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tv   Outside Source  BBC News  August 16, 2018 9:00pm-10:01pm BST

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hello, i'm karin giannone, this is outside source. she was the queen of soul. # find out me. the world of music pays it's respects, to aretha franklin, who has died age 76. tributes are pouring in for a singer whose career spanned seven decades, and racked up 18 grammys along the way. and two days after the bridge collapse italy's government turns its anger on the company that ran it, saying its putting profit before the victims. a judge has sent for trial in malaysia the two women accused of using nerve gas to poison the half—brother of the north korean leader kim jong un. we'll be bringing you all the reaction online to the death of aretha franklin, you can tweet us your thoughts too at @bbcos. the queen of soul, aretha franklin, has died from pancreatic
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cancer, at the age of 76. with a career spanning seven decades, she sold more than 75 million records and won many awards, including 18 grammys. she was the first woman to make the rock and roll hall of fame. let's take a look at her extraordinary life, here's david sillito. here is the queen of the rhythm and blues, aretha franklin! here she is. # looking out on the morning rain. i was born and raised in detroit and warner music. raised on her music. it isa
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warner music. raised on her music. it is a sad day. i will miss seeing her in concert. i still have her music to live on. i am good. she had the best voice. when she sung, you could fill it in your soul. she always saw the something positive and nice. i rememberas a kid, growing up in the 60s, he had vertigo. she feels like family. —— you vertigo. she feels like family. —— you pay vertigo. she feels like family. —— you pay for her to go. the final co nsta ble/ you pay for her to go. the final constable/ her. her health was failing with the voice was still there. the song, the anthem that ca ptu red there. the song, the anthem that captured everything about her. miss aretha franklin didn't ask for respect.
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she commanded it. and for the generation that followed, she was the benchmark for soul. # just a little bit. her legacy a moment such as these, the funeral of martin luther king. and here, the inauguration for the first black american president. this is music to help define pivotal moments in history. and the emotional charge gained from her childhood in gospel and the church, listening to herfather‘s preaching. it certainly served as a testing ground for me as a singer as well as many other good things came from the church. # you are no good. # you are a liar and a cheat.
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but there was also another side to her. one of her producers describe it as a mystery sorrow. she lost her mother at ten and she had two children by 16. but in public,... she always predicted strength and after a career dip in the 70s, she bounced back in the 805. to measure hereby awards. —— it will be wrong to mention hereby awards. that kid catches it. this was soul music, hardship and sorrow turned into beauty and hope. aretha franklin, the queen of soul.
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david sillito there. joining me now, live from new york, is david browne, from rolling stone magazine. welcome. there have been many great soul singers but what aretha franklin apart? as somebody mentioned, the amazing power of her voice. she had one of the most single voices and pop music. i think it brought the church into pop radio in that for a lot of us, it was the first time we heard gospel music in a way. gospel music syncing but an p0p a way. gospel music syncing but an pop songs. within incredible power and personality behind it. no matter what she was singing, whether it was
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gospel what she was singing, whether it was gospel, pop, her 86, what she was singing, whether it was gospel, pop, her86, disco songs, he a lwa ys gospel, pop, her86, disco songs, he always knew it was her. as soon as the voice came in. it didn't matter what the backing is. not many fingers could do what she did. was it what you would say the move to atla ntic it what you would say the move to atlantic records, 1966 and then respect in 1967 which really propelled her into the stratosphere? a totally dead. of the tevez she was with another label as she was sinking more conventional music in the seaside to atlantic and her first song was i never love a man the way i love you, she recorded respect soon after that. completely reva m p respect soon after that. completely revamp their sound as it was more funkier and more soulful and also hit with the civil rights movement at the time. i don't think it was planned but respect became this kind of anthem for that movement and for women and to this day, but she is
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the sort of person who was so connected at the times. she is somebody who toured as a teenager with martin luther king jr as a singer and acquire with them and she staying at his memorial and she sang at obama's the first inauguration, somebody who witnessed history. we witnessed it to. stay with me david — because i want to read some of the tributes for aretha franklin. the obamas have released thisjoint statement, saying she ‘defined the american experience. they also said "in her voice, we could feel our history, all of it and in every shade. she helped us feel more connected to eachother, more hopeful, more human. and sometimes she helped just forget about eveyrthing else and dance. twitter is covered in tributes — elton john led them. and paul mccartney...
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data from the famous water source. —— that is from famous celebrities. david — beyond the world of global stars — what did ordinary people lose today with aretha franklin? what a startling about all the attributes is so interesting in these times in which we live, so polarising as how beloved she was by everybody. it didn't matter where you came from. you related to her in a way and i think that was an important aspect. she was on one hand this regal queen of soul, and everybody call service franklin, on the other hand she seemed as very human. she went to a lot of problems, marital problems and health issues. —— everybody call her mrs. franklin. her career was up—and—down, yet she is seem to make a more normal. everybody can relate
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to her struggles, no matter what they were. she seems like somebody you would want to hang outwith. laughter how much of what aretha franklin did will lavigne now in the music of today that you are reporting and writing about everyday? you hear rid and younger singers, picking up the mantle. —— you hear it and younger singers. despite i think part of her legacy is despite the records of music is made and how much more sophisticated and electronic idiots and terms, it really co m es and electronic idiots and terms, it really comes down to so many ways of voice and personality of the voice that can come right at you. and connect with due on a personal level. that is the legacy of her records and the younger artists like
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adele who are taking it to the next generation and aretha franklin even covered rolling in the deep. it was a nice thing. thank you, david. thank you, david. in a statement, aretha franklin's family described this as "one of the darkest moments of their lives." they also thanked all her fans for their support, many of whom have been visiting the detroit church where she first started singing. aleem maqbool is there. outside the new bethel baptist church which is where once people were drawn to it because they heard of this incredible young singer, this little girl with this powerful once—in—a—lifetime voice and an average on here when aretha franklin was a star because she would come and sing here and give everybody a food as well but over the last week people have been drawn to this church because of vigils and hearing that she was in a serious condition and now they come to lay tributes and many have been driving past, playing aretha and talking about how
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much she means to them. we heard in the statement from the family that aretha franklin died of advanced pancreatic cancer, it is clear that she had been ill for many years but it was not something she wanted to talk about but she cancelled so many concerts because of ill health and she lost so much weight the people knew that something was wrong but when she did perform, right until the end, she absolutely gave her all and we heard from eltonjohn and he performed with aretha franklin at her last concert at the end of last year at an aids benefit concert. he said that he was moved to tears and that is what she did concert after concert because of the power in her voice and also in the way she conveyed emotion but it was more than just about the music industry. she had an impact. we talk about a lot in those terms in the way
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that she sang one beat back and changed the way people sing. the diversity of the songs that she sang from gospel to jazz, the blues and pop, she had a bigger impact than that. barack obama talked about her making you forget about everything and just dancing and we spoke to people who lived in the very streets who said during the civil rights movements, she was the kind of voice that could make you do that and make you forget about that and she was heavily linked with the civil rights movement, her father was a good friend of martin luther king. so, it is clear from all of the people we have spoken to that this was a woman who not only changed the music industry, but in doing what she did and becoming a successful black woman in the 1960s, she also changed the face of this country as a whole. stay with us on outside source — still to come... two suspects are sent for trial in malaysia accused of poisoning the half—brother of the north korean leader kim jong un with nerve agent, they could face the death penalty if found guilty. it's a level results day in england,
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wales and northern ireland. more than one in four entries were awarded the top grades. and they will have to go through clearing. keep calm is the motto. there's plenty of places out there. think carefully, take your time, and try and sort your way through all of the options. it is quite a difficult year because as your piece implied beforehand, there are quite a few seductive offers out there. but there are still some very good universities looking for some very good students. it is all about the person. grades matter. they are really important. the important thing you need on the telephone is your ucast number and some information about your grades because people need to quickly help you evaluate but after that, it can be a very personal matter and you should have a number of quite detailed conversations
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with academics, there's an opportunity to visit us and have a look around and make a decision in a slow and reasonably measured way. this is outside source live from the bbc newsroom. our lead story is: tributes are pouring in for aretha franklin, the queen of soul. her career spanned seven decades — and racked up 18 grammys along the way. let me give you an update on the genoa bridge disaster. the ramifications of what happened when the bridge collapsed. the italian government has intensified its attack on the bridge operator, blaming it for tuesday's deadly collapse that killed 38 people. 15 are in hospital, five of them are critically injured. autostrade per l'italia is the company in charge of the bridge maintenance, it denies accusations that it was negligent. but the italian government wants to terminate its contract,
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and is threatening a $170 million fine. at one point in morning trading, shares in its holding company, atlantia, fell almost 30%. the flags outside autostrade's head office was at half mast toda, but italy's deputy prime minister has accused the company of being disrespectful to the victims. he was talking tough about it today. translation: permit me to say this, politically, that while we are still trying to ascertain the number of victims to check on the health of those injured, help businesses under the bridge was damaged, while all of this is happening, the company is telling us that they are still entitled to the revenue that they will lose when we end their contracts. and this is so shameful. could they spare a word for the victims? on a day like today, of all days, still thinking of their profit and their numbers on the stock market.
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today, the chief prosecutor in genoa said there are still up to 20 people missing, so we're expecting the number of dead to rise further. and that means the search mission continued all night, and into its third day. sniffer dogs are still being used. i want to show you this — because while there's a lot of activity under the bridge — on what remains of it — it's almost like it's been fozen in time — you can see the cars and trucks that came to an abrupt stop — their drivers and passenger so lucky. there are also fears that this part of the bridge could also crumble without warning. today authorities widened the evacuation zone — meaning more than 600 people who live nearby had to leave their homes. they just don't theyjust don't know how secure the remaining part of the bridge is. the rescuers‘ work is highly risky, here's the commander of the italian fire brigade, explaining how difficult it is. translation: we are still looking
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in the cavities that may or may not house the survivors. that is the purpose of our search activities. this type of work is dangerous because the rubble is unstable. site conditions must be continuously monitored to ensure reasonable safety for the crews. the part of the bridge that is still being is controlled by the technicians in order to avoid major risk for the rescuers. and there are still amazing stories of survival being told. the driver of this crumpled truck escaped just with a broken arm, listen to his story. translation: i had just arrived under the bridge, opened the door to get out and i heard an explosion. i turned and i was thrown through the air and hit a wall and i lost my breath.
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the blast of air that had thrown me backwards saved my life. danjohnson is in genoa, and filed this report. the recovery work is still going on here because the local chief prosecutor said today that they believe there are at least ten, maybe 20 people who are still missing and unaccounted for. that is why the teams are still at work sifting through the rubble trying to work out where those people may be so that they can get some answers to their families. already there is an intense political debate as answers are saught to the cause of this disaster. the reasons why that bridge collapsed in such spectacular and devastating style. and the blame is being pinned fairly and squarely on the company that is in of charge italy's motorways. the politicians across the italian government right to the top and prime minister saying that company has to take responsibility for the maintenance of the bridge. alleging that the company hasn't lived up to its responsibilities. there have been calls
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for the chief executives for the chief executives and management to resign and to give up their position. also plans to publish the contracts that the state had with that company so that everybody can see what the financial arrangements were. there have been calls for the company to be more open about the way it makes its profits in the way it pays his taxes because the deputy prime minister said that they charged the highest tolls in europe and yet pays no tax by basis itself in luxembourg. the company itself has said it is all too early to reach these sort of conclusions because investigation work hasn't hasn't even begun here. it says it did keep a regular maintenance on that bridge. but there are also people here waiting for news about missing loved ones and the people do want to know exactly what went on here but it will be a long time before the recovery work here is finished and before we get proper answers through an investigation. the two women accused of killing the estranged half—brother of north korean leader kim jong un will stand trialfor murder.
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this is them. aisyah in the top there is from indonesia — and this is vietnamese national twong. they're accused of smearing a toxic nerve agent on kim jong—nam's face in kuala lumpur last year. both strongly deny the allegations. these pictures came into the newsroom today. you can see the two suspects walking out of court — surrounded by security. ms twong has her head covered. you can just see siti aisyah behind her. she's led into a different car. both women, who are in their 20s, could face malaysia's harshest punishment — the death penalty, if they're convicted. the pair claim to be the victims of an elaborate north korean plot to kill mr kim — and thought they were taking part in a tv prank when they approached him. their lawyer stressed their innocence outside court today. we are still very confident we have a good defence. it does not mean the
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judge has found guilty. that means at the stages that the judge there's at the stages that the judge there's a proper case in the case must proceed another course was to hear oui’ proceed another course was to hear our version of the story. —— and the court wa nts our version of the story. —— and the court wants to hear our version. kim jong nam's death is likely to go down as one of the most notorious in history. remember what happened back in february last year — he was approached by the two suspects in the departure lounge here in kuala lumpur airport. he was due to board a flight for macau — where he was living in exile. the attack was over within minutes and cctv footage captured it all. one woman placed her hands over his face before walking away. it's not too clear from these pictures but the person circled to the left is mr kim and the one on the right — is one of the suspects. this happened next. mr kim asks staff for help. we learned later that he tells them a chemical has been sprayed on him. twenty minutes later he was dead. it was later found that he'd been exposed to vx, one of the most toxic
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of all known chemical agents. theories circulated instantly of possible north korean involvement. four other men — believed to be north koreans who left malaysia the day of the murder — were also been charged but have never been found. today the judge said there was enough evidence to suggest it was a "a well—planned conspiracy between the women and the four north koreans at large". their families disagree. translation: we were shocked that the court ruling today. people said she might want free today but it is not the case. we are very sad. i don't know what else to do today. —— might want. death penalty or not i would urge the authorities to have a fair trial with the right people in the bright charges, the ones who are the bright charges, the ones who are the true criminals, let's have them paste trial, too. my daughter, she doesn't know anything. —— let's have them face trial two. the defense trial is likely to take months — and will be held sometime between november and february. more now from jonathan
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head in kuala lumpur. many people looked at the way the prosecution put this case, putting to death and a october competent. pretend pre—manner. saying these women were assassins. very serious crime and effect when you listen to the what the prosecution put the case it doesn't really add up. there is very compelling evidence that the women indeed believed they were embarking on a career as pranksters and paid. a lot of evidence that will come out and trial, but the judge clearly didn't fill he could downgrade the charge and they are the only people so far to go on trial for this the only people so far to go on trialfor this crime. the only people so far to go on trial for this crime. malaysia was an affect strong on by north korea which held some of his own diplomats hostage and to north koreans here who may have been involved in those four who were charged along with the blood of the same time. they don't have anybody else they can put on trial. also the thoughts ofjenny calendar
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from 38 north, a organisation that monitors north korean developments. the question is will the malaysian government be more of all, try and push for more, with the human rights community start to be more vocal about this in the future. especially if it looks like the women are going to get convicted. i think there are a number of issues here, that it is ha rd to a number of issues here, that it is hard to tell how they will play out and until we see some of how they defend themselves and how it is received and how much or how little the attention does go on to the north korean involvement and the north korean involvement and the north koreans were not on trial again. returning to our top story — the death of the queen of soul — aretha franklin, who has died of pancreatic cancer at the age of 76. i'll leave you with this iconic performance at the kennedy centre honours in 2015 — and be back in a few minutes when outside source returns. # ijust # i just want to
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# ijust want to be... # ijust want to be... # yoo me fill # yoo me fill # yoo me fill # yoo refill like a natural woman. # yoo refill like a natural woman. # yoo refill like a natural woman. # you make me feel like a natural woman. # woman. ifeel like # woman. i feel like a # woman. ifeel like a natural woman. cheering # ifeel like a natural woman. good evening just about all of us
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have seen a bit of rain over the last day or so. at that rate has cleared through it is ushering in quite a change in the field of the weather. the room of the and skies brightened and we saw some sunshine and happy showers. but we started to get into much cooler fresher much coolerfresher air. here is our band of cloud that brought the rain. speckled clouds racing behind it. pretty ha p py speckled clouds racing behind it. pretty happy showers but in every of much cooler fresher pretty happy showers but in every of much coolerfresher air pretty happy showers but in every of much cooler fresher air working across the country. however, lying in wait in the electric is another area of warm air and that is heading oui’ area of warm air and that is heading our way. for most, this cooler fresher field is only temporary, but it will give us some significant lower temperatures and that. clear spells for many, still showers across parts of the north and the west but even in the towns and cities, nine or 10 degrees in the countryside. a really cool start early on small but a bright star for many and the best of the rain is
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moving into the afternoon will be reserved for use in scotland and southeast england in the chennai list because for the west we see increasing amount of cloud and some patchy rain into northern ireland. baby do what someone else but quite breezy wherever you are and across the far north and for many stick with aquila pressure pill but notice temperatures already beginning to creep up. a sign of what's to come. the patchy rain moving into west about courtesy of his warm front and that brings with it some warmer air from the atlantic. the north of the country is going to stay in cool air, separated from the warm air by air, separated from the warm air by a weather front which on stated they just brutal israel brown across parts of northern highlands of scotland. a bit of rain at times to the north of that. —— willjust wiggle his way around across parts. it will be increasingly humid. 25 degrees in london. for sunday, a lot of called across the southern half
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of called across the southern half of the uk in operation of rain moving through. parts of wales, midlands and northern england. northern scotland sticking out into sunshine and to send signed an optical sight but further south pretty humid and quite misty and murky as well. for the weekend, some rain at times and all the time at a humid filth for many. —— and a humid field for many. hello, i'm karin giannone, this is outside source. she was the queen of soul. #reseect. the world of music pays it's respects, to aretha franklin, who has died age 76. tributes are pouring in for a singer whose career spanned seven decades, and racked up 18 grammys along the way. and two days after the bridge collapse italy's government turns its anger on the company that ran it, saying its putting profit before the victims. in the united states 300 newspapers defend press freedoms against the white house.
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donald trump responds saying the media is the real opposition party in us politics. and we'll disover the secret recipe the ancient egyptians used to embalm mummies, that's all coming up on outside source. the queen of soul, aretha franklin, has died from pancreatic cancer, at the age of 76. with a career spanning seven decades, she sold more than 75 million records and won many awards, including 18 grammys. she was the first woman to make the rock and roll hall of fame. i have been speaking to the washington post i find pop—culture writer. she summarise the importance in the world of music. there is no one like her, there is
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no one in american popular culture like are performing today. she laid the groundwork for so many artists i came after her. truly we would not have anyone from beyonc to ushered to maryj blight. none of these artists we would have if not for the foundation laid by aretha franklin. she crossed over from gospel foundation laid by aretha franklin. she crossed overfrom gospel and pop and later ground in the genre without abandoning the roots. this is the music magazine nme‘s tribute to her, "an icon for feminism, the civil rights movement and the greatest soul singer of her generation." and tributes have been pouring in from all those areas she touched on. bonnie greer is a playwright and commentator here in the uk, she came to the studio earlier. i began by asking her what we'd lost. these days, 76 is not in old age any more i am happy to say. so she went to soon. and... it was quite quick
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for all of us, no one really knew besides herfamily. for all of us, no one really knew besides her family. what for all of us, no one really knew besides herfamily. what had been lost was a great voice and a great musician. and a great gatherer of strength and away. i grew up around her and for me she was always the linchpin, the thing that you went back to to look at. and she sounded like you sounded inside yourself when you sing to yourself. that is what she sounded like. she inspired, gave comfort and solace to young black women going up. in the 60s, there were all kinds of different people, there were not a lot of women involved who were forward, involved in the civil rights movement because it was mainly male lead. that she was actively involved because her father was but lead. that she was actively involved because herfather was but she lead. that she was actively involved because her father was but she sang the movement. she gave us the mood,
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the movement. she gave us the mood, the music of it and of our womanhood as well because not only was it about fighting for freedom as a people but for us it was also fighting for read him as women, as black women. she gave us the shapes, sounds, the attitude, all of it. you say she was not an activist but her music... her music was the fuel. she was ina music... her music was the fuel. she was in a sense, she in the african culture, this kind of person who sang stories. she sang the stories and the things that were inside a bus that maybe we could not articulate or did not want to. was a lwa ys articulate or did not want to. was always there, she was home base. how much was some of the hardship in her early life, coming out in her singing and giving the passion...m is one of the things in a sad way that made her so endearing in a
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sense. because she was that made her so endearing in a sense. because she was like the community and away, all the travails of black women, even now, are silently born and she did silently bear those but we dread the loss in her voice and we knew that she was speaking what we could not, what the community could not say. and because of that and she was a great pianist —ite want to stress at. she played back the things that we... i think the community could not say or was afraid to say because the african—american community and i think most black communities are very proper. very... there is protocol, conservatives —— conservative and there are things you do not say or express. we say what has been lost today but what has been gained ? what has been lost today but what has been gained? appreciation i
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think for younger people of who she really was, of the time we are in now which is not a great time. but also the kind of going back now to stay. people are going to look back and see what arcs her music covered. so the 60s in the 70s in the 80s and the 90s and she sing with everybody and she covered everybody. she sang her own song so to see how she was able... she was the first woman to wina grammy. able... she was the first woman to win a grammy. all of these things. this generation will be able to see all the accomplishments that she made. in her death we have a new life. we are going to have now the era, who will pick up the baton and carry it. i think there are quite a few candidates for that. you tweeted today that you would love to have her wheeled out and sing for the first black president... she has a beautiful song and that is what she
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is doing now, she is still with us and we will never lose aretha, ever. this was the boston globe's front page today. "journalists are not the enemy." it had asked other news outlets to coordinate similar editorials with them, more than 300 obliged. this is the new york times, "a free press needs you". this is the new york post, "we'll keep reporting." itsjoining in is significant because they're a pro—trump tabloid, and if you hadn't already guessed, this campaign is targeted at donald trump's attacks on the press. the editorials today provoked another one. from donald trump... "the fake news media is the opposition party. it is very bad for our great country. but we are winning!" and as you'll see from this next montage, that sort of rhetoric is very much in character. because they are the fake, fake, disgusting news. and it was not
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until it became a politician that i realised how nasty, how mean, how vicious and how fake the press can be. as the camera start going off in the background. where are you from? bbc. impartial, free and fair. they do not report the facts. you are fa ke do not report the facts. you are fake news. thank you everybody. does everybody like the press? no! . do you think the media is pierre? no! —— do you think the media is fair. the topeka capital—journal was another pro—trump newspaper to join the campaign. it said of mr trump's attack on the media: "it's sinister. it's destructive. and it must end now."
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some news outlets didn't take part, the wall streetjournal being a notable exception. and the conservative website townhall.com called the globe's initiative a "pathetic bid to pretend it is still relevant." let's go over to chris buckler in washington. tell us about the message that these 300 media outlets we re message that these 300 media outlets were trained to send together? when you take a look at it, this is the new york times and their editorial at the top but it is surrounded by many other of the editorials from 300 plus papers that were taking pa rt 300 plus papers that were taking part in this whole initiative today. what strikes you when you take a look through them is that they are all giving slightly different messages. they are giving their own ta ke messages. they are giving their own take but what is fundamental is they are saying that the anti—press rhetoric from donald trump needs to stop. the new york times for example does not actually mentioned him at all but they do mention thomas jefferson but there are others, from the dispatch saying very clearly that donald trump is inflicting
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irreparable damage to democracy with these attacks. there are big and small papers taking part in this. in indiana, it says even as a small family owned newspaper we have a platform to express the phrase enemy of the people, we never have been and never will be, we're here to report the facts. get the sense from some of the papers, some in small communities that they want to make the point that they are part of the people rather than being the end of the people. stay with us. just want to bring up the results of a recent poll, which are relevant. it suggested that 51% of republican voters now believed the media to be "the enemy of the people rather than an important part of democracy" and 52% of the republican supporters polled were not concerned that mr trump's criticism would lead to violence against journalists. that's similar to an ipsos poll released earlier this month too. and i am just wondering how much concern there is among journalists that they are increasingly
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vulnerable and increasingly becoming targets ? vulnerable and increasingly becoming targets? i think there is a deep concern. i think when you have been to rallies and stand there at eight donald trump rally and have people getting very angry at the media and chanting, particularly cnn, and there are people who come forward and make threatening remarks and make threatening messages at a number of reporters in particular. i think there is a feeling that some of the rhetoric does need to be called. but the truth is when you ta ke called. but the truth is when you take a look at the figures, it shows that his message is striking what ever reason why, with some of those republican voters. he sees that fake news message as a campaigning tool. and has been useful in dismissing u nfortu nate facts for and has been useful in dismissing unfortunate facts for him, things he does not like. yet is saying it time and again to dismiss stories that he
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doesn't like as opposed to ones that are not true and i suppose he will continue to do so. though the survey may be worrying, it may be something that says that his supporters on his side. hopes of him changing this tactic and dropping this rhetoric against the media are pretty low? you mentioned his tweet today already, the fake news is the opposition party and says that we are winning. thank you very much. stay with us on outside source, still to come... the secret of the ancient egyptians modification process has been revealed. the recipe is much older than previously thought. —— ancient egyptians' mummification process. the england rugby international danny cipriani has been fined £2,000 after pleading guilty to common assault and resisting arrest after an incident in a nightclub onjersey in the early hours of wednesday morning.
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three other charges, assault on police, larceny and being disorderly on licensed premises were dropped. the 30—year—old fly—half has apologised and say he's "mortified" by his actions. his future in the england team now hangs in the balance. just last week he vowed to "do everything" to remain in the england set—up. robert hall reports from jersey. reporter: danny, will you apologise for your actions? once again, danny cipriani was running the gauntlet of the cameras for an incident off the pitch. another cloud to hang low over a troubled playing career. this episode opened during a night out during a training trip tojersey. at a seafront bar, cipriani, who admitted having too much to drink, was involved in a confrontation with door staff during which he tried to grab the doorman's body mounted camera. after leaving the club, mr cipriani encountered a female police officer who was aware of that altercation. when she attempted to arrest him, he resisted. there was a brief scuffle during which she was slightly
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hurt and eventually, with the help of a second officer and watched by a small crowd, danny cipriani was handcuffed and taken into custody. in court and later on social media, cipriani apologised for behaviour which he said had left him mortified. his return to the england side in june followed a series of misdemeanours — many associated with alcohol — for theft of a bottle of vodka, injuries after being hit by a bus whilst drunk, a drink—drive ban. his club are standing by him but tonight danny cipriani waits to find out whether his international career has faltered yet again. robert hall, bbc news, jersey. this is outside source live from the bbc newsroom. tributes have been pouring in for aretha franklin,
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the soul singer whose career spanned seven decades. she has died, age 76, after a long battle with cancer. some other stories from here in the bbc newsroom... the number of people believed to have been killed by floods in the southern indian state of kerala has risen to about a hundred. the security forces are distributing food and drinking water to tens of thousands of people who've fled to higher ground. that's on bbc hindi. lawyers in uganda representing an opposition mp, bobi wine, say he has been brutally beaten since being detained on monday. the afrobeat musician has become a thorn in the side of the government since entering politics last year. he was arrested on monday whilst out campaigning, and charged with possessing firearms and ammunition. that's on bbc swahili. and this has been watched a lot online, the grime artist stormzy is funding a scholarship to support black british students going to cambridge university to study. figures rleased recently showed some cambridge colleges didn't take in any black students from 2012 to 2016.
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the rapper didn't go to university himself despite getting excellent grades in his exams. all week we ve been covering a dramatic increase in violence in afghanistan. today, another attack in kabul, this time at a training centre for the intelligence service. at the same time, this was happening in another part of the city. the funerals were held for some of the victims of wednesday 5 suicide bomb at an educational centre, where teenagers had been studying for a university entrance exam. the islamic state group has claimed responsibllity, for the attack which killed 48. rights group amnesty international condemned the attack as a "war crime . there have been a series of attacks on afghanistan over the last few weeks including a full—scale assault on the city of ghazni by the taliban last week that killed as many as 150 civilians and destroyed houses and a local market.
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us special forces in ghazni have warned that there is still a danger posed by undetonated explosives. ss you can see from this picture, a clearing operation is still underway. the latest fighting has raised questions over prospects for peace talks between the taliban and the western—backed government ahead of next week's eid al—adha, a major annual muslim festival. taliban officials have told reporters they were considering a ceasefire, but there has so far been no confirmation. here's auliya atrafi in kabul. it was just after 10:30am when two assa ila nts it was just after 10:30am when two assailants climbed an empty building and started shooting at a base where the afghan intelligence service officers are being trained. it took security forces about six hours to clear the situation, clear the area
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and killed the insurgents. it has been happening of course one day after another suicide bomber blew himself up inside an educational centre where young students were preparing for university. 48 of those young people, boys and girls we re those young people, boys and girls were killed. and later, today, the so—called islamic state claimed responsibility for that. this is... violence has been particularly bad, for the month of august. only last friday the taliban managed to penetrate a city centre not far from ...and penetrate a city centre not far from and there is fighting in the north, in the east and south and west. and of course as we saw in the provincial capital, kabul. the secret recipe of
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ancient egyptian mummification has been revealed by an international team of scientists. the researchers discovered the make up of the 6,000 year old embalming liquid that was used to preserve the body. our science correspondent victoria gill has more. fabric, fragments of ancient history, the 6000 year—old pieces of lenin the content to my chemical secret of egyptian mummification. the body preserved as a vessel for the paternal soul is an icon of this ancient civilization and has been resurrected in many a hollywood film. here in a storage facility in northern england, ancient egyptians the bombing recipe has come too late, contained in textiles and the collection. —— and bombing recipe. they do not look like much to look at at all but usually their are
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significant to our past and usually gets to the heart of what they were about at this time. through the science which you cannot tell through looking. really the science brings this material to life. the recipe they revealed, and embalming liquid which was the makes in a base of sesame oil. you can find the key ingredients today. this is one of them, which is a plant based gum on sale in egypt and this is a key ingredient, pine resin, antibacterial to prevent the body from decaying. the same mixture of su bsta nces from decaying. the same mixture of substances was found on this intact mummy, showing the process is much older than previously thought. pushing the timeline of mummification back by 1500 years and chose to us that it was notjust the point where mummification we knew was very popular, it was happening
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much earlier. it is much more within the culture of egyptology for much longer than we thought. who knows what secrets will on earth next in the museum. back to our top story... the so called queen of soul, aretha franklin has died, at the age of 76. tributes to the singer have been paid from all over the world. and earlier debbie and kim sledge, singers from the group sister sledge, spoke to my colleague simon mccoy. she had a power to her voice and it was the power of not only the talent and the physical power but it was also like... i put it as a supernatural power. the power that goes beyond... it is something that got added to her. i think the song, try a little tenderness, even that song,
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though it may have been a sad song, it was from in here and you could feel it, even the words, the way she expressed them, was all of aretha. and what was the influence on disco, on the ‘70s and ‘805? she also managed in some way is to reinvent herself, too, at various times, didn't she? yes. i think it's because she had been gifted with something so special it didn't matter where she sang. it was all about the spirit on the music. more so than the kind of music. she could have sang mary had a little lamb and it would have been all of aretha but it is also all of the wonderful songs she has given us. she was a great writer of songs. she gave us so many beautiful songs that helped, you know, bring us through the things we were going through. there was encouragement there. describe that. when you were at home, and when you were growing up listening to her, what was it that you went, just let me listen? one of the things that touched me, maybe you, too, kim, she had a relationship with sisters that the special. and it really spoke to us as sisters. you know, we used
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to seeing her songs. the sisters used to sing the songs with her and so we sang many of the songs that she recorded. there was just something so special about the tightness, the fabric of the music and the fabric of the voices as sisters. the challenge of the harmonies, the beautiful harmonies. you remember, daydreaming and i'm thinking of you? sing it, sing it, sing it. go on. # daydreaming and i'm thinking of you. # look at my mind, floating away.# thinking of you. well you heard a little of this song earlier, but let's end this edition of outside source with some more of aretha franklin's incredible voice. here she is in her prime, singing "i say a little prayer" on the cliff richard show back in 1970. # say
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#saya # say a little prayer for # say a little prayerfor you. # say a little prayerfor you. # the moment i wake up... # the moment i wake up... # before i put on my makeup. # before i put on my makeup. # i # before i put on my makeup. #isaya # before i put on my makeup. # i say a little prayerfor you. # i say a little prayerfor you. # yes # i say a little prayerfor you. #yesl # i say a little prayerfor you. # yes i do. # yes i do. # i'm combing my hair now... # i'm combing my hair now... # wondering which dress i'm going to wear now. # they a little prayer for you. # they a little prayer for you. # 0h, # they a little prayer for you. # oh, yes i do. # oh, yes i do. # for ever, and ever you stay in my heart and i will love you... # for ever and ever we will never part. # together, is how it must be.
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# together, is how it must be. #to # together, is how it must be. # to live without you... # to live without you... # would only be heartbreak for me. # would only be heartbreak for me. # i # would only be heartbreak for me. #irun # would only be heartbreak for me. # i run for the bus # would only be heartbreak for me. # i runforthe bus dear... # i runforthe bus dear... # while writing i think of us dear. # while writing i think of us dear. # i'm saying a little prayerfor you. most of us have seen at least a little bit of rain over the last couple of days and with the clarence of the rain, there has been a big change in the feel of the weather, the something much cooler and fresh or. there are some showers. yazidi cloud that brought the rain in the shower clouds chasing him from the west but also bringing in from the northwest is some relatively cool, fresh air. contrast that with the warm air that is sitting and plays out in the atlantic. this is heading in our direction. for many of us the
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change to fresher conditions will be a temporary one. having said that friday morning, starting off on a pretty cool note. single—digit temperatures in a few places. a fair amount of brightness through the morning and some of these will remain. out west we see thickening clouds and patchy rain, northern ireland and west scotland. those temperatures generally around the mid to high teens but down towards the southeast, some sunshine up to 22 or 23 degrees. as we move out of friday into saturday this is the warm front that works its way eastward taking some son with it and behind that we bring in not only a lot of clout in moisture but some misty and murky conditions but also some warm and actually quite humid air. noticed northern area staying in the coolair air. noticed northern area staying in the cool air in marking out the divide between the cool air in humid air is the weather front. during saturday bringing the weather front,
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maybe into northern england and south of that some sunshine, rather murky for some western coasts those. on the warm side, cooler for further north. in the warm air to the south as we get into sunday, developing this area of low pressure. there is tropical moisture tied up in this area of low pressure, bringing outbreaks of fairly heavy rain for a time moving out of northern ireland into england and scotland. to the south of that a lot of clouds still pretty humid. for northern scotland, sticking out to some sunshine and a cooler, fresher feel. as sticking out to some sunshine and a cooler, fresherfeel. as we sticking out to some sunshine and a cooler, fresher feel. as we get into monday, high pressure trace to reestablish itself from the southwest. a new set of weather fronts will push into the northwest of scotla nd fronts will push into the northwest of scotland so we're likely to see some rain here at times during monday's. with the humid air, a lot of clouds and misty, murky and drizzly conditions. the condition still in the middle 20s across the
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south. and two tuesday the fronts in the northwest, some heavy rains across parts of scotland and northern ireland and england as the date worlds on. spells of sunshine and then again high temperatures. what happens through the latter parts of next week? these frontal systems a re parts of next week? these frontal systems are likely to take the rain out of scotland and northern ireland and move it down into england and wales, fizzling all the while. after thatis wales, fizzling all the while. after that is a return to cool northwesterly winds. returning to a cooler, fresher feel. high—pressure never too far away and some of us will be dry, with low pressure up to the northeast. we may see some rain across the northeast of scotland. later next week we suspect it will turn fresher and drive for many with some sunshine and a little bit of rain across the northeast. a change in the feel of the weather over the coming days. # r—e—s—p—e—c—t # find out what it means to me # r—e—s—p—e—c—t
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# take care, tcb # the queen of soul, aretha franklin, has died. one of the greatest stars of the 20th century — she passed away this morning at her home in detroit at the age of 76. after seven decades in the spotlight, aretha franklin finally stopped performing last year. her family say she died of pancreatic cancer. a crown for the queen of soul on hollywood's walk of fame, as fans and stars from round the world mourn her death. she knew when to be silent, she knew when to let rip. she knew how to say so much without the words. the notes were enough. we'll be live from the church in detroit in michigan where her career started.
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