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tv   The Papers  BBC News  February 25, 2018 9:30am-10:01am GMT

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this is bbc news — our latest headlines. syrian warplanes are reported to have attacked the besieged rebel area of eastern ghouta despite the un security council voting unanimously for a ceasefire. russian athletes are told they won't be allowed to march under the country's flag during this morning's closing ceremony at the winter olympics. one of bollywood's most famous actresses, sridevi kapoor — who starred in more than 150 films — has died suddenly at the age of 5a. coming up in a few minutes our sunday morning edition of the papers — this mornings reviewers are the political commentatorjames millar, and the education editor of the sunday times, sian griffiths. before the papers — sport and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here's john. scotla nd
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scotland beat england for the first time ina scotland beat england for the first time in a decade to win the calcutta cup yesterday. ireland remain on course for the grand slam, as ollie foster reports. england are always out some at murrayfield. rarely are they outplayed. eddiejones‘s team have been sent home to think again. the early scorer was the first against them at murrayfield for 14 years. there were two more brilliant scottish tries by half—time. jones dragged two englishmen across the line and they were 16 points up. alan farrell scored all england's points, his sole try gave them some believe that they gave away too many
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pennies —— penalties. just joy believe that they gave away too many pennies —— penalties. justjoy for scotland. scotla nd scotland. scotland have waited ten years for this and it is all the sweeter because they've scuppered england's hopes of the grand slam. there is still one team left in the championship still unbeaten. ireland remain top of the table with three wins out of three though they tried to throw it away against wales in dublin. they came from behind to go 14 dublin. they came from behind to go 1a points clear in the second half as they easily punched holes in the welsh defence. wales came back off the ropes and when steph evans late try was converted they were just three points behind. that is until this steel. his second try of the match and ireland have stolen the match and ireland have stolen the match in the six nations championship. england losing at rugby. they also lost in the cricket this morning. a
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thrilling first one—day international against new zealand. the kiwis chase down 195 to win. ben stokes was making his first appearance since he was involved in an incident outside a bristol nightclub back in september. just 12 with the bat. took a couple of wickets. new zealand won by three wickets. new zealand won by three wickets though it was finished in style in the final over with a maximum. the final event of the winter olympics has come to an end this morning. the closing ceremony will take place at 11:00am and billie morgan, the bronze medallist yesterday has been selected to carry the team gb flag. was plenty of excitement on the final day of action. the men's ice hockey was terrific, a classic final. athletes from russia beat germany 11—3 in overtime. it was a thrilling climax. jubilant scenes as they won their
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second gold. the winning team proudly sighing the russian national anthem. pretty loudly, as the olympic flag was raised in honour of their win. after the british women missed out on a bronze medal yesterday, sweden and the game south korea and the final overnight. it finished 8—3 to the swedes. not a good result for great britain in the four—man bobsleigh. they had two teams one came 18th and another vanished in 17th position. it was the germans who took the gold. the premier league's bottom club were booed off by their own fans as they we re booed off by their own fans as they were beaten 2—1 by hot huddersfield. their fourth straight defeat. they have won once in 1a games second
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goalfor the have won once in 1a games second goal for the visitors shortly before the hour. they are now seven points from safety. i think it three wins in 37 games. does the problem. wejust i think it three wins in 37 games. does the problem. we just got to find a way to win a game, which ever way that is and how ugly it is. it was certainly ugly today but we did not win. we get the opportunity personally to turn it around? i don't know. liverpool moved up into second. 23 for the season. their one point ahead of manchester united to play chelsea later today. here are a yesterday's premiere the results in full. bournemouth to with newcastle and glenn murray got a couple. in
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the scottish premiership coalminer came from to kneel down to draw against her bony. the manager was sent to the stand for his reaction toa sent to the stand for his reaction to a penalty his side conceded. lenin was not best pleased, as you can see. winds from motherwell, hamilton, rangers and thinks johnson. manchester city came from behind to draw at home against chelsea. everything to play for in the title race. chelsea were two up within 25 minutes. city hit back and this spectacular effort from sta nway. right this spectacular effort from stanway. right on the top corner. that was just four minutes from time. all it finished. chelsea are taught by one point. that is all your sport for now. now on bbc news it is time for the papers, with ben. hello and welcome to our look ahead
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to what the the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are the political commentatorjames millar, and the education editor of the sunday times, sian griffiths. following the un's resolution for a ceasefire in syria, the observer carries the picture of two children in eastern ghouta, where it's thought hundreds have died in the past week. brexit leads the sunday telegraph — the paper has a piece from senior cabinet member david lidington, in which he claims that the snp could split the uk economy and ruin trade deals. staying with brexit, and the sunday express reports that the prime minister will declare britain's best days lie ahead in a major speech coming up next week. topshop owner philip green is under fire in the the sunday times which claims the billionaire planned to sell his high—street empire over
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dinner with two hsbc bankers. and the mail on sunday reports that the ministry of defence is setting up a helpline for british troops suffering from conditions including ptsd. so no consensus over the main story, but brexit appears in several guises, perhaps not surprisingly, let's have a look. let's start off with the observer. they're talking about let's start off with the observer. they‘ re talking about labour, jeremy corbyn. jeremy corbyn reno was going to make an important speech tomorrow. which may commit labour to staying in the customs union. absolutely. he's going to be a little bit annoyed this morning because the observer has splashed on the story. there are splits, exposing splits within the labour party. because 80 senior figures across the party, including baroness
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kennedy and lawrence, have warned corbyn that he is not going to be able to fund his promised fund more schools, more hospitals, unless the uk stays in the eu single market. jeremy corbyn poised to make a speech tomorrow that he's gone to signal that labour will back permanent membership of the customs union, this is just permanent membership of the customs union, this isjust going to be seen as not a helpful intervention at this stage. it is extraordinary. as a country, we are getting nearer and nearer the door, if you like. we still don't really know what lies outside her door. yes, the timing of this is perhaps more interesting than the content. because we know there are lots of people in the labour party who would rather we we re labour party who would rather we were still in the eu, never mind in the single market and customs union. it does show up the splits and labour. we know there are splits in the tory party. it is exactly same oi'i the tory party. it is exactly same on the other side. as you say, exactly what either party wants, never mind what were going to end up with, remains something of a
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mystery, really. according to the sunday express, theresa may is also to be making a big speech on brexit this week and sounding very optimistic. the country's best days lie ahead. you are the prime minister would say that, really. what you make of that? it isa that, really. what you make of that? it is a small word that is very interesting. she has said, if we get them right, brexit will be beginning ofa them right, brexit will be beginning of a bright new story. if we get it right. you would expect a prime minister to be saying, we will get this right, are best days are ahead of us. but she's saying is that it are ahead of us. but she's saying is thatitis are ahead of us. but she's saying is that it is fascinating. it goes to the heart of the uncertainty around. she's making a big speech on friday, the big speech on brexit which will set out apparently what the cabinet have agreed. but we don't know exactly what that is yet and as you say, the clock is ticking. we're into march on friday so there was not much more than one year until we leave the eu. whatever happens. i thought as well,
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with the story, when you turn the page away from the best days ahead, says may, the story is exposing splits in the tory party because it has got chris patten saying that it is completely unrealistic that the uk can replace the benefits of single market membership of the global trade deals. there is a great quote from him, all this business about walter raleigh and britain is pretty much for the birds, you know. the rhetoric is all rather grander nationalistic. there is a quote from donald tusk saying this as having your cake and eat it. he will be overseen the negotiation so, you know, to theresa makin set out what she likes on friday. the eu can then turn round and say, yes, you're not getting it. then where does that leave us? disunity within the tory party, the labour party, you thought about. but according to the sunday telegraph, disunity within the united kingdom. maybe scotland doing its own trade deals, making things difficult,
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according to the sunday telegraph. you could not make this up. essentially the government is saying that if you have different. your biggest market, which you are next to, that is a bad thing. surely brexit means we're going to have a print rules to our biggest market, who we are next to. and yet they are saying that the snp of the scottish government, which asked by the different things, the scottish government and the scottish parliament are different to party political entities. they're doing a bad thing by wanting more power and by taking back control for edinburgh. this is somehow not acceptable. and it will not play well in scotland. i'm quite sure. it'sjust weird, i think. this idea that scotland and wales would like to have more powers to negotiate trade deals, you know, praised brexit. i'm welsh and i cannot see the logic in it but in the other hand, it is this idea that the other hand, it is this idea that the uk will be weakened, you know, if it becomes for separate nations 01’ if it becomes for separate nations or try to negotiate. there is power in unity and so, yes, i'm disturbed
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by the sunday times this morning. we had that chequers summit of the inner brexit war cabinet, whatever you want to call it, which there was, apparently consensus of a kind. and we've got pictures and some of the papers of that war cabinet. there was a nice cosy sort of fire. i'm not sure if it is a real log fire ora i'm not sure if it is a real log fire or a gas fire. and they're all in armchairs and on sofas, sitting around, talking about the future of the country. it is quite interesting just to see them around not the cabinet table but around a rather posh living room like that. it isa posh living room like that. it is a classic picture tells a thousand stories, doesn't it? the power politics going on a few sips wear. david davis at the prime minister's left by the fireplace, apparently that was a prime position to have. michael gove reanimated at her right hand. they are all numbered just in case
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you don't know who is who from that stop shop. one of the things we remarked on is how few women are in this gathering. just see that we counted. we also noted that the men were gesticulating rather animatedly and woman sitting there with their hands folded in their laps. there are all kinds of... and i love these kind of photos on the sunday papers because they tell you so much. theresa may trying all the time to keep this consensus or establish a consensus. do keep this consensus or establish a consensus. do you keep this consensus or establish a consensus. do you wonder keep this consensus or establish a consensus. do you wonder 110w keep this consensus or establish a consensus. do you wonder now whether maybe looking back she was right to try and called a snap election? because she needed a majority which obviously shouldn't get, but it would have made her life so much easier if she had a decent majority in the commons. you forget that last april anyone would've said she should draw a snap election and get a big majority do what she likes. not work out like that. it is unfair to suggest that she should've seen ill exactly how
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that election should play out though she suddenly was responsible for many of the tory mistakes that were made that led to the result but we got. but, yes, she must lie awake at night wishing she had that huge majority of 100 that she was dreaming ofa majority of 100 that she was dreaming of a year ago. let's move away into the murky world of spies. it is always fun sunday morning. in the sunday times, they've got unmasked, the daily telegraph reporter who spied for moscow. his name was floyd and he was nicknamed pink floyd. she was the communist affairs correspondent for the daily telegraph, which is a greatjob for the daily telegraph, which is a great job title, isn't for the daily telegraph, which is a greatjob title, isn't it? a fabulous story. who would have thought the commonest affairs correspondent would be a communist spy? it is a fabulous story and he is called david lloyd. he isa story and he is called david lloyd. he is a former british diplomat, and, as you say, he became communist affairs correspondent for the daily telegraph and the sunday times revealed the escape prosecution. he
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was unmasked just after the time that donald maclean disappeared and he was never prosecuted. the thinking is that he was not prosecuted because it would just have been such a huge embarrassment have yet another, you know, russian spy have yet another, you know, russian spy in britain. he was actually given a job. it was all dealt with very quietly and he was given a job in the daily telegraph, and then editor and deputy editor had in fact work for mi6. so we don't know exactly why the deal was struck, whether it was just too, you know, save red faces all round. or whether he perhaps provided more information. we don't know. there was a lot about the story that we don't know but it is just a fabulous story. ple nty of story. plenty of entry, which is what you wa nt plenty of entry, which is what you want from a spy story. and the mail on sunday, they've got a story about another well—known journalist. the bbc‘s ownjohn simpson, and how he nearly fell for a communist spy honey trap.
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it is an interesting insight into how it worked. he was having trouble in his marriage at the time. and, here we go. the communists found a glamorous young lady to try persuading to, well, into a honey trap, exactly. i don't think you need to say any more. honey trap covers it. john simson and honey trap are not words i want to dwell on. we were chatting earlier about what propels people to do this kind of thing. whether it is that you are inspired by communism and you feel this is a good ideology. whether it is actually that you are a man and some rather beautiful young woman from eastern europe comes along with legs up to their armpits and seduces you. i always thought it would be rather flattering to be approached but nobody ever approached me to be a spy. you would say that, though, wouldn't
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you? i would, that's clever. very clever. sunday times front page. they've got a big splash about philip green. what you make of that? an interesting choice of splash. they might be trying to get at something else. the story is that, allegedly, philip green talks about selling off his arcadia group, talked about selling fish shops. you very much says, no, nothing in the story actually happened. which is a slightly odd story for a splash. is there something more to this story? it might have more to run, i suspect. we will have to work that out. the observer, they are leading on syria which has been so sad, so tragic. horrific, all week, really. another picture of misery therein syria. after that you end ceasefire resolution which does not seem to have made much difference says bar. it isa
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have made much difference says bar. it is a very sad picture. two little children at a makeshift clinic in rebel held area. the security council voted in favour of a 30 day ceasefire and they're still been jailed and people are still dying. very sad. there is no end in sight. we've been talking about the papers and comes up every so often and it's so and comes up every so often and it's so incredibly depressing, isn't it? because there is no obvious end. even, you know, the ceasefire. within minutes, according to the coverage, there was no fighting. the world just seem so powerless at the moment, doesn't it? to do anything. it is likely for themselves to a standstill except they haven't because they're still fighting. as education editor you're interested in the university story thatis interested in the university story that is in the observer. this is a story on the front page of the observer. and the headline is
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revealed, university chief's 5—star expenses. the story based on requests and it lays bare the lavish expense account of some british university vice chancellors. they've already been criticised for their allegedly high salaries. very big salaries, approaching half £1 million in some cases. this is a channel 4 special programme tomorrow and there are some juicy bits, really, i guess. the questionable items include a pawn star martini. a fortnum & mason hamper. one university paid £1600 for their chancellor's pet dog to be relocated from australia. he must have flown first—class. of course, you he must have flown first—class. of course, you know, this is coming at a time when universities and facing the worst industrial action they've seen for decades. strikes are to bus week and it is a seen for decades. strikes are to bus week and it is 8111 seen for decades. strikes are to bus week and it is 814 day strike which could be extended into the summer.
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the good hits student exams. it is over pension cuts and students at the moment, lectures have been cancelled, they are demanding refunds for their fees. it is a com plete refunds for their fees. it is a complete mess and given how many overseas tunes we have here, what a huge important business our universities are for britain. it really needs to be sorted out. you get a sense of higher education is in you get a sense of higher education isina you get a sense of higher education is in a state of turmoil at the moment. that is definitely true. the one thing guaranteed to make any situation worse is dropping the word expenses. that is just the magic word. 0r word. ora pawn star martini. i wasn't sure about that, that is a drink, right? it has in it. oh, you know what it what it is? it seems tacky to have a pawn star martini. would expect a vice chancellor to have a proper martini. what is being done about those high salaries were talking about? is anything going to change on that? ministers have come up with very
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strong words. there is a new regulator coming in at the beginning of april and they will have powers to fine universities that continued to fine universities that continued to paint vice chancellors salaries that are notjustified. a vice chancellor can show that the buck salaries justify their in the clear but adding some of the salaries way above. especially when we're seeing lecturers now facing £10,000 cuts to their pensions and many of them are on short—term contracts. it is timing, isn't it? terrible timing given the strike is all about pensions. suddenly you're finding of another nearby towns is getting a huge amount of pay, they can do this as well. that you might not that closely linked but it is very easy to fudge the two together. £1600 to bring your pet dog from australia. that seems a bit over the top. there was a good cartoon on the front page of the sunday telegraph from matt, who is always liable to make us laugh. exactly. have you got that led to
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readers of what matt says? we have of 30 of matt been celebrated in re ce nt of 30 of matt been celebrated in recent days and it is remarkable how he is always on point. this one is what looks like two dogs outside the university and one saying, if a philosophy lecturer goes on strike, and all his students sleep through it, did the strike ever happen? it isa it, did the strike ever happen? it is a serious and issue but it gets to the point and makes you laugh. an incredibly difficult skill, actually, to do time after time. i wonder if that is true. i wonder if some of them have been sleeping through the strike. anyway, ok, let's finish off on the rugby. now, i know, james, you're interested in this. did you enjoy... i've got a foot in both camps on this. who do you support, tell us? i think the scottish addition to the sunday telegraph has a different page. i expect the scottish addition had a jubilant scottish player after they beat england 25 have then ——
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25-13. do you sport england or scotland? you will mean all sorts of trouble here. historically, growing up in scotland, you were required to choose one or the other and you would... i suddenly decided to choose the one who tends to win more, whose england. but i still wish scotland what they're playing but i still wish scotland what they‘ re playing anybody but i still wish scotland what they're playing anybody else. but you are a scottish? i was born in england so ourfoot in both camps asi in england so ourfoot in both camps as i see it. my timeline on facebook and twitter have been overtaken byjubilant scots who are absolutely over the moon, which is lovely to see. because it has been ten years since they last won and apparently it was a good game. i confess i missed it, unfortunately. i will try to catch the highlights. i believe the highlights are on youtube. your recommended to get a bowl of porridge while you're watching them. it is not the championship more interesting, it is underdog story. it is just
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interesting, it is underdog story. it isjust a interesting, it is underdog story. it is just a really nice story. interesting, it is underdog story. it isjust a really nice story. are you a rugby fan? i was at the match where wales beat scotland a few weeks ago. why you? yes. and wales. it was a lovely atmosphere. we were at cardiff station going back in the evening and i was saying to you, there a scottish bagpipe player in his kilt and he was playing scottish tunes. and if it had been a football match it would've been a very brave person to be standing at cardiff station surrounded by drunken welsh bands but it was rugby is of the welsh bands were just singing along and that's the difference between by and that's the difference between rugby and football. such a nice atmosphere to to the games. it is such a family atmosphere. game gentlemen. is that right? very good quote, yes, that is perfect. thank you very much for both of you. that's it for the papers today. don't forget you can see the front pages of the papers online on the bbc news website. it's all there for you — seven days a week at bbc.co.uk/papers — and if you miss the programme any evening you can watch it later on bbc iplayer.
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thank you to james millar and sian griffiths. goodbye. a quiet weekend of weather thanks to an area of high pressure close by to scandinavia. it looks set to continue for many areas the rest of the day. after a pretty chilly start it will remain on the cool side. but there will be some sunshine. it is pretty chilly at the moment is a bit because we are tapping into some pretty cold air up over scandinavia and through siberia. increasingly week we will see the temperatures falling away. i urge you to get out and enjoy the sunshine today. temperatures will not look that spectacular to you but by comparison to what is to come through the rest of the week and the general feel of the days through the forthcoming week, today, really not a bad day to
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be out and about. a bit of a change for this evening and overnight. the skies werejust begin for this evening and overnight. the skies were just begin to cloud up across eastern areas. the first signs of some wintry showers coming in from the north sea. a really chilly start to the new day wherever you are stepping out on monday morning, i think you're going to be that much, much colder than the weekend. there will be some snow showers in the forecast as well. initially, there will be liked and we will find them not exclusively but mostly across the eastern side of the british isles. i shouldn't buy an increasingly noticeable and cold east to north—easterly wind. you can see the temperatures there. no longer the four, five, six, seven, 8 degrees or so. 02 about three orfour will seven, 8 degrees or so. 02 about three or four will cover it. the receiving an overnight more significant areas of snow working its way from the north sea right through the heart of the british isles. and that will lead a covering, several centimetres of snow, quite widely across many areas and tuesday in its own right, a cold feeling day game. elaborate on the
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strength of the wind, noted here that we are suggesting it will feel more like “11, —5, minus six degrees. and it is going to get even worse by the middle part of the week, low— pressure the middle part of the week, low—pressure falling down towards the end will but into the high pressure over scandinavia. it means stronger wind and it is a raw wind coming in from the east. so the feels like temperatures by the stage could be down to “111 —15 degrees. we may well finish of the week with moisture from that low getting into southern parts of britain and that could well be some blizzards after a speu could well be some blizzards after a spell of disruptive snow elsewhere earlier in the week. this is bbc news. i'm ben brown. the headlines at ten: syrian warplanes are reported to have attacked the besieged rebel area of eastern ghouta despite the un security council voting unanimously for a ceasefire. labours brexit secretary says
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the party will keep the uk the uk in a customs union with the eu after brexit. russian athletes are told they won't be allowed to march under the country's flag during this morning's closing ceremony at the winter olympics. one of bollywood's most famous actresses, sridevi kapoor, who starred in more than 150 films — has died suddenly at the age of 5a. making the weight, we hear how jockeys who use extreme
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