, hence the cold start, cloud continuing to roll in from the west. as we go into the evening we continue to see rain pushing into northern ireland, northern and western scotland and eventually into north—west england and part of wales and the south—west. some of it will be falling as slow over the high ground in scotland. not reaching the east or south—east in the dark hours. another cold one with some frost and also patchy and misty fog. this continues to move east as we go into saturday. there will always be more clout in central northern areas, certainly through the morning, one or two showers, wintry over high ground of scotland. brighter skies follow—on behind for northern ireland and eventually into western parts of britain. sunny spells across the south, to the south of this weather front. mild
3:53 pm
temperatures at 1011 degrees, closer to seven and nine in the north. this is where we start to see the change into sunday. this feature is moving from the atlantic and will introduce more cloud and rain. more of a breeze as well. a warm front and that means it is introducing warm air. you can see the orange colours behind it. feeling milder on sunday. we might start with brightness across the north—east of scotland, the far east of england. but pretty soon the far east of england. but pretty soon cloud rolling in and it is looking grey with patchy rain, especially across the hills and misty and murky with hill fog. temperatures nine or ten in the north, 11 or 12 further south and west. a mild day. we hold onto the mild theme into the start of next week. a little bit of rain at first. signs of it becoming drier and potentially colder by the end of next week. stagey and. —— stay
3:54 pm
tuned. hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm ben brown. today at 4... president trump is heading to florida today, as students mourn the deaths of those killed in the deadly school shooting. knowing that everything has been cleaned up, you can almost imagine just blood on the walls, bodies on the floor. no one is going to be able to walk through that building. no one. a dramatic fall in home ownership — new figures show only one in four young people on middle incomes succeed in buying a property. scientists say using cleaning sprays can be as harmful to your lungs as smoking 20 cigarettes a day. oxfam has set up an independent commission to investigate allegations of exploitation by its staff. coming up, all the sport with hugh ferris.
3:55 pm
damian, infact! now, the winter olympics. we got a medal? absolutely. dom parsons took britain's first medal of the games. laura davies and lizzy yarnold are in contention as well. more later. and starve has the weather. it has been a gorgeous day today, apart from a few showers. what is the weekend looking like? i will have the details later on. thank you very much indeed. also this afternoon, building bridges — the team from chester zoo help the endangered orangutans of borneo move around their habitat. hello everyone. this is afternoon
3:56 pm
light. -- hello everyone. this is afternoon light. —— afternoon live. president trump is expected to visit the scene of the florida high school shooting in the next few days. police say a former pupil, who was expelled from the school, has now confessed to the massacre, which left 17 people dead. last night, thousands of people attended a candlelit vigil in parkland, florida. from there, nada tawfik reports. they came to mourn the lives lost and the lives scarred by this senseless attack. neighbours, friends and the students of stoneman douglas high comforted one another as best they could. jet was among the students who ran in a panic once the first shots were fired. he doesn't know if he can handle returning to the halls where his classmates' lives were cut short. i don't know if i'll be able to just cope with walking through the bottom floor of the freshman building,
3:57 pm
knowing that everything has been cleaned up. you can almost imagine just blood on the walls, bodies on the floor. no one is going to be able to walk through that building. no one. all 17 victims have now been identified. among them talented students, star athletes and aaron feis, a beloved football coach and security guard. he has been called a hero for shielding children from the gunman's bullets. nikolas cruz appeared in court briefly on 17 charges of premeditated murder. his lawyer said he was sad and remorseful and described him as a broken human being. the sheriff's office said he confessed to opening fire on his former school. he told authorities he bought a drink at subway and stopped at mcdonald's after the rampage. on social media, cruz often posed with guns. and, in one post, he wrote he would be a professional school shooter.
3:58 pm
those who knew him were troubled by his behaviour. i saw him in the backyard and he had like a, i wouldn't say a bb gun, i wasn't exactly sure. and i was pretty young so i told my mom and i said, mom, it looks like he is shooting at something. and the people who are behind us have chickens and he was shooting at the chickens, so my mom called the cops. he would steal other neighbours' mail. the cops were always at his house. he egged my car one time and we went to go and find out who did it and he was hiding in a bush and he started pelting eggs at my friends and we were chasing him down. he hasjust always been causing trouble. these terrifying scenes of students completely helpless and trembling with fear have shaken the nation. and they have reignited the debate on gun control. people here are in a state of shock that someone from their own community could be capable of such killing, and that their city nowjoins the long list of america's school shooting tragedies. the president said he
3:59 pm
plans to visit soon. never one to shy away from controversial decisions in the name of safety and security for americans, many wonder if he will come with new ideas, and if he will remain silent on gun control. and nada spoke to some of the affected students when she sent this update in the last hour. today, many students and families also preparing for the funerals of their loved ones. i have with me several of the students. you were in the building where the shooting happened. valentina, catherine and gabriella were in the other building. all of them have been speaking to me. alejandro, starting with you, if you can put into words, how are you feeling? right now i
4:00 pm
don't even know how i'm feeling. i'm grateful that i made it out alive. but my heart aches for all of those 17 innocent children who lost their lives and their families, who sent their kids to school that day. it was such a normal day at school. everyone was happy. it was valentine's day. it was a normal day. the bell was about to ring. we we re day. the bell was about to ring. we were ready to leave. nobody knew what was coming. it was just so scary. it wasn't real. it felt like a movie. that is what we have been hearing, as surreal all of this was. valentina, you knew one of the victims. you are going to her funeral in under an hour. you are talking about how difficult it is when you spoke with her every single day? we became really close in geography. we did a project together. we talked every single day. i have friends that were
4:01 pm
friends with her. and finding out that shot was horrible. and finding out that she passed away is heartbreaking, knowing that you know someone heartbreaking, knowing that you know someone like that. it is my first loss, especially of a friend. ijust can't believe what her family is going through. her mum is being so brave. her mother has been really rallying for the country to come together and do something, saying she hopes her daughter's life hasn't beenin she hopes her daughter's life hasn't been in vain. catherine, this is obviously a local tragedy that the nation is also morning with you all. it has inevitably turned to the debate on gun control and mental health. there have to be changes on gun control. knowing that someone with such problems in the past, where he has been expelled, where he has killed animals, can get a hold ofa gun has killed animals, can get a hold of a gun and do something like this is outstanding. there are no words that i can prescribe for it. but
4:02 pm
more thanjust that i can prescribe for it. but more than just the security, that i can prescribe for it. but more thanjust the security, we need to change the people. if there are a bunch of people wanting to do harm to the community, then it's notjust gun control that. them. we need to change the mindset of the people and help them get the mental help they need. be happy in the community and bring us together. gabriella, how do you feel about the fact there were warning signs in this case?” you feel about the fact there were warning signs in this case? i feel like they were a little too late. people that like knew him knew he had strange behaviour. that like he thought all these things. he had all these pictures on instagram. posting a comment on youtube video saying he was going to be a professional school shooter. the warnings just too late. we didn't think of them at that moment. we thought it was a joke. another high school teen saying how he does not like people and doesn't want to be in school. in
4:03 pm
reality it was real and he was planning on doing it in her school, ina planning on doing it in her school, in a place week we are supposed to feel safe —— where we are supposed to feel safe. how has this made you feel about the community? how has the community changed? everybody came together. everybody thought the community would be broken apart. but in reality, last night we realised not only was parts and united as one, but also coconut creek, everybody from our area came together at this one candlelight ceremony to honour the dead. and on the sheriffs and the swat teams who fought to keep us safe and not have more than 17 victims. not that thick talking to for pupils from the school in parkland, florida, were 17 pupils and staff we re florida, were 17 pupils and staff were killed. the number of young people in the uk who own their own home, has fallen dramatically over the last 20 years.
4:04 pm
research by the institute for fiscal studies shows that the proportion of middle—income earners aged 25 to 34 who own a property, dropped over that period from two—thirds, tojust over a quarter. simon gompertz reports. i've been living here a couple of years now. aged 30, keen to buy, but shut out of the market. so this is my room. tom bourlet says renting here in brighton is money down the drain. but the house prices beyond him. it's completely out of reach. there is not a chance i will be able to get the deposit. it's such a cost and with utility bills, with the cost of trains going to london, with my rent prices, it is just unachievable. and my friends, they are all around the same age and none of us are on the property ladder yet. the institute for fiscal studies looked at young people aged 25 to 34 on middle—incomes, at the moment, between 22,000
4:05 pm
and 30,000 for a household after tax — in most cases, couples with children. two decades ago, 65% of those on middle incomes owned their own homes. that's dropped to just 27%. most the are forced to rent. —— most of the rest are forced to rent. the huge increase in house prices is the reason why it has become so difficult. 20 years ago, a young family would need four times their income in order to buy. now, it's more like eight times, so, for increasing numbers, buying a home isjust a nonstarter. the government's help to buy scheme is helping people afford more, particularly new homes, and first—time buyers have had their stamp duty cut. but the problem is also one of supply. councils complained that developers are sitting on planning permission is for more than 400,000 homes that haven't been built, and that is aggravating the shortage. it's really hard to see how we can make this better where we are still seeing huge
4:06 pm
demand for housing and that housing demand is not being met with the right number of houses. so i think it is all coming down to the individual now. they are having to make the choices, they are having to decide for themselves — do i want to rent and have the flexibility but pay more for it, or do i want to make a lot of difficult decisions and get on the housing ladder sooner? my mum always so she got on the property ladder around 25, 26, and she tells me the deposit price and how cheap it was. tom has agreed he is missing out — part of a generation in which most people, like it or not, are stuck with renting. —— aggrieved that he is -- aggrieved that he is missing —— aggrieved that he is missing out. simon gompertz, bbc news, brighton. earlier i spoke to gavin smart, deputy chief executive at the chartered institute of housing, the professional body for those working in the housing profession. he explained some of the issues behind the problem of decreasing home ownership.
4:07 pm
i think supply is a big part of the problem. for a long time now we simply have not build the numbers of homes we need to build. the government has set an ambitious target of 300,000 new homes a year. the latest figures show we were building about 220,000 houses. a big gap to fill. the other problem is it is not just about gap to fill. the other problem is it is notjust about building homes for people to buy. we also need to build homes for people to rent at rents that are affordable. it is quite complicated. we need to do better. we need to do better. how can we do better? we heard in that report they could be hundreds of thousands of more homes built, but at the moment there is a logjam in getting planning applications through?” think planning is part of the problem. but i think we are also very quick to say if only we could make planning better it would be fine. it would be more complicated. we need to ask ourselves the question about how realistic it is
4:08 pm
to assume that current companies building homes for purchase can actually lift the numbers of homes that they build to the levels that we need, whether we need to see more new entrants historically when rates of honour occupation for younger middle—income households were higher. we had more small and medium—sized companies building new homes. that has disappeared. and we need to be thinking about affordable housing. not only does that has people who are excluded from the market, giving them a decent place to live whilst they can't afford to buy, simply raising the overall number of homes we produce helps house prices overall. we are seeing a generational problem were young people, their parents could buy, to get on the housing ladder may be in their mid—20s early 30s. but they, at the same age now, and do that? -- cannot do that. it is a significant
4:09 pm
change. each generation has greater opportunity and more ability to get on in life than their parents. the current crisis of affordability driven by huge increases in house prices compared to modest increases in income has turned that trend on its head. that should be a cause for concern for all of us. it means that sometimes people feel they have less ofa sometimes people feel they have less of a stake in society. we really need to do more to think about how we can lift overall the numbers of homes we are building and make sure that we are building the right homes in the right places that people can afford, which means thinking about homes for renting and affordable renting as well. you say a cause for concern. but in some european countries, most people do just rent their homes. we are a nation that has always been keen on honing our homes? we have relatively high levels of home ownership compared to some countries in europe. that tends
4:10 pm
to bea some countries in europe. that tends to be a little bit exaggerated. even in countries like germany, where there is a significant proportion of there is a significant proportion of the population that rents are high rates of home ownership and they do better in terms of building the homes that their nation needs. arguments about whether you are renting or buying hour to1 arguments about whether you are renting or buying hour to 1 degrees secondary to the fact that we simply are not building the numbers of homes we need to build. the government has the ambition to build. but we are some way short of that ambition and we need to look at what else we need to do to push up the number of new homes we are building, and not in a one—off effort. we need to consistently build larger numbers of homes in the longer term, and that is a problem we will only solve with concerted action in the long—term. we have had to take you to berlin, where theresa may has been meeting angela merkel. —— we are going to take you to
4:11 pm
berlin. inaudible. translation: we basically have not changed their stance on britain leaving the european union. we want to have as close as possible a partnership with britain. we arejust partnership with britain. we are just trying to get the translation of angela merkel. i'm afraid i did a level german but it is not up to translating the german chancellor! she has been talking to theresa may ahead of a speech by the
4:12 pm
prime minister which is going to be in munich tomorrow, on britain's future security relations with the european union. tomorrow's speech is pa rt european union. tomorrow's speech is part of what is being billed as the government's road map to brexit. following borisjohnson's contribution on that same subject a little bit earlier on in the week. important talks, of course. germany such a big power broker within the european union. the german chancellor in particular such an influential figure chancellor in particular such an influentialfigure in chancellor in particular such an influential figure in the chancellor in particular such an influentialfigure in the remaining block of 27 eu countries negotiating brexit with britain. i am sure mrs merkel and mrs may have had plenty to talk about. and the prime minister, tomorrow expected to set out some more of her vision for what brexit is going to be. let's listen.
4:13 pm
inaudible. translation: and delighted... inaudible. we are struggling, i'm afraid, at the moment to get the translation of angela merkel. we will go back to that as soon as we
4:14 pm
can. just to say, the german chancellor has been saying, we want to stick to the brexit timetable, and also saying that she wants as constructive a partnership as possible with britain after brexit. let's listen to theresa may. i'd like to thank you, chancellor merkel, from hosting these talks today. you may recall that you were the first government i visited after becoming prime minister in 2016, underlining the importance of the relationship between our two countries. and i think our partnership is vital in defending our shared values and promoting our interests around the world. if you just look, we are standing side by side in eastern europe as part of nato. efforts to reassure our allies and deter russian aggression. armed forces supporting the iraqi government to territory in their brave fight against daesh in the middle east. and in areas like google health, climate change, uk
4:15 pm
germany corporation has shaped the agenda internationally. in our talks today we have discussed the speech i will give to the munich security conference tomorrow, in which i will reiterate that the uk remains unconditionally committed to european security. and sat at my vision for a unique new partnership between the eu and the uk on defence, information sharing, security and law enforcement. as the threats we face grow and evolve, our structures and capabilities must keep pace, whether the challenge comes from north korea's attempts to nuclear rise the korean peninsula or the islamist terrorist that continue to seek to do us harm. we must work together and use all levers at our disposal to keep people across europe say. on foreign policy we all ready work very closely together. —— already. as the chancellor has referred to, we have reaffirmed our commitment to the iran nuclear deal
4:16 pm
and the need for full implementation by all sides that we made in october last year. we agree that as we continue to work to preserve the deal, we also share us concerns about iran's destabilising activity in the middle east. we stand ready to ta ke in the middle east. we stand ready to take further appropriate measures to take further appropriate measures to tackle these issues. we also discussed the western balkans conference, which i look forward to chancellor merkel attending in london injuly. chancellor merkel attending in london in july. but chancellor merkel attending in london injuly. but of course it's not only in defence of our shared values that the uk and germany rely on one another. trade between our nations, secures and generates hundreds of thousands ofjobs in both countries, with hard work, enterprise and innovation at its foundation. and our proud history of commerce goes back to at least the 12th century, with the trade between hanseatic cities and british ports. it is vital to people in the uk and germany that this shared tradition continues. we have referred in our discussions to the uk vision for a
4:17 pm
bold and ambitious economic partnership once the uk leads the european union. i want to ensure that uk companies have the maximum freedom to trade and operate within german markets, and for german businesses to do the same within the uk. much progress has already been made in the brexit negotiations. we both welcomed the agreement reached last december to secure rights for the more than 100,000 german nationals in the uk, and a similar number of uk citizens living here in germany. we are now ready to enter the next phase of the negotiations. and our immediate goal is to agree a time limit implementation period with the latest round of talks between the uk and the commission due to begin on monday. the uk and germany's shared history, values and culture makes us vital partners and a strong allies, both bilaterally and through nato, the g7 and the 620. we and through nato, the g7 and the g20. we will continue to work together to strengthen these ties for yea rs together to strengthen these ties for years and decades to come.
4:18 pm
thank you. mrs may talking about the shared history between the uk and germany. vital partners. do you understand your fellow leader's frustration that 18 months after the referendum, you cannot say what britain wants? we re you cannot say what britain wants? were you able to tell chancellor merkel any more details today, or must that continue to wait for your cabinet colleagues to agree with one another? chancellor merkel, did you ask the prime minister what britain once and did you learn anything today you did not know yesterday? first of all, we have been setting out, as i said at the beginning of this process, we will be setting out at different times the next sword of state of the process. i have done that through the lancaster house speech, the florence speech. tomorrow i will set out our ambition for a security partnership between
4:19 pm
the uk and the european union as we move forward. we will be saying something in the coming weeks in relation to the future economic partnership. what we're doing, comedy stage we are at, is first of all ensuring we agree the time—limited implementation period. this was a principal agreed in the december discussions when sufficient progress was declared in thatjoint report. and then, of course, we go ahead to start the negotiations, to looking at that future economic partnership. it isn'tjust a one—way street. i think that is what is important. actually i want a future economic partnership that is good for the european union, good for germany, good for the other members of the european union and it is good for the united kingdom. and i believe through negotiations we can achievejust believe through negotiations we can achieve just that economic relationship, alongside obviously ensuring we continue to have a good security partnership. speaks in german.
4:20 pm
while we are hearing for the german chancellor, just to summarise what theresa may was saying, again talking about bold and ambitious plans for an economic partnership with europe post brexit. saying that the uk and germany in particular shared history. they are vital partners and strong allies. saying she will be setting out more about her vision for a post—brexit relationship with europe tomorrow in that speech on security but she will be making in munich. the prime minister was asked whether she had spelt out any more details about her plans for brexit to angela merkel. she said she is gradually setting
4:21 pm
out her vision. another question. question in german and while we listen to that the german question, why we listen to that question in german... —— while we listen. a question in german for angela merkel. she has so far been
4:22 pm
saying that she wants has constructed a partnership as possible with britain after brexit. she also said that as far as he is concerned britain needs to stick to the brexit timetable. that was what she said in her opening remarks. and theresa may has been saying, optimistically, talking in optimistically, talking in optimistic terms about the prospect ofan optimistic terms about the prospect of an economic partnership with germany post—brexit, where britain can sell goods to germany and germany can sell goods to britain, because they have a shared history of trade going back many centuries. vital partners and strong allies, said theresa may. she said much progress had been made in the brexit negotiations. we're now ready, she said, to enter the next phase. negotiations with the european union
4:23 pm
will determine the nature of the future relationship. but as i said earlier, i think it is absolutely clear that the partnership, the economic partnership, will be won and —— will be one that can benefit german businesses that want to continue to operate with the united kingdom, and uk businesses that want to trade with germany and other members of the remaining eu 27. what we're looking at is either believe a comprehensive and ambitious partnership, one that isn't based on an existing model but one that actually recognises the difficult position of the united kingdom as we leave the european union, recognises the close ties we already have an recognises the importance of those trade links and those businesses cooperating that will have been referred to from german companies, and it is also important to uk companies as well. and sky? prime minister, you say this is a
4:24 pm
two way process. do you accept though that it's for the british government to set out what its plans are and not for the eu to make an offer? and to the chancellor, what the prime ministerjust said is she wants a negotiation that is not based on any current models. is that not cherry picking and do you think you can accept something that is bespoke in that way? on the first question, the point of negotiations is two parties sit down and talk about these issues and come to an agreement about those issues. as i said earlier in answer to the first question, we have at different stages set out and clarified different aspects of the future relationship that we want to have with the european union. tomorrow i'll be doing that very clearly in relation to the security partnership. and that, again, will
4:25 pm
bea partnership. and that, again, will be a new arrangement. i think that's important. because we are all facing the same challenges and threats. now is not the time for us to reduce cooperation, now is the time for us to look to see how we can develop on the existing cooperation in a way that be dynamic and i drove for the future. because, as the threat evolve, as they grow, as they don't recognise borders, so we need to continue that cooperation and be able to adapt to threat as they come. i'll be setting out tomorrow in more detail what i think that security partnership should look like. mrs may, theresa may, throwing ahead to that speech she is going to be making an security. stressing the need to maintain security cooperation in the eu after brexit. we are all, said mrs may, facing the same challenges and threats. now is
4:26 pm
not the time to reduce cooperation. mrs merkel has been saying... we wa nt to mrs merkel has been saying... we want to stick to the brexit timetable. also said, denied she is in any way for x rated —— she is a waite with the frustrated. some pretty optimistic and reasonably warm words from the german chancellor. i think it's just ending now. that is the end of their brief "av fanfare-"fa mrs ::== angela
4:27 pm
4:28 pm
4:29 pm
4:30 pm
4:31 pm
4:32 pm
4:33 pm
4:34 pm
4:35 pm
4:36 pm
4:37 pm
4:38 pm
4:39 pm
4:40 pm
4:41 pm
4:42 pm
4:43 pm
4:44 pm
4:45 pm
4:46 pm
4:47 pm
4:48 pm
4:49 pm
4:50 pm
4:51 pm
4:52 pm
4:53 pm
4:54 pm
4:55 pm
4:56 pm
4:57 pm
4:58 pm
4:59 pm
5:00 pm
5:01 pm
5:02 pm
5:03 pm

34 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on