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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  February 25, 2018 7:00am-8:00am GMT

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of its kind, we recreate experiment of its kind, we recreate the nation to find out. coming soon to bbc four. hello, this is breakfast, with christian fraser and rachel burden. russia's olympic doping ban is to stay in place for today's closing ceremony in south korea. but it could be lifted if no more athletes test positive for drugs in pyeongchang. good morning, it's sunday, 25th february. also this morning... the un security council unanimously approves a resolution calling for a ceasefire in syria, but there are reports that government airstrikes have continued. they didn't ask you for id? your age? no. how children are still able to buy corrosive substances in an area with a record
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number of acid attacks. in sport... scotland record their first victory over england in a decade to win the calcutta cup and blow the six nations championship wide open. good morning. another chilly start to the day but what a day on offer across many parts of the british isles. plenty of sunshine to go around but it will stay cool throughout the day. more detail on the upcoming week for you in just a few minutes. good morning. first, our main story. the international olympic committee has decided not to lift russia's suspension for doping in time for today's closing ceremony at the winter games in south korea. but the ban could be lifted at a later date if no more of the country's athletes test positive at pyeongchang. our correspondent, stephen mcdonell, sent us this report from the olympic park. russian athletes will enter the main stadium here under the olympic flag,
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but for the closing ceremony, like the opening, they will be individuals, not technically representing their country. if no further rushing doping violations emerge from these games, the bn on tea m emerge from these games, the bn on team russia will be lifted the future events. —— the ban. a small group of protesters tried to blocked the road. but it crossed the border ata the road. but it crossed the border at a different point. the general as it used to hear of masterminding several attacks on the south including the alleged torpedoing of the south korean naval vessel. 46 seamen were killed. in the coming hours, he willjoin ivanka trump in the stands. the white house says there are currently no plans for the two to meet. at the opening ceremony, images of the us vice
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president avoiding contact with the north korea's leader sister travelled around the world. the us government seems determined to make sure a government seems determined to make surea similar government seems determined to make sure a similar situation is not repeated. syrian activists claim government forces continued their air strikes last night, despite a un security council resolution calling for an immediate ceasefire. it's hoped that an end to fighting in the rebel—held area of eastern ghouta would allow humanitarian aid to be brought in and injured civilians rescued. but the syrian government has criticised the vote. our reporter, andy moore, has the latest. another air attack on the besieged enclave of eastern ghouta yesterday. shortly after the un decision, similar bombings were reported. even as they voted unanimously in support of the resolution, there was doubt on all sides about how much effect it would have. the text calling for
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an immediate ceasefire took place... it will not apply to anyjihadi militants. we are deeply sceptical that the regime will comply. but we supported this resolution because we must demand nothing less. we owe this to the innocent people of syria, begging for help. the russians said it was naive to think difficult issues could be addressed. the syrian ambassador said his country had the right to act in self—defence. translation: this will not succeed and it will backfire sooner or later. we have the right to defend ourselves according to the charter that international aid agencies stand ready to help but it is not safe enough yet for them to go in. we are ready to roll out assistance to be able to cover and reach people
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who have been besieged for a long time and bring them much needed life—saving assistance. time and bring them much needed life-saving assistance. the un secretary general has called for eastern cooter —— the un secretary general has called eastern ghouta hell on earth. terrible scenes in syria. sridevi kapoor, one of bollywood's greatest leading ladies, has died at the age of 54. she was at a family wedding in dubai where she's thought to have suffered a heart attack. joining us now from our london newsroom is asian network's entertainment reporter, haroon rashid. good morning. thank you for your time. a huge figure in bollywood? absolutely. sridevi kapoor, one of the greatest indian actresses of all time, she starred in over 150 films ina career time, she starred in over 150 films in a career spanning more than 50 yea rs. in a career spanning more than 50 years. many memorable performances. people love and celebrate her. she was only four years old when she began acting and in 1978, she made
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her bollywood debut. films like sadma, chaalbaaz, mr india, one of the favourite actresses of her generation but of all time, a comic timing, great dance performances, just some of the areas where she really excelled. her smile, those big eyes, her charm, charisma on—screen, it has left a mark for many people. today the entire world is mourning on social media actresses like this will have treated, a dark day for the world of entertainment. another says she only became an activist after seeing sridevi kapoor and she was a school of acting injust sridevi kapoor and she was a school of acting in just her own self —— another says she only became an actor. children were able to buy corrosive substances in an area of london which has suffered a record number of acid attacks.
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an investigation by newham council found that some shopkeepers were still selling items like bleach despite there being a voluntary code of conduct in place. simon browning reports. almost 400 of london's 1500 almost 400 of london's1500 acid attacks in the last five years have happened in the borough of newham, the highest amount in the uk. she is 14, part of an undercover sting to see if she can buy corrosive su bsta nces see if she can buy corrosive substances from high street shops in the area. i want you to go in to try to purchase caustic soda, bleach, other corrosive substances. he was working with trading standards to test the retailers who have signed up test the retailers who have signed up to test the retailers who have signed uptoa test the retailers who have signed up to a voluntary scheme to prevent such sales to shoppers under the age of 21. how much did it cost you? and again and ask if any idea? £1. no. they didn't ask you for any ide? two
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shops did not sell to her but we did. the shops selling substances such as bleach have broken no law as the restrictions are voluntary. new figures obtained by radio 5 live suggests the scale of attacks involving acid and other corrosive su bsta nces involving acid and other corrosive substances has trebled in five yea rs, 646 substances has trebled in five years, 646 attacks recorded in england and wales in 2017. last autumn, the government promised new laws on the sale and carrying of corrosive and assets but so far no legislation has been introduced. —— corrosives and acids. ina in a keynote brexit speech tomorrow, jeremy corbyn is expected to commit labour to backing being in some kind
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of customs union but not remaining in the single market. business up front, party at the back. love it or hate it, the mullet was the epitome of style in the 19705 and has lived on in one small australian town. kurri kurri is home to mullet fest. this weekend, over 180 people competed in five categories, including the grubby mullet, the lady's mullet and junior mullet. business up front, party town back, i have never heard that! i have never really liked the mullet. i think we need to check photos from your past! icon already —— i can already feel people on twitter... returning to one of our main stories. the closing ceremony today of the winter olympics but the ioc
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have decided not to lift russia's ban for doping. let us get the headlines out of the way, billy morgan who won bronze in the big air event for britain, he will carry the flag. in the last few minutes, the russian ice hockey team have won but the russians will not be able to parade under their own flag. that is right. they will be very disappointed, especially after the second gold medal you just mentioned, they had hoped at these games russia's isolation would come to an end, they could walk into the main stadium as team russia, carrying the russian flag, that this would be the end of the punishment they have had after the mass doping at the sochi games macro. it is not to be. they will be very disappointed. they at least know that as long as there are no more drug failures at these games, as long as no more russian athletes
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fail doping tests, at the next olympics, they will be able to. this is going to be very political rights to the end at pyeongchang, we will have a closing ceremony with ivanka trump and the north korean general potentially sitting again close to her, will they talk to one another? it is going to be very fascinating to watch it all unfold in the coming hours. thank you very much. there's growing concern over so—called "county lines" crime, where gangs in cities send young runners to sell drugs in small towns. the government is investing £13 million to try to tackle the problem. ministers want social workers, police, nurses and other professionals to build relationships with young people at risk from sex gangs and drug dealers. joining us now from our london newsroom is ex—offender turned youth gang worker, junior smart. thank you very much for talking to us. county lines, a phrase some
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people might be familiar with, a growing problem with police and other authorities around the country. that is right. seriously, we are talking about thousands of young people being criminally exploited, a very serious issue, it is hidden, and it is more national than people care to realise. if you just look at the uk, we have got around 450 county lines operations, each involving children around the age of about 11 plus, a very serious issue. it requires organisations to be working together in partnership, but more importantly, it is about engaging with young people and the work we have been doing is using credible people with first—hand trained experienced and it involves prevention as well, going into schools and colleges and pupil referral units and helping the young
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people demystify the reality of what they might be getting involved in before they get into being criminally exploited. the thing to pick up on, the fact is that children as young as 11 are being drawn into this, it was a much higher rage. any age of child is clearly not a good thing. —— it was a much higher age. clearly not a good thing. —— it was a much higherage. how a much higher age. how do they get sucked into this kind of criminal behaviour ultimately? there are a number of different ways. the work we have been doing, my project around this, a multitude of reasons why people get involved. you have got the stuff at them on social media, of course, promoting how much money can be made through this kind of lifestyle, criminal lifestyle choice, you have got young people being coerced, pushed into this. you have got girls being drawn in by the peer group. ultimately, it leads to
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the same ending which is the young person ends up with drug debt, also known as debt bondage, they end up in really serious criminal situations that are life changing because once a young person is criminalised, their life choices, their outcomes are changed. it ends up their outcomes are changed. it ends up with young girls as well being used and sexually exploited. a real serious matter. it is really shocking and very hard to know how these vulnerable kids can extract themselves from these kinds of communities when the social hierarchy is so built around this kind of industry, this kind of business. how do you draw them out? we have been really fortunate, the way we forge really good working partnerships, we work alongside police, probation, social services, but i think what is critical for us
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as we have that cultural competence. we understand the complexities that are involved. it will not be as simple asjust are involved. it will not be as simple as just saying to someone, exit, especially if they have accrued drug debts. what we are able to do is provide them with tools and this is what comes back to things like prevention, going into schools, we impart real tools to the young people so they can use them immediately. it is about connecting with the services. if the services are not communicating with each other, in many ways, they are more territorial than the gangs, they are not sharing information, the systems do not communicate. one of the key things is, even if a young person is out of your area, it is about providing support and making sure that until that young person is back safe... we hear that so often, services are not joined safe... we hear that so often, services are notjoined up. i want to ask about you personally as a
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kid. what would have been the thing that could have diverted you away from that kind of criminal life? for me, it would have had to ultimately come from somebody that knew the reality that kind of could relate to me in a way that i knew, that they understood where i was coming from and what i was going through. i think the problem with a lot of the practitioners, organisations and people we come across is the fact they have their lack of... they definitely have the good will, but they lack that cultural competence of the reality of what's going on and through my servers now and many others, one of the great things were able to do is bridge that gap because we understand what the reality is and we understand the difficult choices that might be involved in extricating someone out and that has shown itself in the successes we have had. absolutely, and that's where the work you do is so
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important, junior. thanks so much for your time, junior smart, —— and ex—offender to now helps others. now, this is often a weekend where people put away their winter woollies but if you were planning that, listen to philip, because, oh my goodness. 0h my goodness. oh my goodness indeed. a great brit of british understatement there. we are tapping in increasingly to some cold air that has been there for awhile over scandinavia, across the north—western quarter of russia. it has widely spread across the continent and it is coming our way. you will feel it cold to start the day. there's plenty of sunshine to come around. plenty of sunshine across scotland and the north—east of england. the temperature is not as high as yesterday. some people
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got nine yesterday. not bad at all. today, five, six, seven for some protected from the easterly breezes on the cards. it's tonight that we see the first signs of a bit of a change. something of a granular look of this cloud coming in here and we see snow showers coming into a cold atmosphere, temperatures widely across the british isles below freezing. once you start putting moisture from the north sea into that, that is when we start to see the first signs of a significant change in the british weather pattern. it will feel much colder tomorrow in today and some wintry showers, light for the most part i would have thought, and largely confined to the eastern side of the british isles on what will be a much colder feeling day. one, british isles on what will be a much colderfeeling day. one, two, three degrees or so, if you get above freezing. notice the area of snow we are talking about there, that i think will drift across the north—east of england overnight and could be an issue for wales and north england as we come through
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tuesday. the showers keep coming and some areas from tuesday through wednesday, all of us feeling colder but this no maps will lie because it is so cold that they will begin to build up, several centimetres, maybe ten centimetres for these eastern areas fully exposed to this great raft of showers. they keep coming tuesday into wednesday, wednesday into thursday. my concern about this chart is the number of isobars, so the wind is picking up. and we have this low pressure in the south. so what? firstly, we begin to see of significant prolonged snow coming up into all of that cold air. but is quite a shopping list of weather. for today and much of tomorrow, no great problems. then, disruptive snow, feeling much colder, we could be down at —15 wind chill wednesday and thursday because of that strengthening wind. there will be
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some sunshine, especially across western pa rt some sunshine, especially across western part sheltered from that easterly wind, and additional ice a hazard, so things ramp up as we work our way through the coming week. thank you, phil. message received. if you've ever tried to lose a pound or two, spare a thought forjockeys who are constantly having to drop their weight ahead of races. now britain's most successful jockey, tony mccoy, is working with researchers to advise riders how to lose weight without damaging their long term health. judy hobson reports. horse racing is part of our national culture, but what is life like for those at the very centre of the sport? for the jockeys, those at the very centre of the sport? forthejockeys, it can those at the very centre of the sport? for thejockeys, it can be dangerous, but most say the toughest pa rt dangerous, but most say the toughest part of thejob dangerous, but most say the toughest part of the job is the relentless struggle to keep the weight off. keeping their weight low is an integral part of a jockey‘s job, because if they can't make the weight, while they wait to get the rights. if they don't get the rights, their careers could be over. southwell races and the jockeys are
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weighing in before the first race. today, paul mulrennan is reading —— riding at nine stone, not easy to achieve when you asked by foot seven. yes, when i got here, i had one last pound to get off so jump seven. yes, when i got here, i had one last pound to get off sojump in the stow, shaved and the pound just flew off. paul used to starve himself and carry out extreme sweating to lose the pounds. and this pressure affects those at the very top of the sport. a p mccoy was championjockey very top of the sport. a p mccoy was champion jockey for 20 consecutive yea rs. champion jockey for 20 consecutive years. i was having hot baths and running with taxon and saunas and probably everything you shouldn't do, iwas probably everything you shouldn't do, i was doing. probably everything you shouldn't do, iwas doing. but probably everything you shouldn't do, i was doing. but everything changed for paul when he came to this university in liverpool. george wilson is a formerjockey and heads up wilson is a formerjockey and heads up the world's leading research on how jockeys can make up the world's leading research on howjockeys can make weight safely. george is measuring how much body fat paul is covering —— carrying.
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you only have 11% in total. we have to tell jockeys they you only have 11% in total. we have to telljockeys they must be realistic about what they are trying to achieve. we offer up individually devised diet and nutrition programmes and exercise programmes based upon the research, as opposed to the jockeys adopting these culturally driven methods which obviously would not be the best for your health. extreme dieting can cause serious long—term physical and even mental health problems in the industry says it wants these practices to become a thing of the past. so this programme aims to educate riders in having a healthy diet combined with fat burning exercises. a p mccoy says he regrets not having access to this research earlier in his career. maybe i could have been so much better if i'd had the access to something like this in the access to something like this in the early part of my career. it could have made me better, could have made me last longer. it could have made me last longer. it could have made me a much betterjockey.
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dieticians are now routinely at ra cetracks dieticians are now routinely at racetracks and advice on healthy weight making —— healthy weight making is made at racing schools. paul is now happy and healthy and riding 100 winners a year. very interesting that and viewers on viewers in the north west can see more on that story tomorrow night at 7.30 on inside out in the north west. the programme will also be available on the bbc iplayer. let's have a look at the papers. i have been somewhat distracted because i think our guest has found the best story of the day in the papers. kick us off because it is a story about winston churchill's secret love. i love world war ii
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histories, documentaries, and here isa histories, documentaries, and here is a fact that i knew nothing about. that during the war, he was having an affair. it can't be true. and what is interesting about it is that it's only come to light recently. essentially what happened was during the second world war, the affair was known by the americans and there was a potential blackmail possibility, so they shipped the lady back to the uk. but what was interesting is that the private secretary of both winston churchill, neville chamberlain and clement attlee ‘s new office and in an interview before his death in 1987, he did a taped interview for the archive, and no one had bothered to forensically listen to the interview until the year before last and in it, he reveals absolute first—hand of this affair. do we know with absolute certainty that this wasn't just gossip that was recorded and going down in history? no, absolute fact.
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it's in a couple of the papers, actually, but this is more in—depth than there was a documentary on channel 4 next week which goes into greater detail but what is also interesting is that churchill's son randolph also had a slight affair. with the same women? yes! . and she is the great, great aunt of kuroda levine. there is a picture of her. she is striking. this is a cecil beating photo. —— a cecil beaton photo and how contemporary is it. you would think it could have been taken this week. she was a woman of high calibre and aristocracy. doris castle rose was her name. she became a lady as well later in life. but it is around 1942. it was mainly the fear of blackmail and one of the things that is really interesting in
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some of the films is how controlled the press was during the second world war, but of course they didn't have that control in america and that was the fear, that the american press would reveal the story and that would have had devastating consequences for the second world war because it would have undermined churchill's authority. it would have been an incredible scandal. having just tapping scandal of the king only a few years before with the abdication —— having just had the abdication scandal with the king only a few years before. it is a good story, across a few papers. we could spend a morning on this but we must move on. tell us about this one. you are not aware of the value of money on the road when a music? this is a warning. fish from marillion was unfortunately slightly ripped off but has won the court
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case. he is saying that legacy artists often have a new career, he has his own recording artist —— recording studio in his house, but on the road it is the memorabilia thatis on the road it is the memorabilia that is of real value and he is a band should be really aware of that value because it is another source of income. as we all know, streaming income is low. how easy is that, because you are focused on what is going on on stage cutter well, hiring somebody else to do it. going on on stage cutter well, hiring somebody else to do itm going on on stage cutter well, hiring somebody else to do it. it is interesting that third—party company, this is a list of companies doing really well in terms of exports and if you look down here at number56, exports and if you look down here at number 56, there is a company called sandbank which was not aware of but they do a of merchandising distribution, and what is interesting, linking the two together, issue have an artist saying how important it is, but also
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a company talking about that distribution. we were talking about gig tickets on five live recently and saying artist don't make as much money with memorabilia now because ticket prices are so expensive. of course, and most artists are making less money now on what is played out. the andrew marr show is on bbc one at 9 o'clock this morning. andrew, what's coming up today? the international trade secretary liam fox is here because we are told the government has a new way of leaving the eu. what does that mean? iam also leaving the eu. what does that mean? i am also joined leaving the eu. what does that mean? i am alsojoined by labour's is dharma because apparently jeremy corbyn has changed his position on the customs union, a very important development that. and i am joined by matt, the daily telegraph's much loved cartoonist and much more at
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9am. avery loved cartoonist and much more at 9am. a very busy hour as always. we look forward to that later on. we're here on the bbc news channel until nine this morning, and coming up... 10—year—old guy can not only play the bagpipes — he can do it one—handed. we'll find out how instruments are being specially adapted for young musicians with physical disabilities. and we'll look back at team gb's best ever performance at a winter olympics, with former olympian turned commentator, chemmy alcott. and as the temperatures are set to drop here, we'll find out why the uk compares so poorly to our european neighbours when it comes to keeping our homes warm and what we can do about it. and actually we will have more details on the weather forecast for next week as well. the snow to come. phil says it will be monday, tuesday, but it will get extremely cold. all that to come on the bbc news channel. but this is where we say goodbye to viewers on bbc one. hello, this is breakfast with christian fraser and rachel burden. good morning, here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news.
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the international olympic committee has decided not to lift russia's olympic suspension for doping ahead of the closing ceremony of the winter olympics in south korea. it means that the russian athletes, who were allowed to compete as neutrals, cannot march under their own flag. moscow had asked for the restoration of its olympic status, but two russian athletes failed drug tests in pyeongchang. syrian activists claim government forces continued their air strikes last night, despite a un security council resolution calling for an immediate ceasefire. it's hoped that an end to fighting in the rebel held area of eastern ghouta would allow humanitarian aid to be brought in and injured civilians rescued. the syrian government has criticised the vote. more than 80 senior labour figures have issued a statement in the observer newspaper warning jeremy corbyn that he will be unable to fund his promised investment in schools, hospitals and social care unless the uk stays in the eu single market.
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in a keynote brexit speech tomorrow, he is expected to commit labour to backing permanent membership of some kind of customs union, but not remaining in the single market. children were able to buy corrosive substances in an area of london which has suffered a record number of acid attacks. an investigation by newham council found that some shopkeepers were still selling items like bleach despite there being a voluntary code of conduct in place. new figures obtained by the bbc have shown that the number of attacks involving corrosive substances in england and wales has more than trebled in five years. actress in the chambers has died at the age of 53. doreen —— the actress emma chambers has died at the age of 53. dawn french posted on twitter
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saying, i will miss her very much. hugh grant also treated, a brilliant actress, very sad news. —— hugh grant also tweeted. this is the kind of morning when i play up my name. there was this tweet from scotland police yesterday after the outcome of the calcutta cup in murrayfield in which they said, we are receiving calls reporting singing and cheering but it seems particularly focused on that area of murrayfield stadium. we have alerted all on duty officers and we will investigate these reports, some police officers will walk 500 miles! i think eddiejones will be walking 500 miles away from newspaper coverage this morning. brutal. amazing. hugh
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newspaper coverage this morning. brutal. amazing. huthones, ten yea rs brutal. amazing. huthones, ten years since scotland beat england in the calcutta cup at murrayfield and the calcutta cup at murrayfield and the scenes were incredible, as rachel was just saying. 25—13, the scenes were incredible, as rachel wasjust saying. 25—13, it finished. it opens up the six nations title race while ireland remain on course for the grand slam. olly foster reports. england are always out some at murrayfield, rarely are they outplayed. hugh jones's murrayfield, rarely are they outplayed. huthones's early murrayfield, rarely are they outplayed. hugh jones's early score was the first against them at murrayfield for 14 years. it is hugh jones amidst the chaos, he has the try! two more brilliant scottish tries by half—time. they were 16 points up. who can stop him? owen
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farrell scrawled all england's points, his sole try gave them some belief, but they gave away too many penalties. sam underhill was sin binned for a dangerous tackle. no way back. just joy for scotland. scotla nd way back. just joy for scotland. scotland have waited ten years for this and it is all the sweeter because they have scuppered england's hopes of the grand slam. but there is still one team left in the championship still unbeaten. ireland remain top of the table with three wins out of three although they tried to throw it away against wales. they came from behind to go 14 points clear in the second half as they easily punched holes in the welsh defence. wales came back off the ropes and when this late try was converted, they were just three points behind, until this steel, his
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second try of the match, and ireland have stolen a march on the six nations. ben stokes is back in action for england for the first time since he was involved in an incident outside a bristol nightclub back in september. he scored just 12 with the bat in the first one—day international against new zealand this morning. england made 284—8 in their innings hamilton. stokes has been involved in the field, too. he's bowled a few overs and taken this catch, dismissing opener martin guptill off the bowling of chris woakes. the final day of competition at the winter olympics. billy morgan will carry the team gb flag at around 11am ourtime in carry the team gb flag at around 11am our time in the closing ceremony. they were singing their own national
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anthem over the olympic anthem, the russian ice hockey team, at the end. joyous scenes. after the british women missed out on a bronze medal in the curling, it was a case of the winner takes it all as sweden regained the olympic title, beating south korea in the final overnight. 8—3, it finished. not a good result for great britain in the four—man bobsleigh overnight. they had two teams — lamin deen and his crew came in 18th and the team led by brad hall finished in 17th position, germany took the gold. west bromwich albion were booed off by their own fans after they were beaten 2—1 by huddersfield. it was their fourth straight defeat. they have now won just once in 14 matches
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since alan pardew took charge. steve meunier scored the decider for the visitors shortly before the hour mark and alan pardew‘s men are now seven points from safety. mark and alan pardew‘s men are now seven points from safetylj mark and alan pardew‘s men are now seven points from safety. i think it is three wins in 37 games. it is a problem. we have just is three wins in 37 games. it is a problem. we havejust got is three wins in 37 games. it is a problem. we have just got to find a way to win a game, whichever way thatis way to win a game, whichever way that is and however ugly it is, it will certainly ugly today but we did not win. do you think you will get the opportunity to turn it around?” don't know. i am employed to be manager, that is what i will do on monday morning unless i am told otherwise. liverpool move up to second thanks to a win over west ham. the 23rd goal of the season for mohamed salah. jurgen klopp's side are now one point ahead of manchester cabinet united to play chelsea later. kilmarnock drew 2—2
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against hibernian. neil lennon was sent to the stand for his reaction to this penalty being rewarded. it was saved on the rebound went in. here is the argument with neil lennon. elsewhere, there were wins for motherwell, hamilton, rangers and stjohnstone. man city came from behind to draw at home to chelsea in the women's super league yesterday. still everything to play for. chelsea were 2—0 up inside 25 minutes but city hit back, this spectacular effort from georgia sta nway. spectacular effort from georgia stanway. it spectacular effort from georgia sta nway. it means spectacular effort from georgia stanway. it means chelsea are still top of the table by one point and thatis top of the table by one point and that is all your sport for now. super goal. great strike. thank you. the carabao cup today. should be interesting. man city against arsenal. pep guardiola's first trophy, if he
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wins? and arsene wenger has never won it, as arsenal manager. incredible. interesting he could do that, should be good. as wigan showed, it can be done against manchester city! lots of us grew up learning to play a musical instrument. did you? i still do a bit now. badly, i played the piano. but you can't play it one—handed. no chance! but it's an activity which many children with disabilities can't can't take part in. now one charity is calling on manufacturers to make adaptions to the instruments. ricky boleto's been to meet ten—year—old guy, who's learning to play the one—handed bagpipe. for guy, a dream come true. he has learned to play the scales, and let's be honest, he looks the part too. but getting this far has not been easy. he was born with no left
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hand. i have got a bone missing in it and hand. i have got a bone missing in itandi hand. i have got a bone missing in it and i have got five fingers but some are really small and i have a lwa ys some are really small and i have always felt special. not many people your age want to learn to play the bagpipes. what made you so interested in that instrument? my mum's scottish so when we go there we see my uncle, neill, and he plays the bank —— the bagpipes. we see my uncle, neill, and he plays the bank -- the bagpipes. his mum reached out to the one—handed musical instrument trust. it has changed his life. in each of the holes, you have a sensor detecting the finger positions so you can make the finger positions so you can make the sound do whatever you like, we came up with this new version of the fingering only using the top five holes to get all of the notes you can getjust holes to get all of the notes you can get just using holes to get all of the notes you can get difficultg fig?
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holes to get all of the notes you can get difficult and g holes to get all of the notes you can get difficult and % cani holes to get all of the notes you can get difficult and g q just holes to get all of the notes you can get difficult and % you ust holes to get all of the notes you can get difficul —— d % you ust it is: bagpipes, whole ‘ instruments can whole - instruments can be a whole range of instruments can be adapted to help musicians with a physical disability. this is keypad connected to a computer and it sounds just like a violin, viola connected to a computer and it soundsjust like a violin, viola or cello and you can it single—handedly. one charity is calling on instrument makers from around the world to help make music more accessible. it is very difficult to find a standard instrument that can be played by a child with a physical disability. the difference is that giving them the right instrument makes in their self—confidence, their ability to join in with others in a musical setting, it is phenomenal. excellent. that was good. now he has
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learnt achieving, ortwo, he excellent. that was good. now he has learnt achieving, or two, he has set another goal, to play the bagpipes at edinburgh castle. it would be so—called playing in front of lots of people, being different to eve ryo ne of people, being different to everyone else. i am sure it is only a matter of time. well done! how goodis a matter of time. well done! how good is he? i vote for guy to play at edinburgh castle. superb. we will be talking to the one—handed musical instrument trust in an hour about what can be done to try to make musical instruments more accessible for disabled people. very good. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning... russia's olympic ban will be lifted if there are no further doping violations from their athletes, but they will not be allowed to parade under their own flag at today's closing ceremony. the un security council has unanimously passed a resolution calling for a ceasefire in syria, but there are reports
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of government shelling overnight. also coming up in the programme... iamon i am on the weight now. horse racing is tough, but manyjockeys say the hardest part is the need to lose weight for races. we'll find out about world—leading research helping them do that safely. it is all about the beast from the east this week with the cold weather on its way. twitchy chilly this morning but nothing like the kind of temperatures we will get as the week goes on. we start on a fairly quiet note. this was the view up the river between devon and cornwall, a little bit of cloud in the sky, a cold and gloriously sunny day for many parts of the british isles. the beast from
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the east, a phrase you may have heard of late, the cold wind coming from siberia across the north sea and into the british isles, that is the beast from the east, especially as we ramp up the strength. by contrast, today is a decent day. if you are feeling cold today, it will get much worse. this is not a bad day in prospect. if you have plans, not much to stop you getting out provided you have enough layers and a decent warm drink inside you. it is this evening and overnight, we begin to see the first signs on the eastern north—easterly wind, the granular looked to the graphics, thatis granular looked to the graphics, that is the indication of snow showers falling into a very cold atmosphere, so monday, the start of the change. from the weekend's weather, we go into monday morning where you will feel that much colder as soon as you step out the door and there will be across eastern parts of the british isles the prospect of
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some mainly light snow showers. this is not the problem by any means. many western areas, pretty much the same as the weekend, it willjust feel colder. the difference, i was offering five, six, seven, eight, it is more like zero, two, three, four. look at this. that is not a snow shower, that is significant and lying snow, initially in the north—east of england and south—east scotland, and tuesday morning commute, the top end of the midlands, wales, that will deposit several centimetres of snow on what will be a really cold day and when i add in the strength of the wind, really significant by this stage, —4—macro, minus five. you will not see that on the thermometer but that is what it will feel like. tuesday into wednesday, getting really quite worrying. the snow showers keep coming, some eastern parts by this stage may well have ten, 15
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centimetres of lying snow. a lot of isobars. we have also got low— pressure isobars. we have also got low—pressure developing down towards the bay of biscay. ramping up the strength of the wind, it will feel like minus 15. we have the prospect of disruptive snow with the snow showers and longer spells of snow, bitter winds, bit of sunshine, later in the week, we may be talking across southern parts of britain about blizzards. that is more than enough weather. back to you. we have gone from disruptive snow to blizzards. i do not mean to make light of it because i know these situations, the kind of conditions that can be a potential risk health and well—being. indeed so and i think we need to ta ke indeed so and i think we need to take it in stages. today and tomorrow, that is not such an issue, it is monday night and through into the middle part of the week where we have got all of those snow showers coming through and that wind—chill
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factor as well, all of which have health ramifications and when we get to the tail end of the week, image a logical terms, thursday or friday are quitea logical terms, thursday or friday are quite a long time away but a couple of model runs have now come up couple of model runs have now come up to the same notion that the low pressure in this case driving cold air into that —— moist air into the cold at messiah will give very strong winds and the prospect of continuous heavy snow. that's where i say blizzards for the southern half of the uk. but we have some way to go before then. and these are predictions could change as the days go on. we will be talking about how the cold weather may actually lead to premature deaths for some people because of cold homes. cold homes and office the poverty regarding fuel and heating. we will be back with the headlines at 8am but now it is time for the travel show. coming up on this week's show...
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we dig in for the night on a snow—covered mountain in scotland. so we've been digging for a couple of hours now and the camera is finally starting to completely freeze over, and i am also freezing over. theme music plays. first up this week, we're in the cairngorms national park in the heart of the scottish highlands. the frozen landscape is beautiful at this time of year but conditions can be brutal, and recently, a number of hikers have found themselves in trouble there after reaching higher terrain. the advice is never to attempt this on your own in bad weather conditions without an experienced mountaineer, so we sentjo whalley on an overnight tour with a guided group to learn some winter survival skills.
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if you find yourself lost in a blizzard like this, one of the best survival techniques is to dig a hole to shelter from the elements. i've scaled mount cairngorm with a tour group led by expert guide, andy bateman. he's going to teach us how to safely construct a snow hole. one of the best places to dig is this small valley, 1100 metres up the mountain. it's nicknamed the snow house because of the drifts that collect here. andy, i'm so cold. yes. it's so snowy. i can't actually imagine how we're going to stay here tonight. well, the big killer in terms of your own temperature is the wind, and when we get in the snow hole, we are totally out of the wind. what is the windchill now? what's the sort of wind speed? we are in quite a sheltered hollow now, so it's probably
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only sort of five, ten, 15 miles an hour, something like that. when we came over the top, it was considerably more than that, as you very well experienced, but once we're in the snow hole, we'll be very sheltered. so we're going to get you warmed up, ok? so there's your shovel. while we've been preparing the equipment, three of the team, lorna, gregor and dave, have made a start on the hole by digging tunnels into the snowdrift. when they're deep enough, we'll connect them to form a cavern. we're just tunnelling into the snow at the moment. we've got to go in a good metre from the top here. do you want to come in and have a dig? yes. i'm just chopping away at this face here. and then how long does it take to do this normally, andy? it very much depends on the snow conditions. we've got relatively soft snow, but slightly three hours plus, sometimes as much as five hours.
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five hours, ok. this is a snow saw, designed to be able to cut through ice and snow, and by using this, we can often remove the snow far more efficiently, inasmuch as we can cut blocks out, rather than chipping away. and are we ok under here, this isn't gonna collapse? no. no, i mean the strength is in the thickness of the snow. this is a well — it's quite narrow so it's well supported, but when we actually make the living space, we want to make sure that that's narrow as well so it's well supported. there we go. oh, that was a good bit in the middle. i'll now get in there with a shovel. what is it about pushing yourself out of the comfort zone that people enjoy? i suppose it goes back to, it very much engages the brain.
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you forget about all the worries, you know, you are concerned about keeping warm, surviving. it takes life back to the elemental, you know, it's about survival. so we've been digging for a comple of hours now and the camera is finally starting to completely freeze over and i am also freezing over. so we're going to focus on digging. otherwise, we might not have anywhere to stay tonight. we chip and carve away at the ice until eventually, it starts to take shape. we've finally reached one of the most satisfying parts of digging, when the tunnels start to connect and we can reach through to each other. andy's built over 50 snow holes with groups of tourists, and shows us how to sculpt the roof with a saw to stop collapse and prevent drips. he assures me he's never had one fall down before. keep going. it's hard work but it is finally starting to warm up in here.
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the average temperature in a snow hole hovers around zero degrees, toasty compared to the freezing winds outside. we're making the hole big enough for six people and all our stuff, but in an emergency, even a small snow shelter can provide vital protection from hypothermia. we heave the biggest pieces of snow to the exit and use them to block up two of the doors, filling in the gaps to stop drafts getting through. there we go. thank you so much. that is amazing! so, we made it. this is our beautiful snow hole, with a nice vaulted ceiling up there. and andy's very kindly cooking up a round of tea for everyone. you canjust see lorna and gregor
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are all the way down there. cheers, everyone. cheers. woohoo. after a hot meal from the stove, we all try to settle down for the night. even with layers of clothing and a specialist sleeping bag, it does feel pretty chilly, but it's completely silent, we're hidden away from the gales outside. so, i survived the night. i've just been woken up, andy was outside chipping the ice away, as all this snow that's fallen overnight has sort of blocked us in, so he's just dug us out and now he's making us a cup of tea. i slept a little bit but yeah, it's been very, very cold. your destination inspiration every week, here on the travel show.
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welcome to the slice of the show that tackles your questions about getting the best out of travel. coming up, singapore to italy overland. first though, welcome to valletta, capital of malta, and for this year only, european capital of culture. the cultural programme for 2018 has a strong travel aspect, key themes include routes, cities and islands. valletta's twin capital is the northern dutch city of leeuwarden, where the artistic highlight in september and october involves 100 friesian horses performing in a drama about the perpetual struggle against the sea. next, matt taylor from stafford in the english midlands
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is getting married in april, and he still hasn't decided on a honeymoon location. the bahamas are expensive to reach and to stay in, and not renowned for their depth of culture or great sightseeing. there's more on offer in dubai and the maldives, but that involves a long and expensive flight, at a time of year when the southern mediterranean is at its best. whether you are on the island of sicily, or here in malta, you can expect temptingly empty beaches, beautiful, clearskies, and feast on thousands of years of history, as well as heavenly cuisine. next, rita from verona in italy, is currently in singapore, where she's recovering from a serious infection,
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and she wants to get home. as i am not fit to fly, are there any other options for me to travel via sea or land? turn your homeward journey into a two week overland adventure. you can get the train from singapore through malaysia, to the thai capital, bangkok. take another overnight train and that will get you across the border into laos. from the capital, vientiane, take a sleeper bus into vietnam, to the capital, hanoi. from there, it's a two night overland journey to the chinese capital, beijing. then, for the next six nights, you can relax aboard the trans—mongolian train all the way to moscow. and would you believe, there's a direct train from the russian capital straight to verona, taking 40 hours? whether you're heading for the deep south or the far north, the travel show is here to help.
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so just e—mail the travel show at bbc.co.uk, and i'll do my very best to find you an answer. from me, simon calder, the global guru, here on the island of malta, bye for now and see you next time. that is it for this week. i hope you canjoin us that is it for this week. i hope you can join us next week on the travel show when... can join us next week on the travel show when. .. christa can join us next week on the travel show when... christa is in norway as she takes a journey along one of the world most spectacular rail lines in search of the history of norwegian music. oh, this is great. and don't forget, if you want to follow us on the road, you can sign up to our social media feeds. but until the next time from me, come roberts, and
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rest of the travel show team here in seoul, it's goodbye. hello this is breakfast, with christian fraser and rachel burden. russia's olympic doping ban is to stay in place for today's closing ceremony in south korea. but it could be lifted if no more athletes test positive for drugs in pyeongchang. good morning, it's sunday 25th february. also this morning... the un security council unanimously approves a resolution calling for a ceasefire in syria — but there are reports
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that government air strikes have continued. they didn't ask for
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