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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  February 25, 2018 8:00am-9:01am GMT

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hello this is breakfast, with christian fraser and rachel burden. russia's olympic doping ban is to stay in place for today's closing ceremony in south korea. but it could be lifted if no more athletes test positive for drugs in pyeongchang. good morning, it's sunday 25th february. also this morning... the un security council unanimously approves a resolution calling for a ceasefire in syria — but there are reports that government air strikes have continued. they didn't ask for identification? your age? no. how children are still able to buy corrosive substances in an area with a record number of acid
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attacks. good morning, in sport. scotland record their first victory over england in a decade to win the calcutta cup, ireland are top of the six nations championship after they beat wales. and philip avery has the weather. good morning. another chilly start to the day but what a day on offer gci’oss to the day but what a day on offer across many parts of the british isles with plenty of sunshine and staying cool throughout the day. i will have more injust a staying cool throughout the day. i will have more in just a few minutes. first, our main story. the international olympic committee has decided not to lift russia's suspension for doping in time for today's closing ceremony at the winter games in south korea. but the ban could be lifted at a later date if no more of the country's athletes test positive at pyeongchang. in a moment, we'll get the reaction from moscow with our correspondent steve rosenberg. first let's go to the olympic park and our correspondent stephen mcdonell.
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the closing ceremony two or three hours away. russia have big to read the gold medal in the ice hockey and severely disappointed they cannot parade their own flag? russian athletes and fans here had hoped the pyeongchang games would be the end of their olympic isolation and they could come into the main stadium carrying the flag as team russia. as an indication of how passionate they feel, people following this will know the deal was, if a won any gold medals, the olympic flag was to be used and olympic anthem played. they have just won the gold medal in the ice hockey. they start playing the olympic anthem, all the players and russian fans belted out the russian
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anthem to drown out the olympic one. this will be talked about all over the world. the could begrudge them, some will say. they have just won. can't be a great surprise to the russians, steve. two out of the four athletes caught doping at the games are russian. you would have thought the russians would have come and been squea ky—clean the russians would have come and been squeaky—clean on this occasion. talking about disappointment, there is great disappointment because many of the russian athletes had stayed on specially in pyeongchang in the hope they could march under the national flag at the closing ceremony. no surprise because two russian athletes did test positive for doping. that is why the russian flag is banned. any disappointment
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is offset by a certain relief that the olympic status will be restored for russia if it is confirmed there are no other doping violations at the winter games and that is the biggest result they could hope for from these games as the country's top sporting newspaper website put it this morning, not having ourflag at the closing ceremony is not that bad when you consider very soon russia should be back in the olympic family. they will take solace from the fact they have won gold in one of their favourite sports, the ice hockey? absolutely. i think the whole country will have been watching russia — germany, and exciting match. enormousjoy, great celebrations when russia applause victory was confirmed, they were standing there. evenif standing there. even if they were not allowed the russian flag and hymn. certainly a
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great day for russian hockey. syrian activists claim government forces continued their air strikes last night, despite a un security council resolution calling for an immediate ceasefire. it's hoped that an end to fighting in the rebel—held area of eastern ghouta would allow humanitarian aid to be brought in and injured civilians rescued. but the syrian government has criticised the vote. our reporter andy moore has the latest another air attack on the besieged enclave of eastern ghouta yesterday. shortly after the un decision, similar bombings were reported. even as they voted unanimously in support of the resolution, there was doubt on all sides about how much effect it would have. the text calling for an immediate ceasefire took place... the text calling for an immediate ceasefire replaced by call for truce. it will not apply to any jihadi militants. we are deeply sceptical that the regime will comply. but we supported this resolution because we
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must demand nothing less. we owe this to the innocent people of syria, begging for help. the russians said it was naive to think difficult issues could be addressed overnight. the syrian ambassador said his country had the right to act in self—defence. translation: this will not succeed and it will backfire sooner or later. we have the right to defend ourselves according to the charter. the international aid agencies stand ready to help but it is not safe enough yet for them to go in. we are ready to roll out assistance to be able to cover and reach people who have been besieged for a long time and bring them much needed life—saving assistance. the un secretary general has called for the un secretary general has called
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eastern ghouta hell on earth. sridevi kapoor, one of bollywood's greatest leading ladies, has died at the age of 5a. she was at a family wedding in dubai where she's thought to have suffered a heart attack. joining us now from our london newsroom is asian network's entertainment reporter haroon rashid. and actresses of all time. a career spanning five decades. in 1978 as shejoined in bollywood. she found fame. in the 1980s and 1990s she made a name for herself in many films. she was great, no one performance better than the other. incredible in almost all of them, her comic timing, dance performances
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remembered fondly. the big guys, the smile, the charm on the screen. many celebrities morning her loss on social media. —— mourning. it was said she was a school of acting just from her own talent. children were able to buy corrosive substances in an area of london which has suffered a record number of acid attacks. an investigation by newham council found that some shopkeepers were still selling items like bleach despite there being a voluntary code of conduct in place. simon browning reports. almost 400 of london's 1500 acid attacks in the last five years have happened in the borough of newham, the highest amount in the uk. she is annie, 1a, part of an undercover sting to see if she can buy corrosive substances from high street shops in the area.
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i want you to go in to try to purchase caustic soda, bleach, other corrosive substances. she's working with trading standards to test the retailers who have signed up to a voluntary scheme to prevent such sales to shoppers under the age of 21. how much did it cost you? £1. they didn't ask you for any id? no. your age? no. two shops did not sell to her but three did. the shops selling substances such as bleach have broken no law as the restrictions are voluntary. new figures obtained by radio 5 live suggests the scale of attacks involving acid and other corrosive substances has trebled in five years, 646 attacks recorded in england and wales in 2017. last autumn, the government promised new laws on the sale and carrying of
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corrosives and acids but so far no legislation has been introduced. more than 80 senior labour figures have issued a statement in the observer newspaper warning jeremy corbyn that he will be unable to fund his promised investment in schools, hospitals and social care unless the uk stays in the eu single market. in a keynote brexit speech tomorrow, he is expected to commit labour to backing permanent membership of some kind of customs union, but not remaining in the single market. business up front, party at the back. love it or hate it, the mullet was the epitome of style in the 1970s, and has lived on in one small australian town. kurri kurri is home to mullet fest. this weekend more than 180 people competed in five categories including the grubby mullet, the ladies mullet and junior mullet.
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are you tempted, christian fraser? someone scented tweets, a photo shop of me. a had a google for embarrassing haircuts of the past. jason donovan mullet. did he pull kylie minogue? maybe it works, but she was charlene. enough of that. could the legacy of the 2018 winter olympics be better relations between north and south korea? at the start of the games, athletes from both nations paraded under the same banner. and there was that historic meeting between kim jong—un‘s sister and the president of south korea.
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but is that enough grounds for improved diplomacy? joining us is tom plant from the royal united services institute. concern in the united states and japan that north korea have driven a wedge during the aims between south korea and the united states. that is the concern of people worried about the concern of people worried about the strength of the alliance but thatis the strength of the alliance but that is overstating it slightly. the north koreans have achieved a propaganda benefits from the games. the early reporting around the cheerleading squad and kim jong—un‘s sister. presentation and not substance. problematic but later on in the games, it was different. the
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general in south korea. how close is heated kim jong—un? general in south korea. how close is heated kim jong-un? very close indeed. organisationally. personally, who knows? he would not go unless he had that connection and authority. the vice—chair of the korean workers party. one of the most senior people in the country. and head of reconnaissance, one of north korea's an umbrella intelligence and pa ramilitaries services. the test of whether this diplomacy has brought the two sides closer is only after the olympics we will return to the tests we saw before the olympics? war games postponed for the olympics, but back to normal in a couple of weeks? people are hoping this would be the
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peace olympics. we have not achieved that but also not the war olympics. that is something to be thankful for because we have had between north and south korea initial meetings. early meetings between leaders. personal connections will be essential to long—term deals on the peninsula. but no change on the fundamental strategic issues. north korea pursuing a nuclear programme for the reasons it had before and will have after the olympics. no contact between the north koreans and the united states. at most it will have laid the groundwork for future conversations but still difficult. if the initiative was
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there to get an easing of aid for there to get an easing of aid for the north koreans because donald trump in the last week has unveiled tougher sanctions? he would say that, wouldn't he, about tougher sanctions? two thirds of the entities on the latest north korean —based and registered. would have real trouble operating anyway even without being on the list will stop american propaganda, actually, around that. the timing of this announcement during the games says that it announcement during the games says thatitis announcement during the games says that it is designed to say to the north koreans, we are still committed to the policy of pressure. thankfulfor american committed to the policy of pressure. thankful for american approach that has enabled the internet korean dialogue. —— inter—korean. the south
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koreans have said that. this has laid the groundwork for subsequent talks. but what are they willing to give for that and is it worth it? it was a cold day but the sun shone down on scotland at murrayfield. i thoroughly enjoyed the rugby. congratulations to scotland. decent spells of sunshine tampered with an influx of cold air. we have been talking about this and we are only 24 talking about this and we are only 2a hours from getting the full effect of the siberian cold air. for many of you today, get out there and
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enjoy it. you will need layers. but cabbage is not as low as over the coming days. —— temperatures not as low. nothing to right home about. the change starts as early as this evening. wintry showers working their way into the cold atmosphere across the east. monday will feel where ever you are, west and east, north or south, much colder than of late. snow showers in the forecast. for the most part, light during daylight hours. towards the west, the difference is the colder feel as we see the first shots of the really cold aircoming we see the first shots of the really cold air coming down from siberia and scandinavia. zero, two, 3—4 in
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the west possibly. more than a shower... raining really heavy snow into the north—east of england and then the early hours of tuesday, the commute perhaps, northern midlands, into wales, following behind much bigger showers. into wales, following behind much biggershowers. depositing significant lying snow. more widely across the uk. you will feel colder. minus five, it feels like. middle pa rt minus five, it feels like. middle part of the week, isobars. blood pressure. southern part of britain, thursday to the weekend. elsewhere, middle part of the week, widely much more wind, gold, and getting the senseit more wind, gold, and getting the sense it will feel really bitter wednesday and thursday. —15, feels
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like. my concern late in the week in the south is blizzards. we will keep an eye on that. horse racing is an incredibly competitive sport, but ask some jockeys what the toughest part of the job is, and they will tell you about the endless struggle to drop weight before races. for some, the pressure to balance the scales leads to unhealthy practices like starvation and extreme sweating. now a team of researchers at liverpooljohn moores university have found a way for riders to lose weight without damaging their long term health. tony to ny m ccoy tony mccoy says the facility could have extended his career. saunas, sweating, probably everything you should not do i was doing. maybe i could have been
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better with access to something like this in the earlier part of my career, i could have lasted longer, then better. make me a much better jockey. we'rejoined by sports physiologist dr george wilson. a formerjockey a former jockey yourself? a formerjockey yourself? in the 19805. but i a formerjockey yourself? in the 1980s. but i am just shy of six feet. carrying more weight over the jumps. i got into academia because in 1985 jumps. i got into academia because in1985| jumps. i got into academia because in 1985 i was struggling to make the weights, trying weight loss methods. things haven't changed much over the last 200 years, you make the weight the way you can. i packed it in because i could not make the weight, got into academia and i am now talking to you. i think this is important. you look at the eating
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patterns, if we were talking about anyone else, we would say this is disordered eating, mental health issues associated. even in the short term. starvation in some cases a form of anaemia? looking at the research. it is showing that —— bulemia. we're talking about dehydration. it is not good. there is sweating in every racecourse. sweat suits. and food deprivation. with the research we have looked at the energy cost of being a jockey, energy output and expenditure. and
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advising dietary intervention giving advising dietary intervention giving a slight deficit, taking slightly less food than putting out in energy and losing body fat. when you talk about professional sport. sports science goes into athletes and horses. and yet the person on the horse, the industry seems to have forgotten about. 30% of male flat jockeys reducing bone density, that is staggering. we don't know if that is staggering. we don't know if that is to do with food deprivation or sweating, losing calcium. like psychos, because there is not an osteogenic stimulus, you are not pounding the floor like that happens, you don't know if the low bone density is due to the lack of osteogenic stimulus, which is what
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we see in cyclists. we are looking at it. if you are riding a horse at 35-40 at it. if you are riding a horse at 35—40 mph, you want good bone density. what about a healthy, sensible diet. what do you device thatis sensible diet. what do you device that is unique? the energy balance. the food frequency and composition is key. the most effective way is to exercise first thing in the morning. when you have lasted. the physiological reason is because your body has been using glucose, storing it in the river. —— the liver. the exercise without food and then that is what we put in the research, we worked with professionaljockeys.
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the six—week programme we implemented and then we given three main meals, two snacks. based on the energy intake based on the energy balance, slight deficit in energy balance, slight deficit in energy balance reduces body fat. the carbohydrate intake will remain high. as with other professional athletes. they have high carbohydrate diets because the energy activity didn't burn that energy activity didn't burn that energy in jockeys, but the difference was the guys and girls eating five times a day which was what they had not been doing before. fascinating. viewers in the north west can see more on that story tomorrow night at 7.30 on inside out. it will also be available
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on the bbc iplayer. or, it will be. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. let's have a look at the papers. steve levine is here to tell us what's caught his eye. we hinted at this. reading to children. in the sunday express? the importance as early as possible reading to children. march the 1st is world book day. camilla says this. we read to two goes when they we re this. we read to two goes when they were younger. you are this. we read to two goes when they were younger. you are falling asleep yourself. but it is saying how important it is. as they get older,
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their commander of the english—language. their commander of the english-language. we read to both oui’ english-language. we read to both our children when they were young. then ten—year—olds reader and books. i have been reading the far—away tree to my six—year—old. now, my daughter is coming back and wants to be read to despite being able to read. think about audio books. we all love it. you are nurturing, my wife would read my daughters. it is the nurturing thing of the voice. —— read to my daughters. it becomes pa rt read to my daughters. it becomes part of the bedroom routine. bath and bed. and the sole attention of a single parent and you without distractions. this is great. what about this, the music theme, that is
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your industry. why music documentaries are enjoying a golden age. i love and make radio music documentaries. it is same year the detailed film documentaries are on a resurgence, making money and allowing the fans the deep insight into the inner workings of the band. that is fascinating. recently the berlin film festival great for the uk economy the difference between a film documentary versus bbc for document. the budgets are bigger. more detailed research. —— bbc four. it isa more detailed research. —— bbc four. it is a great article about a positive spin on music documentaries, never enough on the television i think. i saw the oasis
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one. not for the children. there is a book coming out, brett anderson, suede. he is adding first—hand... i talk about this on the radio. fans love menu showing —— fans love the small details. talking about a certain drum machine. the fans know about this. talking about bernard butler. that is the sound of suede. i have worked with bernard. he knows his stuff. when a guitarist can develop... this looks like a well written book. if you are a fan. talking about adapted musical
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instruments for children with disabilities. a boy who is according to the headline the plucky guest musician in britain, deaf, blind, playing the violin. -- his parents and musicians. he was falling in love with the violin through resonance properties. as a record producer, the resonance has an impact on the way you feel. they noticed he had an aptitude for learning an instrument. but as profoundly deaf, technology plays a pa rt profoundly deaf, technology plays a part in his implants which allows him to hearand part in his implants which allows him to hear and feeling the instrument through his body and has passed his exams. a beautiful story. blind and deaf. in the industry, a
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lot of blind musicians are successful. i have worked with stevie wonder and when you sit next to him it is breathtaking when he plays because his awareness of sound is incredible. when you lose one in this case two, your other senses become more pronounced? because he has been feeling the violin through his body, the body is resonating the instrument, an aptitude. the same with stevie wonder. feeling the piano ina with stevie wonder. feeling the piano in a way because he is blind, the people see the way he plays, his ability and sounds he can create because he is listening in a heightened way. thank you, steve. lovely to have you. stay with us.
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the headlines are coming up. hello, this is breakfast with christian fraser and rachel burden. it's 8:31am. here's a summary of this morning's main news. the international olympic committee has decided not to lift russia's olympic suspension for doping ahead of the closing ceremony of the winter olympics in south korea. it means that the russian athletes, who were allowed to compete as neutrals, cannot march under their own flag. moscow had asked for the restoration of its olympic status, but two russian athletes failed drug tests in pyeongchang. syrian activists claim government forces continued their air strikes last night, despite the un security council resolution calling for an immediate ceasefire. it's hoped that an end to fighting in the rebel held area of eastern ghouta would allow humanitarian aid to be brought in and injured civilians rescued.
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the syrian government has criticised the vote. children were able to buy corrosive substances in an area of london which has suffered a record number of acid attacks. an investigation by newham council found that some shopkeepers were still selling items like bleach despite there being a voluntary code of conduct in place. new figures obtained by the bbc have shown that the number of attacks involving corrosive substances in england and wales has more than trebled in five years. one of bollywood's most famous stars, the indian actress sridevi kapoor, has died at the age of 5a. she starred in more than 150 films, beginning her career as a child. it's thought she suffered a heart attack while at a family wedding in dubai. more than 80 senior labour figures have issued a statement in the observer newspaper warning jeremy corbyn that he will be unable to fund his promised investment in schools, hospitals and social care unless the uk stays in the eu single market. in a keynote brexit speech tomorrow, he is expected to commit labour to backing permanent membership of some kind of customs union, but not remaining in the single market.
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business up front, party at the back. love it or hate it, the mullet was the epitome of style in the 1970s, and has lived on in one small australian town. kurri kurri is home to mullet fest. this weekend more than 180 people competed in five categories including the grubby mullet, the ladies mullet and junior mullet. michael thompson kindly tweeted us this picture of christian. christian auer alleges he never had a mullet but this is how we imagine him in his heyday. if only! look at that! did you have a mullet? yes, in the late 80s. what kind of mullet? it was just a flick, like a little
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curl behind the ear. maybe i should bring it back. you look like henry from neighbours in that picture. it was 1980s australian soap territory. cut—off t—shirt. brilliant. what have you got? from the mullet cup to the calcutta cup. it was scotland's first calcutta cup win since 2008, and it prompted incredible scenes of celebration at murrayfield. huthones starred in a 25—13 victory, whilst ireland remain on course for the grand slam. olly foster reports. # the flower of scotland... england are always out sung at murrayfield, rarely are they outplayed. proud eddiejones' team have been sent home to think again. hquones's early score was the first against them at murrayfield for 1h years. it is hquones amidst the chaos, he has the try! two more brilliant scottish tries by half—time.
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sean maitland went over in the corner. jones dragged two englishmen across the line. they were 16 points up. hquones, who can stop him? owen farrell scored all england's points, his sole try gave them some belief, but they gave away too many penalties. when sam underhill was sin binned for a dangerous tackle, there was no way back. just joy for scotland. awinfor a win for scotland at murrayfield to celebrate. scotland have waited ten years for this and it is all the sweeter because they have scuppered england's hopes of the grand slam. but there is still one team left in the championship still unbeaten. ireland remain top of the table with three wins out of three, although they tried to throw it away against wales in dublin. they came from behind to go 1a points clear in the second half as they easily punched holes in the welsh defence. wales came back off the ropes and when steff evans' late try was converted,
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they were just three points behind, until this steel by jacob stockdale, his second try of the match, and ireland have stolen a march on the six nations. terrific day of rugby. ben stokes backin terrific day of rugby. ben stokes back in action for england for the first time since he was involved in an incident outside a bristol de mai ;% back an incident outside a bristol de mai % back in an incident outside a bristol de mai 53 back in —— an incident outside a bristol de mai 52 back in —— outside an incident outside a bristol de mai 53 back in —— outside a club back in september. —— outside a bristol nightclub. and it's not gone too well for him, he made just 12 of england's 284 for eight in the first one day international against new zealand this morning. stoke's took a catch early on, and has since taken two wickets. this was latham on the 79, caught by joe root and that inspired a comeback, cheaply caught behind by buttler. taylor has passed 104 new zealand. they need 41 from four overs. it's going to be really tight
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—— has passed 100 thingies you are and. —— four new zealand. it's the final day of competition at the the winter olympics in pyeongchang today, and it's been announced that big air bronze medallist, billy morgan, will carry the team gb flag at the closing ceremony at around 11 our time. the men's ice hockey final was a classic as the olympic athletes from russia came from behind to beat germany 4—3 in overtime in a thrilling final. the win gives oar their second gold of the pyeongchang games and their 17th medal overall. in the curling yesterday, sweden regained the olympic title, beating south korea in the final overnight. 8—3 it finished. the bottom club in the premier league the bottom club in the premier lea g u e west the bottom club in the premier league west brom were booed off by theirfans league west brom were booed off by their fans yesterday at the hawthorns beaten 2—1 by
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huddersfield. it was their fourth straight defeat and they've now won just once in 14 games since alan pardew took charge of the club. steve mounie scored the decider for the visitors shortly before the hour. alan pardew‘s men are now seven points from safety. liverpool moved up to second place in the table thanks to a 4—1win over west ham. emre can, roberto firmino, sadio mane along with mohamed salah, his record is incredible, 23 goals this season, putting jurgen klopp's side one point ahead of manchester united who play chelsea later today. these are yesterday's premier league results in full. bournemouth were 2—0 down and drew 2—2. glenn murray scored two as brighton hammered swansea. in the scottish premiership kilmarnock came from 2—0 down to draw 2—2 against hibernian. the hibs manager neil lennon was sent to the stand for his reaction to a penalty his side conceded. kris boyd's spot—kick was saved but he scored from the rebound to earn kilmarnock a share
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of the points. elsewhere there were wins for motherwell, hamilton, rangers and stjohnstone. take a look at this finally, one of those bad day at the office moments. ever been doing something else when you should have been focusing on yourjob? have a look at this. something that msv doysburg goalkeeper mark flekken will probably never be allowed to forget. this is the first half of yesterday's bundesliga two match between doysburg and ingolstadt. a long ball into the box, a mix up in defence. where's the goalkeeper? he had turned his back on play to take a quick drink from his water bottle, and once he's realised what's about to happen, all he can do there is stand there in horror. superb. so good. absolutely love that. today's closing ceremony will bring to an end team gb's most successful ever winter olympics. the athletes secured five medals in total, one gold and four bronze. former team gb olympian, chemmy alcott, is here to help look back at some of the highlights. good morning. good to have you here.
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weird day today because it's been such an emotional two weeks, roller—coaster of emotions. i think we have celebrated so much success but also seen the vulnerability and dedication that it takes. elise christie showing us all of that rawness straight after her interviews and that's what we need to see. in winter olympics when you are subject to the vagaries, of so many unpredictable forces. some summer sports you can train really ha rd summer sports you can train really hard for reach your peak and know that you have a chance of winning a medal. winter sport is about taking the ultimate risk and there is so much danger and inconsistencies in terms of the environmental. a gust of wind... that is what billy morgan said, he won the big air contest, said he had never finished that jump where won the big air contest, said he had never finished thatjump where he grabbed hold with both hands on his board. this is mental. he said he
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fell so much fear will suddenly get confidence from experience, he had landed this once in training, never ina landed this once in training, never in a competition. to have the chance to get on the olympic podium and paul that run out just to get on the olympic podium and paul that run outjust then and land it it was amazing. the fact he admitted to having that fear is something that is important for sporting stars like billy to say because in life we all feel fear and face fear. is one of those moments where adrenaline takes over and you produce that moment. if it wasn't for billy yesterday would you have been disappointed about the medal haul? i think team gb have done amazing and we have had three fourth positions but yesterday was difficult with the curling team being very close and so disappointed with the performance. but billy changed that. we needed that end, you need to end the olympics with a high and he provided that, the flag amaq fact he is flag bearer is a nice story. is important to see you worked really ha rd nice story. is important to see you worked really hard and sometimes
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things don't go your way. not forgetting lizzy yarnold and her astonishing achievement to retain her olympic medal and fighting to illness to do it. she overcame so much, she overcame the performances of the season, not going there as someone to watch. we talked about her as someone to watch. we talked about heras an someone to watch. we talked about her as an olympic gold champion but we didn't say that she was speaking. laura has had a better season so the fa ct laura has had a better season so the fact they both shared it, and for me that was an amazing moment, not the fa ct that was an amazing moment, not the fact that the two of them were on the podium but the friendship meant they broke the best out of each other. the skeleton team gets £6.5 million, enormous funding for the winter olympics team. five medals. is that a good return? skeleton athletes have won medal in lots of olympics and there are so much science involved. there was lots of chitchat before they competed on how their speed suits were faster and other competitors were getting very jealous with that. but that's what
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the funding goes in, these tiny marginal gains, and a fraction of a second between bronze and nothing at all. i do believe there is a return on that. controversy over the women's bobsleigh team who didn't getfunding. women's bobsleigh team who didn't get funding. huge story. they did incredibly well, the men's team did, and their performance was far weaker. they were powered by the people, amazing support, i believe that gave them the edge to pull out that gave them the edge to pull out that performance. the federation didn't believe in them but they believed in themselves and other people backed them to be there. we are disappointed in the two four—man bobsleigh, and we need to look at why it didn't work out for them, looking at their runners and their tea m looking at their runners and their team setup, they should have happened before the olympics. it doesn't matter how much backing you have, you can pull out the performance when it matters. it's been wonderful to watch. are you inspired? what are you going to take 7 ifi 7 if i was to do it all again... he's just
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if i was to do it all again... he'sjust come back if i was to do it all again... he's just come back from a ski trip, could you be in the british ski team? the skis were halfway up the slope. the skis were halfway up the slope. the crash test dummy! i'd love to do bobsleigh. go down to bath, the push track. we hope people get inspired. you want to be the driver? always like that at the fairground. i enjoyed your today at the winter olympics. thank you. i loved it. it's time to say goodbye to me, i'm leaving. goodbye! iforgot leaving. goodbye! i forgot about that! i've had enough, i'm off to read the news with andrew marr but i will leave you here in the capable hands of philip avery. there is no better man to look after us all, which he is very much at the moment. i don't want to ruin chemmy alcott‘s message about getting involved, i went on the ice once in bournemouth and lost in kneecap as a result. that's my stupid fault. high price
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to pay as an international sportsman, must be! this is the scene behind me in glasgow, glorious day, i urge you to get out there use it to its fullest because it's going to a cold day, i should not say cool, i need somewhere to go, because the cold weather is lurking with intent and is now 24—36 hours away from our shores, and i mean a significant drop in the general feel of how cold the days are. today there is plenty of sunshine around, the eastern side of sunshine around, the eastern side of scotland, north—eastern england, that of cloud throughout the day, but elsewhere some of you will get unbroken sunshine. it won't do much for the temperatures mind you, and if you are exposed to the breeze, the temperature will struggle, one or2 the temperature will struggle, one or 2 degrees, some sheltered in the west, seven or eight, where we were in the last 24 hours could. through the evening and overnight the first signs of these granular showers working their way towards the eastern side of the british isles.
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the moisture from the north sea falling into the cold atmosphere. here we go, right from the word go when you step out of the door tomorrow morning it will feel much colder than it has done this weekend, and there will be some snow showers in the forecast, primarily light, primarily for the eastern side of the british isles. out west you will feel it that bit colder but it will still be sunny and you will think, what is all the fuss about? these are the temperatures, you can see how they dipped away well down in single figures, some of you struggling to get into positive territory. and then this is organised area of snow, gradually working its way initially into sappy scotland, north—east of england, and in the wee small hours it comes right across the midlands, we think. we keep a close eye on that, tricky commute first thing on tuesday. a long way away but stay tuned to the forecast. on the temperatures on the thermometer when i add in the temperatures stomach strength of the
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north—easterly, —5, —8 when you step out of the door. the showers ramped up out of the door. the showers ramped up through tuesday, wednesday, thursday, look at the number of isobars, that's a lot of wind because we are developing a big area of low pressure down here running into that high over scandinavia putting the squeeze on the wind and as the wind speed ramps up it will feel that much colder. temperatures still holding on but it's a field that's going to really get you. we could be talking about —15 at the end of the week of the low pressure comes up end of the week of the low pressure comes up from biscay that could mean blizzards across southern britain. thank you for keeping in touch with us thank you for keeping in touch with us this morning and we will keep in touch with the weather. speaking of the cold weather. thousands of people are dying each year in the uk due to a cold home, according to research by national energy action. the charity is calling for urgent
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action and stronger regulations on energy efficiency to end what it describes as "entirely preventable" deaths. peter smith, director of policy and research at national energy action, is in our london newsroom. it isa it is a pertinent time to be talking about this, just hearing about the weather forecast from about this, just hearing about the weatherforecast from phil. can about this, just hearing about the weather forecast from phil. can you explain the correlation between cold homes and the numbers of preventable deaths you are talking about? homes and the numbers of preventable deaths you are talking abounm homes and the numbers of preventable deaths you are talking about? it is unsurprising more people die in the winter compared to the other seasons. but what perhaps is shocking is the scale of the disparity and the fact it is happening in such an affluent country as the uk. we know that over 32,000 excess winter deaths happen on average each year, and about 10,000 of those are directly attributable, we feel, to households living in cold homes. some of the principal causes for that are that in the winter berries increased spikes in risborough tree and
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circulatory injuries, exposure to hypothermia and influenza rates can va ry hypothermia and influenza rates can vary —— respiratory. the thing that stays constant is the shabby state of our housing stock. we know that the uk has some of the least efficient properties across europe and that is a principal cause for this excess winter mortality. are these people who tend to have pre—existing medical vulnerabilities when it comes to the kind of conditions you have spoken about? exactly that, respiratory and circulatory problems are exacerbated by living in a cold home. it is that overla p by living in a cold home. it is that overlap which is causing this hugely damaging issue to happen year—on—year. damaging issue to happen year-on-year. you say something like 3200 of these might be directly attributable, or linked to people experiencing fuel poverty. that in itself is a shocking number if it's accurate. the remaining 6000 or so,
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are these people who are just choosing not adequately heat their what's happening there? typically, the nonfuel poor population is elderly households. elderly households, as i've mentioned, with existing health conditions that aren't officially fuel poor but still struggle to keep their properties warm. that might be for a range of reasons, those properties are too large, that they are limited in their income and it is not sufficient to keep them warm. but they are not classified as living in fuel poverty. however, there is a huge overlap between these two populations and the principal causes are the same. the fact that all households are struggling with the continued high cost of energy. in many instances very low incomes, and asi many instances very low incomes, and as i have referenced, the appalling state of the energy inefficiency of these houses. i hear your concerns and that is a long—term issue,
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increasing the energy efficiency of our homes. given the fact we have had so many, especially with this period, advance warnings about the cold weather coming and it will be bitterly cold, is there something we can do to make sure those who are vulnerable are better protected? absolutely. we should show enhanced vigilance for neighbours, people that of honourable, particularly people we know have existing health conditions, and we should invite them over to keep warm and potentially for a hot meal if we know that can't be achieved for themselves. we also want to see the clear guidance laid out by the national institute for clinical excellence that provides real clear blueprint around this area to be adhered to. there is an great practice going on but we need that to be common practice if we are going to avoid the scale of these needless winter deaths each year. and finally we need to get serious about energy efficiency. you are right it is a long—term issue, but it is one that the government through public infrastructure funds
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could address. i hear that message loud and clear. peter smith from national energy action, thank you. in a statement the department for business, energy and industrial strategy says the government will shortly be introducing new measures on capping energy prices that will bring even more benefits to customers. lots of us grew up learning to play a musical instrument but it's an activity which many children with disabilities can't easily take part in. a charity is calling on manufacturers to make adaptations to instruments. nicky butt letter has been to meet ten—year—old guy, who is learning to play the one—handed bagpiper. —— ricky boleto. for guy, a dream come true. he has learned to play the scales, and let's be honest, he looks the part too. but getting this far has not been easy. he was born with no left hand. i have got a bone missing in it
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and i have got five fingers but some are really small and i have always felt special. not many people your age want to learn to play the bagpipes. what made you so interested in that instrument? my mum's scottish so when we go there we see my uncle neil, and he plays the bagpipes. his mum reached out to the one—handed musical instrument trust. it has changed his life. they found this that has changed his life. in each of the holes, you have a sensor detecting the finger positions so you can make the sound do whatever you like, we came up with this new version of the fingering only using the top five holes to get all of the notes you can getjust using one hand. it is not that difficult and you can just learn the scales and once you have got the notes and sound you can start learning songs.
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it is notjust the bagpipes, a whole range of instruments can be adapted to help musicians with a physical disability. and express themselves musically. this is a linnstrument, a keypad connected to a computer and it sounds just like a violin, viola or cello and you can it single—handedly. one charity is calling on instrument makers from around the world to help make music more accessible. it is very difficult to find a standard instrument that can be played by a child with a physical disability. the difference that giving them the right instrument makes in their self—confidence, their ability tojoin in with others in a musical setting, it is phenomenal. excellent. that was good. now he has learnt a tune or two,
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guy has set another goal, to play the bagpipes at edinburgh castle. it would be so cool playing in front of lots of people, being different to everyone else. i am sure it is only a matter of time. well done! how good is he? rachel wolffsohn is from the one handed musical instrument trust and joins us now. along with a couple of instruments. we have a trumpet, rachel, do you wa nt to we have a trumpet, rachel, do you want to explain? it is placed on a special bracket on a floor stand so that somebody who doesn't have full control of one hand can play the instrument without having to worry about the balance and the weight. because they are played with just one hand anyway. we have some different bits for the controls when they are high standard players. that is one of the most simple things. we have a recorder that is slightly
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more complicated. it is a beautiful piece of work. tell us about this. this is a one—handed recorder made with rosewood, beautiful gold plated handmade keys, it works like a normal recorder from the bottom half, sojust normal recorder from the bottom half, so just the normal recorder from the bottom half, sojust the normal normal recorder from the bottom half, so just the normal holes, normal recorder from the bottom half, sojust the normal holes, and the top half has a key system so when you click the levers between the bottom holes it operates the key cove rs o n the bottom holes it operates the key covers on the top half of the instrument. the problem with these is because they are one—offs they are very expensive. this record is over 500 euros, so your challenge is to make this accessible for more children. with all of the instruments, they are made generally by small instrument makers on a fairly artisan basis. this recorder has been around a long time, it is not a one—off itself but it is small—scale production. we're working on 3d printed technology to see if we can make them more affordable and more replicable. but they are always going to be more
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expensive. i think the 3d printing aspect of this is really interesting and it matter now technology to provide some of the solutions. that's still very much in the pipeline. there have been very famous one—handed musicians, rick allan, the def leopard drummer, of course. but they are not very visible. if you were to ask a hundred people in a pub to name disabled athletes everybody would be able to name a few. disabled musicians are very, very small and far between. largely, i think, because people don't think it is an activity that is open to them. and yet to be denied this formal expression and creativity is a terrible thing, particularly for children who may have a natural aptitude. yes, it is. in england certainly at the moment we get a whole class teaching musical instruments and one child in the class who doesn't for some reason have full control of their upper limbs and they are excluded from
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that activity. you also have adults who acquired disabilities later in life, people who have strokes, traumatic injuries, whatever it is, and suddenly can't play either, whether it was a hobby or a professional interest for them.“ people want to find out more they can come to your organisation. we have a website which has much more information on it, and we will do what we can. we don't have all the a nswe rs what we can. we don't have all the answers but we are working towards it. thank you so much, rachel wolffsoh from the one handed musical instrument trust, i appreciate your time, and thank you for your company over the weekend on breakfast. dan and louise will be back tomorrow morning from six o'clock. wrap up, it will get much colder next week but enjoy the rest of your weekend. this is bbc news. i'm ben brown. the headlines at nine. syrian warplanes are reported to have attacked the besieged rebel area of eastern ghouta despite the un security council voting unanimously for a ceasefire. russian athletes are told
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they won't be allowed to march under the country's flag during this morning's closing ceremony at the winter olympics. one of bollywood's most famous actresses, sridevi kapoor, who starred in more than a hundred and 50 films — has died suddenly at the age of 54. and — making the weight, we hear howjockeys who use extreme methods such as starving, to keep their weight low — are being encouraged to use safer practices. and our sunday morning edition of the papers is at 9.35 — this mornings reviewers are the political commentator james millar, and the education editor of the sunday times, sian griffiths.
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