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tv   BBC News  BBC News  May 7, 2018 2:00pm-2:31pm BST

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this is bbc news. i'm lukwesa burak. the headlines: extra police on patrol in london — after four shootings in just 2a hours leave one teenager dead and three others injured. borisjohnson goes to washington in an attempt to persuade donald trump to keep the iran nuclear deal working with our european friends, we think we can be tougher on iran, but not throw away the heart of deal about stopping them getting nuclear weapons. vladimir putin is sworn in for a fourth term as president — promising to improve the lives of the russian people. translation: we are open to dialogue, along with our partners, we stand for equal partnership with every state in the interests of peace and stability on the planet. record breaking weather for a bank holiday in may — as temperatures reach 24.2 degrees in east sussex. and it may become even hotter. the beach at its best — for many a
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record—breaking day. for some here a wonderful day out at the beach for some here a wonderful also — preserving one of the world's most loved species. the australian state of new south wales announces a £25 million plan to help protect its dwindling koala population. and ‘a force in crisis' investigates allegations of misconduct and corruption at police scotland. that's in half an hour here on bbc news. good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. the metropolitan police are continuing to investigate shootings in london over the weekend, and extra officers supported by armed units, are patrolling the streets. a 17—year—old boy has
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died, and three other people are in hospital, although their injuries are not considered to be life threatening. earlier, detective chief superintendent simon rose spoke to our correspondent danny shaw and updated him on an incident in wealdstone, north west london, where a thirteen year old and a fifteen year old suffered pellet wounds it was shortly after 1.15, where two young people on a motorcycle or moped approached, discharged a shot gun towards their intended targets. it accidentally injuring a 13—year—old boy who was passing boy. it isa 13—year—old boy who was passing boy. it is a cowardly act with no regard to the safety of members of the public who were enjoying a lovely bank holiday weekend and certainly asa bank holiday weekend and certainly as a father myself, can i understand how people are extremely concerned for their safety and that of their
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children. how badly was the 13—year—old? children. how badly was the 13-year-old? it appears it is a shot gun pellet. he was treated in hospital and he has been dis—charned and he is with his family. what can you tell us about the 15—year—old, was he the intended target? you tell us about the 15—year—old, was he the intended target7m you tell us about the 15—year—old, was he the intended target? it would appear that is the case, but that is pa rt appear that is the case, but that is part of investigation and we need to leave that. he is still in hospital? he is being treated, yes. what is his condition? it is not life—threatening. he is stable and being cared for by the hospital. he got hit in the head? yes. there was another victim, can you tell us about this other victim. at this stage, we believe there was a third victim a youth who received minor injuries to his arm and left the scene prior to police or the ambulance service arriving. we are still to speak to him. the foreign secretary is in washington in an attempt to stop president donald trump
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abandoning the iran nuclear deal. boris johnson has just appeared on the american tv show, ‘fox and friends' in an effort to persuade president trump scrapping the deal. mr trump is known to be an avid viewer of the programme. the foreign secretary said the deal had its weaknesses but these could be fixed. the president has a legitimate point — he's set a challenge for the world. we think that what you can do is be tougher on iran, address the concerns of president, and not throw the baby out with the bath water, notjunk a deal — because, as i say, plan b does not seem to me to be particularly well developed at this stage. the deal expierps in 2015 and there no way of stopping the iranians going to get a nuclear weapon. we think we can fix that, working with oui’ think we can fix that, working with our european friends, we think we can be tougher on iran, but not
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throw away the heart of the deal about stopping them getting a nuclear weapon. barbara plett usher is in washington for us. what sort of reaction has there been to what borisjohnson has said? well, he was given a sort of tough line of questioning in terms of the attitude of the presenter, because thatis attitude of the presenter, because that is the way fox news presents and they know also that is their political line, but the president is watching them. so they gave him a run for his money. but his message remained consistent, that yes, the deal is not perfect, it could be uf tougher, but it is preventing iran from get agnew clear weapon. inga nuclear weapon. he said there is not a plan b. he said in is a very boris johnson way, he said it isn't well
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developed. he said are we going to seriously bomb iran's nuclear facilities. we don't want military activity. that reflects the concerns in britain and europe if you do do away with the deal you're on a path to confrontation. thank you. vladimir putin has been sworn in for a fourth term as russian president, at a ceremony in moscow. the lavish inauguration ceremony was held inside the grand kremlin palace before an invited audience. mr putin has been in power, as president or prime minister, for the past eighteen years. in the latest vote in march, he won an overwhelming victory after the main opposition leader was barred from standing. more than a thousand people were arrested during demonstrations against his leadership at the weekend. after being sworn in, he pledged to create a "country of possibilities" for all russians.
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let's cross live to moscow and our correspondent there sarah rainsford. mr putin is not saying anything new for the russians? no, this was very much a repetition i think of what russians have been hearing for some time — which that is vladimir putin is presenting himself as the strong man to lead this country into the future. very much as he has done for the past 18 years. he is of course now the longest serving leader of russia since josef now the longest serving leader of russia sincejosef stalin led the soviet union. that is quite a time in office. he is pledging to remain as the strong leader of a strong country. he is talking about a need
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to continue the policy of standing up to continue the policy of standing up to the west, of course defending russia's position as he put it, on the international stage. but he has also shifted the focus slightly to pledge to improve russian standards of living. he talked about increasing wealth, working to improve the economy. now of course thatis improve the economy. now of course that is important, but there is a big question mark over whether or not he can achieve that, especially given the western sanctions that are in place, because of vladimir putin's foreign policy. just how bad are things in russia in terms of economy? well, there was a recession here, russia has now crept out of recession to a very slow recovery, but it is weak and russians are feeling the pinch. a few years ago the country felt wealthy and people we re the country felt wealthy and people were living comfortably. there was an expanding middle class. it doesn't feel like that any more. it doesn't feel like that any more. it does feel like people are feeling
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the pinch, beginning to at least. but it is no at country that feels like it is in crisis either. i think at the moment vladimir putin has some space to continue on the line that he has kept so far. also this isa that he has kept so far. also this is a country which is in the midsts ofa is a country which is in the midsts of a patriotic surge as vladimir putin has presented russia as a country surrounded by enemies. that helps if he can point to a hostile environment for tightening the belt, some russians may forgive him. thank you. joining me now is philip worman who is the managing director at political risk consulting firm gpw. i don't know if you saw that speech by vladimir putin. were you convinced he can do the job of improving the lives of russians? convinced he can do the job of
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improving the lives of russian57m isa improving the lives of russian57m is a difficult term. he is almost a semi religious figurehead in russia and he has to improve living standard, he has to raise income tax and the pension age and fund these adventures. he has losses in syria. he has domestic protests. there is a lot on his plate. the biggest risk for lot on his plate. the biggest risk foeradimir lot on his plate. the biggest risk for vladimir putin is that the country lapses into stagnation. how goodis country lapses into stagnation. how good is he at resolving domestic issues. he is much better on the international stage. he played extremely skilful cards in crimea and syria. he is less good at resolving domestic issues and clamping down on unrest. he prefers to focus externally and leave the issues at home to his ministers. what do you expect to see? many say it could be his final term. i think it could be his final term. i think it will be his final term, unless he
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changes the constitution again. that would be unpopular. people are looking for the answer to the question whoa comes next? the elites who have made a lot of money and gained influrns will be —— influrns fluence will want somebody to keep the assets safe and the people want to see wage rises and to keep buying the nice cars and benefit from the, let's face it, he has benefitted from high oil prices since he started as president. he mentioned something about improving dialogue. with who. who are his targets?” think there will be a bit of de—escalation with the us. the kremlin has toned down its anti—us rhetoric. he has the world cup coming up and is spending a lot of money on that. the message from the top is no big surprises are, let's keep things calm and dial down the rhetoric. thank you. it is 12
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minutes past two. the met office has confirmed today is the hottest may day bank holiday since the long weekend was introduced in 1978 — after temperatures reached 24.2 degree celsius in east sussex. and it could get even hotter — with forecasters predicting that temperatures could reach 28 degrees in some parts this afternoon. in a moment will speak to our correspondent kathryn stanczyszyn in london's regents park, but first let's speak to claire woodling who's in bigbury—on—sea on the south devon coast. it looks s gorgeous out there. yes it could be a good day in august, but it is a great day in august. there are crowds of people here enjoying the sunshine. it is record—breaking highs in parts of the south today. a lot of people
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out. 900 parking spaces and they're all full. everyone seems to be enjoying the water and the beach. the sea is calm that makes it ideal for young people. we have been speaking to some beach—goers. it's nice and hot and sunny. have you ever known it to be this warm here? no. we're planning to hire some kayaks and get out there and just make the most of it, because it's just unheard of this incredible weather this early on many may. but yeah, we've got a picnic... and we are going to get out into the water, hopefully get this one to get his toes in the water. that's the plan. oh, it's brilliant, we have been out paddling and just awesome, nice, because the kids said it was the beast from the east a few weeks ago. now we're out in shorts and t—shirts, so great. this sunshine is very welcome,
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because just two months ago in march in devon we had snow believe it or not. of course the beast from the east. joining me is brendan prince, you are a charity who sends message to young people. what is the message. this year cold water shock. that is anything under 15 degrees. our average temperatures is about 12 and today it is nine and the temptation to jump in and today it is nine and the temptation tojump in is and today it is nine and the temptation to jump in is there. and today it is nine and the temptation tojump in is there. cold water shock is a killer and we need the spread the message for all people to neverjust the spread the message for all people to never just jump the spread the message for all people to neverjustjump into water and to take it gently, splash some water, back of the neck, face, get used to the temperature before you actually get into the water. how long should that process take? two or three minutes. we know what it is
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like when you go into cold water and that big intake of air and like when you go into cold water and that big intake ofairand it like when you go into cold water and that big intake of air and it is getting rid of that sensation before you go into deeper water. neverjump into deep water. especially this time of year when it is nine degrees and it is a real shock. have you beenin and it is a real shock. have you been in the sea? we have been in all morning with the children and it getting them used to the temperature. they were there up to the christmas and the water temperature is better at christmas. you can have a lovely day, but never jump you can have a lovely day, but never jump into cold water. thank you. we are expecting the tide go out further to the cause way which leads to bear island. it should be ate its lowest at five o'clock. thank you. our correspondent is in regent‘s park in london. you have winged feathered friends also trying to
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keep cool? yes, but it is hot in the city and it makes places like this very popular. thousands have flooded into the park to picnic, play games and use this boating lake as well. that has been incredibly popular and the queue was as long as the queue for the ice—cream earlier on when i was checking. there is huge amount or was checking. there is huge amount o's amounts of people. i saw 30 or 40 o's amounts of people. i saw 30 or a0 people in a party. everyone wants to enjoy the sunshine in urban areas andi to enjoy the sunshine in urban areas and i have been speaking to some of them. it is unbelievable. it is like we are living in spain. it is cool. and the fact it is a bank holiday. i'm enjoying the weather very much. i don't usually get out. but the weather like this it was so tempting that... we came out for a walk and a day of relaxation. it is fabulous. we are enjoying ourselves. getting
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out and before it starts raining again, because it is english summer time. and we knew it would be a record—brea ker today. it has time. and we knew it would be a record—breaker today. it has smashed the previous high temperature for the previous high temperature for the early may bank holiday. the previous high was 23.6 back in niemplt. —— 1999. we are expecting it to get up to 28 where we are. but a word of warning, the uv levels are high and the pollen levels are high, s0 high and the pollen levels are high, so make sure you slap on the sunscreen. thank you. the headlines on bbc news: the metropolitan police is putting on extra patrols in london — afterfour shootings in just 2a hours leave one teenager dead and three others injured. vladimir putin has been sworn in for a fourth term as president of russia — marking 18 years in power. it's a record breaking may day bank holiday —
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the met office says temperatures reached 2a.2 degrees in east sussex and could rise as high as 28 degrees. pubs and hotels will struggle to employ enough staff, if eu nationals are no longer allowed to work freely in the uk. that's the stark warning from the recruitment and employment confederation, who says the hospitality industry is in crisis. it's calling on the government to allow eu workers to still come to britain after brexit. our business correspondent joe lynam reports. the bingham is a prestigious hotel and restaurant in london. 70% of its highly trained staff are eu nationals, and its french manager is very worried about what will happen when britain leaves the single market. i think it's going to be hugely difficult to get the quality of the people i have right now, going forward, because obviously
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the english people don't see hospitality as a career, and therefore we will have slightly less—skilled, if i may say, people. the hospitality sector is the fourth—biggest employer, with three million people working in pubs, restaurants and hotels. 1a% are from the eu, while in london it is much higher. workers in pubs and hotels are officially considered low—skilled, and recruiters say that employers should do more to encourage british workers to consider hospitality as a career. so one of our messages to government is, at some point, we need to think carefully about how we promote the uk as a good place to come and live and work. so the debate can't be just about coming people we will let in — so what's our proposition to people so that they want to come and live in the work in the uk, because in sectors like hospitality we need them. the government said it has commissioned advice to better understand the reliance of eu migrant workers across the economy, and would work closely
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with the hospitality industry to consider their needs. joe lynam, bbc news. the nhs could be bankrupted by people's lifestyle choices according to a senior government advisor. the senior medical advisor to nhs england says urgent action is needed especially in poorer communities where ill health and early deaths are linked to a poor diet, high rates of smoking and not enough exercise. for the past 18 months our health correspondent dominic hughes has been following efforts to improve health in one such town, the formerfishing port of fleetwood in lancashire. this is the generation that has seen their town of fleetwood undergo dramatic changes. from a prosperous fishing port to a community plagued by illness and premature death. one step forward. but now the youngest generation is being offered the prospect of a healthierfuture.
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from getting active... to thinking about what they eat. they're taking control of their destiny. wouldn't be sat here now, i'd probably be in a coffin, dead. when we first met tom in 2016, he was playing football as part of his recovery from drug addiction. a year and a half later, he is doing well. now coaching others and in some ways, making amends for his behaviour in the past. the only thing i wanted to do was cause chaos and destruction. and now i'm doing something active that i like, and it's also making a great difference. tom has turned his life around. and on fleetwood's westview estate, local volunteers are trying to make similar changes across an entire community. a lot of people in fleetwood, they've become isolated. you have done your schooling. at the
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end there is nothing. from 15 upwards, there's nothing for that age. do you feel more or less optimistic than 18 months ago. definitely more, more people arejoining. than 18 months ago. definitely more, more people are joining. we have to bring people together and get them to go out and look out and say, we live in fleetwood. we are proud of fleetwood. but there's a world out there and we've got to try and make the best of it. what happens in fleetwood matters because lifestyle choices, smoking, drinking, poor diet and not enough exercise, mean people are dying early, notjust here but right across the uk. and yet over the past 18 months, we've seen lots of different projects that are all trying to break that cycle of ill—health that is claiming lives. and senior nhs figures say something has to change because otherwise the health service itself could be overwhelmed. what can we do so people stay fit,
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well and healthy into their holdest older years encouraging lifestyle changes is becoming a nhs priority. the problem is, if we don't make those changes, we'll be in the situation of saying, we just don't have enough money to look after as many people as we would choose to, as doctors would choose to, and could end up with the equivalent of bankrupting the nhs. this is a process that has only just begun. but the prize is that these young people grow up in a town that is healthier and happier. and time, everyone, well done. the state of new south wales in australia has announced a twenty five million pound plan to protect one of its most iconic creatures — the koala. the money will be used to establish forest reserves and build a hospital to care for the sick and injured animals. the koala's decline has been blamed on habitat loss, dog attacks and climate change. well to discuss this further i'm joined in the studio by deborah tabart, who's the ceo of the australian koala foundation.
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thank you for coming in. how much of a crisis is the koala population in the koala was listed as vulnerable to extinction six years ago. so this isa to extinction six years ago. so this is a long over due statement. it is not what i would want, i would rather we had strong laws to protect trees. i don't see any legislative reform in the announcements. a lot of national parks they will create are formerly forested lands, so i was going to say they flogged the forest, but nay cut the trees down and then said we will make it into a national park. i'm sceptical, i think it is an election promise. national park. i'm sceptical, i think it is an election promisem is interesting they are going to be building specialist hospitals to ca re building specialist hospitals to care for them. are they at risk
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health—wise, is that a risk affecting the population? you think about going home tonight and your houseis about going home tonight and your house is gone, you have no food and nowhere the live and your family's gone. so as soon nowhere the live and your family's gone. so as soon as you nowhere the live and your family's gone. so as soon as you take a tree down, the koalas are prone to all sort of things. and over my 30 year year career we have shot and moved and sterilised them and done all sorts of things. this is maybe well meaning. but it isn't going to fix the problems. i'm here in london talking to environmental lawyers about stronger world laws that really need tolike at what is happening to our planet. 80% of koalas' forests are gone. you see this every day in myjob. can we imagine this planet without the forests ? imagine this planet without the forests? are australians aware of
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the problem? are they rallying around organisations like yours? we are privately funded. so you know getting money nor koalas is not difficult. getting political commitment and will to upset industry, which what is it is, upsetting industry, to say we're going put constraints on you. i say to industry leaders, if i was leading your businesses i think i could still coal mine and keep koalas and still grow food and they just want to be land clear and our political leaders are creating divide farmers and the green move. president macron was in australia and he gave a clear message — climate is changing. you're having your hottest day today. in if summer we had 50 degrees celsius. are people listening to you what, you're
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saying it much bigger than implementing and using the $3a million? are they listening to you, how big a job do you have? well, in 2011 a senate inquiry listened to 101 submissions from the people and said we will protect it and then it got shelved. six years later minister said it is too hard. they're not listening to anyone but industry. i don't have a problem with industry going about its business. but we are at a time where i feel strongly unless we understand how serious the climate changes are, i'm privileged to travel my country every day. in the bush. and i have seen every day. in the bush. and i have seen what i regard as ecological colla pse seen what i regard as ecological collapse and in canberra they have no idea that is happening. collapse and in canberra they have no idea that is happeningm collapse and in canberra they have no idea that is happening. it is an iconic image... handsome isn't he?
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yes i found out he is a gentleman. how important is the koala to australia. when our former prime minister was going to shirt front vladimir putin, the first thing they did was put in a koala in his hand hands. now the weather. what a sizzler today. we have beaten the record it is the hottest early may bank holiday weekend on record. this what is we had in 1999. 23.6. that was the previous hottest. today, we're going to smash that record. we are talking about highs of 28 degrees no question it is going to bea degrees no question it is going to be a really hot one. this is thousand how the temperatures have been shooting up. large parts england and wales with temperatures
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in the high 20s. in the north low 20s expected as well. a balmy evening on the way. beautiful starry skies. warm evening. but the weather is going go down hill in western areas. a front is approaching. by the end of night we will see rain pushing into northern ireland. a weather front moves in. pushing into northern ireland. a weatherfront moves in. it pushing into northern ireland. a weather front moves in. it is a cool front with fresher air. so things will go down hill a bit across the western areas. so here is the weather front. this is western areas. so here is the weatherfront. this is the morning on tuesday. by around lunchtime you can see it reaches some western parts of the uk. to the south, a few showers, but it is still going to be a hot one. 27 expected in london. around 26 in norwich. the fronts keep on moving through on tuesday into wednesday and you can see the blue o's s that means cooler air. 0n
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wednesday another front moving into northern ireland, rain expected here and yet more fresher air into northern ireland. you can see how cool it is here. still 20 in the south—east. towards the middle part of the weekend, the fronts keep on moving through. so things are turning more unsettled as we go through the rest of the week. so atla ntic through the rest of the week. so atlantic winds win and we are in that fresher air. still a lot sunshine. but closer to what we should normally have this time of year. this time of year it is 18 the average. so cooling off in the week ahead. this is bbc news — our latest headlines.

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