Skip to main content

tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  August 13, 2018 2:00pm-5:01pm BST

2:00 pm
hello, you're watching afternoon live. i'm simon mccoy. today at 2pm: new action on homelessness — the government says it wants to make rough sleeping a thing of the past. but where is the promised £100 million coming from? when you are starving and hungry and you ain't got no money, there's nowhere to go and get some food or anything, to have a shower or a change of clothes. tackling the touts — ticketmaster is closing two of its secondary ticketing websites, which allow people to offload unwanted tickets. a not—so—warm welcome to the uk — delays at heathrow airport passport control left passengers queuing for up to two—and—a—half hours last month. coming up on afternoon live, all the sport with ben. the usa confirm the first eight members of their ryder cup team. but, after his runner—up performance at the us pga championships, will tiger woods be on the plane to paris? he says it's pretty cool to be in contention. indeed. more from you later. and,
2:01 pm
darren, the weather. yes, a feud thunderstorms today, certainly more showers, but later on i will try and a nswer two showers, but later on i will try and answer two questions, what's happened to the summer and will it come back again? talk to you later, darren. also coming up — turmoil on the world markets as turkey's economic woes deepen. the country's president says the united states is seeking to "stab it in the back". hello, everyone. this is afternoon live. i'm simon mccoy. the government has launched an initiative to end rough sleeping on england's streets within a decade. ministers are promising millions of pounds "to help people turn their lives around", including support for mental health and addictions, and funding for housing. but there are questions about where the promised cash — £100 million — is coming from. it's becoming clear there's no new money involved. graham satchell has more. we are on the streets of east
2:02 pm
london with homelessness charity st mungo's. 0utreach workers do this every night, checking parks, streets, doorways. this man, who didn't want to be identified, told us he had drug and mental health problems. he's been sleeping rough for four months. i got evicted because i didn't engage with a couple of services and they didn't like that, the fact i wasn't engaging. they thought i wasn't willing to sort myself out so they evicted me. that's how i became homeless. it's quite hard. and it's quite scary as well. most of the time when you are starving and hungry and you've got no money with nowhere to go and get some food. if you could say one thing to the government, what would you say to them? i would say help the homeless. give them a chance to change their lives. the number of people sleeping on the street has more
2:03 pm
than doubled in a decade. today's announcement by the government promises £100 million to end rough sleeping in england by 2027. it includes £50 million for homes for people ready to move on from hostels and 30 million for targeted mental health services for rough sleepers. the housing secretary james brokenshire on a visit to homelessness hostel today. he says nobody should have to sleep rough and he wants to make it a thing of the past. the 100 million is in respect of reprioritisation of the budget, so half of that is new money to rough sleeping and homelessness. it is a question of prioritisation. that is why we know it is important. i know there is more that we need to do in respect of dealing with the challenges of people being out the street. mungo's have welcomed today's strategy but remain concerned about the causes of homelessness, like a lack of safe, affordable housing. what we're saying is that much
2:04 pm
more needs to be done. so it is a good start, but it isjust the beginning. and to end rough sleeping by 2027 is going to take a lot more investment. labour says government cuts to benefits, housing and other services have caused the homelessness crisis. we know that rough sleeping is a huge problem. you just have to go out on the streets to see it. but what we have got from the government is a strategy that will reduce it byjust under a decade, which doesn't really reflect the scale of the problem at all. and the investment they are announcing is a drop in the ocean. graham satchell, bbc news. in birmingham now isjean templeton, chief executive of st basil's, an organisation which works with young homeless people across the west midlands. thank you forjoining us. this sounds good on paper. an awful lot more than words on paper. i think,
2:05 pm
like many of the other homelessness organisations, absolutely we welcome the strategy and we welcome the resources that come with it. the homelessness organisations have been involved in talking to government, andi involved in talking to government, and i think government have listened, and quite a lot of what we said is in this strategy, but absolutely, it is only the first step, and there is a lot to do. not just to end rough sleeping. rough sleeping is just the tip of the iceberg. homelessness is much broader than that, and certainly we'd like to see root causes tackled and an ambition to end all of homelessness. there is a view, and i know you've heard this, that it's all very well coming from a government that many people pointing the blame on this very government for all of the austerity and the cuts which, they say, is why we are where we are with this level of homelessness. yes. well, there has
2:06 pm
to be an impact, doesn't there? if you have major cuts to public services, if you have had a reduction in investment, in truly affordable housing, if affordable housing actually means affordable for people wear their incomes are stretched, where benefits have been cut or reduced, so there are a combination of systemic factors, and those factors will always have a greater impact on people who have personal challenges, so the most vulnerable will always be most at risk. so i think any government has a responsibility to tackle those wider systemic issues and to ensure that the most vulnerable in our society are supported and protected. you seem to be suggesting that the government does get it.|j you seem to be suggesting that the government does get it. i really hope they get it. i've been involved in the advisory panel along with many others from homelessness organisations, and i don't think we would have been invited to be on
2:07 pm
that panel if government were not going to listen because, frankly, we wouldn't have signed up to a strategy, we wouldn't have supported and welcome it if we didn't think that it had taken account of the points we were making. but it is still stage one. lots more to do. and i'd really like to see, we need to plan for what we want to achieve, not just plan for what we want to avoid. if somebody gave you a blank cheque book and you can do what you wanted, how would you start off this vital task of making homelessness the scourge that it is? first of all, i'd like to see us develop a national housing strategy, notjust a homelessness strategy, so that we actually understand the housing needs of our populations and we take account of young people in particular. we work with young people, and there was no where a young person can live and work on earned income unless they are with
2:08 pm
the family or at home. so i'd like to see a national housing strategy. i'd like to see us reclaim social security. what we actually mean by having social security, and notjust a welfare system that churns people around and doesn't see them through the difficulties that they encounter. so, yes, notjust a black chipmunk. by all means give me that! but also i think we could do with ci’oss government but also i think we could do with cross government support. —— not just a blank cheque book. we could doa just a blank cheque book. we could do a lot better with cross government support. thank you for your time. the website ticketmaster is to shut down its secondary resale sites, seatwave and get me in, later this year in a bid to tackle touts. the sites, along with other similar outlets, have been criticised by fans and artists, because tickets were often sold for an inflated price. lizo mzimba has more. it is notjust concertgoers who have been unhappy
2:09 pm
with the activities of ticket touts. artists like ed sheeran have long campaigned for a fairer deal for fans from secondary sites when it comes to tickets for their tours. today's announcement from ticketmaster that it is closing down the two secondary sites it owns has been seen as a major step forward. in a statement, the company said... ticketmaster has been criticised in the past for not doing enough to combat overpriced tickets from touts because it also owns seatwave and get me in, which take a cut of the profits from the sales of tickets that are often being resold at highly inflated prices. instead, ticketmaster will set up a new exchange system where tickets cannot be sold for more than the original price. that is what the website twickets has been doing for some time. it is the reason artists
2:10 pm
like ed sheeran and adele have chosen it for the resale of tickets to their concerts. should ticketmaster have done it years ago? in our view, yes. we welcome any change and the change today is great news but ideally everybody should operate in the way we have done over the last six years. protect the consumer, protect the fans, who are constantly being ripped off by the secondary market, whether that be through the excessive ticket prices or the fees they are charged to trade. this move will not stop touts completely. tickets are still sold for increased prices for profit on sites like ebay and viagogo. earlier this year, ed sheeran‘s promoters cancelled more than 10,000 tickets for his stadium tour that had been resold on viagogo. the singer has been one of the leaders for the campaign group the fanfare alliance. it welcomed the news today but also said more had to be done to prevent
2:11 pm
touts exploiting the passion of fans for their favourite artists. lizo mzimba, bbc news. the uk border force is repeatedly missing its target for passenger waiting times at heathrow airport, according to figures obtained by the airline virgin atlantic. on 30 out of 31 days injuly, the borderforce missed its target of a 45—minute wait or less for 95% of visitors from outside the european economic area. some passengers were left queuing for up to two—and—a—half hours. caroline davies gave us an update on the figures from heathrow. these figures from frustrated who think the uk border could be better managed. they say that leaving people waiting at the border for several hours or however long is a very bad first impression when they
2:12 pm
first get to the uk. this often happens to people from outside the european economic area, so roughly outside europe's borders from the rest of the world. why is it happening? according to the home 0ffice, they've blamed computer failures and said they've had a large number of cases dealing with adults and children who are vulnerable. there are some things outside their control, with flights are delayed and will arrive at the same point, it means those queues will tend to be longer. there have been solutions suggested, so heathrow airport asked for people from low—risk countries, what they refer to them as, people from america and canada, that they might be able to use the electronic gates when they go through rather than queueing up to see a person at the border. the home office has said they've highlighted that the vast majority of people do still get through within the targeted times, and they've said they play a crucial role in protecting the uk by looking after its borders. they highlighted
2:13 pm
that, at the beginning of the summer, they had an extra 200 staff at heathrow to help with those problems. the airlines say they understand problems. the airlines say they u ndersta nd safety problems. the airlines say they understand safety issues but, particularly at the moment, it's important to show the rest of the world the uk is open for business. the court of appeal is due to decide whether a doctor who was struck off following the death of a six—year—old boy will be allowed to practise again. dr hadiza bawa—garba is fighting the decision, after being convicted of manslaughter due to gross negligence in 2015. a doctors' campaign group has argued that her lifetime ban is too punitive, and that nhs staffing pressures were partly to blame. 0ur health editor, hugh pym, has more. six—year—old jack adcock died in 2011 after developing sepsis at leicester royal infirmary, and a court later heard there was a catalogue of errors with his treatment. dr hadiza bawa—garba, seen in the middle, was convicted of gross negligence, manslaughter. later an independent medical tribunal ruled she should be suspended from practising as a doctor for one year, but the general medical council appealed, arguing this was not sufficient to protect the public.
2:14 pm
the high court ruled that hadiza bawa—garba should be barred from practising. backed by some other doctors, she mounted her own challenge to that ruling at the court of appeal which was held last month. she had this message forjack adcock‘s family. i would like to first and foremost apologise wholeheartedly once again to jack's family for my role in the events that led to his death. i am truly sorry for this. and i will live with this for the rest of my life. she also spoke exclusively to the bbc‘s panorama. i think that the nature of ourjob means that unfortunately sometimes we will get it wrong, and the way it is designed is that the system should have safety nets. but jack's mother argued that hadiza bawa—garba should not be allowed to return to work.
2:15 pm
i hope that the decision will stand, where she will still be struck off, she will never be able to work in the uk again, because i know that the people that are supporting her are basically all medical professionals and they are all from the same profession. of course they are going to support her. the judgment in the appeal will be announced today and will be closely scrutinised both byjack‘s family and across the medical profession. you're watching afternoon live. these are our headlines: £100 million is what the government promises to pay, in a bid to tackle homelessness. ticketmaster is closing two of its secondary resale websites to try to tackle the touts. a not—so—warm—welcome to the uk — delays at heathrow airport passport control left passengers queuing for up to two—and—a—half hours last month. tiger woods says it's pretty cool to be in contention for the usa ryder cup team. he's up to 26th in the world after his runner—up
2:16 pm
finish at the us pga. he's not one of the eight automatic picks confirmed today. dina asher—smith says her attention is now focused on next year's world championship in doha and the tokyo 0lympics. it's after she picked up a third european sprint gold in the relay last night. and danny kerry — the coach of great britain's gold medal winning woman's hockey team — has left his post to take up the same role with the men's team. i'll be back with more on those stories at half—past. the trial of england cricketer ben stokes is continuing for a sixth day at bristol crown court. the 27—year—old is accused of affray in relation to a fight outside a nightclub in bristol during the early hours of a day in september last year. he denies the charge. 0ur correspondent andy moore is outside bristol crown court. the barristers are delivering their closing speeches, and we heard from the prosecution this morning, who reminded thejury about this charge of affray. he said it was often in connection with disturbances at football clubs or outside nightclubs.
2:17 pm
he said it was violence where a person of reasonable firmness would be afraid for their personal safety, and he went on to say that the various video footage that the jury had been shown clearly and plainly demonstrated that ben stokes moved, perhaps from a defensive posture, because he was threatened with a bottle, but he moved from that posture and became the aggressor himself. he went on to talk about ben stokes's performance in the witness box, where he said he couldn't recollect many elements of the incident, and the prosecutor said, it is plain that he, ben stokes, is seeking to justify his behaviour. he acted as the red mist came down, he acted deplorably. we've also heard from the defence, gordon cole, for ben stokes. he said that ben stokes was defending himself and others. we've heard that ben stokes was trying to defend,
2:18 pm
in his own words, two gay men who were being homophobically abused. mr cole, for the defence, said, a person cannot way to a nicety the exact measure of his defensive actions. so those speeches are going on at the moment, but we've heard from the judge that he intends to send the jury out sometime this afternoon. the labour leaderjeremy corbyn says he would "of course" be open to the labour party adopting, in full, the internationally recognised definition of anti—semitism including all examples. the party has faced criticism that its new code of conduct isn't adequate. let's go tojonathan blake. what does this change? very little in the short term. for months, the labour party has faced accusations of not dealing efficiently and effectively enough with anti—semitism among some of its
2:19 pm
members. and, earlier this month, last month, the party's ruling body, the mec, agreed to a new code of conduct which did take on and adopt the internationally recognised definition of anti—semitism as set out by the international holocaust remembrance alliance, and it did all but one of the examples given by the ihr a, word for word. but the one example which the party has sought to adapt its own code of conduct, pertaining to the criticism of israel, and that has seen labour members of parliament protest against that and try to adopt their own set of rules, which does take on board all those examples word for word. in the last few days, we've seen trade unions criticising the labour party's seen trade unions criticising the labour pa rty‘s position seen trade unions criticising the labour party's position and calling on it to adopt the full code as well
2:20 pm
as those examples, and many others in thejewish as those examples, and many others in the jewish community as those examples, and many others in thejewish community criticising the labour party for this stance. what the labour party ruling body is doing is consulting for a period of a few weeks about whether it should adopt or change that example, and the labour leader was asked about this today on a visit to the west midlands, as to whether he would, at the end of that consultation, changed his mind, and whether the pa rty‘s changed his mind, and whether the party's ruling body would change its mind and adopt the full definition with example word for word. of course, consultation means you consult and listen to people, and what the national executive did at its meeting injuly was what the national executive did at its meeting in july was to agree a very comprehensive code of conduct, the most sophisticated, toughest code of conduct of any political party in britain, to drive out any form of racism in any form whatsoever of anti—semitism in the party. it agreed on the definition, the ihr a definition of
2:21 pm
anti—semitism, and agreed on almost all of the examples. jeremy corbyn is also faced questions over the last day or so about the conference he attended in 2014 in tunisia. he wasn't leader of the labour party then, of course, but the controversy has been around whether he was present for or indeed involved in the laying of a brief at the grave of several members of the black september group, who were held responsible for the kidnapping and deaths of several israeli athletes at the munich 0lympics deaths of several israeli athletes at the munich olympics in 1972. now, mr corbyn has confirmed he was at the conference, he did take part in it, there were people there from all over the world, looking at ways to further the palestinian cause and achieve peace in the middle east, but specifically with regard to laying a wreath at those graves, mr corbyn said he was there at the time
2:22 pm
but not involved in it. a wreath was indeed laid by some of those who attended to those who were killed in paris in 1992. who were involved? i was present when it was late but i wasn't involved. i was there because i wanted to see a fitting memorial to everybody who has died in every terrorist incident everywhere, because we have to end it. you can't pursue piece by a cycle of violence, only a cycle of dialogue. mr corbyn also said on that visit to the west midlands that he was laying a wreath to members of the palestinian liberation organisation who were killed in a bombing raid in 1982. so questions to mr corbyn today on two very sensitive topics, and two on which he is likely to face more questions in the coming days. the turkish president, recep tayyip erdogan, has accused the united states of stabbing his country in the back. it is the latest in a diplomatic row
2:23 pm
between the two countries, which has contributed to steep falls in the value of the turkish currency, the lira. emre temel of bbc turkish is here. what is happening right now? the global markets are really spooked. exactly. the turkish president, president erdogan, described the current situation as a political and economic siege imposed on turkey earlier today. he argues that what is going on right now in turkey has nothing to do with the two big economic crises in the country, one in 1994 economic crises in the country, one in1994 and economic crises in the country, one in 1994 and then 2001, and he sharpened his rhetoric against the trump administration, i saying the us is trying to stab turkey in the back. however, the turkish lira slid
2:24 pm
further against the dollar, another 6% today, and exchange rate is almost down at the moment. it's the worst performing currency of 2008 tea m worst performing currency of 2008 team so far. attacking the united states so far but that was a fault the turkish government would put up its interest rates, it would react somehow fiscally to try and help this situation. they haven't done that. are they going to have to do more? that was the expectation of the markets. the market is expected in interest rate hike. but the turkish central bank didn't do that, and we need to remind audiences that it is the turkish president, president erdogan, who appointed his son—in—law as the treasury minister following his last election victory, and that is why the central bank's first meeting was seen as a test hypermarkets and, when the central
2:25 pm
bank didn't increase the interest rate, obviously the market reacted. what does this mean for people in turkey? how was this changing everyday life? people are going three difficult time, because inflation in turkey reached 16%, the highest since january 2014, and turkish companies have huge debts in dollars and euros, and it's almost impossible to ignore them. what will be the exchange rate even next week? so they are concerned, and turkey's central bank is taken some measures to prevent a kind of economic collapse. it's great to talk to you. thank you. satisfaction in the rail network has dropped sharply in the past decade, with train travel now one of the uk's least trusted consumer industries, according to a survey by the consumer group which? in the past year, passengers have voiced concern about the introduction of new timetables, cancelled
2:26 pm
services, and rising fares. here's our business correspondent, joe lynam. new timetables, thousands of cancelled services, angry commuters, strike action, and rising costs — it has not been a happy time for many rail users, and it is evident in a detailed satisfaction survey over the past decade. a study of transport focus data found that overall satisfaction with rail punctuality and reliability has fallen from 79% a decade ago to 73% today, but regular commuter satisfaction fell even further to 62% in that time. on top of that, rail fares could be set to rise by 3.5% next year. that is because train fare increases are tied to the higher measure of inflation, known as rpi. it could add £150 to an average long—distance commuter. i understand that our passengers have had a really tough time over the last few months. i'm a regular commuter myself. but we have to work together, and with a long—term plan. that's what companies are doing, rail companies are doing. that plan is going to make journeys better over the coming years. it's going to improve the economy, it's going to better connect
2:27 pm
communities up and down the country. to compound things for some train users, another strike by rmt rail workers is set for next month, in a very long—running dispute about guards on trains. joe lynam, bbc news. time for a look at the weather. i've been looking at your atlantic winds. looking at the summer, what's left of it, is it coming back? june and july were dominated by high pressure but this week we're going to influenced more by low pressure. the winds are coming in from the atlantic, it's more unsettled, the wettest weather in the north—west and the drier and warmer weather for and the drier and warmer weather for a time in the south—east. it looks like that sort of weather pattern, that sort of scenario will continue into next week. we've got the jet stream, the pressure and the air mass. it's going to run a couple of
2:28 pm
times, giving you a flavour of next week. we've got a strongerjet than earlier in the summer, and it occasionally dives further south, and thejet occasionally dives further south, and the jet stream picks up areas of low pressure. mainly, that will be more towards the north—west of the uk, but occasionally the lows go further south. if you are wondering where the heat has gone, it is mainly across mainland europe. we are on the warmer side of the jet mainly, but it's not particularly hot, and nor will there be a heatwave next week. looking ahead to the bank holiday at the end of the month... 0h, another bank holiday! i hate bank holidays! i'll show you one scenario. this is one scenario for the bank holiday weekend. the low pressure coming in... and you have you are going to get on? there are at least two. the low pressure that comes in from the atla ntic pressure that comes in from the atlantic get stuck over here and it allows us to draw up air from
2:29 pm
atlantic get stuck over here and it allows us to draw up airfrom spain, this is your classic spanish plume, so this is your classic spanish plume, so you get hot and humid air coming up so you get hot and humid air coming up from so you get hot and humid air coming upfrom spain so you get hot and humid air coming up from spain and you get some thunderstorms. we could find that over the bank holiday weekend it gets hot and humid but we could get a thunderstorm. that's at the moment only 25% probability. 75% probability is for a continuation of the atlantic winds and mixed weather and it be, for most of the uk, we have sky is looking a bit like this. i don't know people to know too much about what we get up to before we come on—air... you are not going to mention ironing, are you? idida ironing, are you? i did a bit of his ironing this morning. too much information. one of the reasons was there were reports the bank holiday was going to be hot, so what you are doing is hedging your bets. i'm saying that there is a 75% chance we'll continue with what we are seeing next week. longer term? september and october, we may start
2:30 pm
to find more instances of high pressure building in across the uk. as we saw over the summer. and that means that it will be dryer, it may well be warmer, but we are moving later in the year, so the 35 degrees we had is less likely, of course. let's see what's happening in the next few days! let's do that. a bit more detail. this is today, york, taken by one of oui’ this is today, york, taken by one of our weather watchers, and showers developing. they have been spreading out across parts of england, and possibly into wales as well. temperatures today near normal, 19, 20 across scotland and northern ireland, low 20s for england and wales. a few showers in wales and the south—west, but not as many nor as heavy, because the heavy ones have been in the south—east and east anglia, with some thunderstorms. no wind at the moment, we haven't really got those atlantic winds. slow—moving downpours. generally dry
2:31 pm
and cloudy for northern ireland, cloudy in scotland, with some light rain and drizzle. somewhat weather, and most of it in northern and eastern england. those downpours eventually fading in the early hours, getting dryer across most of scotland. there will be clear spells, but it's quite warm air, so temperatures around 12 to 14. looking ahead to tuesday and wednesday, focusing on this weather front, which goes a long way south into the atlantic, bringing some pulses of rain to the north—west. was the south—east, this high pressure coming from the azores, so we've got a split. most of england and wales probably dry with some sunshine and increasing cloud. scotla nd sunshine and increasing cloud. scotland and northern ireland will see figure cloud and maybe some outbreaks of rain and drizzle, mainly over the hills and western parts of scotland. away from here, pretty light, and temperatures similarto pretty light, and temperatures similar to today. on wednesday, we may see some more widespread and
2:32 pm
heavy rain in northern ireland and scotland, into north—west england and perhaps wales. still dryer conditions in the south—east, but the wind is picking up more, gusts of typically 30 or 40 mph around western coasts, but temperatures still up and around 25 across lincolnshire, east anglia and the south—east. that might not last long. rain in the north—west is on that weather front, which long. rain in the north—west is on that weatherfront, which is long. rain in the north—west is on that weather front, which is going to get pushed down as the jet stream buckles southwards, pushing the weather from south and taking rain to the south—west of england by thursday. —— south—east. coolerair for thursday, so temperatures will be lower and will have some sunshine and showers, mainly in the north—west. this is bbc news — our latest headlines. the government promises more money to eradicate homelessness in england by 2027 and help deal with mental health problems and addictions, but labour says the plan doesn't go far enough.
2:33 pm
ticketmaster is closing two of its secondary ticketing websites seatwave and get me in — which allow people to off—load unwanted tickets. the move is to combat touts who hike up prices. the home office is deploying 200 extra border force staff to heathrow airport after delays at passport control left some passengers queuing for up to two and a half hours last month. turmoil on the world markets as turkey's economic woes deepen. the country's president says the united states is seeking to ‘stab it in the back‘ a new study finds younger asians in the uk are more socially conservative on issues like same sex marriage than their peers in the rest of the population. sport now on afternoon live with ben croucher. ben, the ryder cup is just around the corner
2:34 pm
and there's a pretty famous golfer by the name of tiger who seems to be playing his way into contention for the team. very much. so he has not been included as one of the automatic picks. but he has been turning back the clocks. there are few more emotive sights in sports that tiger woods. he captured the imagination at the usa pga last night. he didn't win, but with shots like this, he had a final round of 64 and the runner up had a final round of 64 and the runner up spot. much of the attention has turned to the ryder cup. america have confirmed their automatic picks. woods isn't one. but he is up to 26th in the world. so could he still get a wild card? no one's ever had a fused spine while hitting it and it has been
2:35 pm
hard. it has been harder than people think. i'm pleased at what i've done so think. i'm pleased at what i've done so farand think. i'm pleased at what i've done so far and now i'm in... think. i'm pleased at what i've done so farand now i'm in... to be part of ryder cup conversation going from where ooifr come from the in the la st where ooifr come from the in the last year is pretty cool. his ryder cup, he has played seven, but only won once. it may not be the worst thing for europe either way. but he is in contention. not bad for a 47—year—old with a bad back. the premier league had a familiar start with last season's top five all winning. seems there's no pleasing pep guardiola though. pep guardiola wasn't. he is a bit of a perfectionist. he manchester city tea m a perfectionist. he manchester city team began with a confident win over arsenal. but pep guardiola said there is more to come, referring to there is more to come, referring to the fact that some of his squad are
2:36 pm
returning to full fitness after the world cup. mendy is a world cup winner and played the full 90. he provided the assist for both of city's goals and he is impressing the boss, but apparently stressing him out. sometimes you want to kill him out. sometimes you want to kill him and sometimes you say, wow, what a player we have. he gives us this extra energy with kyle, with him, that help us. when he attacks in that help us. when he attacks in that consistent it is so important. but mendy has a lot of things to improve. hopefully we can convince him to be calm. to forget that he is a bit of social media and focus on what he has to do. world cup winner, two assists, still lot to improve. this was his response. he tweeted about it, why wouldn't he? 0ne this was his response. he tweeted about it, why wouldn't he? one word sufficient feised? 0ops! after
2:37 pm
becoming the first british athlete to win three golds at a european championship, dina asher—smith is looking to the future. after helping the british relay team to gold she is one of the favourites for next yea r‘s world is one of the favourites for next year's world championships. scott quinn has qualified for the final of the 100 metres breaststroke. he will bejoined by connor the 100 metres breaststroke. he will be joined by connor robertson. the 100 metres breaststroke. he will bejoined by connor robertson. danny kerry, the man charged with guiding britain's women to the he 0lympic hockey gold has been appointed to head coach of the men's team.
2:38 pm
finally, if you have a fear for heights, this maybe the time to look away. that is mont blanc, the north face, and in there is the swiss extreme mountaineer, who set a speed climbing record. all 4,208 metres. he completed the climb in two hours and four minutes. that is all your sport for you. my word. that is amazing! but you're right. i will look at it later! thank you very much. british south asians are more socially conservative than the wider uk population, a survey for the bbc‘s asian network suggests. it found that a third of british asians don't agree with sex before marriage, or same—sex relationships. more than 2,000 responded to the poll as part of the bbc‘s big british asian summer season of programmes. nomia iqbal reports. the 2026 british south asians
2:39 pm
questioned in this poll are of predominantly indian, pakistani, bangladeshi and sri lankan heritage. one of the big findings looks at the issue of integration, with 53% of british asians saying they have to tone down their identity to fit in or change their behaviour. i think that's a really interesting reminder about how integration happens. the second generation of british asians often had the educational and professional success their parents who came as migrants were hoping they would have and so found themselves as pioneers in new places. but for priya from birmingham, fitting in is about balancing different identities. i feel very comfortable with my identity, i'm very proud to be asian, ilike doing... i go to asian weddings, wear asian clothes, i'm very comfortable with my identity. i don't really pressure to be more westernised. i feel as though i come from quite the modern family in general, so that does have a big
2:40 pm
influence on me. religion also plays a big role, with 46% saying their muslim, sikh or hindu faith is important. compare that with the rest of the uk as a whole, where more than half say religion doesn't matter to them at all. i never used to wear a scarf before, and i never used to dress in a full—on maxi dress. i've gone the other way, i've come more to my faith, and now i dress completely modestly, so it's not to adapt, it's because i've got to know my faith more and wanted to do more for my faith, to be closer to god for my own personal reasons. while some are confident of their place in britain, others are navigating how best to fit in, but for those who made the uk their home, there are no regrets. my father was from pakistan, from peshawar. coming to the uk definitely has been really good for him. it's just about coming to somewhere where they've got opportunities, education, you've got the nhs.
2:41 pm
we've got a lot of good things about, you know, in england. we've even had good weather this year so, yeah, i think coming to the uk has done really well for dad — and for a lot of other asians as well. more than three quarters feel that way and, according to the poll, consider the uk country where they can fulfil their dreams and ambitions. nomia iqbal, bbc news. reports suggest at least 67 people, including children have been killed and many are still missing following a blast that brought down a building in the syrian province of idlib. the building is said to have contained munitions belonging to an arms trafficker. idlib is the last major rebel—held area, and is expected to be the next target for syrian armed forces. more than 300 people have been
2:42 pm
injured at a music festival in spain. witnesses reported scenes of panic, as people tried to scramble to safety. the crowds were watching a rap artist at the time. the south korean president will meet the north korean president will meet the north korean president will meet the north korean president later this year. it is hoped the meeting will give fresh impetus to the stalled disarmament process. cuba — a country which has historically had a reputation for homophobia — could become the latest country to approve gay marriage — after changes to the country's draft new constitution were approved by the national assembly. the document will be sent out to every corner of the island today for a process of national public debate, before being put to a referendum later this year. will grant reports from havana. hot off the presses — cuba's new constitution. 0rdinary cubans are only now
2:43 pm
digesting a completely newly written magna ca rta. big changes are proposed, like recognising private property and redefining marriage as between two people, notjust a man and a woman. paquito and miguel are two people who have been together for 15 years. on an island renowned for the homophobic attitudes of its past, this change, they say, is long overdue. translation: i took a long time to come out of the closet, because i had no points of reference around me. there was no information about it. back then, it was a problem and a stigma. translation: we're trying to say there isn't a single type of family. the nuclear family isn't the only one that exists. that's what we're fighting for. cuban society hasn't always been this understanding towards gay men and women. in the worst years of the 19705, homosexual people were exiled, sent to work camps or even prison. today, people seem to want to rectify mistakes of the past, except for one institution
2:44 pm
which still won't budge on gay rights — the church. in this methodist church in havana, the congregation is deeply committed. but when it comes to the question of same—sex marriage, the message is not one of tolerance. translation: we have distributed material which talks about the original design of the family, that is the family as it has always been known, and we're going fight with all of our strength to make sure this measure isn't included in the constitution. still, its expected same—sex marriage will be approved. the main supporter the lesbian and gay community have is mariela castro, the daughter of raul castro, and the influential head of the homosexual rights commission. at a recent gay pride march in havana, symbolic weddings were held with blessings from sympathetic members of the church. by the time the next pride comes around, paquito and miguel,
2:45 pm
who have already brought up a son together, hope they might be able to get married for real. will grant, bbc news, havana. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live £100 million is what the government promises to pay, in a bid to tackle homelessness. ticketmaster is closing two of its secondary re—sale websites to try to tackle the touts. a not—so—warm—welcome to the uk — delays at heathrow airport passport control left passengers queuing for up to two and a half hours last month. here's your business headlines on afternoon live. turkey's central bank has said it is ready to take "all necessary measures" to ensure financial stability after the collapse of the lira. it has vowed to provide banks with "all the liquidity" they need. this is all after a worsening diplomatic row with the us prompted market turmoil in the country.
2:46 pm
shares in bayer — the german pharmaceuticals and chemicals giant — have fallen almost 10% in early trading in frankfurt. it's the first time they've been traded since an american court ruled that one of monsanto's weedkillers was linked to a man's cancer on friday and ordered a damages payout of nearly $300 million. bayer completed its takeover of monsanto in june. monsanto denies the cancer link and says it will appeal. uk firms ukfirms are uk firms are finding it hard to fill jobs, because there is a lack of suitable candidates. almost half of older workers feel unsupported by their employers, despite the fact that millions are working longer, according to research published by aviva today. it warns that a failure to support such workers risks a "disheartened and discouraged over—50s" workforce. imagine that, disheartened and
2:47 pm
discouraged over 50s? right. it seems, ben, that whatever turkey says — the lira continues to fall? yes, investors seem unconvinced by the rather defiant talk coming out of ankara. turkey's president talks about his country not being defeated by what he calls "economic war". but the turkish currency has fallen further today. the lira. yes. this is after it fell on friday when president trump doubled tariffs on metal imports to the us from turkey. partly because turkey retaliated to the original tariffs that the united states put in and partly over a row
2:48 pm
over an american preacher being detained in turkey. the turkish central bank said it will give commercial banks the cash they need. but it has not calmed the nerves of investors. well why that is a good question. joining us now is our north america business correspondent kim gittleson. so why is the turkish lira falling further ? why don t investors seem appeased by the moves from the country 5 central bank? investors want to see one thing thing — the bank to raise interest rates, because of the increased inflation. so far the turkish central bank has not done what most banks would do, which is to increase interest rates. as a result the fact the central bank said it will increase liquidity does not go far enough to make investors feel calm
2:49 pm
about the bank's ability to intervene ina about the bank's ability to intervene in a dramatic currency crisis. the turkish lira hit record lows on friday, it is still near those lows today, as a result of political tension with the united states and the global environment and investors don't think the central bank will do anything significantly to combat it. so we are seeing the declines in the currency. sometimes we use the word contagion. could this spread beyond turkey? yes, one of the interesting things about turkey is it has a significant amount of debt for companies and for its government denominated in foreign currency, so that makes it more expensive to repay. we that makes it more expensive to re pay. we have that makes it more expensive to repay. we have seen that the south
2:50 pm
african rand has declined as well and the fear is that this sort of problem that we're seeing in turkey could spread beyond its border. there is another issue, that is many european lenders have exposure to turkey and there are concern that those banks might be hurt if this crisis worsens and we have seen the classic investor response to fear. we have seen them pouring money into safe haven currencies like the us dollar and we will see if this continues, but again so far it seems to be contained within turkey. the fear is what happens if this crisis isn't contained. thank you very much. we have been talking about the high street and normally they benefit from warm weather. but this time it has been too hot? yes. we don't tend to go to the shops when
2:51 pm
it is cold and rainy. but during the heat wave, it seems people have been going out, but not to the shops. they have been spending money on a cold pint or ice—cream. the british retail consortium said there was a 0.8% drop in people visiting shops last month. because it is too hot in the shops. not in the frozen food. sophie willmotjoins us not in the frozen food. sophie willmot joins us now. not in the frozen food. sophie willmotjoins us now. the weather seems to have dipped, so is that a good sign that the shops may have a few more people in them?|j good sign that the shops may have a few more people in them? i think the weather turning wetter may be will help retailers. the prolonged period of warm weather has been hard on retailers, where shoppers are choosing to spend time outside rather than go to shopping centres. big retail story over the last few
2:52 pm
days, was house of fraser and the fa ct days, was house of fraser and the fact that it had to be rescued by sport district's mike ashley. how do the fortunes of big names have an impact on the rest of the high street. the department stores are anchor retailers for town centres and draw in the consumers. if they're not offering the products consumers they're not offering the products consumers want they will go elsewhere or shop online. so it is important to have a compelling product, something which house of fraser has lacked. this is another case, this foot fall decline, is it another case of retailers not perhaps adapting quickly enough and being fleet of foot enough to get customers coming through the doors? potentially. it is difficult for retailers to encourage people into the shops if the weather is too warm. consumers will steer their interest instead to spending time outside. maybe retailers should be
2:53 pm
capturing the sales online and offering promotions. the other problem is that around this time in august, they start putting the winter coats on the racks, whereas if the weather picks up, no one will wa nt to if the weather picks up, no one will want to go out and buy a duffle goat in august. yes, august can be tough for retailers, if the weather stays warm, people won't be interested in buying coats and boots. so they need it to turn cold to help try and make those sales stronger. thank you very much. duffle coat. do you not have a duffle duffle coat. do you not have a d uffle coat? duffle coat. do you not have a duffle coat? many years ago! now the markets. rather than my fashion chooses. we would be here all night! holiday group tui travel led the ftse100fallers on monday
2:54 pm
morning after its shares fell. thomas cook and easyjet are also down. tui suffering from the weather being good here. yes people were not going abroad. the main factor at play is turkey, the dominant thing in the minds of investors. yet with the lira dropping, it is a very cheap place for us to go. it means a cheap holiday, but perhaps people are worried about going somewhere where there is uncertainty. a cheap holiday is a cheap holiday. yes, but the effect on the financial markets is it is weighing them down, particularly in europe, you see the french and the german markets down. because of the fears about how much
2:55 pm
they have lent to turkey and turkish businesses. that is the snapshot of just a couple of shares and the ftse 100 in london. i will have more in about an hour. less insulting perhaps? las vegas had this show last night, this free one. this thunder storm caused chaos. it moved in through the east with wind speeds up in through the east with wind speeds up to 70mph and left tens of thousands of homes without power. that would be nevada. forecasters warned of flash floods and dust storms. but a remarkable free light show in the sky. we have some pictures from china. a car escaping
2:56 pm
falling into a sink hole. it opened up falling into a sink hole. it opened up after torrential rain. people helped pull the car to safety. no one was injured according to state media. who are now looking into it! that is the car out. now the weather. pressure will be lower this week. that means some brisk atlantic winds coming our way over the week ahead. most of rain or showers will be in the north—west of the uk. generally it will be drier and for a while warmer towards the south—east. not a great deal of sunshine around today. temperatures are near afternooning. —— afternoon. the low 20s in england and wales. we have seen a few more showers developing, despite the fact that there is not a great deal after sunshine, always drier in the south—west. further
2:57 pm
east in england, particularly in east anglia and north york sher, some heavy showers developing. dry in northern ireland. but more of this low cloud and damp drizzly weather still in the afternoon in scotland. as we run through the night, things become dryer in scotla nd night, things become dryer in scotland and the heavy showers in eastern england will decay. a lot of cloud in the north—west and temperatures holding into double figures across the uk. a warm sort of night. 12 to 15 degrees. if we look ahead to tuesday and probably into wednesday, we have this weather front, you can trace it back into the mid—atla ntic. front, you can trace it back into the mid—atlantic. we will find pulses of rain on that. high pressure in the south—east of the uk. so in many parts dry with some sunshine. some rain coming into scotla nd sunshine. some rain coming into scotland and northern ireland and most of rain for western scotland
2:58 pm
not much into eastern areas. again 25 degrees the highest temperature in the south—east of england. as we move into wednesday, the winds will be fresher along the western coasts and we will find more widespread rain in scotland and northern ireland and the north—west of england. still we have higher pressure towards the south—east and here is where we will find the best of sunshine and more warmth at 26 degrees. that rain coming on the the front there and that is going to push down to the south—east by thursday. as the jet stream buckles its way south, we draw down some cooler and fresher air with any rain replaced by sunshine and showers. hello, you're watching afternoon live. i'm simon mccoy. today at 3pm: new action on homelessness — the government says it wants to make rough sleeping a thing of the past. but where is the promised £100 million coming from? when you are starving and hungry and you ain't got no money, there's nowhere to go and get some food or anything, to have a shower
2:59 pm
or a change of clothes. tackling the touts — ticketmaster is closing two of its secondary ticketing websites, which allow people to offload unwanted tickets. a not—so—warm welcome to the uk — delays at heathrow airport passport control left passengers queuing for up to two—and—a—half hours last month. coming up on afternoon live, all the sport with ben, and we're talking golf. good afternoon. the usa named the likes of dustin johnson, jordan spieth and brooks koepka in their ryder cup team. no place for tiger woods just yet, but, ryder cup team. no place for tiger woodsjust yet, but, after ryder cup team. no place for tiger woods just yet, but, after his second—place finish at us pga, captainjim furyk second—place finish at us pga, captain jim furyk says second—place finish at us pga, captainjim furyk says he's hard to ignore. darren has all the weather. we've seen a few scattered showers in the past couple of hours, over the weekend it's quite mixed weather, atlantic winds heading our way and the best of the warmer and
3:00 pm
drier conditions likely to be in the south—east. more on that later. thanks, darren. also coming up — we'll be speaking to the royal correspondent at the sunday times about the latest comments by the duchess of sussex's father. hello, everyone. this is afternoon live. i'm simon mccoy. the government has launched an initiative to end rough sleeping on england's streets within a decade. ministers are promising millions of pounds "to help people turn their lives around", including support for mental health and addictions, and funding for housing. but there are questions about where the promised cash — £100 million — is coming from. it's becoming clear there's no new money involved. graham satchell has more. we are on the streets of east london with homelessness charity st mungo's. 0utreach workers do this every night, checking parks, streets, doorways.
3:01 pm
this man, who didn't want to be identified, told us he had drug and mental health problems. he's been sleeping rough for four months. i got evicted because i didn't engage with a couple of services and they didn't like that, the fact i wasn't engaging. they thought i wasn't willing to sort myself out so they evicted me. that's how i became homeless. it's quite hard. and it's quite scary as well. most of the time when you are starving and hungry and you've got no money with nowhere to go and get some food. if you could say one thing to the government, what would you say to them? i would say help the homeless. give them a chance to change their lives. the number of people sleeping on the street has more than doubled in a decade. today's announcement by the government promises £100 million to end rough sleeping in england by 2027. it includes £50 million for homes for people ready to move
3:02 pm
on from hostels and 30 million for targeted mental health services for rough sleepers. the housing secretary james brokenshire on a visit to a homelessness hostel today. he says nobody should have to sleep rough and he wants to make it a thing of the past. the 100 million is in respect of reprioritisation of the budget, so half of that is new money to rough sleeping and homelessness. it is a question of prioritisation. that is why we know it is important. i know there is more that we need to do in respect of dealing with the challenges of people being out the street. st mungo's have welcomed today's strategy but remain concerned about the causes of homelessness, like a lack of safe, affordable housing. what we're saying is that much more needs to be done. so it is a good start, but it isjust the beginning. and to end rough sleeping by 2027 is going to take a lot more investment.
3:03 pm
labour says government cuts to benefits, housing and other services have caused the homelessness crisis. we know that rough sleeping is a huge problem. you just have to go out on the streets to see it. but what we have got from the government is a strategy that will reduce it byjust under a decade, which doesn't really reflect the scale of the problem at all. and the investment they are announcing is a drop in the ocean. graham satchell, bbc news. melanie 0nn is the shadow housing minister. shejoins me. good afternoon. this isa shejoins me. good afternoon. this is a step in the right direction, isn't it? any announcement with funding is always a step in the right direction but i think it needs to be counted with the fact that this is a recycling of a substantial amount of money, based on announcements that we've heard before, and frankly it demonstrates a lack of ambition from the
3:04 pm
government. along with this announcement, which is we cycled, the funding is recycled, there is nothing that says they are going to tackle rough sleeping before nearly a decade comes, and i think that is a decade comes, and i think that is a real dereliction of duty from this government. but you accept that reflects the seriousness of the real problem here? there is a real problem here? there is a real problem and i'd say this problem is not just dropped out problem and i'd say this problem is notjust dropped out of the air, it isa notjust dropped out of the air, it is a problem of the government's making. if they cut the benefit system to the bone, if they take away funding from local authorities and they throw funding into supported housing schemes into question, then all of these things create a perfect storm which results in the most vulnerable people in society ending up sleeping on the streets. if you've got £30 million being spent on things like mental health, if they figure that they've got, they've targeted it, that's a
3:05 pm
positive, isn't it? it depends how the money will be spent in reality. we've had lots of promises from the government but on their watch rough sleeping has more than doubled in the last eight years, so the funding is to be used in the right way and there has to be a long—term strategy and, until they get the issue of affordability of housing right, until they get the complexity of issues people are experiencing to end up sleeping rough right, unless they understand the depth of that, and let's not forget they have a homelessness minister who says they don't understand why homelessness is that the scale it is that, they are not going to solve this problem. we've already heard from those housing charities concerns that actually the steps the government is taking are not enough. in your view, why is homelessness such a problem and an increasing one? it's an increasing problem under this government, and it's a range of different issues, down to a lack of focus on making sure there are
3:06 pm
suitable, affordable housing, whether that is socially or privately rented, that there is a squeeze on the benefits system, so things like the bedroom tax have had a huge amount of impact, and the roll—out of the disastrous universal credit is impacted that. and then the combination that we've seen around mental health support and the thresholds that accessing mental health support being increased to such a high level, and funding for things like alcohol and drug abuse being cut to the quick through local government cuts. thank you very much for your time. the court of appeal is announcing its decision on whether a doctor, who was struck off following the death of a six—year—old boy, will be allowed to practise again. let's listen in. 0rder order is ascension of the tribunal and the erasure, judgment. the court
3:07 pm
of appeal unanimously allows the appeal. it holds that the divisional court was wrong to interfere with the decision of the tribunal. the court of appeal set aside the order of the divisional court, that the doctor should be raised from the medical register, and restores to the tribunal that she should be suspended from practice for 12 months, subject to review. reasons for thejudgment. the months, subject to review. reasons for the judgment. the decision months, subject to review. reasons for thejudgment. the decision of... this related to her conviction for gross negligence manslaughter was not a decision of fact or law but an evaluative decision based on many factors. it is the type of decision which has been described as a kind of jewellery question about which has been described as a kind ofjewellery question about which reasonable people may reasonably disagree. an appeal court should generally be cautious before interfering with such a decision.
3:08 pm
that caution applies with particular force in the case of a specialist adjudicated body such as the tribunal. an appeal court should only interfere if such an evaluative decision if it is an error of principle in carrying out the evaluation orfor any principle in carrying out the evaluation or for any of reason the evaluation or for any of reason the evaluation was wrong, in the sense that it was a division which fell outside the bounds of what the adjudicated body could properly and reasonably decide. neither of those grounds applies in the present case. the tribunal did not reduce the level of dr haiza bawa—garba's liability below the level of that which had been established by the jury, mainly that her failings which had been established by the jury, mainly that herfailings in her care were truly exceptionally bad and, taking into account evidence of systemic failures at the
3:09 pm
hospital and the failings of others. first, as mrjustice nichols said in his sentencing remarks at the criminal trial, there is a limit to how far systemic failings of the hospital and the failings of others could be explored at the criminal trial. the focus of it was on the personal actions of dr haiza bawa—garba and their contribution to the death. second, the criminal court and the tribunal word and bodies with different functions, addressing different questions and at different times. the jury was concerned with dr haiza bawa—garba's guilt or absence of guilt, having regard to her past personal conduct. the task of the tribunal, looking to the future, was to decide what sanction would meet the overriding objective of rejecting the public. third, there are different degrees of culpability which are capable of satisfying the requirements of gross
3:10 pm
or severe negligence for a conviction of gross negligence manslaughter. that is reflected in the range of penal sentences that are available, depending on the particular facts of the case. the sentence imposed in the criminal proceedings by mrjustice nichols at the criminal trial was at the lightest end of the sentencing range for the fence. in passing that sentence, he took into account the systemic failings of the hospital and the failings of others who shared responsibility with dr haiza bawa—garba for the care and treatment of jack. they included that the unit was a busy ward which could not limit its intake. the communication of jack's blood results was delayed because the hospital's computer system wasn't working on that day. there was not a co nsulta nt working on that day. there was not a consultant in the unit the whole time, and the nurse assigned to the ca re of time, and the nurse assigned to the care ofjack... time, and the nurse assigned to the care of jack. .. that ruling marking
3:11 pm
success for the doctor, dr haiza bawa—garba, and she will now be back on the list of those medical practitioners allowed to practice. 0ur correspondent richard lister is at the court of appeal in central london. a long process but ultimately she's won. yes, and that's the heart of this case was a question of to what extent a doctor working in a very difficult situation, in a hospital with multiple systemic failings, should be prosecuted for making a clinical error ofjudgment. now, should be prosecuted for making a clinical error of judgment. now, it was an error of judgment clinical error of judgment. now, it was an error ofjudgment which, along with all the other failings at the hospital, contributed to the death of six—year—old jack adcock backin death of six—year—old jack adcock back in february 2011 but, as many hearings and cases heard, it was decision is that she made that were really in the context of a much
3:12 pm
larger problem at lester ryan infirmary at the it failings, communications issues, problems in the ways that different communications were handed over between medical staff, and the medical tribunal, the independent tribunal which had to decide the extent to which she should be sanctioned, to those into account and said there were multiple systemic failings. the gmc disagreed, saying that, given a case of this seriousness, the doctor involved should really be struck off the medical register as a way of ensuring that the public had confidence in the nhs. but, as we've heard, the court of appeal disagreed, saying the medical tribunal‘s ruling should stand and dr haiza bawa—garba should eventually be allowed back into medical practice. in the past, she has apologised to jack's parents for what happened. she has, and when she was here, back injanuary, actually,
3:13 pm
december, when the court of appeal case was launched, she was very clear that she was deeply apologetic to the adcock family. she said she'd have to live with this for the rest of her life. but underlying all this isa of her life. but underlying all this is a feeling amongst many in the medical community, many doctors, hundreds, in fact, who supported dr haiza bawa—garba, that actually theirs is a very difficult profession, and there are times when, under great pressure, mistakes will be made, and sometimes those m ista kes will be made, and sometimes those mistakes have tragic consequences, as in this case. at the same time, they say, if we are to do ourjobs properly, we have to be able to be honest about those mistakes and share what happened in the run—up to those mistakes openly, and not be immediately chased down and punished by the gmc when those mistakes are made because, ultimately, doctors say, nobody benefits from that, and the system doesn't learn if doctors are later reticent about being open about mistakes they made for fear of
3:14 pm
being prosecuted. richard lister outside the court of appeal. the website ticketmaster is to shut down its secondary resale sites, seatwave and get me in, later this year in a bid to tackle touts. the sites, along with other similar outlets, have been criticised by fans and artists, because tickets were often sold for an inflated price. lizo mzimba has more. it is notjust concertgoers who have been unhappy with the activities of ticket touts. artists like ed sheeran have long campaigned for a fairer deal for fans from secondary sites when it comes to tickets for their tours. today's announcement from ticketmaster that it is closing down the two secondary sites it owns has been seen as a major step forward. in a statement, the company said... ticketmaster has been criticised in the past for not doing enough to combat overpriced tickets from touts because it also owns ticketmaster has been criticised in the past for not doing enough
3:15 pm
to combat overpriced tickets from touts because it also owns seatwave and get me in, which take a cut of the profits from the sales of tickets that are often being resold at highly inflated prices. instead, ticketmaster will set up a new exchange system where tickets cannot be sold for more than the original price. that is what the website twickets has been doing for some time. it is the reason artists like ed sheeran and adele have chosen it for the resale of tickets to their concerts. should ticketmaster have done it years ago? in our view, yes. we welcome any change and the change today is great news but ideally everybody should operate in the way we have done over the last six years. protect the consumer, protect the fans, who are constantly being ripped off by the secondary market, whether that be through the excessive ticket prices or the fees they are charged to trade. this move will not stop touts completely.
3:16 pm
tickets are still sold for increased prices for profit on sites like ebay and viagogo. earlier this year, ed sheeran's promoters cancelled more than 10,000 tickets for his stadium tour that had been resold on viagogo. the singer has been one of the leaders for the campaign group the fanfare alliance. it welcomed the news today but also said more had to be done to prevent touts exploiting the passion of fans for their favourite artists. lizo mzimba, bbc news. you're watching afternoon live. these are our headlines: the government promises new measures to tackle the problem of people sleeping rough in england. ticketmaster is closing two of its secondary resale websites to try to tackle the touts. delays at heathrow airport passport control left passengers queuing for up to two and a half hours last month —
3:17 pm
more on that shortly. usa's ryder cup captain jim furyk says it's hard to ignore tiger woods. the 14—time major winner rolled back the years to finish second at the us pga, but will need a captain's pick to play in paris next month. great britain's triple european champion dina asher smith arrives back in the uk. she's already looking ahead to next year's world championships as she bids to win a first world title. and danny kerry has been appointed the new coach of great britain's men's hockey team. he leaves his post with the women, having led them to olympic gold two years ago. i'll be back with more on those stories at half—past. the uk border force is repeatedly missing its target for passenger waiting times at heathrow airport, according to figures obtained by the airline virgin atlantic. on 30 out of 31 days injuly, the borderforce missed its target of a 45—minute wait or less for 95% of visitors from outside the european economic area. some passengers were left queuing
3:18 pm
for up to two—and—a—half hours. 0ur correspondent caroline davies is at heathrow. caroline, not just caroline, notjust missing the targets, they are missing them consistently and by a rather large margin. well, this is why the airlines are quite so frustrated. they say the uk border could be better managed at heathrow. let's break down those targets. if you from the european economic area, the plus other european countries, you can expect to be processed through passport control within about 25 minutes. if you are coming from outside the eea, which might be a country like america or canada, they expect to process used in 45 minutes, and they hope to get 95% of travellers through passport control in those times. injuly, they only managed that on one day for non—eea
3:19 pm
passengers, and it's something the airlines are frustrated about. they say it's a bad first impression for people arriving in the uk. what's behind it? according to the home 0ffice, failures in their computer system caused issues, and they also say they were dealing with a lot of vulnerable adults and children, which took longer to process. there are some things outside their control, for example, if delayed flights land all in one go, there might be longer queues. heathrow is asked to get people who are from what they call low risk country, that's canada and america, they want them to be able to use the electronic gates rather than queueing up and speaking to a person at the border. the home office have said to us that the vast majority of people are still getting through within that targeted time frame. they also say it's important to keep the uk border say. it's all about security. the other thing they pointed out is that, from the beginning of the summer, they gave
3:20 pm
heathrow an additional 200 medical staff deployed at the border to try and make things go more smoothly. the airlines say they understand the importance of creating a secure environment at the uk border, but they pointed out it's particularly important at the moment that the rest of the world knows that the uk is for business. the labour leader, jeremy corbyn, says he would "of course" be open to the labour party adopting, in full, the internationally recognised definition of anti—semitism including all examples. the party has faced criticism that its new code of conduct isn't adequate. 0ur correspondent in westminster isjonathan blake. is this a marked change in the mood music coming from jeremy corbyn? slightly, perhaps. but, in the short term, nothing has changed. the position of the labour party has been to adopt the ihra definition of anti—semitism and all of its working exa m ples except
3:21 pm
anti—semitism and all of its working examples except one, which has slightly changed for its code of conduct with regards to anti—semitism, agreed at a recent meeting of labour's ruling body, the national executive council. they are consulting with jewish national executive council. they are consulting withjewish community groups and others about the wording of that one example, which has been changed, which pertains to criticism of israel and the actions of the israeli government. mr corbyn was asked today whether, at the end of that consultation, it is possible that consultation, it is possible that labour would do what many labour mps that labour would do what many labourmps and that labour would do what many labour mps and increasing numbers of trade unions and other labour party members would like to see it do, and adopt the full definition and exa m ples into adopt the full definition and examples into its code of conduct. of course, consultation means you consult and listen to people, and what the national executive did at its meeting in july was to agree a very comprehensive code of conduct, the most sophisticated, toughest code of conduct of any political party in britain, to drive out any form of racism and any form whatsoever of anti—semitism in the party.
3:22 pm
it agreed on the definition, the ihra definition of anti—semitism, and agreed on almost all of the examples. now, a decision is expected by labour's national executive council early next month. mr corbyn was also asked today about the story on the front page of at least one paper this morning, and something which home secretary sajid javid has called on him to resign over. this is his presence in 2014 at a cemetery in tunisia. he was there as pa rt cemetery in tunisia. he was there as part of a conference bringing together various palestinian factions, with the aim of forming a unity government and pursuing peace in the middle east. at that cemetery, at the end of the conference, mr corbyn was involved ina conference, mr corbyn was involved in a wreath laying ceremony to the victims of the bombing in 1985 of the palestinian liberation
3:23 pm
organisation headquarters, in which many people died. the claim he has faced is that he was also present for the laying of a wreath at the graves and a plaque commemorating those who were held responsible by some for the kidnap and deaths of israeli athletes at the munich 0lympics israeli athletes at the munich olympics in 1972, alleged members of the so—called black september group. mr corbyn said today, as he has claimed in the past, that he was there at the time but not involved in that wreath laying. a wreath was indeed laid by some of those who attended to those who were killed in paris in 1992. were you involved? i was present when it was laid but i wasn't involved. i was there because i wanted to see a fitting memorial to everybody who has died in every terrorist incident everywhere, because we have to end it. you can't pursue peace by a cycle of violence, only by a cycle of dialogue. so mr corbyn explaining that there
3:24 pm
in his own words, and a labour party spokesperson has said the munich widows are being misled. that in response to quotes from them in the daily mail today saying thatjeremy did not honour those responsible for the munich killings. the trial of england cricketer ben stokes is continuing for a sixth day at bristol crown court. the 27—year—old is accused of affray in relation to a fight outside a nightclub in bristol during the early hours of a day in september last year. he denies the charge. 0ur correspondent andy moore is outside bristol crown court. the barristers are delivering their closing speeches, and we heard from the prosecution this morning, who reminded thejury about this charge of affray. he said it was often in connection with disturbances at football clubs or outside nightclubs. he said it was violence where a person of reasonable firmness would be afraid for their personal safety, and he went on to say that the various video footage that the jury had been shown clearly
3:25 pm
and plainly demonstrated that ben stokes moved, perhaps from a defensive posture, because he was threatened with a bottle, but he moved from that posture and became the aggressor himself. he went on to talk about ben stokes's performance in the witness box, where he said he couldn't recollect many elements of the incident, and the prosecutor said, it is plain that he, ben stokes, is seeking to justify his behaviour. he acted as the red mist came down, he acted deplorably. we've also heard from the defence, gordon cole, for ben stokes. he said that ben stokes was defending himself and others. we've heard that ben stokes was trying to defend, in his own words, two gay men who were being homophobically abused. mr cole, for the defence, said, a person cannot weigh to a nicety the exact measure of his defensive actions. so those speeches are
3:26 pm
going on at the moment, but we've heard from the judge that he intends to send the jury out sometime this afternoon. satisfaction in the rail network has dropped sharply, with train travel now one of the country's least trusted consumer industries. in the past year, passengers have voiced concern about the introduction of new timetables, cancelled services and rising fares. new timetables, thousands of cancelled services, angry commuters, strike action, and rising costs — it has not been a happy time for many rail users, and it is evident in a detailed satisfaction survey over the past decade. a study of transport focus data found that overall satisfaction with rail punctuality and reliability has fallen from 79% a decade ago to 73% today, but regular commuter satisfaction fell even further to 62% in that time.
3:27 pm
on top of that, rail fares could be set to rise by 3.5% next year. that is because train fare increases are tied to the higher measure of inflation, known as rpi. it could add £150 to an average long—distance commuter. i understand that our passengers have had a really tough time over the last few months. i'm a regular commuter myself. but we have to work together, and with a long—term plan. that's what companies are doing, rail companies are doing. that plan is going to make journeys better over the coming years. it's going to improve the economy, it's going to better connect communities up and down the country. to compound things for some train users, another strike by rmt rail workers is set for next month, in a very long—running dispute about guards on trains. joe lynam, bbc news. sunshine is proving limited today,
3:28 pm
with more showers breaking out. temperatures through the afternoon and into the early evening probably near average for the time of year, 19 or 20 four the central belt of scotla nd 19 or 20 four the central belt of scotland and into northern ireland, low 20s in england and wales. quite a few showers on the eastern side of england, some of them heavy and sundry. slowly decaying into the latter pa rt sundry. slowly decaying into the latter part of the evening, and any damp and drizzly weather tending to move away. a fair bit of cloud coming in from the atlantic, so a pretty warm night, with temperatures typically 12 to 15. for tomorrow, we're going to find most of the heavy rain in the north—west of the uk, perhaps for northern ireland at times, more especially for western scotland. england and wales likely to have a dry day with a fair bit of sunshine to begin with and increasing amount of cloud, but still 25 also in the south—east, and those temperatures not changing much overnight. this is bbc news —
3:29 pm
our latest headlines. a doctor who was struck off over the death of a six—year—old boy has won her appeal to practise medicine again. dr hadiza bawa—garba was convicted of manslaughter by gross negligence in 2015 over the death of jack adcock, who died of sepsis in 2011. the government promises more money to eradicate homelessness in england within nine years and help deal with mental health problems and addictions, but labour says the plan doesn't go far enough. ticketmaster is closing two of its secondary ticketing websites seatwave and get me in — which allow people to offload unwanted tickets. the move is to combat touts who hike up prices. delays at passport control at heathrow left some passengers queuing for up to two and a half hours last month. after a year of rail misery — satisfaction in train travel has dropped sharply making it one of the uk's least trusted consumer industries. a new study finds younger asians across the uk are more socially conservative on issues including sex before marriage and same—sex relationships
3:30 pm
than their peers in the rest of the population. sport now on afternoon live with ben croucher. the usa have announced the first group of players for the ryder cup. yes will tiger woods be in it. he is going a good job of pressing his case. a year ago he could barely hit the ball 60 yards. now it is one of great sights in sports, tiger woods tearing up. he was two shots away from winning the us pga he was just 2 shots away from winning a fifteenth major title. brooks koepka won in st lewis, but it was tiger who had the crowds following and holla—ing his every stroke.
3:31 pm
whilst he's up to 26 in the world — it's not enough for an automatic pick for next month's ryder cup — but the vice captain has caught the eye of captainjim furyk. . his game is trending, he said. for me the numbers are nice. good to look at. but not always the most important. we want the players who are going to help us be successful. woods has played in seven ryder cups and only won one of them — not a great record. here are the picks them brooks koepka, world number1 dustinjohnson, justin thomas, master winner patrick reed, bubba watson, three time major champion jordan spieth, rickie fowler and webb simpson. a formidible team heading to paris. for woods even to be in the running is impressive for a forty year old with a bad back. that is not bad. now britain's new golden girl. because she is home. yes. dina asher smith. this time last week simon — we were hoping she might do well at the europeans. fast forward seven days and she won the 100,
3:32 pm
the 200 and anchored the relay team to gold last night too. she's returned to heathrow in the last couple of hours — no doubt to a few more cameras and pa parrazzi than when she left for germany. she became the first british athlete to win three golds at a european championships and is now one of the women to beat at next year's world championships in qatar. definitely not used to this, i'm not the kind of person that hunts out the kind of person that hunts out the limelight. that is not me at all. so i don't think i will erget used to this, but it is heart warming and nice to see not only so many people have taken an interest in athletics, but they want to see a british female do so well. that is important. well done to herment england have named an unchanged squad for the third test against india starting on saturday at trent bridge. it means there's no place for ben stokes — who is on trial for affray at bristol crown court. his replacement chris woakes retains his place after a maiden test century at lord's. seamerjamie porter is also named with moeen ali to contend with adil rashid for the spinners berth.
3:33 pm
britain's defending champion scott quin has qualified fastest for this evening's final of the sb14 100 metres breaststroke at the world para swimming european championships in dublin. quin will be joined in the final by team—mate connor morrison, who was fourth fastest. ellie robinson and maisie summers—newton are into the s6 50 metres freestyle final along with tully careney. danny kerry — the man charged with guiding great britain's women to olympic hockey gold — has become the new coach of the men's team. after 13 years coaching gb and england woman — he's been appointed as the successor to bobby crutchley who stepped down earlier this year. he says he's excited by the opportunity and that he's proud of how the women he's coached inspired future generations of hockey players and finally, if you've got a fear of heights — this may be the time to look away. that is mont blanc. that is the fearsome north face the grandes jorasses. that there is swiss extreme mountaineer dani arnold.
3:34 pm
he's set a new speed record climbing to the top. all 4208 metres of it. he passed teams using ropes that had set off the previous evening to complete the climb in two hours and four minutes. if you have a couple of hours, to spare, simon, you know what you can do in france? yes, i can cheer them on! more now on the measures set out to tackle homelessness in england. the government has vowed to end rough sleeping by 2027 — with extra support for mental health and addictions. charities have described the strategy as a step forward but still some way from a totalfix . with me now is balbir chatrik, director of policy and communications at centrepoint — which provides housing and support for young people. i'm guessing that you welcome any announcement like this? but have they got their priorities right?m is definitely a welcome announcement. we want to see
3:35 pm
homelessness high on the agenda. but with the measures announced, it is highly unlikely to end it by 2027. why? because what it is not being addressed is the lack of affordable housing. people can't afford the rent. also what we know is that one of the biggest causes of homelessness is actually people losing their tenancies and we need more tenancy support as well. private rental is, that is a real issue here isn't it? yes, absolutely. what is happening is benefits is not keeping pace with how much it costs to rent a property. so if you're in work and you get support through the benefit system, often you can't afford the rents. these are all problems that have got particularly bad in recent yea rs, have got particularly bad in recent years, with austerity and what do you say who say, this is a government that's helped to create
3:36 pm
the very problem that they're now saying we're going to solve. to some extent that is true. i think there was austerity cuts across the board. now what we are doing is seeing the impact of some of those and it is fantastic the government's recognised it. but what we know from our services is there are not some kinds of support that young people need, such as mental health support. it is just not there for young people in particular. that is why they end up on the streets? yes and what we would say is prevention is critical. it will save the country a rot of money, but —— lot of money but it will make sure that young people in particular don't have to go on the streets. what is it that you do, when you see someone on the streets, what can you say to them that gets them somewhere safe. this is not a safe place for people to be. it is not a safe place and people don't choose to sleep on the streets. it is not a lifestyle
3:37 pm
choice. there are some people who still believe that that it is. we know from our work it is not a lifestyle choice. we know a young people in particular, it is unsafe to be on the streets and they're more likely to sofa surf. can you imagine sofa surfing with all your belongs and you want to go to couege belongs and you want to go to college and you can't keep up and your mate will, say i need you to move on. then there is a risk you may sleep on the streets. is itjust money? no it is an attitude as well. what we need to make sure is that the money that is directed is supporting prevention. we need to make sure that they don't end up on the streets in the first place. money is part of solution. but it is making sure that everybody is working joined up. thank you very much. british south asians are more socially conservative than the wider uk population, a survey for the bbc‘s asian network suggests.
3:38 pm
it found that a third of british asians don't agree with sex before marriage, or same—sex relationships. more than 2,000 responded to the poll as part of the bbc‘s big british asian summer season of programmes. nomia iqbal reports. the 2,026 british south asians questioned in this poll are of predominantly indian, pakistani, bangladeshi and sri lankan heritage. one of the big findings looks at the issue of integration, with 53% of british asians saying they have to tone down their identity to fit in or change their behaviour. i think that's a really interesting reminder about how integration happens. the second generation of british asians often had the educational and professional success their parents who came as migrants were hoping they would have and so found themselves as pioneers in new places. but for priya from birmingham, fitting in is about balancing different identities. i feel very comfortable with my identity, i'm very proud to be asian, ilike doing... i go to asian weddings,
3:39 pm
wear asian clothes, i'm very comfortable with my identity. i don't really feel pressured to be more westernised. i feel as though i come from quite the modern family in general, so that does have a big influence on me. religion also plays a big role, with 46% saying their muslim, sikh or hindu faith is important. compare that with the rest of the uk as a whole, where more than half say religion doesn't matter to them at all. i never used to wear a scarf before, and i never used to dress in a full—on maxi dress. i've gone the other way, i've come more to my faith, and now i dress completely modestly, so it's not to adapt, it's because i've got to know my faith more and wanted to do more for my faith, to be closer to god for my own personal reasons. while some are confident of their place in britain, others are navigating how best to fit in, but for those who made the uk their home, there are no regrets. my father was from
3:40 pm
pakistan, from peshawar. coming to the uk definitely has been really good for him. it's just about coming to somewhere where they've got opportunities, education, you've got the nhs. we've got a lot of good things about, you know, in england. we've even had good weather this year so, yeah, i think coming to the uk has done really well for dad — and for a lot of other asians as well. more than three quarters feel that way and, according to the poll, consider the uk country where they can fulfil their dreams and ambitions. nomia iqbal, bbc news. joining me now is pria rai from the bbc asian network. i think ithinka i think a lot of people would be surprised at the suggestion that many, particularly younger, british asians are more conservative that
3:41 pm
others of that age? yes that is one of the surprises, it maybe easy to assume all young people are more liberal than older people. that is not the case with british asians. 0n sex before marriage, it is a mirror image, whether you look at 18 to 34—year—olds or 35 to 54—year—old and the same on same sex relationships. 35% of those below and 37% of those above the age of 35 don't think that they're morally acceptable. should we be surprised, given particularly the asian... they live as a family, the youngsters live as a family, the youngsters live with their grandparents, the family unit is perhaps more important than elsewhere and of course you're going to be influenced by that? you are and interestingly when asked what word best described the asian community, the public and the asian community, the public and the asian community both said
3:42 pm
family—orientated first and then traditional. so it is obvious to see where those traits and cultural values carry through. but obviously you have then got british asian 5 who are born in this country and for them, we respect people of indian and bangladeshi and sri lankan backgrounds and for those born here, they're trying to bridge two different cultures. what was interesting also was the number of younger asians who feel they have to compromise to fit in, that they actually change their attitudes. what sort of things are we talking about? more than half, more than half of british asians admitted to acting a bit less asian to fit in. that figure goes up to 60% when you look at the younger part of the population. things like changing the name, to something that sounds more british. 0rjust not talking about
3:43 pm
religious practices when you're at work or in front of people who are not asian. and i think that is again coming down to the idea of trying to negotiate someone's identity. coming down to the idea of trying to negotiate someone's identitym coming down to the idea of trying to negotiate someone's identity. it is also about fitting in. is there a sense that british asians do feel they fit in? i think there is in a lot of ways, just speaking to people of the younger generation in particular, they may feel they can be around their friends and do the types of activities like you know resist going out or doing sports etc, but then they're also trying to hold on to those cultural values of theirfamily back hold on to those cultural values of their family back at home. when we talk about british asians and their opinion, british asians encompasses a huge amount of people, is it easy to talk as one huge section? no, you can't paint everyone with the same brush. which spoke to all the people of all the south asian countries,
3:44 pm
but different religions and religion was the number one factor they said was the number one factor they said was important to their identity. muslims, hindus, sikhs and muslims in particular came out as more conservative, nearly half disagreeing with same sex relationships. that can show t different things you ufr to consider when you try and dissect their attitudes. and we will have more tomorrow? yes tomorrow we will look at the greater feeling of hostility in this country to muslims in particular since the terror attacks and british asians, they will get behind england on a football pitch, but when it comes to cricket... it isa but when it comes to cricket... it is a different story. i could have told you that. we will wait until tomorrow. thank you very much. we
3:45 pm
have had a verdict in the case of a model who was stabbed to death in london. our correspondent is at the 0ld london. our correspondent is at the old bailey. what has happened? after more than 15 hours of deliberations at the old bailey, two men have been found guilty of murdering the male model harry azoka. they are george coe and mercer kanda. another defendant has been found guilty of manslaughter. the victim was stabbed near west london. that happened because in the lead up to the fight the victim and one defendant had a feud over a girlfriend. it claimed that george slept with harry's girlfriend and a fight was arranged on social media. 0n the day of the fight in january this on social media. 0n the day of the fight injanuary this year, the two men had got into that feud, george
3:46 pm
coe admitted to having two knives. harry and a friend had armed themselves with dumb bell bars and within two minutes, harry was stabbed. he stumbled home, but he collapsed and the emergency services could not save him. there were tributes after his death and one by a fashion house who he worked for. both playing tribute. harry uzoka was considered a rising star in the world of modelling. he had done work for many brands. but today the jury have found two men guilty of his murder, they are george koh and mercer kanda. another defendant who was presents during the fight has been found guilty of manslaughter, all three are due to be sentenced next month. thank you very much. ben bland is here —
3:47 pm
in a moment he will be telling us what's hot and what's not in the business news. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live. a doctor who was struck off over the death of a six—year—old boy has won her appeal to practise medicine again. £100 million is what the government promises to pay, in a bid to tackle homelessness. ticketmaster is closing two of its secondary re—sale websites — to try to tackle the touts. here's your business headlines on afternoon live. turkey's central bank has said it is ready to take "all necessary measures" to ensure financial stability after the collapse of the lira. it has vowed to provide banks with "all the liquidity" they need. this is all after a worsening diplomatic row with the us prompted market turmoil in the country. shares in bayer — the german pharmaceuticals and chemicals giant — have fallen more than 10%. today is the first time they've been traded since an american court ruled that one of monsanto's weedkillers
3:48 pm
was linked to a man's cancer on friday and ordered it to pay damages of nearly $300 million. bayer completed its takeover of monsanto in june. monsanto denies the cancer link and says it will appeal. uk firms are reportedly finding it hard to filljobs — because there's a shortage of suitable candidates. the chartered institute of personnel and development says this is because of fewer eu workers coming to the uk this year. meanwhile, almost half of older workers say they feel unsupported by their employers. this is despite millions of people working longer, according to research by aviva. it warns that a failure to support such workers risks a "disheartened and discouraged over—50s" workforce. and you leave it there! grouse shooting — it's not a mass popular appeal pastime, but it does matter to parts
3:49 pm
of the economy and there are worries about it? yes, today is the start of the grouse shooting season — the glorious twelfth — though it's actually on the 13th because english law says the start of the season can't fall on a sunday and they observe that in scotland where it's big. but you're right, it generates about £150 million for the uk economy every year. and supports more than 2,500 jobs — ranging from gamekeepers and beaters to those working in tourism and hospitality. some estates have cancelled shoots and are delaying the start of the season, because there's a shortage of the game birds. why? it's to do with the weather. severe late snow after march followed by extremely dry and hot conditions between may and july are believed to have reduced the number of the game birds successfully breeding. the industry is warning that's going to have a massive knock on effect for the rural economy. joining us now is
3:50 pm
amanda anderson, director of the moorland association. can't may make up the losses later in the year. it is worse than that. we are down from seven out of ten will be cancelled. in terms of effect it has, can they weather one quiet year, or are the impacts felt almost immediately. moorland managers can deal with it for a year. but the birds are wild and feed on heather and that has had a real hit from the cold followed by the drought. so the moorland managers are used to it. but the local economy is hit hard. which
3:51 pm
areas are likely to be worst affected, which parts of the country? certainly in scotland, but the whole of north of england is affected. there are pockets that seem to be fine. i think that depends on the altitude and how long the snow stayed on the ground. very few moors are still shooting. but most have cancelled across the north of england. so in terms of what can be done, to deal with this problem, is there anything that can be done or not? not this year i'm afraid. the local accommodation providers, i was ina the local accommodation providers, i was in a hotel today and they expected the place to be full and buzzing, and it is dead as a grave. they won't be putting grouse on the menu this evening, as they have done forever. i'm afraid they willjust ta ke forever. i'm afraid they willjust take the hit and the staff time will be down, the local butcher, baker and the garage will feel the impact. it strikes me though when we talk of the impact ofjobs, surely they're
3:52 pm
seasonal jobs the impact ofjobs, surely they're seasonaljobs and the people who do them will have other work throughout them will have other work throughout the rest of the year. to a degree, but we are talking of remote rural places and it is notjust the money in people's pockets on the days. but it is the social side. people come from long distances and it is a social occasion and there are environmental benefits from the grouse moor management. thank you very much. now the markets. the big factor affecting markets is the situation in turkey and fears about the impact beyond turkey with travel company shares down. holiday group tui travel led the ftse100fallers on monday morning after its shares fell.
3:53 pm
you would think people want cheap holidays. i know people who have been to turkey and are getting great deals. so i'm surprised. there is a lag effect, because of the good weather here, a lot of people who would have taken last minute holidays have stayed at home and enjoyed the summer here. the other thing pulling down european markets, some of the big banks, their shares are down, because of fears about the situation in turkey. that is a snapshot as things stand this afternoon. i shall talk to you again in an hourorso. afternoon. i shall talk to you again in an hour or so. thank you. thomas markle has reportedly not spoken to his daughter meghan since her wedding to prince harry in may. in a newspaper interview, mr markle expressed fears that he would lose contact with his daughter permanently — after he missed the royal wedding due to health problems. with me me now is roya nikkhah, royal correspondent at the sunday times.
3:54 pm
are wejust are we just talking about someone who is feeling the pressure a bit. 0r who is feeling the pressure a bit. or is there a sense that buckingham palace could have prevented this?” think it's a bit of both. i think thomas markle feels very sensitive about the way things have panned out. i think he was very ill—prepared for how his life would change completely over night and i think he probably feels he hasn't really been prepared for that. i think at the heart of it, what he feels upset about is that contact with his daughter has been broken. he has said he feels he made a big mistake in colluding with the paparazzi but he feels hurt that since before the wedding he has had no contact at all. he's not going to go anywhere. he is continuing to tuck to the press —— talk to the press and that is something the palace will understand and try and
3:55 pm
think about how they go about trying to draw a line under this. eight pages in one paper yesterday, do we know how the duke and duchess of sussex feel about this? not officially, no. but! sussex feel about this? not officially, no. but i think it is fairto officially, no. but i think it is fair to assume that harry will not be loving this, nor will meghan. harry's views on the press are well known and he will feel it is press exploiting members of his family. it will be casting a shadow over their holiday in balmoral, seeing this splashed across the papers. but harry has very little control over what members of meghan's family choose to do and still two years after being with meghan, he has still not met with thomas markle is fuelling the feeling of being snubbedin fuelling the feeling of being snubbed in mexico, where he is.- the heart of this, is a dysfunctional family, at least at the moment. we have reported on
3:56 pm
that... for many years, when we talk about prince harry's family. the only person who could do anything about this is meghan herself isn't it? yes, there has been speculation in newspapers that kensington palace need to get a grip on this and send people out there. i don't, there is managing a situation, but i don't think sending a courtier to mexico is what thomas markle wants. he wa nts is what thomas markle wants. he wants contact with his daughter. the keyissue wants contact with his daughter. the key issue and the nervousness will be that they will feel now any meeting that takes place or any conversation that happens, they're nervous that will appear in a newspaper the next day. that is the problem. the last thing they need is that right now. because they have got a high profile visit to australia and new zealand. yes in 0ctober an enormous tour to australia and new zealand. that is harry and meghan's first important
3:57 pm
trip and they won't want to have this still hanging over them when they go on that trip. thank you very much. now the weather. sunshine is proving to be limited today. we are seeing more showers breaking out as well. temperatures through the afternoon into the early evening, probably near average for the time of year at 20 in scotland and northern ireland and low 20s in england and wales. quite a few showers around opt eastern side of the eastern side of the uk. some heavy and thundery. slowly decaying tonight. any damp weather easing away from scotland. so it does become dry overnight. a fair bit of cloud coming in and a warm night. temperatures around 12 to 15 degrees. tomorrow we will find most of any degrees. tomorrow we will find most ofany rain degrees. tomorrow we will find most of any rain in the north—west of uk. perhaps running into northern ireland and specially for western
3:58 pm
scotland. eastern scotland not seeing much rain. england and wales having a dry day with sunshine to begin with and cloud through the day. still 25 degrees in the south—east and the temperatures not changing very much further north. hello, you're watching afternoon live. i'm simon mccoy. today at 4pm: a doctor who was struck off over the death of a six—year—old boy has won her appeal to practise medicine again. the court of appeal sets aside the order of the divisional court — that dr bawa—garba should be erased from the medical register — and restores the order of the tribunal — that she be suspended from practice for 12 months, subject to review. the murder of 25—year—old model harry uzoka — two men are found guilty at the old bailey. new action on homelessness — the government says it wants to make rough sleeping a thing of the past. but where is the promised £100 million coming from? when you are starving and hungry and you ain't got no money, there's nowhere to go and get some food or anything, to have a shower
3:59 pm
or a change of clothes. tackling the touts — ticketmaster is closing two of its secondary ticketing websites, which allow people to offload unwanted tickets. a not—so—warm welcome to the uk — delays at heathrow airport passport control left passengers queuing for up to two—and—a—half hours last month. and let's talk sport, and tiger woods. the usa name the first eight members of their ryder cup team. no space for tiger woods just yet, but us captainjim furyk says his form is hard to ignore after coming close to a 15th major title at yesterday's us pga championship. thanks, ben. darren, what's happening with the weather? a lot of showers today, northern and eastern parts quite a few thunderstorms. we'll look at those in a moment, and will also look at the longer range forecast. thanks, darren. also coming up — we'll be meeting
4:00 pm
the little girl who won't let disability stand in the way of her dream of being a cheerleader. that's in news nationwide. hello, everyone. this is afternoon live. i'm simon mccoy. a doctor who was struck off following the death of a six—year—old boy has won her challenge at the court of appeal over the decision to strike her off. dr hadiza bawa—garba was convicted of gross negligence manslaughter in 2015 after the death of jack adcock. dr bawa—gabra had originally been suspended for a year by a tribunal before high courtjudges ruled she should be struck off. today, master of the rolls sir terence etherton, explained why the tribunal decision should stand. the court of appeal unanimously
4:01 pm
allows the appeal. it holds that the divisional court was wrong to interfere with the decision of the tribunal. the court of appeal sets aside the order of the divisional court, that dr bawa—garba should be raised from the medical treasure, and restores the order of the tribunal, that she is suspended from practice for 12 months, subject to review. reasons for the adjustment. the decision of the tribunal, suspension rather than erasure was an appropriate sentence, was not the decision of back or law, but an evaluative decision based on many factors. it is the type of decision which has been described as a kind ofjury question, about which reasonable people may reasonably disagree. an appeal court should
4:02 pm
generally be cautious before interfering with such an evaluative decision. that caution applies with particular force decision. that caution applies with particularforce in decision. that caution applies with particular force in the case of a specialist adjudicating body such as the tribunal. an appeal court should only interfere with such an evaluative decision if, one, there is an error of principle in carrying out the evaluation or, two, for any other reason the evaluation is wrong in the sense that it was a decision which fell outside the bounds of what the adjudicative body could properly and reasonably decide. neither of those grounds that in the present case. 0ur correspondent richard lister is at the court of appeal in central london. a big victory for her, this. it is, and it's a case which has sent ripples right through the medical establishment. at its heart is the question of the extent to which a doctor should be punished for making
4:03 pm
clinical errors, in the context of working in a hospital with serious systemic failures. even though this case resulted in the death of a six—year—old child, the medical profession has been struggling with that question, and today the court of appeal has answered and said, yes, this doctor should be allowed to return to work after a sanction approved by an independent medical tribunal. with me is one of the doctors from the doctors association who supported dr bawa—garba through this case. he is an anaesthetist in the west midlands. why has the doctors association been backing dr bawa—garba in this? doctors association been backing dr bawa-garba in this? i'd like to pass on my condolences to that family. 0ur on my condolences to that family. our thoughts are with them. going forwards, we've been supporting dr bawa—garba in this case because we feel we need to move towards a just and learning culture in the nhs, where doctors and other nhs staff feel they are able to speak out
4:04 pm
about both honest clinical areas, understaffing, the lack of resources sometimes that we face on a daily basis. only when we do that are we able to get a culture where patients become safer at the end. the general medical council said it was important to pursue dr bawa—garba and try and have her removed from the medical register to ensure that public confidence in the nhs is maintained but certainly people will look at this case and say, a six—year—old child died, why shouldn't the doctor be struck off? we understand the views of the public have and are concerned the public have and are concerned the public have and are concerned the public have about this, but there are well— known instances of other doctors who are convicted of gross negligence manslaughter who have retained their registration and have become advocates of safer practice. in situations like these, we know that the experiences doctors go through can be those which teach
4:05 pm
them and they learn and develop from that and, actually, we have more confidence that dr bawa—garba going forward will be an excellent paediatrician and so will her supervisors and comments have been as such, and we think she be a favoured doctor through these experiences, sad as they are. it's taken experiences, sad as they are. it's ta ke n yea rs experiences, sad as they are. it's taken years for this to play out. what's been the impact on the medical profession? the medical profession have been tentative about how they are paterson, resulting in the profession becoming defensive, and we worry that, rather than learning from errors and being open about them, actually it leads to a culture of doctors hiding potential errors on the basis of things we just happened such as gosport, this is something we need to eradicate from the nhs and need to work towards getting away from. should the gmc change its focus? there's
4:06 pm
been a lot of unhappiness about the way they pursued this case. we think the gmc should look and reflect on the gmc should look and reflect on the outcomes of the case today. we think that, certainly from a doctor— regulator relationship, that's been damaged over the last few years by this case and others, and so i suspect this is the start of trying to rebuild that relationship between the profession and its regulator. what would your message to the general public be in the wake of this? that the doctors, nurses and staff throughout the nhs value our jobs and value the fact that we are caring for you, and actually that's what we've gone into our professions to do, so there is no inherent culture of harm, and we want to try and eradicate harm from the nhs to its fullest extent. thank you for that. so we have had a response from the gmc, saying they fully accept
4:07 pm
the gmc, saying they fully accept the court of appeal‘s judgment, we understand they are not going to appeal it. they have said, we are sorry for the anguish and uncertainty these proceedings have had onjack‘s uncertainty these proceedings have had on jack's family, uncertainty these proceedings have had onjack‘s family, dr bawa—garba and the wider profession. thank you. the bbc panorama programme spoke to dr bawa—garba about her reaction.” am pleased with the outcome, but i wa nt to am pleased with the outcome, but i want to pay tribute and remember jack adcock, a wonderful little boy, who started this story. i want to... let pa rents know who started this story. i want to... let parents know that i always worry for my role in what has happened to jack, and i also want to acknowledge and give gratitude to people around the world, from the public to the medical community, who have
4:08 pm
supported me. iam medical community, who have supported me. i am overwhelmed by their generosity, and i'm very grateful for that. the government has launched an initiative to end rough sleeping on england's streets within a decade. ministers are promising millions of pounds "to help people turn their lives around", including support for mental health and addictions, and funding for housing. but there are questions about where the promised cash, £100 million, is coming from. it's becoming clear there's no new money involved. graham satchell has more. we are on the streets of east london with homelessness charity st mungo's. outreach workers do this every night, checking parks, streets, doorways. this man, who didn't want to be identified, told us he had drug and mental health problems. he's been sleeping rough for four months. i got evicted because i didn't engage with a couple of services and they didn't like that, the fact i wasn't engaging. they thought i wasn't willing to sort myself out so they evicted me.
4:09 pm
that's how i became homeless. it's quite hard. and it's quite scary as well. most of the time when you are starving and hungry and you've got no money with nowhere to go and get some food. if you could say one thing to the government, what would you say to them? i would say help the homeless. give them a chance to change their lives. the number of people sleeping on the street has more than doubled in a decade. today's announcement by the government promises £100 million to end rough sleeping in england by 2027. it includes £50 million for homes for people ready to move on from hostels and 30 million for targeted mental health services for rough sleepers. the housing secretary james brokenshire on a visit to a homelessness hostel today. he says nobody should have to sleep rough and he wants to make it a thing of the past. the 100 million is in respect of reprioritisation of the budget, so half of that is new money to rough sleeping and homelessness. it is a question of prioritisation.
4:10 pm
that is why we know it is important. i know there is more that we need to do in respect of dealing with the challenges of people being out the street. st mungo's and other charities have welcomed today's strategy but remain concerned about the causes of homelessness, like a lack of safe, affordable housing. what we're saying is that much more needs to be done. so it is a good start, but it isjust the beginning. and to end rough sleeping by 2027 is going to take a lot more investment. labour says government cuts to benefits, housing and other services have caused the homelessness crisis. we know that rough sleeping is a huge problem. you just have to go out on the streets to see it. but what we have got from the government is a strategy that will reduce it byjust under a decade, which doesn't really reflect the scale of the problem at all. and the investment they are announcing is a drop in the ocean. graham satchell, bbc news.
4:11 pm
in central london for us now is james prestwich, head of policy at the national housing federation, who represent housing associations in england. let's pick up that point. is it a drop in the ocean? as you saw in the report, and as has been widely voiced in the media today, i think it's definitely a step in the right direction, and that's something to be very positive about, but i think what the strategy doesn't address are the underlying problems of a lack of supply of affordable homes, and in particular cuts to adult social care services and support services over the last eight years orso, services over the last eight years or so, which have exacerbated the problem. when we talk about a lack of affordable homes, how many are we talking about? research the national housing figuration carried out
4:12 pm
indicated we need to be building around 90,000 homes per yearfor affordable, social rents. so we've got some considerable way to go. we know as a nation we have not been built in the home is the country needs for some considerable time, and as! needs for some considerable time, and as i said, while this is a step in the right direction, we need an awful lot more in terms of where we need to get to as the country and build the homes we need. because the problem of people ending up on the streets, and they don't want to be there are they find themselves there because they've had with welfare payments or landlords or terms of leases, and its issues like that, isn't it? that's right. we know that the single largest cause of homelessness is the termination of a private rented sector tenancy. as people having to live in private rented homes has become more prevalent, that problem has risen.
4:13 pm
when you have that against the background of cuts to welfare and welfare reform, it has created a perfect storm as far as homelessness is concerned. is it the building of that affordable homes, will that change things dramatically?m that affordable homes, will that change things dramatically? if we can build the homes the country needs, yes, that will have a knock—on effect, but clearly that's some way down the road, so the funding and the announcement today is welcome, because it seeks to address the short—term, very serious problem of rough sleeping. we know that on any given night there are round 5000 people sleeping rough on the streets, so clearly we need funding upfront to be able to put in place a safety net, to help get those people off the streets. you will be aware of the criticism of the government going on, along the lines of, this is the government that put many of them on the streets with these policies. is there any truth in that? i think that
4:14 pm
haemolytic impact of some of the cuts to support services and then the wider welfare reforms, against the wider welfare reforms, against the backdrop of that housing prices, has helped to exacerbate the problems. anecdotally, people will know when they are out on the street in towns and cities across the problem that street level homelessness is much more visible now than it was in previous years. and the issues of mental health and addiction, and also those that have recently been released from short prison sentences, there are lots of different ingredients to what is now a serious problem. how much money do you think would go some way towards that? £100 million here, regardless of where it comes from, how effective could that be? as i said, it's absolutely a start. the government had committed to halve rough sleeping by 2022 and ended by 2027, and that's a bold claim, and i think for the government to do that
4:15 pm
they'll need increased the funding they've provided. i think there's also a knock on wood for saying that actually, that's quite a long time to seek to try and enter rough sleeping, and more money upfront might mean they were able to that time period down somewhat and be able to try and solve roughly pink somewhat sooner than that. thank you, —— sold rough sleeping somewhat sooner. you're watching afternoon live. these are our headlines: a doctor struck off after the death ofa a doctor struck off after the death of a six—year—old boy has won her appeal to practice again. the murder of 25—year—old model harry uzoka — two men are found guilty at the old bailey new action on homelessness: the government says it wants to make rough sleeping a thing of the past — but where is the promised £100 million coming from? the usa's ryder cup captain jim furyk he's excited to see tiger woods playing well but refused to say if he'd be one of his captain's picks for next month's competition in france. woods finished runner—up at the us
4:16 pm
pga championship yesterday. dina asher—smith has arrived back in the uk with three golden additions to her hand luggage. the newly—crowned triple european champion says its heartwearming to see the impact she's had. there's no place for ben stokes as england name an unchanged squad for the third test against india. that starts in nottingham on saturday. two men have been found guilty of the murder of 25—year—old model, harry uzoka, who was stabbed to death in west london injanuary. adina campbell is at the old bailey. what was the background to this? well, it's taken the jury here just over 15 hours to reach their verdicts and, as you say, two men have been found guilty today of murdering the model harry uzoka in west london. they are george koh and
4:17 pm
merse dikanda. a third man, jonathan okigbo, has been found guilty of manslaughter. harry uzoka was stabbed repeatedly during a fight near his home in shepherd's bush on january 11 this year. he was considered a rising star in the modelling world, having taken part in different campaigns with some of the biggest high street brands, including river island, levi's, g star and top man. the court heard that, just before his death, he'd been given a script and had been offered a role within a british film. in the lead up to his death, thejury were film. in the lead up to his death, the jury were told that harry uzoka had become involved in a dispute with george koh over claims that george had slept with harry's girlfriend, and subsequently a fight was arranged on social media, and various was arranged on social media, and various messages were was arranged on social media, and various messages were exchanged and between the men. on the afternoon of the fight, january the 11th, the court heard that harry uzoka had armed himself with dumbbell bars with another friend but, armed himself with dumbbell bars with anotherfriend but, when armed himself with dumbbell bars with another friend but, when they
4:18 pm
turned up, george koh had two knives, and he wasjoined in that fight by the two other men, jonathan okigbo and merse dikanda and, in the space of two minutes, harry uzoka sustained several stab wounds, one of them in his chest. he managed to stumble back home nearby but his injuries were so serious and the emergency services could not save him. there were various tributes after his death from the world of modelling, including british model jordan dunne and some of the fashion brands harry uzoka had worked for, one of them being everlane. all three men had plenty self defence, saying what happened that day was accidental and they were only protecting themselves, but the jury didn't believe them and today, george koh and merse dikanda have been found guilty of murder, jonathan okigbo guilty of manslaughter. merse dikanda also
4:19 pm
found guilty of possessing an offensive weapon. george koh had already admitted to that offence. all three men are due to be sentenced next month. the website ticketmaster is to shut down its secondary resale sites, seatwave and get me in, later this year in a bid to tackle touts. the sites along with other similar outlets have been criticised by fans and artists, because tickets were often sold for an inflated price. lizo mzimba has more. it is notjust concertgoers who have been unhappy with the activities of ticket touts. artists like ed sheeran have long campaigned for a fairer deal for fans from secondary sites when it comes to tickets for their tours. today's announcement from ticketmaster that it is closing down the two secondary sites it owns has been seen as a major step forward. in a statement, the company said... ticketmaster has been criticised
4:20 pm
in the past for not doing enough to combat overpriced tickets from touts because it also owns seatwave and get me in, which take a cut of the profits from the sales of tickets that are often being resold at highly inflated prices. instead, ticketmaster will set up a new exchange system where tickets cannot be sold for more than the original price. that is what the website twickets has been doing for some time. it is the reason artists like ed sheeran and adele have chosen it for the resale of tickets to their concerts. should ticketmaster have done it years ago? in our view, yes. we welcome any change and the change today is great news but ideally everybody should operate in the way we have done over the last six years. protect the consumer, protect the fans, who are constantly being ripped off by the secondary market, whether that be through the excessive ticket prices or the fees
4:21 pm
they are charged to trade. this move will not stop touts completely. tickets are still sold for increased prices for profit on sites like ebay and viagogo. earlier this year, ed sheeran's promoters cancelled more than 10,000 tickets for his stadium tour that had been resold on viagogo. the singer has been one of the leaders for the campaign group the fanfare alliance. it welcomed the news today but also said more had to be done to prevent touts exploiting the passion of fans for their favourite artists. lizo mzimba, bbc news. the labour leader, jeremy corbyn, says he would "of course" be open to the labour party adopting, in full, the internationally recognised definition of anti—semitism. the party has faced criticism that its new code of conduct
4:22 pm
doesn't go far enough. i've been speaking to our political correspondent in westminster, jonathan blake. the position of the labour party has been to adopt the ihra definition of anti—semitism and all of its working exa m ples except anti—semitism and all of its working examples except one. it has slightly changed that one for its code of conduct. with regards to anti—semitism, this was agreed at a recent meeting of labour's ruling body, the national executive council. they are however consulting with jewish community groups council. they are however consulting withjewish community groups and others about the wording of that one example, which has been changed, which pertains to the criticism of israel and the actions of the israeli government. mr corbyn was asked today whether, at the end of that consultation, it is possible labour would do what many labour mps, an increasing number of trade unions and other labour party
4:23 pm
members would like to see it do, and adopt the full definition and exa m ples into adopt the full definition and examples into its code of conduct. of course, consultation means you consult and listen to people, and what an actual executive did at its meeting injuly was what an actual executive did at its meeting in july was to agree a very comprehensive code of conduct, the most sophisticated, toughest code of conduct of any political party in britain, to drive out any form of racism in any form whatsoever of anti—semitism in our party. it is on the definition, the ihra definition of anti—semitism, the definition, the ihra definition ofanti—semitism, and the definition, the ihra definition of anti—semitism, and it agreed on almost all of the examples. a decision is expected by labour's national executive council early next month. mr corbyn was also asked today about the story on the front page of at least one paper this morning, and something the home secretary sajid javid has called on him to resign over. this was his presence in 2014 at a cemetery in tunisia was the he was there as part ofa
4:24 pm
tunisia was the he was there as part of a conference bringing together the various palestinian factions, with the aim of forming a unity government is pursuing peace in the middle east. at that cemetery, at the end of the conference, mr corbyn was involved in a wreath laying ceremony to the victims of the bombing in 1985 of the palestinian liberation organisation headquarters, in which many people died. the claim he has faced is that he was also present for the laying ofa he was also present for the laying of a wreath at the graves and a plaque commemorating those who were held responsible by some for the kidnap and deaths of israeli athletes at the munich olympics in 1972, alleged members of the so—called black september group. mr corbyn said today, as he has claimed in the past, that he was there at the time, but not involved in that wreath laying. a wreath was indeed laid for some of those that attended
4:25 pm
the conference for those who were killed in paris in 1992. were you involved in that? i was present when it was late but i don't think i was involved in it. i was there because i wanted to see a fitting memorial to everyone who has died in every terrorist incident everywhere, because we have to end it. you cannot pursue peace by a cycle of violence. the only way you pursue peaceis violence. the only way you pursue peace is a cycle of dialogue. mr corbyn explaining that in his own words, and a labour party spokesperson has said the munich windows are being misled, that in response to quotes from them in the daily mail today, saying thatjeremy did not honour those responsible for the munich killings. the uk border force is repeatedly missing its target for passenger waiting times at heathrow airport, according to figures obtained by the airline virgin atlantic. on 30 out of 31 days injuly, the borderforce missed its target of a 45—minute wait or less for 95% of visitors from outside the european economic area. some passengers were left queuing for up to two and a half hours. let's speak to kathryn leahy,
4:26 pm
director of operations at heathrow airport. at the time when we are trying to persuade everybody we are open for business, a figure like this doesn't help. it doesn't, and at heathrow we are very help. it doesn't, and at heathrow we are very disappointed at the home office treatment of the border. we wa nt to office treatment of the border. we want to be absolutely clear and make the travelling public clear that this home office issue, not a heathrow issue, and unfortunately the two get mixed up by our passengers. so you agree with those who call it uk border wreath? yes, we agree with our airline partners and we want to work with the home office to ensure that every passenger coming to the uk as a welcome, and the border isn't providing that. a lot of people would say, it's a bit rich, because in america hater and a half hour queueis in america hater and a half hour queue is something to aim for, you are suspecting those passengers from
4:27 pm
outside the eea are facing queues of what? how do get around it? we are clear there is a simple answer. sajid javid could organise and arrange it tonight. that would be opening up the 60 electronic gates we have two australian, canadian and american passengers. this would allow those passengers to use the gates, and the technology that the boa rdercross gates, and the technology that the boardercross and heathrow airport have invested in to expedite their processes through the border. —— that the border force. so why does it take so long? as passenger numbers have grown over the past numbers have grown over the past number of years, the number of officials manning the border has decreased and, without the use of the technology on the electronic gates, we don't see, without increasing the people fronting the border, we don't see a means of how the home office can resolve this. it's a simple thing for sajid javid
4:28 pm
to do this evening, to allow those passengers that go to the home office agree are low risk to use the electronic gates. the airlines are angry and would suggest talking to you, and so are you. yes, we want every customer to have a great experience when they enter the uk. we are the gateway to the uk, we receive the largest number of international customers into the uk through heathrow, and we want their experience to be excellent. and you are saying people often confuse the uk border force with heathrow. does that mean you get a lot of complaints from people, some of them quite angry, i'd guess? it is our highest source of complaints at the moment, in this busy summer, and we wa nt to moment, in this busy summer, and we want to make sure we work with the home office to improve this, but we need to work quickly together, and we are asking sajid javid to do that. thank you forjoining us. don't forget, you can let us know what you think. all the ways to contact us
4:29 pm
on screen right now. we'll be reading some of those out. time for a look at the weather. here's darren. has summer gone? well, we talked about this earlier. we had a good chat about the long range forecast. igoup chat about the long range forecast. i go up stairs to my office, and they say, i didn't know simon did your ironing? that is all i got. we weren't supposed to mention that. we had a long chat over the ironing board. we move on. we move on and hopefully i will get some more positive feedback. they suggested i should take you home. i soon put them straight on that! as would i! we have a change. high pressure dominated for most of the summer and it was hot and sunny. now we have westerly winds that will bring u nsettled westerly winds that will bring unsettled weather. it looks like
4:30 pm
next week that pattern will continue. we have got the jet stream and the pressure chart and the air mass. a lot on there. what we have now is a strongerjet stream, that will continue into next week. that picks up areas of low pressure and drives them towards the uk. steering them more towards the north—west. if you're wondering where the heat has gone, that is over the near continent. we have high pressure across the azores, that tries to come into the south. that pattern is what we have been used to over the past few years in august. this is the sort of weather we have had over the sort of weather we have had over the past few years in august. so towards the end of august, into september/october, what may happen? we may find high pressure buildings backin we may find high pressure buildings back in again and we see things settling down for longer periods and some trier weather and more —— drier weather and more heat. we have the bank holiday weekend before then.
4:31 pm
and it is likely that this sort of pattern will continues into that weekend. but there is a 25% chance that it won't. 25% chance that the low pressure that is driving in off the atlantic stops and pick up the heat from spain and the humidity and it goes bang and we get thunder storms. the 75%? we will iron out the uncertainty as we get closer to the uncertainty as we get closer to the day. got to hand you that one! what is in store closer to home. we have a few thunder storms around today. a couple of weather watcher pictures. here in cambridgeshire, really angry looking cloud. we have had thunder storms here and in northern england. another picture, things look different towards the south—west. i was going to show you that. but that is later on! the radar shows the storms that we are cracking off across northern england and down to east anglia and some towards kent. for wales, the
4:32 pm
south—west and the west midlands, not as many showers. the storms are continuing tonight. especially across lincolnshire into northern england. dry in northern ireland. more cloud for scotland with some rain left over from the weekend. it is not producing the same volume of rain as these storms in northern and eastern england. they will tend to fade away slowly tonight. we will tend to dry off in scotland. some areas of cloud coming and going and some clear spells. but it is warm airand it is some clear spells. but it is warm air and it is quite muggy. temperatures tonight 12 to 14 degrees. as we look into tuesday and wednesday, we have this fronts lining up lining up into the mid—atlantic, bringing rain. high pressure is trying to push into the south—east. so we have a north—west, south—east. so we have a north—west, south—east split. for most of england and wales it will be a dry
4:33 pm
day with few showers. some fair weather cloud. and the numbers similarto weather cloud. and the numbers similar to what we're seeing today and a high in the south—east of 25 degrees. wednesday, again, the same front bringing rain across northern ireland and scotland. and across the west of england and into wales. the south—east will be dry. but there will be stronger south—westerly winds. still blowing in warm air in to eastern parts, where it will be 25 degrees. that will change. things are unsettled. the rain is on the front there. that will get pushed south—east wards across the uk as the jet stream dips south. a south—east wards across the uk as thejet stream dips south. a bit south—east wards across the uk as the jet stream dips south. a bit of rain on thursday. but the jet stream position changing draws down colder airand it will turn position changing draws down colder air and it will turn cooler and fresher on thurt. any rain in the south—east replaced by sunshine with some showers in the north—west. this is bbc news —
4:34 pm
our latest headlines. a doctor who was struck off over the death of a six—year—old boy has won her appeal to practise medicine again. dr hadiza bawa—garba was convicted of manslaughter by gross negligence in 2015 over the death of jack adcock, who died of sepsis in 2011. at the old bailey, two men are found guilty of murdering 25—year—old model harry uzoka — who died in a knife attack in shepherd's bush in january. a third man is found guilty of manslaughter. the government promises more money to eradicate homelessness in england within nine years and help deal with mental health problems and addictions, but labour says the plan doesn't go far enough. ticketmaster is closing two of its secondary ticketing websites seatwave and get me in — which allow people to offload unwanted tickets. the move is to combat touts who hike up prices. delays at passport control at heathrow left some passengers
4:35 pm
queuing for up to two and a half hours last month. a new study finds younger asians across the uk are more socially conservative on issues including sex before marriage and same—sex relationships than their peers in the rest of the population. sport now on afternoon live with ben croucher. will tiger woods be playing in the ryder cup next month? one thing we can say for sure is that he will be in paris. because he has been named as vice captain. but after two top ten finishes at the open and yesterday's pga, he could still force his way into the team as a player. they have announced the first eight members of the team. no space first eight members of the team. no 5 pa ce yet first eight members of the team. no space yet for tiger woods, but he is roaring back into form. he is up to 26th in the world and turning it on when it matters. what is important is how he has
4:36 pm
played. his game, i think the word he used was "trending". #i9d is great to see him playing well. for me the numbers are, they're nice, good to look at, but not always the most important. we want the players who are going to help us be successful. here are the picks then. three time major winner jordan speith, webb simpson, world number one dustin johnson, justin thomas, bubba watson, rickie fowler, patrick reed, and the newly crowned pga champ brooks koepka. jim furyk has a few more weeks to decide on his final four. he says he's take into account fitness and form over the year, players playing well at the minute and those pairings that will work. remember though — tiger's ryder cup record is not great. he's lost more matches than he's won down the years. but everybody would love to see him back. now british athletics. they
4:37 pm
have a new golden gird en girl and she is back from berlin. what a week it's been for dina asher—smith. remember she's just 22 years old. in the space of a week broke the british records in winning the 100 and 200 title and then stormed to victory in the relay to become the first briton to win three golds at a single europeans. she's returned to heathrow in the last couple of hours — no doubt to a few more cameras and paparrazzi than when she left for germany. she returns with her hand luggage a little heavier as well. she proudly show. definitely not used to this, i'm not the kind of person that hunts out the limelight. that is not me at all. so i don't think i will ever get used to this, but it is heart warming and nice to see not only so many people have taken an interest in athletics, but they want to see a british female do so well. that is important. england have named an unchanged squad for the third test against india starting on saturday at trent bridge. it means there's no
4:38 pm
place for ben stokes — who is on trial for affray at bristol crown court. his replacement chris woakes retains his place after a maiden test century at lord's. seamerjamie porter is also named with moeen ali to contend with adil rashid for the spinners berth. twin brothers adam and simon yates will race together at this month's vuelta a espana for their australian team mitchelton scott. simon — who led the giro d'italia earlier this year — was always scheduled to take part in the final grand tour of the season and will be team leader in the race. adam though also decided to ride to add to his experience of competing in three week races after a modest performance in the tour de france. the race starts in malaga on the 25th august. and finallly. .. if you've got a fear of heights — this may be the time to look away. that is mont blanc. that is the fearsome north face the grandes jorasses. that there is swiss extreme
4:39 pm
mounteneer dani arnold. mountaineer dani arnold. he's set a new speed record climbing to the top. all 4,208 metres of it. he passed teams using ropes that had set off the previous evening to complete the climb in two hours and four minutes. hejust has he just has the eiger to go. hejust has the eiger to go. i will silly getting out breath the next timei silly getting out breath the next time i climb the stairs. more for you in the next hour. now on afternoon live, let's go nationwide and see what's happening around the country — in our daily visit to the bbc newsrooms around the uk. let's go to mary rhodes who is in birmingham where west midlands police have begun a campaign to clamp down on illegal vehicle chop—shops. have to be careful how i say that. i will be with you in a moment to find out what it is. and carol malia is in newcastle for us where she's had the plessure of speaking to one
4:40 pm
young girl who's battled against the odds to achieve her dream, of becoming a cheerleader. i will be with you in a moment. chop shops, a big problem, car crime where you are. this isn'tjust a case of stealing a car and selling it on? no it is not that straight forward. neither is a chop shop. car theft has doubled in the last four yea rs. theft has doubled in the last four years. business business from 5,000 in 2014 to more than 10,000 in the last 12 months. police believe part of the reason for the increase is because they're being used for spare parts to repair legitimate insurance write offs. the police raided a car ya rd write offs. the police raided a car yard today and police found at least one stolen car and made three arrests. they seized all the vehicles. stolen vehicles are broken down at these so—called chop shops, sometimes in a matter of hours in back street garages or industrial
4:41 pm
estate unit and the repaired write offs are sold at a vast profit. . when they break down the vehicles for the parts, they need somewhere to operate from and that might be a back street garage or an industrial unit. something like this premises that we're at today. we call these chop shops. we are launching a campaign today to shop a chop shop and asking for the community to let us know where the suspicious activity is. it might be unusual hours of operating, vehicles that come in and don't go out. anything that raises suspicion we would like to know. shop a chop shop, that is catchy! what can be done to stop this? police are lobbying the government to make it harderfor insurers to sell fixable write—off vehicles. they're mainly luxury makes and they‘ re vehicles. they're mainly luxury makes and they're sold at auction as
4:42 pm
fixable write—offs, rather than write—offs to be scrapped. because it is still registered there is no way of telling if it was repaired with parts from a stolen one. the police say if anyone sees a vehicle for sale at a bargain price to be be ware. because if it is looks too good to be true, it probably is. cops launch shop a chop shop. i can't do it. i haven't written the headline that way. it is because it is very difficult to say! indeed! carol, you have been meeting an amazing young lady? she is and no tongue twisters in this. which have been hearing from nicha who was born
4:43 pm
prematurely with part of her leg missing. she had a big dream to become a cheerleader. now, she had a look around and she was able to join the hartlepool hawks cheer leading academy who, have brought her on so well and this is her now and she is absolutely loving it. it's really just what i have been wanting to do for a long time and i have been thinking i could make a nice career out of it and to inspire others and it means a lot. for other people to be sitting down and saying, i can't do this, they can look at me and they can say, well, i can do it, because if she can, i can do it. wow! the hard work is not over yet? no, you can tell she is a sensible young girland she no, you can tell she is a sensible young girl and she is only 11. but she did take a break from the cheer leading, because she found that she couldn't go upside down at first and
4:44 pm
took a break and said, couldn't go upside down at first and tooka break and said, ok, iwill try and practice this at home and thatis try and practice this at home and that is what she did and applied herself and when she was confident enough, she went back and amazed all of the coaches there and now she is of the coaches there and now she is of course on the team and we are hoping, she hasjoined up with fitness classes to strengthen her arms and compensate for that part of her leg that needs support and we're hoping there more competitions ahead. because she is doing brilliantly. i love this slot, because these are stories you don't normally see. she is amazing. she is and she will inspire others we hope. ple nty and she will inspire others we hope. plenty more at 6.30 on bbc one. mary, i won't even try it again. that is it. that is nationwide. thank you. if you would like to see more on those stories, you can access them
4:45 pm
through the bbc iplayer and we go nationwide every afternoon on afternoon live. artificial intelligence can diagnose eye disease as accurately as some of the world's leading experts. research by moorfields eye hospital in london and the google company deepmind, found that a machine could learn how to read complex eye scans and detect more than 50 types of disease. our medical correspondent fergus walsh reports. it is quite bright... on the brink of going blind, elaine's sight was saved by doctors at this hospital. this scan showed she needed urgent treatment. there is a growth of about normal blood vessels. now artificial intelligence, machines, have learned how to interpret these images. a computer analysed a thousand patient scans using a set of rules and was able to detect over
4:46 pm
50 eye conditions and did not miss a single urgent case. this is a jaw—dropping result and i think it will make most eye specialists gasp, because you know we have shown that this algorithm is as good as some of the world's leading experts in interpreting the scans. using artificial intelligence to diagnose eye disease could be a game—changer, because at present doctors are swamped by the number of scans they have to read and some patients go blind before they get treated. can i see the leaves, the detail isn't sharp. 200 people a day in the uk like elaine develop the blinding form of age—related macular degeneration. she only has vision in her right eye and welcomes the advent of artificial intelligence in health care. it is extraordinary, it
4:47 pm
is absolutely brilliant. people will be empowered, because their sight will be saved through this artificial intelligence. and they won't be disabled by not having sight at all. google's london led quarters is home to its artificial intelligence company dean mind. they developed the algorithm and are researching ia's use in other health conditions. we are looking at eye disease and how you would plan radiotherapy treatment, because it can take specialists up to eight hours to plan a treatment and also whether we can use artificial intelligence to identify breast cancers intelligence to identify breast cancers better and earlier. artificial intelligence will have a profound impact in health care. speeding up die know sis and freeing
4:48 pm
—— diagnosis and freeing up clinicians to spend time with patients. but many will not be happy with a company like google having access to their data. that data protection will have to be embedded in what they do. the eye research results are so promising that artificial intelligence looks likely to play a key role in the nhs within just a few years. ben is here with the business news in a moment. first the business news in a moment. first the headlines: a doctor who was struck off over the death of a six—year—old boy has won her appeal to practise medicine again. the murder of 25—year—old model harry uzoka — two men are found guilty at the old bailey. new action on homelessness — the government says it wants to make rough sleeping a thing of the past, but where is the promised £100 million coming from? here's your business
4:49 pm
headlines on afternoon live. turkey's central bank has said it is ready to take "all necessary measures" to ensure financial stability after the collapse of the lira. it has vowed to provide banks with "all the liquidity" they need. this is all after a worsening diplomatic row with the us prompted market turmoil in the country. mike ashley's sports direct is facing calls to boost payments to out—of—pocket house of fraser suppliers. sports direct bought the 59—store department store chain on friday for £90 million, just hours after it went into administration. some suppliers expect to be paid almost nothing for what they are owed. but philip day, who also wanted to buy house of fraser, says mr ashley should pay suppliers — who are said to be owed £70 million — "in full". shares in bayer — the german pharmaceuticals and chemicals giant — have fallen more than 10%. today is the first time they've been traded since an american court ruled that one of monsanto's weedkillers
4:50 pm
was linked to a man's cancer on friday and ordered it to pay damages of nearly $300 million. bayer completed its takeover of monsanto in june. monsanto denies the cancer link and says it will appeal. it seems, ben, that whatever turkey says, the lira continues to fall? yes, investors seem unconvinced by the rather defiant talk coming out of ankara. turkey's president talks about his country not being defeated by what he calls "economic war". but the turkish currency has fallen further today. this is after it fell on friday when president trump doubled tariffs on metal imports to the us from turkey. various reasons for that — partly because turkey had retaliated to the initial import tariffs, and partly over a row about a detained american preacher in turkey. the turkish central bank has promised it will give commercial
4:51 pm
banks all the liquidity, the cash, they need, but that hasn't calmed the nerves of investors. it's having an impact on travel company shares — we'll get more on that shortly. it's been a tough time for the high street, hasn't it? it normally benefits from warm weather, but it seems it's been too warm! yes, we don't tend to want to go to the shops when it's cold and rainy. but, during the heatwave, it seems people have been going out but not to the high street. just having a nice time outside. yes perhaps not spending anything at all. the trade body the british retail co says there was a 0.8% annual drop in the number of people visiting shops last month. tesla — the electric car maker — is back in the headlines with more on the plan to go private? they're gaining strength these
4:52 pm
rumours. yes elon musk, the founder, has outlined his plan to take tesla private and said he discussed financing the deal with saudi arabia. he said he'd need to raise far less than the $70 billion it has been estimated he would need. mr musk announced on twitter on 7th august that he was considering taking tesla private — adding, "funding secured". since then, he has been facing questions about where he would obtain the funding for his proposed $420 a share offer. his latest announcement comes just days after investors filed a lawsuit claiming that he misled the market. there's a lot more detail on this story online — bbc.co.uk/business. . now markets and get some reaction to the stories which were talking about. joining us now is monique wong, senior portfolio manager at coutts. first the situation in turkey. the
4:53 pm
lira falling further today. making back some losses, but still falling. what do investors want to hear? i'm going to say that turkey is a an ied idiosyncratic story and it is no reflecting the global economy. this started with a diplomatic spat, but turkey already had challenging economic conditions, it has a current account deficit, like the us. but unlike the united states it has inflation at 16% and a central bank that can't act in a timely manner, because the president thinks higher interest will increase inflation. so it means more
4:54 pm
extensive measures, more than what has been put in place. i know the central bank has said it will do what it takes, but we haven't seen any serious measures put on the table. the market wants to see a five to 6% rise in interest rates and more fiscal consolidation and some resolution on the political front, both of the leaders sitting down. we are not seeing that. i think they will come to it eventually. but things may get worse before they get better. some people have said a weak lira makes for good cheap holidays to turkey. why is the share price in tui falling? you're right, it should be a cheaper lira will entice uk customers, travellers, because we have a weak sterling and not a lot of countries you can go to for cheap holidays. so travel shares took a hit and tui was
4:55 pm
down 2.5% on fears that the the turkish economy will collapse. that is not the central scenario. i painted a negative picture, but we are not there there. tui in particular, it owns turkish assets and most of its turkish hotels that will have been prebooked and paid in sterling and tui have euro—dominated contracts to take way the currency volatility like it is experiencing now and its cost base, which is in lira, that is lowered. soitd is a gut response from —— so it is a gut response from the market and i don't think it is right. thank you. the market down across europe. that
4:56 pm
is the picture. mostly because of the turkey concerns weighing on the market. there is a the cac figure or a computer glitch? a good question. i will check. thank you for finding it. thanks, ben. that is it from your afternoon live time. now time for the weather. sunshine is limited today. we are seeing more showers breaking out as well. temperatures through the afternoon into the early evening probably near average for the time of year. so 19 or 20 central belt of scotland into northern ireland, low 20s in england and wales. quite a few showers on the eastern side of the uk. some heavy and thundery. slowly decaying into the latter part of evening. any damp weather easing a way from scotland. so it becomes dry tonight. afair bit scotland. so it becomes dry tonight. a fair bit of cloud coming in from the west and a warm night. temperatures 12 to 15 degrees. as we
4:57 pm
head into tomorrow, we will find most of any rain in the north—west, perhaps in northern ireland and western parts of scotland and eastern scotland not seeing much rain. england and wales likely to have a dry day. a fair bit of sunshine to begin with, with increasing cloud. warm in the south—east and the temperatures not changing much further north. today at 5 — a doctor who was struck off over the death of a six—year—old boy wins her appeal to practise medicine again. jack adcock died of sepsis. dr hadiza bawa—garba was convicted of manslaughter by gross negligence thousands of doctors signed an open letter of support for dr bawa—garba. signed an open letter this afternoon she again apologised for his death. iam i am truly sorry for this and i will
4:58 pm
live with this for the rest of my life. we'll have the latest from the court of appeal in central london. and we'll be talking to dr cecily cunningham, from the doctors association uk, to find out what the ruling means for the nhs. the other main stories on bbc news at 5... the murder of 25—year—old model harry ozkau. two men are found guilty at the old bailey.
4:59 pm
5:00 pm

25 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on