Skip to main content

tv   Baftas 2018  BBC News  February 18, 2018 5:15pm-6:45pm GMT

5:15 pm
police in leeds have been called to one of yorkshire's busiest shopping streets after an attempted ram raid took place. as you can see, men in two cars drove onto a pedestrianised street in the centre of leeds and attempted to rob a high end watch shop. the men in balaclavas didn't succeed in gaining entry and escaped before the police arrived. now on bbc news, it's time to join jane hill for special coverage live from the red carpet at the baftas. hello and welcome to this bbc news special programme, bringing you all the red carpet arrivals for the annual british academy film awards, coming live from the royal albert hall in central london. let's start oui’ hall in central london. let's start our coverage by reminding you which films are in the running for the coveted award of best film. how are you doing? nice to meet you. you must be a resource did. a little bit. bring things up to your room? follow him. you are very welcome
5:16 pm
here. our home is your home. when will the lesson be learned? when will the lesson be learned? when will the lesson be learned? when will the lesson to be learned? ! how many more dictators must be appeased?! before we learn! you cannot reason with a tiger! when your head is in its mouth! can you get closer? ! i can't risk it. hang on. get them out. bring it here... bring it here.
5:17 pm
if it was me, i would start up a database. if a baby was born, stick him on it. and as soon as he has done something wrong, ci’oss — refe re nce done something wrong, cross—reference it and make sure it isa cross—reference it and make sure it is a correct match, then kill him. yeah, well, there's definitely civil rights laws prevent that. and welcome to our perch here above the red carpet at the royal hall for the red carpet at the royal hall for the annual british academy film awards. that gives you a flavour of the real variety of films that we have been watching over the last year. but tonight's ceremony has an unusual backdrop, a much more political backdrop, because you may
5:18 pm
well have heard in the news today of the letter that has now been signed by more than 200 british and irish whip in working in the entertainment industry, working across film, television and theatre. and it's an open letter to a major british newspaper in which they call for an end to harassment for all women wherever they work, rather they work in the world, which ever industry they work in. we will talk about that, i'm sure coming here tonight. also, we expect here on the red carpet and echo of what we saw globes in the united states, with a very, very large proportion of the actresses and actors wearing black on the red carpet. and we are going to talk about all of that here tonight with the film criticjason solomons, he with me outside world albert hall for another year. and the fashion news director at the telegraph. lots to talk about in your specialism as well. they will be with me for the next
5:19 pm
hour and they will be with me for the next hourand a they will be with me for the next hour and a half as we watch all the stars arrive, and all those questions are asked, doubtless, about the backdrop to this year's ceremony. leesis ceremony. lees is but is with us at the other end of the red carpet are standing right now. you will be talking to a lot of people as they arrive, who are we expecting to. we expect some of the biggest stars of the film and screen. in the acting stakes, we hoped is big to gary oldman, people like annette bening, frances dormant, sally hawkins, angelina jolie is up for best foreign language film, so a host of people will be coming through and we will ask them about the films themselves. and of course, the time's up campaign, many will be wearing black and the pains to emphasise the message they are getting across. we will be with all of the latest at this end of the red carpet when they
5:20 pm
arrived. back to you for the time being. lizo, talk to you shortly. asi being. lizo, talk to you shortly. as i have been watching everyone arrive in the last half an hour, a lot of people have already arrived and a large proportion of people i have seen have had the time out... time's up lapel. it is striking how many people we have already spotted. it is not just many people we have already spotted. it is notjust actors and actresses coming this evening, it is people working behind—the—scenes in the film industry, and that is what this movement is all about. let's reflect on what year it has been in sin are and what we might see tonight. jason, good to have you with us tonight, we will talk about the films in a moment, but you follow this industry so closely, it is really striking. there is something different here. we saw it at the golden globes, what do you think might change? it might feel different tonight because of this letter and the time's up campaign.
5:21 pm
after the harvey weinstein story broke, people felt there was a sea change. the golden globes came along with the time's up campaign, and wearing black. things really are changing. what is interesting is it is continuing at the baftas to show that no one is giving up on this. it isa time that no one is giving up on this. it is a time for a sea change in the industry. the women are taking it in their own hands. women do it themselves, they are fed up of it. and it is not for the men to argue. i think the depth of feeling was unknown. i think now we are seeing the anger and frustration coming out with an industry that you would have thought had put women on top, it makes goddesses out of actresses, but it has been a lie. underneath it all, it has not been satisfactory, and the industry is waking up to that and being woken up to it as well. two yea rs that and being woken up to it as well. two years ago, it is about
5:22 pm
being woke to diversity, and now you have a bug buster like black panther tearing up the box office this very weekend. that energy is happening on the red carpet, women want equality in the way films are made. it is the industry behind the red carpet. film—makers behind the camera. we look tonight at the best director category, it is all male. a lot of comment about that when nominations we re comment about that when nominations were announced. sometimes you can only reward the films out there, but it might be the last year we see that happening. and in future, it might not be the mother mated, women are not signing up for that, but they want parity and equality. time's up, i can listen to that as well. it is interesting that cinema is taking the lead on this. it is a huge industry, but it is about iconography and messages on the screen, having the inspiration to change people's lives, they are doing that off—camera now. now the
5:23 pm
camera is on the carpet, it is their time to shine and it is a hugely important evening for that to be taken at around the world. we were listening to kristin scott thomas in the last ten minutes or so, she was talking to lizo, and that was part of her point, "we have a platform." rightly or wrongly, people listen to people like her. if you are in the public eye, people listen to you, and her take on it was getting the message out it is notjust about rich privileged women, it is all women, but the point is, if you are a big success, people will listen to you. that is why they are trying to use their voice. if you are in a film, ina use their voice. if you are in a film, in a great film, people will look up to you and want to behave at that. but it leads off the screen as well. as an actress, you have that was once ability and you take that
5:24 pm
responsible aguillon. you see an icon like that, emma watson donated £1 million of her own money. she was hermione, beauty and the beast, people adore the image of this person. and the person behind the image speaks up when they had to project at awards are minis at this. it is hugely influential, and they are aware of that influence. in the age of instagram and twitter, those influences spread even wider even quicker. the industry is trying to play catch up with the force of the movement here. next year, we will see it catch up, things will move very quickly because it is a force of nature here on the black clad carpet. and in terms of fashion, we saw it at the golden globes, anecdotally, you and i have been watching people arrive over the last half hour, i would say, a very high proportion of people have chosen to wear black. what impact does that have? what does it mean within the
5:25 pm
fashion world? the decision to wear black really shows how powerful fashion can be as a statement. this letter has been sent out and we talking about it but nothing will have the impact of seeing those pictures of all these women together on the red carpet wearing their amazing black dresses. the statement of that sends a strong message. and the red carpet is the platform that women owfi the red carpet is the platform that women own in the film industry. they can make money from the contracts they get with the designers, and you know, it is their time to shine. it is about them taking the power back. 0k, we will talk more about that over the course of the evening. jason, we are here to discuss film and celebrate film, that is what the awards are about. let's have a ca nter awards are about. let's have a canter through some of the runners and riders here tonight. a really curious year, a really unusual mixed bag in that category of best film.
5:26 pm
curious year, a really unusual mixed bag in that category of best filmlj would like to say that i am sure any of the women that have signed that letter today, they wouldn't want to detract from the work done in the films, it is important the films get celebrated. and there are extraordinary films at bafta this year. we have the shape of water, dunkirk and darkest hour, the evacuation of dunkirk, british stories. it is a very british year that bafta is getting behind, which is interesting with four best actors being brits, recognising the craft and stage talent we have here for many years. young actors coming through from a different background as well. things are changing. we are seeing that. it can go quicker, but this year, i think dunkirk phillips asiam this year, i think dunkirk phillips as i am going to say to now, i think dunkirk will surprise people do not. christopher nolan has done an extraordinary job christopher nolan has done an extraordinaryjob of directing the film. we will see him recognised as
5:27 pm
best i written, i think. i think right now, there is a very divisive film in three billboards. much more to be discussed, let's head over to the other end of the carpet and rejoin temperament. i am joined niels you did all of the animatronic creations loved by many, how does it feel to work on something like that? it isa feel to work on something like that? it is a dream come true. that is what i wanted to do as a little boy andl what i wanted to do as a little boy and i am still a little boy! when you helped create the characters, did you know how much people would love ? did you know how much people would love? no, you don't. it is difficult to do. it appeals to the young as well as to the old. it is a tricky thing. i always worried that if we
5:28 pm
get it wrong, we would end up with as much hate mail with as much as people that love it. how much of it is down to radical creations? you have you creating something real onset. it is an important thing with all the star wars films. certainly when i grew up, they have always been showcasing visual effects. it is important they are grounded in reality, that is what the star wars world is. the practical effects will always be in the films, they are loved for that reason as well. it is an important aspect of what makes a star wars film different to other phones. you are now working on star wa rs phones. you are now working on star wars episode nine. we are. the hans solo movie is coming out soon, so we are looking forward to how that goes down, the film looks amazing. thank you so much. best of up to you. thank you very much indeed. thanks, lizo. let's continue to talk
5:29 pm
about the films themselves, star wars, worth reminding people early on that at the battles we have two categories, best film, but also best british film. a curious one because three billboards, which you touch on, which i enjoyed hugely, it is nominated in both categories. that is interesting in itself, because it is interesting in itself, because it isa is interesting in itself, because it is a brit and depiction of life in small—town america, but it is in the best british film category because a brit wrote and directed it, a london—based man. brit wrote and directed it, a london-based man. he calls self london-based man. he calls self london irish because he is all about. many people will ask what is british about it. it is a film that looks at small—town life in america. i think there is a bit of small—town ireland in their —— there as well.
5:30 pm
it is universal, there are lots of missouris all over the world. it is about that tinderbox atmosphere of how politics can be thrown into the middle of at the races arty and cause ructions. they will have to get on together. that is what the film is about, the difficulties of doing that when people almost against doing that and living together. it has a fantastic performance in the middle of it by francis mcdormand. it has been 20 years since francis mcdormand carried off a bafta. this isa mcdormand carried off a bafta. this is a firebrand character who is hell—bent on revenge. sometimes she does things that you do not admire and sometimes she does things that you want to cheer about. she makes
5:31 pm
such impassioned speeches, it is such impassioned speeches, it is such a great performance. the actress category will be super strong. you have got sally hawkins, margot robbie in i tonya. they are an lucky to come up against one of the all—time performances. an lucky to come up against one of the all-time performances. it would be hard to imagine anyone other than francis mcdormand going away with that statu ette, francis mcdormand going away with that statuette, but it is the baftas and surprising things happen. in that category let's talk about saoirse ronan in lady bird, we are talking about a strong year for women. it is written and directed by greta garbo wake, known as a comedian, a performer herself. it is a wonderful portrait of family life and life in sacramento in california. an ordinary girl trying to break out of an ordinary town. it is another strong female performance ina is another strong female performance in a lovely film. it is delightful. small but perfectly formed. it has
5:32 pm
only got three nominations. timothee chalamet is nominated for another film, call me by your name. but saoirse ronan is fantastic. she shows her comic timing and it is the sort of film that a younger woman might watch and say, that is me, i understand that. it is a film about daughters and mothers. there is a wonderful supporting performance by laurie metcalf who has also been nominated. it is a tender film, laurie metcalf who has also been nominated. it is a tenderfilm, it is about communication and noncommunication, things we should have said that we felt we did not say. it is about growing up and this is the sort of film that might not have got to the baftas a few years ago but now it has. 0n the back of the #metoo movement and the empowerment we are seeing from the female side of the industry, stories like this are being given more time and they are being looked at again.
5:33 pm
the female perspective is being reconsidered and not in terms of what it is saying, but in terms of its importance, giving equal importance to the male perspective. that is why lady bird is being celebrated so justly. we are slightly biased because we love lady bird. there is kristin scott thomas, nominated for best supporting actress for her role alongside gary 0ldman. if that does not win and make a award, i don't know... put kristin scott thomas is acting opposite that make up, literally supporting it! gary 0ldman is everyone's favourite to win it, but there could be a surprise. daniel day lewis is great as a 19505 couturier in london. it is also 5uppo5edly his final performance. we'll bafta, who have awarded him many times before, get all romantic
5:34 pm
and give him another one. he has never won for an acting part before. he has won bafta5 for directing and writing, back in 1998. he is an actor rather than a director and writer and never been rewarded a5 actor rather than a director and writer and never been rewarded as an actor. it is been a great career and maybe churchill will carry the day. iamjoined by maybe churchill will carry the day. i am joined by leticia wright. you are at the centre of one of the biggest movie phenomenon is we have seen for years, black panther. how has it been? it has been incredible to see everybody come together and support ourfilm, to see everybody come together and support our film, it means a lot. month5 support our film, it means a lot. months of dedication from the cast, the crew and the studios and seeing everybody coming together in unity to go to the cinemas and to break records like that has been amazing. we are records like that has been amazing. we a re really records like that has been amazing. we are really grateful. we will be
5:35 pm
seeing a lot more over you in the next few months. you play in stephen spielberg 5pecial next few months. you play in stephen spielberg special effects extravaganza. you have been doing it for awhile, but this year it has really ta ken. for awhile, but this year it has really taken. what has happened? it i5 really taken. what has happened? it is mad. i have been working really ha rd is mad. i have been working really hard and the seeds are growing there. everybody is turning their head and pay attention to the young people in the industry. daniel kaluuya i5 people in the industry. daniel kaluuya is having a great year, but thati5 kaluuya is having a great year, but that is year5 kaluuya is having a great year, but that is years of hard work. we are grateful for everybody showing to ask their positivity and support, we are ask their positivity and support, we a re really grateful. ask their positivity and support, we are really grateful. thank you for speaking to us. she is currently in black panther. she is currently in black panther. she is currently in black panther. she is a remarkable talent and still only 24. you are commenting on what she is wearing. she has been dressed by gucci tonight. the film industry will talk about someone as a
5:36 pm
promising up and coming personality, but you know when the big designer houses are addressing these girls and they get interested in them, and gucci is the label of the moment. simon kelly is the creative director there and he is stressing all the coolest young girls in the world. if she is wearing gucci, that is a good sign. she has already made it. how does that relationship come about? the head of gucci and the chief designer, do they literally go through a guest list for an event like this and say, this is who i want? how does that come to fruition. the fashion houses will have their vip liaison teams who work closely with the stylists for these girls. it is not the designer and the actors, it is the liaison team and the stylists working together to create this relationship. it is really strategic. they do not thinkjust one award thing at a time, they
5:37 pm
think about the whole season and what they want to get out of the end of it. they want to raise their profiles and make them into fashion stars and film stars and they work together to do that. that is the gucci seal of approval. you have very recently returned from new york fashion week and going back to so many people, as we are seeing here, wearing black on the red carpet as they did at the golden globes, what was the talk of that in new york and what has been the impact on the fashion industry? a lot of designers in new york had been influenced by the golden globes red carpet. they would have been creating their collections at the time when all that happened and they would have had to rush to make up new samples of the games they had made but in black. we saw a lot of the finales of the shows showing beautiful, long, black, velvet dresses. it really had a deep impact on some
5:38 pm
people. they agreed with the sentiment behind the messaging. someone ended up doing a whole series of black dresses at the end of their show and that was a nod to the movement and showing the impact it is having already and maybe what we will be wearing next season, who knows? maybe there will be a lot more black in the shops. leticia wright in that interview mentioned daniel kaluuya, a little bit older than her, but still what a fantastic talent. how striking to be nominated in an acting category this year, but also nominated in the rising star award which is the only award that is voted for by the public. what a year he is having. it is extraordinary and he has been nominated for best actor in get out, an extraordinary film, nominated at the bafta5 and the oscars. a few
5:39 pm
yea rs the bafta5 and the oscars. a few years ago it might not have got the attention. we are seeing indie films and edgierfilms, attention. we are seeing indie films and edgier films, films attention. we are seeing indie films and edgierfilms, films that attention. we are seeing indie films and edgier films, films that deal head—on with in black a film - deals with panther, a film that deals with race. maybe it is way race. maybe it is changing the way race. maybe it is changing the way race i viewed as a business - a tonight very as the red carpet as. egg”; —— — ——~ and the pet! target as tltettfl; —— — ,... and one of those is indeed and one of those is presenting an award tonight. i am with gemma atherton who is presenting an award tonight and also talking about the campaigns and the action that has been taking place. she has beenjoined by gwen davies and eileen fulham, who are two of the original dagenham girls who fought for equal pay at the end of the 19605 which led to the launch of the 19605 which led to the launch of
5:40 pm
the equal pay act. so much has been happening today, the open letter in the observer, how much has been done, is it enough? it is an incredible amount of work that has been done in a very short amount of time. there is a real appetite for change and this is the moment, but there is so much more to do. 0ver half of women in the uk have suffered sexual abuse and that is a statistic that needs to be eradicated. we have set up a justice and equality fund which will help anyone who has been sexually abused in the workplace and that is the way we can keep moving this forward and get out further than the entertainment industry. eileen gwen, you fought for this in the motor industry. did you imagine with all the steps forward you made in 1968 onwards that still on the 21st century people would be fighting on these issues? never, we thought it would end by now, we thought everybody would have their rights,
5:41 pm
but it has not happened unfortunately. 50 years ago we did all this, didn't we? what is it like having a platform like the bafta5? it is lovely. and what is it like working with these incredible people who have been such an example for the last four decades? it is a com plete the last four decades? it is a complete on air. she has done us proud. but you have done everybody proud. but you have done everybody proud. all the women out there maybe do not realise what these women have done for them, getting the equal pay act, and we still have so far to go with it. there are echoes of you two. you should be so proud. you are like royalty to me. thank you so much. i hope you have a good evening. thank you. that is to
5:42 pm
reflect. and that sums up what it is all about. we were doing this 50 yea rs all about. we were doing this 50 years ago. yes, my goodness, they were. that brought through the equal pay act and there are elements of that still being talked about in 2018. and tonight being talked about on the red carpet. gemma atherton not the only actress arriving here tonight with an activist of one form or another. we have already seen the one from andrea rice barak who had another member of the activist group with her and there will be an number of others and again replicating what we have seen at some of the award ceremonies in the united states where a similar move was made. that is wonderful to hearfrom gemma atherton and those fantastic women who, as well as the serious issues, one hopes are in for an enjoyable night at the british academy film awards. this is special coverage
5:43 pm
from bbc news broadcasting across the uk and around the world on bbc world news live from the royal albert hall in central london. it is an occasion where we celebrate film and commemorate those who have done so brilliantly in cinema over the last year but with a very political backdrop this year in particular. jason, let's talk about daniel kaluuya, we were talking to him before, and we were talking about the rising star category voted for by the public. it includes florence pugh, who was wonderful in that bleak film lady macbeth. i pugh, who was wonderful in that bleakfilm lady macbeth. i enjoyed it more than i thought. bleakfilm lady macbeth. i enjoyed it more than i thoughtlj bleakfilm lady macbeth. i enjoyed it more than i thought. i am glad you enjoyed it. i think she becomes a star in that movie. she is a rising star and it was an outstanding british debut. the film is by william 0ldroyd, about a woman
5:44 pm
who takes her revenge on society really. it is putting her in a situation she does not want. it is very timely. this feminist firebrand movement. it has had a long momentum. interesting to see how florence seizes her moment as well and becomes this slightly monstrous figure, but one that you love. in this scene here she is quaffing all the wine of her master played menacingly by chris fairbanks. but she is tremendous in it and becomes her own woman. she is 17 when she is forced into an unhappy marriage and brea ks forced into an unhappy marriage and breaks out of it. in quite a brutal way. i will not give too much away. iam way. i will not give too much away. i am delighted to see at the bafta5 and that is what the bafta5 are for, to elevate british films onto a higher pedestal. it was made for under £1 million and here it is on
5:45 pm
the red carpet getting this exposure internationally as well. americans will see florence pugh and say, who is this talent? bafta uses this occasion to push british films into the bigger spotlight. when you have got talent like daniel kaluuya and florence pugh, they could be so in demand. some people were annoyed by angela jackson, a brit, taking the role of an american. he is tremendous as well. here he is in get out. 0ne hesitates to give too much away because there is a surprise in it, but it is about the black boy going to white parents to meet the parents for the first time and finding some very strange goings on in the woods. he is tremendous. he is funny, sensitive and strong and powerful in it as well. he manages to mix those emotions very
5:46 pm
well. there is a mystery to it as well. there is a mystery to it as well. and an excellent american accent because you would not know this was a brit again in a quintessentially american film. this was a brit again in a quintessentially american filmm north london boy from camden and i have known him for a few years. i did a double—take when i saw him. i knew he was good! but i did not know he was that good. when they get their moment and they seize it, and he is great in black panther as well, a huge blockbuster. no one is backwards in that either, they seized the day. see actors do that isa seized the day. see actors do that is a real pleasure when you see them grow into mighty stars as well. i might never get near him again! he is on this platform, that is as close as you are going to get. i am keeping my eye out on the red carpet and watching people arriving. sir patrick stewart is going to be presenting an award. and angela
5:47 pm
riseborough is behind us, wearing black. have you been keeping an eye, but i have not seen many flashes of colour. it looks as if the vast majority of people tonight are wearing black. there are few outer codes that other colours and you cannot blame them for that. gemma atherton looked as if she was freezing to death. that is what you have to do when you are dealing with these red carpets. i don't know why they don't have these shows in the middle of summer! everyone seems to be wearing black and it is interesting, but you can still show your individuality and your style. some women have been wearing great kaiser dashed trouser suits. gemma
5:48 pm
atherton had a fantastic dress that was trailing behind her. yes, it looks fantastic. and there is no sense in which designers feel hamstrung by this in any way? perhaps it encourages them to be even more creative. everyone is wearing the same colours so they have to find a little flash of individuality to make their particular actor or actress standout. i don't think they could refuse to do it. these women wearing their addresses, it is such an important moment for them that they will do anything. saoirse ronan's dress had already been made for the golden globes and it was all prepared and then they had to remake it, versace had to remake the dress in black once the dress code was announced. i have been hearing a lot about runs on black fabric in factories and things. they have to
5:49 pm
get on board with it and things were being done right at the last moment. but the fashion industry is really on board with this whole movement. the fashion industry has had its own #metoo moment with models being abused and photographers being exposed and harassment and it feels pa rt of exposed and harassment and it feels part of one big movement actually. to turn the argument on its head, what about people who say what difference does it make? what is this telling us? what is it doing? there were three women at the golden globes who did not wear black and did it for the reason that they said, if we are protesting that we have been told what to do for so long and we have been oppressed for so long and we have been oppressed for so long, why should we protest that by being told what to do once more. you had a few more minor characters on the scene wearing these fabulous
5:50 pm
floral dresses. 0ne model wore a red dress that was slipped right up to her side. it was kind of an act of defiance. but it didn't really go with the tone of the moment. i am not sure it went down too well or up their profiles. that is interesting. i have spotted tobyjones behind us. iama big i have spotted tobyjones behind us. i am a big fan of his, particularly on stage. i notice he is wearing the #timesup badge. a lot of the men are wearing it as well. this is notjust about women doing this. this movement is nothing without male allies. there are a lot of men as we are seeing here wearing the badge as well. the actual cry is to end, to listen up, time is up. men have to
5:51 pm
listen. men in the industry have to listen. men in the industry have to listen. men in the industry have to listen. men who run the voting bodies. they call it the patriarchal society, it is a stuffy old institution that has had to take stock of the movement. the 05cars have done it. they changed the membership and they ushered through more gender diverse members and the ba ftas more gender diverse members and the bafta5 did the same in 2016 and we are seeing that change. we are seeing a change in the sort of films that get favour with the voters. the more people see things from a different perspective, the more we will see it change. bafta5 is an old institution and it takes awhile to change things around. men have to listen really and that is their brief at the moment. these movements are making it impossible for them not to hear. we are all listening
5:52 pm
and paying attention. the films change as well and the nature of the films that we are watching eventually shift. it is all very well to look at the red carpet, but the important thing is ultimately the important thing is ultimately the stories and the way they get told and viewed will also change. as critics have to listen to fresh perspectives equally. we must return to you, look who is with you. iamjoined by to you, look who is with you. i am joined by the writer and director of three billboards 0utside ebbing. how was itjuggling all the elements of pain and anger and incredibly dark humour in this film? i guess writing wise most of my stuff is like that, it veers between darkness and comedy so it is natural for me. but when you have got the best actors around and you let them get on with it, they take care of that for you. where did the inspiration come from? that for you. where did the inspiration come from ?|j
5:53 pm
that for you. where did the inspiration come from? i saw something similar to what we see on our billboards about 20 years ago in the southern states of america and it stuck in my mind and i thought if it stuck in my mind and i thought if it was like an angry mother who put those up, what story would develop from there, so that is where the idea came from. the part was written with francis mcdormand in mind. could you imagine anyone else in that role? know, if she had said no, we would have been screwed. she is perfect for the part. she has got so much integrity and so much intelligence and range. she isjust perfect, especially in a year like this with the #timesup and #metoo year. it is fantastic with somebody like that who is so brilliant and strong in the film. amazing. thank you for your time, best of luck. thank you very much. i was a bit
5:54 pm
distracted by gemma atherton sporting ruth wilson in the crowd and they had a big hug. there was a big cheer whenjulie walters had her photo taken with her husband behind us. a huge amount of affection for damejulie us. a huge amount of affection for dame julie walters, damejulie walters, as we must call her. there is tobyjones. he is wearing the times are from a bad will stop bethan hold from the telegraph who is with us throughout our coverage this evening, you were picking up on information about gemma atherton as well. usually as soon as the actress appears we are told what she is wearing because it isa very told what she is wearing because it is a very important thing to know. but we have not been told yet. this could be part of the strategy of this moment, even though we are
5:55 pm
talking about it, for us to reflect on other things instead and for the focus not to be on the dresses. there has been this whole campaign around the film industry for a few years now called ask are more, but to talk about the actresses on other things as well. it is conflicting because they rely so much on these designers to dress them and the designers to dress them and the design houses get the publicity. i am sure it will not be a secret for too long. it is interesting it is something we have talked about here for quite a few years in our coverage, we are fascinating to know who designs the dress and very rarely do we say, eddie redmayne is wearing a lovely suit, who designed that? it just does wearing a lovely suit, who designed that? itjust does not get asked as much. maybe that is because all the
5:56 pm
men look the same. some men do go out on a limb, but often they are in the same flat tie. tonight the women are all wearing black, but they look quite different. yes, you are right. we are looking at annette bening who is nominated for film stars don't die in liverpool. daniel kaluuya as well, who we have talked about so much tonight. he is an plastic. two fantastic performers side by side. and i love film stars don't die in liverpool as well. it was not nominated at the oscars. i think annette bening is great. also jamie bell is nominated as best actor. she was playing the hollywood siren gloria grahame in her later years when she came to england and was working in a theatre in watford and
5:57 pm
ends up having to recuperate from an illness with a family in liverpool. julie walters plays the mother in that family, looking after annette bening. she has to put the electric blanket on. it becomes a clash between hollywood celebrity and a good old liverpudlian family. then they are, annette bening, gloria graham, dancing. let's talk about the film we have not touched upon so far. that film is the florida project. an incredible film. a slice of life seen through the eyes of small children. you either most responsible adult, what was it like on the set? it was fantastic, we we re on the set? it was fantastic, we were with people reflecting the story we were telling and it was really good. it was a cast made up of actors and nonprofessionals and
5:58 pm
it was an interesting experience. it was the only way we could capture the story. why has it resonated so much with people around the world? because it expresses how people have to help each other. it is a very human story. it does not have a lot of bells and whistles. thank you so much for your time. and another very loud cheer went up behind us during that interview and some of it was for salma hayek and that is interesting because she was one of the first people we can say to kick—start everything that we are now talking about, because she has written at length and very powerfully about her experiences of making that wonderful film frida, which was produced by harvey weinstein. it is interesting to see
5:59 pm
her here. in 2001 she was one of the big a list celebrities who came to the bafta5. the bafta5 moved to this cold position to be for the oscars, which changed the bafta5 as a world player on the stage and a lot of that was to do with harvey weinstein. he said, i will bring mikea weinstein. he said, i will bring mike a list to you. that is if you change it. so the bafta5 did and we cannot look at all these movements because the bafta weekend was a big weekend for harvey weinstein and it is no longer than that. the ghost of harvey weinstein is here, and the victims are here, that we can now call them the survivors.|j victims are here, that we can now call them the survivors. i am on the red carpet with one of the red stars nominated for best actor, jamie bell. what drew you into this incredible life story? it was an unexpected, extraordinary, surreal
6:00 pm
beautiful portrait of two people meeting each other and falling in love. i almost could not believe it was a true story. but then i met the real guy and i saw the truth and it was a real story. it is hugely important to me that annette bening is in this film and it was important for her to have this input and wisdom and experience. it was one of the most extraordinary things that happened in this man's life. he became a writer after that and wrote a beautiful memoir. we valued his inclusion in it. it did not concentrate too much on the age gap, but portrayed these two people who had a strong love for each other. i think that love transcends all things. this film is about love. i really love how the film had that.
6:01 pm
if the character didn't think about it, i didn't either. you are here with your partner as well. you are wearing a time's up badge. how important is the activity going on on this issue? very, i think. would you like to say something? it's great for us all to be here, the women are mostly in black, the men are wearing the time's up pins to keep this incredible moment in our lives and our history going, and to keep the conversation going. thank you for your time. in fact, jason cummings you and i we re in fact, jason cummings you and i were talking about jamie bell, your excellent bafta knowledge coming through. he was responsible for one of the big upsets when he beat russell crowe to the best actor award. he carried that off. after
6:02 pm
does do that, it does reward the home crowd at several stages. we might see that night. we have some great british performer tonight, and none greater than gary 0ldman. the man himself is here with us. playing winston churchill in darkest hour. what was it like playing someone like that? it was pretty daunting going in. the good news is that the family, the churchill family and particularly randolph churchill, really impressed in the film at the performance. i feel almost like an honorary family member now. 0ccasionally, he calls me great grandpa par. did you try to channel
6:03 pm
his spirit rather than a straight impersonation? we know him so well, the mannerisms of the voice. impersonation? we know him so well, the mannerisms of the voicelj studied a lot of footage and read as much material as i could, like you would with any famous figure. you have to limit what you look at. at the end of the day, it's a creation rather than an impersonation. you almost start with an impersonation and kind of work away from it. you have to own it. it has caught the attention of audiences around the world, not just here attention of audiences around the world, notjust here in england. good luck tonight. you are fairly certain that that award should be his tonight. as you are just reflecting, bafta can throw up surprises. remind us who votes and
6:04 pm
how it works. we talk about this sense of it being someone's turn, or they have that career but not the statu ette. they have that career but not the statuette. how does that play out in the boating? people have loved gary 0ldman for many years. they thought he was great in many things. he was great as count dracula when he went to hollywood. there is a sense among many british voters that he left british cinema when he was doing all of that realism stuff. maybe younger actors from this country might behave differently. daniel kaluuya went to hollywood and has an oscar nomination. hejoins us now. a bafta nomination for get out and also for the rising
6:05 pm
star. what has it been like? it has been a while when. it is great being hit with my family, celebrating and enjoying this. it is stuff that you believe in. it is such a special feeling. why do has the movie resonated with audiences notjust in america but around the world. resonated with audiences notjust in america but around the worldm resonated with the audiences. it is really exciting. it is one of those films that isn't released in the traditional award season towards the end of the year, it has been around for almost 12 months now. where was the point you realised that it could bea the point you realised that it could be a serious award contender. we had a 0&a,
6:06 pm
be a serious award contender. we had a q&a, and it was packed. that was crazy. that journey was surreal. what does it mean to get a rising star nomination. it's amazing. everyone i respected in that year, whatever year it has been, i have been excited about. being amongst these people who fan of, and they are great people, it is a special thing. thank you for your time. i was desperate to hear everything he said, but it is officially getting very loud here now, and it is very hard to tell what anyone is saying. there have been a lot of screams. a lot of cheering. naomie harris as well. we were talking about how they were making the black outfits look individual.
6:07 pm
absolutely stunning. absolutely stunning. a fantastic set of black trousers and a gorgeous, sheer overdressed with further embellishment. loaded with further embellishment. loaded with crystals. her hair looks majestic. she looks fantastic. just shows that you can show your style even when you're wearing black, and gold in her case. black and gold, yes. beautiful it was. iam here yes. beautiful it was. i am here with annette bening, best supporting actress for film stars don't die in liverpool. . this is a story you have known about for 20 yea rs or story you have known about for 20 years or so. why was now the right time to make it? we were very lucky. peter turner, who wrote the book, is from liverpool. he had this unusual relationship with gloria grahame many years ago and wrote a beautiful, tasteful book about this
6:08 pm
important event in his life. he and barbara broccoli, a producer, were friends and they started talking about making it 20 years ago. it was not the right time. it was about five or six years ago that barbara andi five or six years ago that barbara and i ran into each other at the ba ftas, and i ran into each other at the bafta5, in the ladies room, and we looked at each other and said we have got to get back at that. that is when it started to get rolling again. we were very lucky. colin bains came on as director. we put it together. we have wonderful people. i feel so lucky to be a part of it, and the family of people who wanted to make this love story. what made gloria such a complex character to play? she had a complicated personal life, but it was hard for me to get a lot of facts about that. i didn't wa nt to a lot of facts about that. i didn't want to invade anyone's privacy. she was a life force and believed in her
6:09 pm
craft. when things were not going so well, she came to england to do place will. she met this beautiful man from liverpool called peter turner, tool after deeply. they broke up and eventually she got sick and his family in liverpool to corinne. that is what the story is about. —— his family in liverpool took her in. the wonderful annette bening nominated tonight. the film stars are writing thick and fast now. we noticed florence you behind her. she is nominated for the rising starfor lady behind her. she is nominated for the rising star for lady macbeth. there is another that has had an
6:10 pm
impact this year. what is important that these are becoming popular in the cinema as well. it was made into a big hit. lady macbeth as well, which i mentioned was a small film and made a star of its leading role. a great herald of a great career. i think that we can hear from them. another windswept british film. let's hear more about it. i'm joined by the star of lady macbeth, florence pugh. what was getting the nomination like? i mean, it's pretty
6:11 pm
crazy when bafta gives you any nod, let alone a nomination. it has been so wonderfulfor me, let alone a nomination. it has been so wonderful for me, so wonderful for the film, and it is such an amazing category. i'm in front of daniel white now, alongside people like him! you must be delighted to see lady macbeth getting a debut nomination. it constantly keeps letting the film higher and higher, further than we thought it was going to go. this is probably the last time we can milk the film. we have done ourfair share of time we can milk the film. we have done our fair share of events. thank you to everyone who voted, and to people who continue watching the film. we will see you in the follow—up in some ways to the night manager, the next big adaptation. you play that little drummer girl. we started filming a couple of weeks
6:12 pm
ago. we not stopping for a long time. we are in it now, no going back. very excited. i'm pretty chuffed that i got that role. keep your eyes peeled. a lot of people are wearing black. the time's up movement is important for you. how important is what is happening today? it is everything. the reason i suddenly felt empowered about being a young actress now is for that reason. it is so important to talk and to keep listening, and so important that this is everywhere, not just important that this is everywhere, notjust in our industry. to be a young woman right now is a fantastic time, because we will be listened to. i'm pretty excited for the next chapter. thank you. enjoy your evening. thank you. nominated for her role in
6:13 pm
lady macbeth. and the wonderful sally hawkins wiese dotted standing behind her as well. she stars in the programme crepe. it has so many nominations. 12 nominations, leading the pack. it is a strange film, about sally hawkins, a mute clean—up called eliza, who has a relationship with an aquatic creature in that. a film set in the early 19605, during the height of the cold war in the us, set in a nuclearfacility the height of the cold war in the us, set in a nuclear facility where this strange creature is brought in, and the cleaners are the only people who understand the creature. it is about the marginalised and downtrodden of the time. there is a mystery did alien creature. it is
6:14 pm
maybe seen as a riposte to trumpthis america. this is the fantasy film made as a response to be movie films. these issues have been in the air for a very long time. they come up time and time again, which is why they are saying time is up for them. it is time to address them and get the balance right and talk about them. as bevan said earlier, for many years women on the red carpet said, don't ask me about my dress and my nails, ask me other questions. florence pugh said it was an exciting time to be a young actress. while time is up, it is only just actress. while time is up, it is onlyjust beginning for a new generation like her. atime to
6:15 pm
generation like her. a time to sign autographs as well, which is what we saw a time to sign autographs as well, which is what we sanennifer lawrence doing behind us. a lot of screaming for angela jolie, who is right behind you there. she is having a lot of phones thrust at her. she is wearing a british brand, one of her favourite couture brands, the people who designed megan markle's wedding dress. margot robbie hasjust arrived, she is starring in i, tonya, which hasjust openedin starring in i, tonya, which hasjust opened in the uk. is there a sense of the number of british designers worn here tonight? there are definitely a few. angelina jolie is wearing one. sally hawkins is also wearing one. sally hawkins is also
6:16 pm
wearing the same label. designed by tomorrow ralph will stop we also saw the lee james wearing lilli mccartney. we're in the middle of london fashion week, so it is a nice complement to london fashion week to see all these brilliant british designs on the red carpet. you mentioned lee james, who is in the darkest hour. we were talking about gary 0ldman earlier. let's return to learn more about the shape of water. i'm joined by the lead, sally hawkins, who is up for best actress. how challenging was it playing this character, who hardly ever speaks? you have got the technical challenge, but it was a bit of a gift. i was delighted to hear she doesn't speak, because in the script you are trying to work out how you
6:17 pm
make words that the mouth. and make sense. and yet her inner dialogue is so rich, of course. there is no such thing as true silence. all about communication is not really through words at all. it felt completely right. the best moments are when we're not speaking, i think. especially in terms of love, you can't define it. how flattering was it that guillermo del toro, the director and writer, had you in mind when he created it? he had a lot of us when he created it? he had a lot of us in mind, and he wrote for all of us, i think. i think he is one of
6:18 pm
those people... when he has a voice in his head... i always worry, even when we are filming, i was convinced he got the wrong person. he had a name, but the wrong face. then when we met, it was too late. that he was just being polite. you always go through that. that is how he is. i'm not sure how he knew and plucked me from putney into baltimore. i don't how that happened. that is him. he does that with everything. wonderful performance and a beautiful film. enjoy the wonderful performance and a beautifulfilm. enjoy the rest wonderful performance and a beautiful film. enjoy the rest of the evening. i wish i was more eloquent on these occasions. you we re eloquent on these occasions. you were beautifully eloquent. lovely to meet you. have a lovely night. and you. and get drunk. i won't. i'm
6:19 pm
working tonight. wonderful axe macro have a lovely night. sally hawkins wants you to. there was someone i wanted to listen to. there is something curious about the shape of water, but quite enchanting. she was also in happy—go—lucky. . people warm to sally hawkins and her performances. there was another film where she played an american folk artist. she was unlucky. bafta would love to celebrate sally hawkins with an
6:20 pm
underwater, but she's up against frances mcdormand, which is bad luck because she is hard to beat. if anyone has a chance, it is sally hawkins in the shape of water. it is a silent role, and she plays it like an old—fashioned silent screen heroine. iam i am pausing onlyjust because i have spotted who we have. it is saoirse ronan. so many women around the world have said they related to lady bird so much. what does that reaction mean to you?m is the best reaction you can hope for. if anyone wants to see a film or read a book, you have to feel like you see a bit of yourself in it. even if it is set in sacramento and you are from the uk, or it is
6:21 pm
set in space or something. it is that human sentiment of wanting to belong and find your way. that is something everyone can relate to. it is an incredible thing that people have responded to it in the way they have. the young people who are out tonight who love the film so much is great. how strongly did you have to look back through your own memories of that age for emotions, feelings, what you were going through that could help portray lady bird on—screen? could help portray lady bird on-screen? i think i could help portray lady bird on-screen? i thinki still could help portray lady bird on-screen? i think i still have them. i don't know if they are gone. it was only a few years ago that i was that age. 0ne it was only a few years ago that i was that age. one of the things that i related to was needing to go somewhere else, go to a different city or find out who you are away from where you grew up, in order to be able to really truly appreciate it. so i could relate to that. i
6:22 pm
think what everyone goes to add that age, which is figuring yourself out, and your insecurities and trying on different characters to see which one fits you. i think that is some thing that every young person goes through. have a wonderful rest of the evening. thank you. saoirse ronan, who came to prominence in atonement. 0ne ronan, who came to prominence in atonement. one of our favourite films this year, lady bird. did we spot 0ctavia spencer in the crowd ? we did we spot 0ctavia spencer in the crowd? we are getting so deafened by all of the cheers, it is slightly overwhelming. i am conscious that we have not talked a huge amount about a best supporting actress, about that particular category. we touched on kristin scott thomas because she is in darkest hour. i have not seen leslie manville, what are my
6:23 pm
favourite actresses of all time it isa favourite actresses of all time it is a great category because there is her and allisonjanney, who to my mind steals i, tonya. i know she's not technically the star, but it is herfilm. not technically the star, but it is her film. she is great. she plays the mother of tonya harding, played by margot robbie in that. she is fantastic. she is probably the favourite to win. i know that bafta... they come and kind of do the hustings, they come to the bafta membership. she plays the mother of tonya harding. a monstrous figure in many ways in this story of ice—skating. if they are not watching us, they will be watching the ice—skating. it will be coming to the fore there as well. it is about the commitment a mother makes to get her daughter all the way to the olympics. a terrible story of what happened with tonya harding in
6:24 pm
the olympics, and the strength needed to kind of go all the way. allison janney is needed to kind of go all the way. allisonjanney is traffic here, a ha rd allisonjanney is traffic here, a hard smoking mother who has a tough relationship with her daughter. we mentioned lady bird, which is a tender mother—daughter relationship. this is a very different relationship, kind of brutal. you think it would be very much focused on the ice—skating. it is a hard—core comedy, very brutal. so much love for her from her work on west wing. as you say, a very tough category. laurie metcalf is terrific
6:25 pm
as well, leslie manville. it was interesting, many years ago, leslie manville and gary 0ldman were an item. they had a son. they are reunited on the red carpet. i don't think they are frosty, but it is interesting for them to be back in the same room, and potentially carrying off the best performing awards. mark kermode is convinced that leslie manville will win the award. that would be quite a turn up. if she wins the oscar, it will. i don't think she could do the whole thing and win at the bafta5 as well. leslie manville is not a showy performer, has done 11 films for
6:26 pm
mike leigh, which accrues you a lot of love over the years. never the main character in those movies, but a brilliant supporting actress. again, so superb as cyril in phantom thread. this controlling figure, done up to the waist. the only person who can floor daniel day—lewis's character. fingers crossed. let's see what happens in that regard. the best supporting actress is a strong category. let's see who takes home the statu ette category. let's see who takes home the statuette tonight. 0ctavia spencer in the shape of water also nominated. we have also had from kristin scott thomas who was talking about her proud involvement in the time's up campaign. we began that conversation because we started talking about i, tonya, which has only just opened here talking about i, tonya, which has onlyjust opened here in the uk. i
6:27 pm
was saying that i think it is allison janney‘s film. she was saying that i think it is allisonjanney‘s film. she is the knockout, as the hardest mother you could ever possibly imagine. i think we can hear from could ever possibly imagine. i think we can hearfrom her. we arejoined by we can hearfrom her. we are joined by allisonjanney, one of the stars of i, tonya. how hard was it ringing empathy to a character it would be so easy to play as a monster? that was my challenge, to bring humanity to her. ijust had to issue that someone like that, i know that she started out as a little girl, so something had to have terribly gone wrong in her life. i have to imagine that she too was abused, it is those sort of things i had to piece together on my own. i did not have the advantage of meeting the woman and asking what her childhood was like. but i
6:28 pm
approach every role, even a real live person, as having to have it make sense to me. also knowing how much it took, growing up as a figure skater, i knew had much it took to ta ke skater, i knew had much it took to take me to the rink before school and after—school, and what that meant. that helped me understand what she had to go through to get her daughter this unbelievable opportunity to be a start, to have success. those things rooted me in her humanity. that's myjob. briefly, they say that the cliche, never work with children or animals will stop you had the younger tonya harding and a parrot as well.|j auditioned three parrots. i had a breathing tube, and he was
6:29 pm
fascinated with that so started picking at my ear. but i wasn't going to let him stop me telling my story. i can definitely say he was my favourite animal co—star of all time. i love working with animals. thank you for your time was up enjoy your evening. i'm so glad you asked her about the parrot. i wondered whether it was cgi. you have not seen it, you will have deceived to understand it. it is quite an achievement. allison janney, much loved by so many people, as you suggested earlier, not least because she was amazing in the west wing, but also in i, tonya. i could not hear everything, because that man there walked behind us at the same time. my goodness, the number of screens for gary 0ldman! will he walk home with the bafta award for best actor for his
6:30 pm
performance as churchill in the darkest hour? he is now standing close to the entrance to the royal albert hall here in central london. that final stage, the final flash of light bulbs before people go inside for the evening ceremony. the cheers are still very loud. i'm sort of starting to get the sense, certainly among the public, not that they are the ones who vote, but there will be a lot of disappointed people here tonight if he doesn't take her the ba fta for tonight if he doesn't take her the bafta for best actor. we have heard so much about this film already and i am told that gary 0ldman's performance is getting standing ovation around the country. he does some of the speeches of winston churchill and people have been standing cheering in the aisles and roaring it on again. those
6:31 pm
speeches were heard on the wireless in the 405 and now they are being seen. he is to reflect as churchill. he views it with the same maverick spirit that he brings to all his films. in dracula he was naughty and cheeky. in george smiley in taker taylor, it was the same and he brought energy to films he has directed as well. it has been a fantastic career that i think will be crowned tonight by that fantastic performance. it is almost a camper and theatrical performance. it is not saying this is real history, this is an actor's take on history. doing churchill is like doing hamlet. millions of people do their own version of churchill and this is gary 0ldman's version of churchill
6:32 pm
and it is helped by the hair and make—up department. if they do not win this bafta, there is nojustice. there is always a fellowship at ba fta. there is always a fellowship at bafta. tell us who we know will be receiving the fellowship. this is a spoiler. it goes to ridley scott, a pillar of the british establishment who has been working since the 19705 with films like alien and blade runner. he made the original blade runner. he made the original blade runner and the second version is now nominated. but ridley scott's career has come full circle with the legacy he started out with in 1982 and the original blade runner. he has also been involved with thelma and louise and gladiator, so he is one of the big film—making presences. all the money in the world is nominated for
6:33 pm
with christopher plummer. he replaced kevin spacey when the sexual allegations surface. they got the film made in exactly the same time, so he is still pulling of these feeds of directing and that is why he is getting awarded a fellowship tonight. a bit more about that later. let's talk about the film we have not talked about much, the death of stalin. armando iannucci, best screenplay. and best film as well. it does not seem like obvious comedy material, the death ofa obvious comedy material, the death of a figure like stalin. certainly, the death was grim and hilarious at the death was grim and hilarious at the same time and that is what appealed to me about it. at the times they all said reign of terror, a despot, everyone is too scared to say the right thing or the wrong
6:34 pm
thing and everyone behaves abnormally. we found when we were researching it, people used to joke about stalin. but it is like comedy was the way out, it was the way of undercutting the terror. and you made the decision to have the actors using their own accents, inspired by sean connery in the hunt for red 0ctober. sean connery in the hunt for red october. i wanted it to feel real and it would not feel real if eve ryo ne and it would not feel real if everyone put on fake russian accent. the russian press said thank you for not using fake russian accent, hate that. and what is the situation in russia? has it been resolved? not yet. i have spoken to the russian distributors and there is a russian election coming up next month and maybe they got sensitive about it. i am still hopeful it will come out. people who have seen it have loved
6:35 pm
it and the banning it has made it more infamous in the country anyway. it is the opposite of what they wanted. thank you for talking to us. enjoy the rest of the evening. armando iannucci behind so many favourites on television and now the death of stalin and you probably spotted leslie manville standing behind him, nominated in the best supporting actress category alongside daniel day lewis in phantom thread. we are edging towards what should be the closing down of the red carpet. they don't call it that. i have stood here on many years when they have had a few comedic moments when the late comers scuttle up the red carpet and don't assign any autographs because there is no time at all. we are just waiting for one or two people to arrive here at the albert hall to
6:36 pm
night. no sooner do i talk about leslie manville. .. with us right now, best supporting actress nominee for phantom thread. did you immerse yourself in 505 fashion to prepare for this role? what research did you do? there is a lot of delightful research you can do, you can start at the v&a. you can read lots of wonderful books and look at lots of amazing pictures. yes, i had seven months to do all of that and it was a glorious time to immerse myself in that whole world. i like clothes anyway, so it was not like, i have got to read up about this period in fashion history and it was a drudge, it was wonderful.” think that is harder to research is this co—dependent relationship that your character has with her brother, played by sir daniel day lewis. how ha rd played by sir daniel day lewis. how hard was that to work on, or did it
6:37 pm
click immediately? thankfully it clicked. we did not know each other immediately, but once we knew we we re immediately, but once we knew we were going to play brother and sister, a good few months before the film, we got to know each other and became friends and easy with each other and translated that to these two brother and sister who are immensely comfortable with each other and very easy and can have brea kfast other and very easy and can have breakfast without speaking and it is still 0k. breakfast without speaking and it is still ok. that thankfully happened organically and thankfully we got on and it was all a dream. for you what was the message? what came out of the movie? is it an exploration of art versus real life? i suppose it isa art versus real life? i suppose it is a film about how we want love in our lives but some people want to be autonomous and maintain their individuality and their own life, therefore they can block love out
6:38 pm
and they can be very controlling and at times narcissistic about themselves and things. but it is about how we juggle all of those things which is relevant to all of our lives. leslie manville, best supporting actress nominee, have a lovely evening. thank you, i will. leslie manville, nominated for best supporting actress alongside daniel day lewis. let's see whether either of them take home an award here tonight. as we approach the end of our programme, it is worth reflecting on what we have seen on the red carpet almost exclusively black. i saw one lady who perhaps was not wearing it and it is interesting how strictly it has been absurd in that sense —— observed in that sense, and there was no loss of individuality. we have seen some really striking designs. there was
6:39 pm
talk about naomie harris in that incredible beaded stress that she was wearing. kristin scott thomas looked incredibly chic wearing deora, designed bya looked incredibly chic wearing deora, designed by a female designer. a few messages in that. we have not seen as many suits as i may be thought we might. there were a lot of women wearing trouser suits at the golden globes. it really has been an night of a great stress, but nodding to the dress code. and it was interesting about leslie manville's dress. was like the character in the film. usually you expect somebody nominated to be in a big, world—famous designer, but she is wearing and ballantyne, london couturier who dresses the society women in london. i think she dresses the of cornwall. it is very much a london centric choice. a quite nice change. an unusualtake. that is
6:40 pm
london centric choice. a quite nice change. an unusual take. that is a film for anyone who has not seen it. the attention to detail. it is nominated in costume design and rightly so because it is beautiful. it is so beautifully done. they spent several years researching every tiny aspect. if you want to appreciate the time that those into all these dresses tonight, you want to watch that film. the last minute working through the night to get everything finished, the precise measurements that go into everything. daniel day lewis trained for a year at the new york city ballet to master the techniques of couturier. he studied all these vintage designs. he recreated his own balenciaga dress for his wife. it isa own balenciaga dress for his wife. it is a real art and it is a real tribute to that artform. it ties nicely into the red carpet tonight.
6:41 pm
it isa nicely into the red carpet tonight. it is a love letter to the craft of making a dress which we think is so old—fashioned making a dress which we think is so old —fashioned and totally making a dress which we think is so old—fashioned and totally out of the reach of 99.9% of the population. but for those who could afford it, and back then a few more people could, it is absolutely beautiful to watch. nowadays most of us were things that are made in factories in different countries. the women on the red carpet tonight, it will all have been made with incredible attention to detail. that is why a film like phantom thread is successful because it pays attention to the craft. behind that it is all about the film and how it comes together. there is an element of craft in how a film like this comes together as well. and the duke and duchess of cambridge arriving at the royal albert hall. we were talking earlier about the bafta fellowship, one is awarded every year. ridley
6:42 pm
scott is receiving the fellowship tonight and it is customary for that fellowship to be presented by prince william. it is. he is a patron of ba fta william. it is. he is a patron of bafta as well. and it is important for ba fta bafta as well. and it is important for bafta to have that patronage with the royal family and william in particular because he is a bit of a fan. i know kate is as well. they don't mind a night in with the telly and a box set those two. it is important to continue that patronage throughout the royal family and it gives a seal of approval to the british film industry and it shows how important it is to the national culture and national conversation that a film like this can do. and the royal couple walking right behind us and it is interesting that it isa behind us and it is interesting that it is a largely green dress with a nod to black. when i looked at it on the screen i thought it was black.
6:43 pm
as she appeared in front of us it appears to be green. she is seven months pregnant, so an added challenge for her. i think the royal family very rarely get involved in political messaging and so perhaps it is not such a surprise that she did notjoin in with it is not such a surprise that she did not join in with the it is not such a surprise that she did notjoin in with the rest of the women and were black tonight. we are a lwa ys women and were black tonight. we are always told eventually, as with the actresses, eventually we are told which designer is responsible for what they are wearing. presumably at some point we will be told here as well. we know, rightly or wrongly, how much interest there is in what she is wearing, and now meghan markle as well. you can make a real statement. to what extent that she we re statement. to what extent that she were british designers as well? she wears a lot of british designers. a
6:44 pm
few weeks ago she was in norway and what a wonderful alexander mcqueen dress. i what a wonderful alexander mcqueen dress. lam what a wonderful alexander mcqueen dress. i am wondering if this is alexander mcqueen, her go to designer. this would have been made especially for her. we are still waiting to hear which designer she is wearing. due to have her third child in april, and it is a very chilly night for everyone to be out here at the best of times. i have lost cou nt here at the best of times. i have lost count of the number of actresses we lost count of the number of a ctresses we have lost count of the number of actresses we have seen really physically shivering here tonight on the red carpet. it is quite interesting. we know when the awards are. these beautiful dresses are designed for them. i look and think, could they not have gone the extra mile and design something with shoulders? we need to start talking about the red carpet coat. and for william as well with his new haircut as well, it would have been a bit
6:45 pm
chilly tonight. i thought he looked very stylish as well. thank you for bringing it back to the men as well. jason and bethany, it has been a fascinating night. a very quick thought from you. what will happen tonight? i think we will see britain awarded very well. we will see gary 0ldman carry off the prize and i think we will see dunkirk rallied the troops and bring home some big prizes. we will find out in a while. very good to have you both with us. thank you very much indeed and that you for watching our special coverage here from the royal albert hall in london. the british academy film awards get under way in the next few minutes and we will be back on bbc news in a couple of hours from now to analyse the results, to go through it all with jason
6:46 pm

55 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on