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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  August 23, 2018 6:00am-8:31am BST

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good morning, welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and steph mcgovern. our headlines today: setting out the plans for a no—deal brexit. today the government will publish advice for people and businesses. good morning. companies will receive long—awaited guidance today, but what could no deal mean for them and are they ready to leave the eu? new grades and tougher tests. hundreds of thousands of teenagers get their gcse results this morning. the waiting game. figures obtained by the bbc show that four ambulance trusts took more than 2a hours to answer some 999 calls. in sport, danny cipriani won't be sanctioned by the rfu after pleading guilty to common assault and resisting arrest. good morning. a much fresherfeel over the next few days and. rain around this morning in east anglia
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and south—east england and scotland and south—east england and scotland and northern ireland. elsewhere, spells of sunshine. all the details inis spells of sunshine. all the details in 15 minutes. it's thursday the 23rd of august. our top story: contingency plans for a ‘no deal‘ brexit will be outlined by the government today. brexit secretary dominic raab will say the uk is prepared to take unilateral action to maintain continuity whatever the eu does, but insists they're confident of securing a deal. jonathan blake has more. as well as summer holidays, government ministers have been away on business over the last few weeks, touring the capitals of europe to talk up their plan for brexit. the agreement reached weeks ago by the cabinet at chequers has not been warmly welcomed by officials in brussels, which has meant more talk about the possibility of britain leaving the eu without a deal. it does mean disruption to trade as we know it, and, as a consequence of
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that, a disruption to the level of economic activity. it makes sense to put those preparations in place for no deal, because we're in a negotiation. so we're taking sensible precautions, we're taking sensible precautions, we're taking sensible measures, but we're taking sensible measures, but we're working hard to get a good deal. hospitals and ambulance services have warned of a possible shortage of supplies. farms could be on the brink of collapse according to the national farmers union. and a committee of mps said no deal would bea committee of mps said no deal would be a disaster for the committee of mps said no deal would be a disasterfor the uk committee of mps said no deal would be a disaster for the uk food and drink industry. the brexit secratary dominic raab said the government pass technical notices will tackle what called hair raising scare stories. here at westminster, of leaving the eu without a deal is a sensitive subject. some see it as no bad thing. for others, it's the worst of all worlds. everyone, though, will be looking closely to see how the government has decided people should prepare. as the deadline for departure looms, what life could be
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like outside the eu without a brexit deal is about to become a little clearer. jonathan blake, bbc news. let's get more on this now from our political correspondent iain watson, who is in westminster this morning. dominic raab has an interesting message today, on the one hand he is talking about practical arrangements oi’ talking about practical arrangements or no deal, on the other hand reassuring people that a deal is on the way. -- for no deal. you're right, his task is to say he is confident of a deal with the eu but what one senior government minister said to me, not dominic raab, was that businesses were spooked by the idea the government hadn't prepared for every eventuality. rather than stoking fears about no deal, as some in the opposition would claim, the government is saying this is necessary to give people reassurance. it's not just necessary to give people reassurance. it's notjust a negotiating tactic to tell the european union we're prepared, it's to tell british businesses that we're prepared should things go wrong. as you suggest, dominic raab
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will emphasise he wants to get a good dealfrom will emphasise he wants to get a good deal from brussels, will emphasise he wants to get a good dealfrom brussels, but in doing so what's interesting is this phrase you mentioned about unilateral action. if there is no deal, what might some brexiteers is how little might change the moment we dropped out of the european union. i think that phrase suggests he is likely to continue to follow eu rules in some areas to suggest there is minimum disruption, for example to transport and trade. for the moment, thank you. hundreds of thousands of teenagers across england, wales and northern ireland will receive their gcse results later today. in england, there have been major changes, with a new grading system and less coursework. elaine dunkley reports. as and bs, yes! under new changes, this is a thing of the past for gcse students in england. from today, it's out with letters, which have been replaced
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with numbered grades. most gcse subjects are now graded on a new scale from nine to one, as opposed to a8 to g, with nine being the highest grade.|j opposed to a8 to g, with nine being the highest grade. i think we used to it now, it's only teachers and stu d e nts to it now, it's only teachers and students that are really used to it, like parents or some employers might not understand. i found it definitely a lot more challenging but interesting, because obviously it was a whole new system. it's not just the grades that are changing. there's less coursework and more emphasis on final exams to make gcse is more challenging. fewer grade 9a will be awarded than a and a grade four is broadly equivalent to a c grade. there's been more change with education with a—levels and what we've seen... we seen that on teachers, who haven't been able to rely on past papers as they should, but it's put huge pressure on young people, and some will be doing 20 or more papers with a great emphasis on
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exams and they‘ re more papers with a great emphasis on exams and they're worried that the guinea pigs in the system. there has been criticism the reforms will lead to confusion among employers used to the old grading system, but the government says the new 9—i grades area government says the new 9—i grades are a better way to differentiate between the abilities of students. elaine dunkley, bbc news. some patients who have dialled 999 have had to wait more than 2a hours for an ambulance, according to a bbc investigation. services across the uk have had to leave patients with non life critical complaints waiting as they deal with an increase in emergency calls. the patients association says the figures are extremely concerning. matt graveling reports. category one, the highest priority 999 call. the ambulance response in seven minutes or less can mean the difference in life and death. but it means that other patients may have to wait. it's my wife, she's fallen off
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a step and broke her wrist or leg or something, she can't move. this was not classed as category i. sylvia had broken a hip but had to wait on the floor while ambulances were diverted to more urgent calls. her daughter calls again. unfortunatley we don't have any vehicles currently assigned at the moment. oh god, oh... unfortunately we have been exceptionally busy in the area. i know, but two hours? south central ambulance service has apologised, saying there were nine patients in the local area with more serious or similar injuries awaiting a response too. it took three and half hours for sylvia's evidence to arrive, but our figures show that some patients have had to wait much longer. betweenjune, 2017 and june, 2018, ambulances from four different services took more than 2a hours to reach patients. these included people with breathing difficulties and mental health problems. the longest delays in the uk were recorded by the welsh ambulance service, which kept four patients waiting for more than 50 hours each. the service said the numbers were
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not typical. the trusts involved have said the longest waits for work for less serious calls and said they had to prioritise resources to life—threatening emergency is. the government have said david recently announced £30 million of funding to boost ambulance crews and improve ambulance fleets. matt graham bling, bbc news. the labour leader jeremy corbyn will call for a radical reform of the media industry in a speech at the edinburgh tv festival later. he'll threaten big digital companies with a windfall tax unless they agree to help fund independent journalism. companies could also be required to pay what is being called a digital licence fee to help the bbc compete with businesses such as amazon and netflix. the conservatives say the ideas would lead to higher bills for consumers. we'll be speaking to the labour's deputy leader tom watson about this in just over half an hour. the prime minister of australia, malcolm turnbull, who narrowly fought off a leadership challenge earlier this week, has said he'll quit if a second contest is approved by his party. his challenger peter dutton has
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called for another vote tomorrow, and several members of mr turnbull‘s cabinet have resigned, as pressure for him to stand down grows. the us has imposed a new round of financial tariffs on chinese goods, worth almost £i2.5 billion. duties will be collected on products ranging from motorcycles to steam turbines in an ongoing trade war between the two countries. china has responded by imposing tariffs of equal value on goods from america. we're joined from singapore by asia business correspondent, karishma vaswani. the impact of this could be huge, couldn't it, not just the impact of this could be huge, couldn't it, notjust in those two countries but the ripple effect of this as well, karishma you're absolutely right, and that ripple effect is already being felt in some respects out in countries like
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singapore, which frankly are stuck in the middle of these giant superpowers, the us and china. many of the companies i've been speaking to here sell their goods and they send their goods to china through the singapore port, which isjust behind me. billions of dollars worth of trade... billions of pounds worth of trade... billions of pounds worth of trade... billions of pounds worth of trade as well in fact going through the singapore port, off to china and into the united states. the worry is as this trade war escalates between the us and china, countries out here could be caught in the middle because their products also become more expensive. economic growth forecasts are being lowered all across the region. the worry is this could get much worse before it gets better. karishma vaswani from singapore for us karishma vaswani from singapore for us there. over the counter medicines or more traditional remedies, including honey, should be the first line of treatment when suffering from a bad cough. according to new guidance from public health england and the national institute for health care excellence, the use of antibiotics will do little to speed up recovery and could even make harmful bacteria stronger.
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i'm very much in favour of honey as a thing! i'm very much in favour of honey as a thing i have when i got a cold actually. or any time. it is good for your throat. in ourjob, actually. or any time. it is good foryourthroat. in ourjob, i actually. or any time. it is good for your throat. in ourjob, i lose my voice a lot and it's good for that. sally, do you like honey? the wire were right all the time. basically they were right! honey, lemon and whiskey —— the nanas were right. or whisky! they all worked! we start with danny cipriani, we've been talking about him a lot, the saga of danny cipriani looks like it is nearing its conclusion —— they all work. we're going to talk about him actually playing later on today! he won't face any sanctions from the rfu after that incident at a nightclub injersey. he pleaded guilty to common assault and resisting arrest in court last week, and has been fined by his club
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gloucester. rugby‘s governing body has decided those punishments are enough, and he's free to continue his pre—season. he has a friendly tonight. big problems for stoke in the championship, beaten 3—0 at home by wigan last night. they were relegated from the premier league last season and are still without a win this season. england will name their squad this afternoon for the fourth test with india after yesterday's defeat in the third test. hampshire's james vince is expected to be recalled as cover forjonny bairstow, who's injured. he broke his finger. and it was another good night for the british team at the european para—athletics championships in berlin, as teenager kare adenegan beats rival and fellow brit hannah cockroft in the 100m. lots of great pictures to show you in the papers this morning. that's coming up in a moment. thanks. here's alina with a look at this morning's weather. good morning. good morning. hello, everyone. this was taken yesterday, barely a cloud
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in the sky in lincolnshire and we saw temperatures up to 27 in collings be. nothing like that over the next few days because it's turning cooler and fresher for all of us. sunshine around and fresher and today we have a more general speu and today we have a more general spell of rain, two bands, the first from lincolnshire to the midlands to south—west england and a second one from northern ireland and scotland. both will be gradually moving south and east through the day. the behind the band of rain, sunshine and showers and. drying up in east anglia and south—east england as the rain clears. more persistent rain in parts of northern england for a time in the afternoon. noticeable breeze, particularly in northern ireland and scotla nd particularly in northern ireland and scotland and not as warm as yesterday in england and wales, temperatures between 19 and 23 but just 11! to 16 for scotland and northern ireland. we will keep showers going through this evening. most will tend to fade away and become confined mainly to northern
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ireland, scotland and the far north of england but elsewhere, lots of clear skies. if you're not a fan of the warmth and humidity recently, a much fresher night with lows of seven or eight for scotland and northern ireland and 9—11 or 12 for england and wales but rural spots will be a few degrees cooler. we are all in the cooler, fresher air to end the week. we've lost the warmth and humidity and noticeably different over the next few days. showers around tomorrow still, chiefly in the morning for northern ireland, western scotland and northern england. south and east through the day they will go, sharp ones with a rumble of thunder. fewer showers on the eastern coasts, staying dry, but temperatures not getting out of the mid—to—high teens tomorrow, 11! to 19 to end the week. chilly start to saturday but with an area of high pressure building through saturday, fewer showers. a few around but many places having a largely dry day with spells of sunshine, but again temperatures up to only 19 or 20 at their highest in
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england and wales and just 13 to 16 in scotland and northern ireland. into sunday, we lose our area of low pressure and this front topples in from the atlantic. that will increase the cloud through sunday and bring outbreaks of rain into western areas, northern ireland, wales, south—west england in the afternoon and eventually the west of scotland. the further eased you are on sunday, mainly dry with the best of sunshine here —— east. nothing much higher than 16 to 19. back to you to. thanks, we will see you in a bit. -- you to. thanks, we will see you in a bit. —— back to you two. let's take a look at today's papers. the metro leads with the fallout from the court cases of president trump's former lawyer michael cohen and former campaign manager paul manafort. while the daily telegraph focuses on a speech about the media by the labour leader, jeremy corbyn. the guardian also focuses on mr corbyn's speech and speculates on the future of the james bond franchise, following the departure of the director, danny boyle.
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yes, and even though the picture is trump, it is not him in the running for bond. and the daily mail turns its attention on a study that suggests tens of thousands more people could die as a result of the "diabetes epidemic". and trending on twitter is #brexit with the government set to publish papers with advice on what contingency plans people and companies should make in the event the uk leaves the eu without a deal. yes, and that is what we are going to talk about with then, later? yes, we will look at what is an ideal scenario will mean for them, and also people who deal with logistics and whether they are worried about what happens at the border, firms that export materials to europe, what it means for them, and firms
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importing raw materials, so a lot of concern about what the no deal scenario could mean. inside the papers, you can tell kiddies august, there isn't a lot of business news happening. 0ne there isn't a lot of business news happening. one big news, saudi arabia ditching plans for the saudi aramco, hoping to list it around the world, london or new york, on the stock market. you might not think it is interesting but it was a symbolic opening of the saudi economy and they were going to sell shares. that's not happening. so lots of concerns about what happens next. and yesterday on wall street, a pretty good time. it was tech stocks rising pretty sharply yesterday with wall street on a record bull rally with shares rising on the stock market for nearly nine and a half yea rs market for nearly nine and a half years without a big fall in the market and that's what's so important as far as the economy is concerned. 0f important as far as the economy is concerned. of course president trump claiming a lot of credit for that.
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sadly, what do you have? chap who looks like a sixth former in trouble visiting the headmaster, danny cipriani for his hearing at the rfu yesterday, with the papers yesterday suggesting he should have worn a suit. is it half a suit? i reckon it isa suit. is it half a suit? i reckon it is a borrowed jacket, someone else's tie, maybe his own shirt, and his own jeans and trainers. tie, maybe his own shirt, and his ownjeans and trainers. he has tried, hasn't he, put on his tie and turned up at the rfu on a serious note, and we have heard he won't face any further disciplinary action, but papers picking up on the picture of him arriving for the hearing yesterday, and inside the times this morning, james haskel, a man who really does like to chat, often about himself, has interviewed himself, it yes. this is a video online of him asking himself questions, talking about cipriani.
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he is prolific on social media? what do you mean, did he get up and ask himself a question and walk to the other seat? and he edited it in between and so it isjust the two of them. is very clever. i have never heard of this before. it is the future. can i show you this picture which has tickled me this morning? you think of their —— bear grills doing his thing, and here is the chap he is helping, this is yao ming, seven tall, a bus tour player, taking bear grills and it is a great picture, isn't it? is he standing on a stone? who is? no, that is his
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genuine height, that is made a. that is how i feel most days. the chap on the left. compared to? you arejust showing off! that is how i feel most days. please, sit down. do you remember when you first came here and the lights had to be changed in order to fit you in the space, because we hadn't accounted for your height?” am worried that we are making it sound like you are freakishly tall. we are on a raised platform, i should say. that chap is seven foot six inches. i wish. we will be chatting all things brexit. yes. thank you. it's gcse results day in england, wales and northern ireland, and hundreds of thousands of pupils will be finding out how they got on in their exams.
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naga, jayne and tim are at a school in uxbridge this morning, where pupils will be getting their results. naga is here for us now. good morning. good morning, charlie, steph, good morning, everyone. remember the feeling on exams day? i do. the students behind us are among hundreds of thousands getting results today. in england there is a new star gcse with 90% moving to the system, this grading system, but people in northern ireland, wales and england, some of them i think are mostly smiling, mostly smiling! we are going to find out how jayne and tim did later on and talking to the head teacher to find out how the
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system has worked out. as you mentioned, jayne, tim and i sat our maths gcse, here is how it went. i have resigned myself to the fact that i know what i am going to know and that is it. what will be will be. it is about everyone else doing it as well and understanding what they are going through and what it is like to re—engage with the subject as an adult. i genuinely love maths and i have really enjoyed studying. i think i am just not enjoying the pressure of having to show everything i have learnt.” knew know so much more than i did when i started and even if i don't make the grade, i am not confident i will, i am glad i did it. what i didn't realise is how much more is
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in the gcse exam now than i remember andi in the gcse exam now than i remember and i did a level maths and i think some of the a level stuff i was doing is in these exams. this is reminding me of how tight it is and how stressful it can be to be in the exam room. there it is ten minutes to go and you haven't finished the paper. 0h, to go and you haven't finished the paper. oh, my goodness. 0h, to go and you haven't finished the paper. oh, my goodness. oh, my goodness, that was an experience.” actually have a bit of a headache. at the start of that exam, what did tim say? is it ok if we finish early, can we just do one and...? yes! you were really optimistic. early, can we just do one and...? yes! you were really optimisticm is good to be optimistic. i was scribbling at the end and i didn't finish it. there is never enough time. we did it. well done. no more. it is all over. yes! 0h, oh, it really was very nerve racking, but we did it, and it's very different for us, we are in our
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careers. speak for yourself, naga. how was the experience for you?” really enjoyed it, i and glad i did it. it really helped remind me what it. it really helped remind me what it is like for the young people who are waiting for their results. i am quite excited in an odd way. we just wanted to bring a really important story to life, as you say. it is a ha rd story to life, as you say. it is a hard year. there is a lot of pressure on kids. it is not an option to fail as i did first time. if you fail now you have to sit it again and they have put in the hard work and we wanted to just bring it to life. kingsley, nadia, natasha and tom, the results come through, how are you feeling? really good. absolutely smashed it. nigel cle m e nts absolutely smashed it. nigel clements is the principle here as well. good morning. nice to see some happy well. good morning. nice to see some ha p py fa ces well. good morning. nice to see some happy faces here. a lot of the talk has been about the new exams, 90% of gcses in england now, a new grading
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system, a lot more pressure on exam time as well, how has it translated here? this is the biggest change to the exam system in the last 30 years and it's not just the exam system in the last 30 years and it's notjust the grading, but it is all about the content and the depth of the exams. they are new exams and staff and students have had to get to grips with those quickly. stressful? yes, it is stressful. teachers have taken it in their stride. we are always working with curriculum change. it is good to review the curriculum. it is good to review the curriculum. it is good to do it at an appropriate pace so that we can do the best for the children. but the work that has gone in from teachers across the country has been unprecedented to get the children ready for the exams this summer. thank you. bobby was coaching us. is it too late for brides? here you go. you have been taking a look, you are doing the phd en masse anxiety, we looked at maths, people say it is much more
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difficult, what do you think the problem is, will this help to break it down? it is partly the niche of the subject, where you get it either right or wrong, the repeated reinforcement that makes you think you are not good at maths, but partly also the culture and attitude in the uk, it is acceptable to say you are not good at maths, but you never say you can't read. we are changing that and we gave it a go. we will get our results in two hours or so. i don't envy you, naga. good luck is all i can say at this point. yes, good luck to anyone opening those results today. for people who have got their results today, you can find advice and support on the bitesize website at www. bbc. com/bitesize/support. details are on your screen now. things don't always go to plan and there is lots of support. good luck
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with everything. yes, it has lots of good content and brilliant videos from different people at different stages of their lives, so it is worth looking at even if you do do well in your results, just to get a little advice. coming up on breakfast this morning: from portly penguins to chubby chimps, it's the annual weigh—in for the residents of london zoo. we'll be there to hear how they go about monitoring the health of thousands of animals. headlines coming up next. good morning from bbc london news. i'm sara 0rchard. police officers are being urged to record each time they are spat at while on—duty. union, the police federation, believes the evidence will help convince the head of the met to issue spit guards to all frontline staff. the controversial restraints are being trialled across the capital, but are only used in custody suites. the home office says that spit guards are a tactical option to give officers protection from spitting and reduce the worst effects of biting. the number of thefts at cash machines in london has gone up
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by nearly 60% over the last ten years. research by moneysupermarket found that since 2007 there were more than 1,400 robberies at atms in the capital, higher than any other city in the uk. the two worst hotspots for the crime were westminster and camden. just over 50% of the public are expecting a no—deal brexit according to a survey by the financial services firm kpmg. they questioned 3,000 people and of those 54% said they thought a no—deal brexit was more likely than not. it comes as brexit secretary dominic raab prepares to outline some of the government's contingency plans in the event of a no deal. let's have a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tubes this morning. if we move onto the disruption on greater anglia trains following
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overrunning engineering works. services on the stansted express are also affected. 0nto the roads, finchley road is down to one lane for emergency waterworks. and the victoria embankment is closed westbound from southwark bridge to westminster bridge with delays as traffic diverts. let's have a check on the weather now with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. a little bit of everything weatherwise today. it is a very mixed picture but a warm and humid start, 19 in central london. then we are going to see a cold front come through. it will give us a little bit of early rain. and behind that we will have fresh conditions for this afternoon but also good spells of sunshine around as well. this is the picture this morning. lots of thickening cloud around and then we see the cold front come through. 0utbreaks around and then we see the cold front come through. outbreaks of rainfora front come through. outbreaks of rain for a short while, not much for south—eastern areas of the capital.
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maybe it is staying dry. then brightening up. north—westerly breeze developing and some sunny spells. top temperatures of 22 or 23 degrees but of course those values are degrees but of course those values a re lower degrees but of course those values are lower than in the sunshine over recent days because of the warm, humid air. 0vernight and be a couple of showers this evening. some call a coming through again. clear skies mostly overnight tonight and temperatures as low as seven or eight celsius, 11 or 12 in the towns —— cooler air. so a cool start to the day tomorrow, feeling fresher tomorrow, sunny spells and maybe some showers around and generally dry with some sunshine over the bank holiday weekend, but getting cooler. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now though it's back to charlie and steph. hello, this is breakfast with steph mcgovern and charlie stayt. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning: it's the big day for thousands of gcse students as they get their results. and they'll be joined
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by our three breakfast scholars, who'll also be opening their envelopes live on air later. hollywood superstar glenn close tells us how she'd like to remake the classic movie fatal attraction, this time from the point of view of the mistress. and growing up with two deaf parents, sign language has always been second nature for comedian ray bradshaw. he's here to tell us how it's become an important part of his act. good morning, here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news. advice on what people and businesses can do if the uk leaves the eu without a trade deal will be released this morning. the brexit secretary, dominic raab, is expected to say the guidance will help make sure the economy continues to function smoothly in the event of a no—deal brexit, although he stresses he's confident an agreement will be reached. hundreds of thousands of teenagers
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in england will find out their gcse results this morning after the exams went through a radical shake—up. more emphasis will be placed on final exams and most papers will be graded under a numbered system making it easier to identify the best performers. wales and northern ireland are keeping the a* to e grades for their qualifications. some patients who have dialled 999 have had to wait more than 2a hours for an ambulance, according to a bbc investigation. the figures, which were taken betweenjune 2017 and june this year, also showed that in one case a patient faced a 62—hour delay. the patients association says the findings are extremely concerning. the labour leader jeremy corbyn will call for a radical reform of the media industry in a speech
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at the edinburgh tv festival later. he'll threaten big digital companies with a windfall tax unless they agree to help fund independent journalism. companies could also be required to pay what is being called a digital licence fee to help the bbc compete with businesses such as amazon and netflix. the conservatives say the ideas would lead to higher bills for consumers. the number of heart attacks and strokes linked to diabetes could rise by nearly a third in england by 2035 because the number of people with the condition is increasing. the british heart foundation predicts that in two decades around five million people will have diabetes, resulting in 39,000 heart attacks and 50,000 strokes a year. the prime minister of australia, malcolm turnbull, who narrowly fought off a leadership challenge earlier this week, has said he'll quit if a second contest is approved by his party. his challenger peter dutton has called for another vote tomorrow, and several members of mr turnbull‘s cabinet have
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resigned, as pressure for him to stand down grows. err, the reality is that a minority in the party room, supported by others outside the parliament, have sought to bully, intimidate others into making this change of leadership that they're seeking. the us has imposed a new round of financial tariffs on chinese goods, worth almost £12.5 billion. duties will be collected on products ranging from motorcycles to steam turbines in an ongoing trade war between the two countries. china has responded by imposing tariffs of equal value on goods from america. a british—built laser satellite has been launched into space on a mission to provide
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meteorologists with better weather forecasts. the aeolus had been due to launch on tuesday but was postponed for 2h hours due to, you've guessed it, bad weather. the spacecraft blasted off late last night and delivered aeolus into orbit. the satellite, which was built in stevenage, is equipped with a powerful laser which will be able to directly measure wind speeds on earth from space, as well as help protect people from disasters such as floods and hurricanes. there you go, making our weather forecast better. but they don't get much better than ours, do they! we are right all the time, 100%, can't be improved. isn't that why everyone watches! time for the sport. talking about danny cipriani. looks like the saga of danny cipriani
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could be drawing to an end and he is due to play tonight, then he will wa nt to due to play tonight, then he will want to draw a line under what's happened over the last few weeks. danny cipriani won't be sanctioned by the rfu over an incident at a nightclub in jersey last week. cipriani was fined by the courts after pleading guilty to common assault and resisting arrest. he was also fined by his club gloucester. rugby‘s governing body has decided that's punishment enough, and he's free to make his gloucester debut in a pre—season friendly tonight. england captain joe root says his side are still in the driving seat for their series with india despite a heavy loss in the third test at trent bridge. the final day lasted just ten minutes before england lost their last wicket, jimmy anderson the last man to fall. india winning by 203 runs, but are still 2—1 down in the 5—match series. we're definitely in the driving seat as far as the series goes. you know, we have to keep remembering that. we have got a little bit of time now to go away and reflect on what's been a difficult week, but in england we
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area difficult week, but in england we are a very good side at bouncing back from a tough couple of days. 0ne back from a tough couple of days. one thing you can never question about this group of players is the character and the way they can respond to a difficult period or passage of play. do you remember yesterday i had a moan because they we re yesterday i had a moan because they were charging entrance into trent bridge £10 to go in, and the whole thing could have lasted one minute, in the end it lasted ten. well done to the organisers and trent bridge, they change their minds, they talked about —— we talked about it at 6:30am and at 8:30am they said you could just turn up. really nice. a sensible thing to do. well, england will name their squad this afternoon for the next week's test in southampton, this man, hampshire's james vince, is expected to be re—called as cover forjonny bairstow who's broken a finger. it was a busy night in the championship, and more porblems for stoke city. another defeat, this time at home to wigan. they lost 3—0. stoke were in the premier league
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a few months ago but are yet to win this season. fans already booing and criticising the manager and the team. aston villa are still unbeaten in the championship, but onlyjust after securing a two all draw against brentford with just 16 seconds to spare. much better though for aston villa, they're still unbeaten this season, but they needed a late equaliser against brentford. neal maupay put brentford ahead in each half at villa park, butjonathan kodjia was just as prolific, and rescued a point for villa deep into injury time. it finished 2—2. it was another night of british success at the european para—athletics championships in berlin. teenager kare adenegan beat fellow brit hannah cockroft to win t3a100m gold. atjust 17, she is already the world record holder but this is herfirst major title having been beaten into second place by cockroft at both the paralympics and world championships. there was gold too for shot putter vanessa wallace in the f34 event. it's the 41 year—old's first international title after finishing fifth at both the rio paralympics and last year's world championships. sport is full of superstitions, from players
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having to put on their kit in a set way to having lucky charms. do either of you have a lucky mascot? lots of sports people have superstitions. footballers will put their socks on or their shinpads on ina certain their socks on or their shinpads on in a certain order. left first, right first, and they will always do it the same way. david beckham is famous for having a particular routine, particularly when playing for england. now russian premier league side fc rostov have taken things a step further thanks to this fan who brought his carpet to a match to change their fortunes, and it worked. after losing their previous match they bounced back with a 4—0 win. the club invited the fan and his carpet to their training ground and things escalated from there to the point where they've released a new fourth kit featuring the design of the carpet. it's already got 500 orders. why did he bring a carpet in the first place? steph, i don't know! was it based on the one match?m
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was. obviously lots of people took pictures of him, the carpet was famous, there must be something about this carpet and the reason he's brought it. the club loved it, he's brought it. the club loved it, he went to training with his carpet, the players loved it. 500 people have already ordered the shirt, i think it could be a classic. magic carpet, love it! see you later on. tech giants such as google, amazon and facebook could be taxed to pay for public interest journalism under labour leader jeremy corbyn's plans to reform the media industry. he'll give a speech later in edinburgh later today where he'll talk about the importance of press freedom, and will also suggest changes to the way the bbc is run and funded. labour's deputy leader and the shadow digital culture, media and sport secretary tom watson joins us live now from brighton. good morning to you, mr watson, thanks for your time this morning. firstly could you take us through the notion of this fund that could be created from those big companies,
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google and facebook. tell us a little bit about that. well, the setting for this is really what newspaper editors and publishers have been telling us. they're very concerned public interest journalism is under threat. in the last decade, we've seen 300 local newspapers close. half of local and regional journalists have lost theirjobs. that's mainly because these big tech platforms are sucking up all digital advertising revenue. google and facebook now take more than half of all uk digital advertising revenues alone. now, that's a big problem because it means journalism alone. now, that's a big problem because it meansjournalism is under threat. we're saying to the big tech companies very clearly, this is the start of labour‘s conversation towards our manifesto, what will media policy look like. —— labour's.
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they've ignored parliament in recent yea rs. if they've ignored parliament in recent years. if they don't start behaving responsibly, paying their taxes, taking part in civic society in the uk then we will make sure they pay their way and one of the ways that might happen is some form of levy on their content creation so that we can help subsidise the licence fee for poorer taxpayers. because obviously, this government has ensured the bbc has to pay for free license fees for the public for over 70s rather than others. one of the other areas, i understand jeremy corbyn is going to be talking about, is the bbc, its structure, but also issues around the licence fee. you mentioned already those people over a certain age get a free license fee, who else do you think should get either a reduced or a free bbc
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licence? well, jeremy will speak about that in more detail in his speech later. sorry, i wasn't very clear in my first answer their. currently people over 70 get the free license fee. —— there. that was paid for by the treasury, the taxpayer, but changes a few years ago meant the bbc themselves have to pay for the subsidy for those free licenses. what we're saying is it might be, if the tech companies don't play their role, they will have to take their share of that. we would rather the tech companies behave well in britain, pay a fair share of taxes, understand they have a responsibility to our democracy to make sure journalism works. i'm really struck by the contrast. you know, ten years ago there was a controversy know, ten years ago there was a c0 ntrove rsy over know, ten years ago there was a controversy over phone hacking, we dragged rupert murdoch to parliament and he had to answer and account for the behaviour of the people working
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for his company. we had the facebook data scandal involving the use of people's data, and mark zuckerberg, the man who runs facebook, refused to come to the uk and attend parliament. not only are these tech companies not paying their taxes and undermining journalism, companies not paying their taxes and underminingjournalism, but companies not paying their taxes and undermining journalism, but it seems they're almost undermining journalism, but it seems they‘ re almost unaccountable undermining journalism, but it seems they're almost unaccountable to our democratic institutions and this is jeremy corbyn saying we're not going to have a few billionaires dictate the media market in britain in the decades ahead. we need to change that, we need rigourous public interest journalism and if that, we need rigourous public interestjournalism and if the tech companies don't play their part in that, we will make sure they do. you won't be surprised i've got a question for you today, a question that's already been asked ofjeremy corbyn six times, some people might be aware of this, and we on bbc brea kfast love be aware of this, and we on bbc breakfast love a straight be aware of this, and we on bbc brea kfast love a straight a nswer to a straight question. can you indulge me, if! a straight question. can you indulge me, if i ask you the same question asked ofjeremy corbyn the other day, do you honestly believe that
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britain is better off outside of the eu rather than in it? tom watson, that's your question. if there is no deal brexit, will certainly not the better off. it will be worse off, and disastrously worse off. as to whether we are better off, that depends on the deal and we don't know what the deal looks like yet. the question is an interesting question, isn't it, because you haven't answered the question either — the question is do you honestly believe britain is better off outside the eu rather than in it? it is whether you think we will be better off in the eu or outside of the eu, that is the question. yes, i don't know what the deal will be when we leave the eu. do you know that, charlie? no, of course not. so i can't answer that
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specific question, but i can say if there is no deal brexit, britain will be worse off. if there is a deal, then let's look at the deal andi deal, then let's look at the deal and i can answer the question honestly when i know what it looks like. i can't answer a situation... we don't know what the deal looks like. i don't want to get bogged down on this, but if it is a good deal, you are saying that we will be better off outside the eu? can you say that? i hope that if there is a good deal that there will be benefits, there will obviously be losses as well, and some will be better off and some people won't, and that's the problem with the referendum outcome. i thinkjacob rees—mogg will be better off because he has managed to move his company to ireland so that they can trade within the eu but of course he can make speeches as to why the no deal brexit is good for the country. that is where i think the hypocrisy is, not how people answered single word
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a nswe rs not how people answered single word answers on complex questions. not how people answered single word answers on complex questionsm not how people answered single word answers on complex questions. it is answers on complex questions. it is afair point, answers on complex questions. it is a fair point, thank you for your time this morning, and i should pay credit to the people that i see wandering in and out of the ocean, they are very brave souls, so if you fa ncy they are very brave souls, so if you fancy a bit later on, they are very brave souls, so if you fancya bit later on, i they are very brave souls, so if you fancy a bit later on, i am sure...” mightjoin them later, i mightjoin them later. our cameras can stay with you if you like. if i say yes, they probably will, so i might wait for everyone to leave the. thank you for everyone to leave the. thank you for your time this morning.” for everyone to leave the. thank you for your time this morning. i wasn't expecting that! well, the weather in brighton looks quite dull, doesn't it, a little overcast. but the picture behind you looks gorgeous. good morning. this picture was taken yesterday when we had the best of the sunshine across east anglia. this is lincolnshire and in fact coningsby saw a high of 27 degrees. we won't see those figures over the next few days because everywhere
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turning cooler and fresher with a mixed of sunshine and showers but today we have a general band of rain, two band of rain, the first retching from lincolnshire down through the midlands into south—west england and the second through northern ireland and scotland with heavy and persistent rain in northern ireland this morning. both of these band of rain slowly moving south and east and both becoming a little patchy and wheat through the day. still like to see shari rain for northern england in the afternoon with further showers into scotla nd afternoon with further showers into scotland and northern ireland. elsewhere spells of sunshine when we lose the rain from south—east england and a quite breezy day for many with gusty wind for northern ireland and scotland. certainly a cooler feeling day. in ireland and scotland. certainly a coolerfeeling day. in northern ireland, temperatures not higher than 15 or 16 celsius. 18 to 22 in england and wales and maybe 23 in the south—east of england. the evening and overnight, we keep showers going for scotland and northern ireland, some moving into northern england, calls were some clearer skies with a much fresher
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feeling night. temperatures generally between seven and 12 celsius. you can see through tomorrow that we are all in the cooler air and tomorrow that we are all in the coolerairand a tomorrow that we are all in the cooler air and a noticeable north—westerly wind. in that direction we will get quite a few showers for scotland, northern ireland, down into northern england. and what we will find is a brisk breeze tomorrow, some showers extend a little further south and east, by and large the further south and east you are we will see fewer showers and the best of the sunshine but temperatures won't get out of the mid—to—high teens tomorrow afternoon, so much fresherfeel, and afternoon, so much fresherfeel, and a cool start on saturday as the wind sta rts a cool start on saturday as the wind starts to fall light. we apply pressure on saturday, so showers fewer and further between, so if you do see it it will be in scotland and wales but elsewhere it will be mainly dry with spells of sunshine. but again temperatures not much higher than 16 to 19 celsius for most of us. as we go into sunday we lose high—pressure, this frontal
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system lose high—pressure, this frontal syste m m oves lose high—pressure, this frontal system moves in, that will increase cloud through the day and eventually we will see outbreaks of rain in northern ireland, wales and south—west england through the afternoon and eventually western scotland. further south and east, maybe mainly dry but temperatures not much higher than 17 to 19 celsius. thank you very much. we will see you in a bit. this morning the government will publish advice for businesses and the public on what to do if we leave the eu without a trade deal. ben's gathered together a panel of firms just outside our studio to see what they're looking out for. good morning to you, ben. morning to you both. as you said i am outside the studio. there are a lot of people i want to hear from this morning. let's get to it. it is a big day for business as far as the potential no deal and the advice the government will issue later today. let's get to it. vicki brighton from the centre for economics and business research. good morning.
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take us back to the basics. what could a no deal look like? we don't really know what could happen? absolutely. if we have no deal it was suggest we go back to wto rules and trade organisation rules, the world trade organization rules, which means that while perhaps some arrangements are being made as to what exactly it will mean for the uk, being back on those rules, which we haven't been for a while, it means that we are no longer in the customs union with the eu, so we have to look at tariffs that are going to be imposed on us. we are no longer part of the single market, which means that there will be nontariff barriers put on businesses wanting to transport things across, or do financial services across the eu. unfortunately the wto rules which have lots of tariffs which will affect us usually don't cover and number of areas that are very important for us, such as aviation,
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for example, so we need a different deal with the eu to be able to have planes flying across, and also to have the freight moving from place to play. so we are going to be in a position where quite a lot of rethinking will need to be done as to how exactly we do business with one of our the guest partners in terms of trade. it sounds fiendishly complicated. alex is next to you from the freight transport association, and vicki mentioned the idea that we have seen in the headlines with the long queues and that would directly affect you. headlines with the long queues and that would directly affect youm would affect all of us with our members moving 50% of trust in the uk, trucks moving 70% of the uk international trade, and it is worth saying half of the trade is with the re st of saying half of the trade is with the rest of the world already. we know what the rest of the world trade procedures are and our members know how to do it. what we need our two things, certainty and clarity. if it isa no
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things, certainty and clarity. if it is a no deal, there are ways to work around it, the logistics profession has 2.5 million people, we are problem solvers, but as vicki said there needs to be specific deals reached, leaving politics aside, on aviation particular it and also on road transport. so we need to be able to get trucks across to the eu, we able to get trucks across to the eu, we need to get british planes to the eu and the reversed to get them moving seamlessly. the idea of queues at the ports, it could it be a reality? it is something that could happen. moving beyond the project fear thing we are trying to say that there are ways to resolve it. if there is a deal on permits, the eu places a limit on the number of non—eu trucks that can come through to the eu every year, and that's an issue. it is a solvable issue that needs a deal. and the
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other issues around customs, the right paperwork, they are more solvable because that is a case of speeding up and making the rest of the procedures as quick and easy to follow as possible. tony grimshaw is the director at what more, a plastics manufacturer, how worried are you about this, because you importand are you about this, because you import and export a lot of stuff, when you hear that, are you worried? that is what we are trying not to use. it is about planning, and project fear has created the worry. business faces crisis on a daily basis and business solves the crisis. like alex was saying, it is about knowing the start date to comment plans a, b and c, and when we comment plans a, b and c, and when we started then we can get into it. we are already planning. vicki mentioned wto rules, there are 164
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countries that operate those rules and that represents 98% of total world trade. so there are a lot of answers in the wto. hopefully we don't get to that situation. the idea is that we get a deal. and just a final word from you, how well prepared our businesses, are they ready? i don't think they are ready for brexit generally and certainly not for the no deal. i saw a survey that suggested 6% of firms are actually planning for the no deal, andi actually planning for the no deal, and i think probably actually 6% are planning for brexit itself and mainly it is the big ones, who can do all sorts of things, of course, they can export and they have been exporting, as we have heard, everywhere in the world, smaller firms find the proximity of the eu very useful and they know that the rules are the same and they can export easily. the idea of trying to do something different and sell to china or india overnight instead is actually pie in the sky. ok, vicki,
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alex and tony, thank you. we will have more from you later. we will have more from you later. we will have all sorts of businesses this morning to talk about what that potential no deal scenario might mean for them. as you have heard, there are different views on getting on with it. it seems to also be about clarity and information on what could happen, when it could happen and business will prepare for it but they do need some clarity and we might have an idea of that later when the government advice is published. thank you, ben. see you later. i wonder if he is coming back for the headlines? he has around two and a half minutes. yes, he doesn't have long. coming up on breakfast this morning: from portly penguins to chubby chimps, it's the annual weigh—in for the residents of london zoo. we'll be there to hear how they go about monitoring the health of thousands of animals. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. i'm sara 0rchard. police officers are being urged to record each time they are spat
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at while on duty. union, the police federation, believes the evidence will help convince the head of the met to issue spit guards to all frontline staff. the controversial restraints are being trialled across the capital, but are only used in custody suites. the home office says that spit guards are a tactical option to give officers protection from spitting and reduce the worst effects of biting. the number of thefts at cash machines in london has gone up by nearly 60% over the last ten years. research by moneysupermarket found that since 2007 there were more than 1,400 robberies at atms in the capital, higher than any other city in the uk. the two worst hotspots for the crime were westminster and camden. just over 50% of the public are expecting a no—deal brexit according to a survey by the financial services firm kpmg. they questioned 3,000 people and of those 54% said they thought a no—deal brexit was more likely than not. it comes as the brexit secretary dominic rab prepares to outline some of the government's contingency plans in the event of a no deal. let's have a look at
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the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tubes this morning. there's disruption on greater anglia trains between liverpool st, cambridge and hertford east following overrunning engineering work near cheshunt. services on the stansted express are also affected. leighton road is blocked following a collision. the victoria embankment remains closed westbound from southwark bridge to westminster bridge for gas works with delays on southwark street as traffic diverts towards the blackfriars road. let's have a check on the weather now with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. a little bit of everything weatherwise today. it's a very mixed picture but a warm and a humid start, once more, 19 celsius in central london.
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then we are going to see a cold front come through. it will give us a little bit of early rain. and behind that we will see some fresher conditions for this afternoon, but also good spells of sunshine around as well. this is the picture this morning. lots of thickening cloud around, then we see the cold front come through. outbreaks of rain just for a short while, not too much for south—eastern areas of the capital. maybe it is staying dry. but then brightening up. north—westerly breeze developing and some sunny spells. top temperatures of 22 or 23 degrees, but of course those values are lower than they have been in the sunshine over recent days we have lost the warm, humid air. 0vernight and maybe a couple of showers this evening. some cooler air coming through again. clear skies mostly overnight tonight and temperatures as low as seven or eight celsius, 11 or 12 in the towns. so a cool start to the day tomorrow, feeling fresher tomorrow, sunny spells and maybe some showers around, and generally dry with some sunshine over the bank holiday weekend, but feeling cooler.
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i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it's back to charlie and steph. bye for now. good morning, welcome to breakfast with steph mcgovern and charlie stayt. 0ur headlines today: setting out the plans for a no—deal brexit, today the government will publish advice for people and businesses. companies will receive long—awaited guidance today, but what could no deal mean for them and are they ready to leave the eu? i've assembled a panel of businesses and experts to find out if they're ready. new grades and tougher tests, hundreds of thousands of teenagers get their gcse results this morning. some of them are here at uxbridge high school this morning. lots of smiles, lots of coaches and lots of excitement. we're here to examine how the grading system is impacting
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on students with their gcse results —— hugs. the waiting game. figures obtained by the bbc show that four ambulance trusts took more than 24 hours to answer some 999 calls. in sport, danny cipriani won't be sanctioned by the rfu, after last week pleading guilty to common assault and resisting arrest. some rain around today for parts of northern ireland and scotland and east anglia and south—east england. both of these bands moving south and east. sunshine around too. all the details in 15 minutes. it's thursday the 23rd of august. our top story: contingency plans for a no deal brexit will be outlined by the government today. brexit secretary dominic raab will say the uk is prepared to take unilateral action to maintain continuity whatever the eu does but insists they're confident of securing a deal. jonathan blake has more. as well as summer holidays, government ministers have been away on business over the last few weeks,
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touring the capitals of europe to talk up their plan for brexit. the agreement reached weeks ago by the cabinet at chequers has not been warmly welcomed by officials in brussels, which has meant more talk about the possibility of britain leaving the eu without a deal. it does mean disruption to trade as we know it, and, as a consequence of that, a disruption to the level of economic activity. it makes sense to put those preparations in place for no deal, because we're in a negotiation. so we're taking sensible precautions, we're taking sensible measures, but we're working hard to get a good deal. hospitals and ambulance services have warned of a possible shortage of supplies. farms could be on the brink of collapse according to the national farmers union. and a committee of mps said no deal would be a disasterfor the uk food and drink industry. the brexit secratary dominic raab
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said the government pass technical notices will tackle what called hair—raising scare stories. here at westminster, talk of leaving the eu without a deal is a sensitive subject. some see it as no bad thing. for others, it's the worst of all worlds. everyone, though, will be looking closely to see how the government has decided people should prepare. as the deadline for departure looms, what life could be like outside the eu without a brexit deal is about to become a little clearer. jonathan blake, bbc news. let's get more on this now from our political correspondent iain watson, who is in westminster this morning. iain, fora long iain, for a long time, no deal planning, the government talking about no deal planning just didn't happen, did it? what's changed. that's right. a senior member of the government said what is spruiking businesses at the moment was the worried the government for every
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eventuality —— spruiking. this isn't ratcheting up the, leaving without something less than an ideal relationship with the eu, but about giving businesses certainty that if the worst comes to the worst of the government has thought about it. the view from opposing political parties is rather different, some saying this is to make theresa may's chequers compromise seem a bit more a cce pta ble compromise seem a bit more acceptable by comparison. but the government are also trying to, in dominic raab's words in a speech he will give later today, is have a sensible and measured approach to tackle scare stories about empty food shelves and shortages of medicine, but some of these scare stories came from investigation is carried out by cross—party groups of mps, including some chaired by
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dominic raab's party themselves. hundreds of thousands of teenagers across england, wales and northern ireland will receive their gcse results later today. in england, there have been major changes, with a new grading system and less coursework. elaine dunkley reports. as and bs, yes! that's good! under new changes, this is a thing of the past for gcse students in england. from today, it's out with letters, which have been replaced with numbered grades. most gcse subjects are now graded on a new scale from nine to one, as opposed to a* to g, with nine being the highest grade. i think we're used to it now, it's only teachers and students that are really used to it, like parents or some employers might not understand. i found it definitely a lot more challenging but interesting, because obviously it was a whole new system. it's notjust the grades that are changing. there's less coursework and more emphasis on final exams to make gcses more challenging. fewer grade 9s will be awarded
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than a*s, meaning it will be harder to get top marks, and a grade 4 is broadly equivalent to a c grade. there's been very significant change in education with a—levels and as we're seeing today at gcse, that's put pressure undoubtedly on teachers who haven't been able to rely on past papers in the way that they would, but it's also put huge pressure on young people, many of whom are doing six or more additional papers, they're doing 20 or more papers with a great emphasis on exams and they're worried that the guinea pigs in the system. there has been criticism the reforms will lead to confusion amongst employers used to the old grading system, but the government says the new 9—1 grades are a better way to differentiate between the abilities of students. elaine dunkley, bbc news. it can be a nerve wracking day for anyone opening those results today. for people who have got their results today, you can find advice and support on the bitesize website at www. bbc.com/bitesize/support.
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good luck to anyone going through that today. hope it goes well. if it doesn't, there are plenty of people to give you advice. don't panic if it doesn't go according to plan, not everything in life does! the number of heart attacks and strokes linked to diabetes could rise by nearly a third in england by 2035 because the number of people with the condition is increasing. the british heart foundation predicts that in two decades around five million people will have diabetes, resulting in 39,000 heart attacks and 50,000 strokes a year. the labour leader, jeremy corbyn, will call for a radical reform of the media industry in a speech at the edinburgh tv festival later. he'll threaten big digital companies with a windfall tax unless they agree to help fund independent journalism. companies could also be required to pay what is being called a digital licence fee to help the bbc compete with businesses such as amazon and netflix.
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the conservatives say the ideas would lead to higher bills for consumers. these tech companies not only are not paying their taxes, not only are they undermining journalism, but it seems there almost unaccountable to our democratic institutions and this isjeremy our democratic institutions and this is jeremy corbyn our democratic institutions and this isjeremy corbyn saying we're not going to have a few billionaires dictate the media market of britain in the decades ahead. we need to change that. we need rigourous public interestjournalism, change that. we need rigourous public interest journalism, and change that. we need rigourous public interestjournalism, and if the tech companies don't play their pa rt the tech companies don't play their part in that, then we'll make sure that they do. some patients who have dialled 999 have had to wait more than 24 hours for an ambulance, according to a bbc investigation. services across the uk have had to leave patients with non life threatening conditions waiting as they deal with an increase in emergency calls. parkinson's uk said it was tragic and ludicrous. nhs england said recent improvements had been made to
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the system. the prime minister of australia, malcolm turnbull, who narrowly fought off a leadership challenge earlier this week, has said he'll quit if a second contest is approved by his party. his challenger peter dutton has called for another vote tomorrow, and several members of mr turnbull‘s cabinet have resigned, as pressure for him to stand down grows. err, the reality is that a minority in the party room, supported by others outside the parliament, have sought to bully, intimidate others into making this change of leadership that they're seeking. the us has imposed a new round of financial tariffs on chinese goods, worth almost £12.5 billion. duties will be collected on products ranging from motorcycles to steam turbines in an ongoing trade war between the two countries. china has responded by imposing
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tariffs of equal value on goods from america. over the counter medicines or more traditional remedies, including honey, should be the first line of treatment when suffering from a bad cough. according to new guidance from public health england and the national institute for health care excellence, the use of antibiotics will do little to speed up recovery and could even make harmful bacteria stronger. a british—built laser satellite has been launched into space on a mission to provide meteorologists with better weather forecasts. the aeolus had been due to launch on tuesday but was postponed for 24 hours due to, you've guessed it, bad weather. the spacecraft blasted off late last night and delivered aeolus into orbit. the satellite, which was built in stevenage, is equipped with a powerful laser which will be
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able to directly measure wind speeds on earth from space, as well as help protect people from disasters such as floods and hurricanes. everyone uses ambulances from time to time... some patients have had to wait more than 24 hours for an ambulance to get to them after dialling 999. that's according to a bbc investigation which shows that betweenjune, 2017 and june of this year, the longest delays were recorded at more than 50 hours. we can speak now to mark docherty from the association of ambulance chief executives. thank you very much for talking to us this morning, and some of those statistics are pretty shocking, what do you make of them? those figures
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represent the longest waits and what we've got to remember is most people who need an ambulance urgently get a response very quickly. certainly when i'm working on ambulances, we deal with very serious incidents, the life—threatening conditions in a very timely manner and there is evidence more and more patients are surviving as a result of us getting to the most life threatened quickly. clearly when patients wait longer than we would like, that's reg retta ble, than we would like, that's regrettable, but as an example some of the long waits in my own service we re of the long waits in my own service were during the beast from the east and that made it very difficult to get to patients. we didn't want to keep them waiting but unfortunately the weather conditions meant it was exceptionally difficult.” appreciate it's a hard job. do you think that everything's all right and there are a few anomalies because of things like whether? know, there's clearly things we've got to work on. we mustn't lose sight of the fact we are doing exceptionally well. —— no. patients
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with trauma, you reported that a couple of days ago, more patients are surviving major trauma than ever before and we're getting to patients who have had a stroke and getting them to stroke centres quickly. patients with heart attack. the very serious patients with life—threatening conditions, we are doing extremely well with. but we've got to not be complacent, we have to continue to make improvements that we are making. what do those improvements need to be? so, we want more paramedics dealing with patients, we want more patients going to the right services, so we get many calling us who don't really have a life—threatening condition, and it is important those patients ta ke and it is important those patients take responsibility and go to the services that are able to provide the service for them — for example i was on an ambulance recently when we had a young man with a cough, a persistent cough, that takes the ambulance away from dealing with life—threatening emergencies and
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that's unacceptable. we have to start to get the public to use the services responsibly. when you have a call from someone with a persistent cough, do you send an ambulance? surely you don't send one. we often do. you have to remember we only have the symptoms the patient tells us. if they say they are having problems breathing, then we will go and assess the patient. so if you are a person who has an incident at home, how do you know when to call an ambulance and when not to? so there is a service called nhs111 which is intended to help patients choose the right service, so it you don't have a condition that is immediately life—threatening, then really my advice would be to call 111 and that will help you make the right choice as to which service is better suited to the particular problems you've got at the time. and i know you are
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in the west midlands area and you're good at hitting your targets, what's different about what you do compare to other areas that are not? we have a paramedic on every ambulance, a new fleet of vehicles, we resource our demand according to how it's going to come in, so there is lots of things we have done in preparation. we have also made sure that most of our ambulances have two crew, so they have the ability to transport patients, whereas we had ca rs transport patients, whereas we had cars for example, we changed the model of delivery, we have double—crewed ambulances, which means if they need onward transport there is no delay in getting the patient to the service, so with patients who have had a stroke, we might get there a little slower, but when we do we have the right vehicle, the right expertise to get those patients to a hyperacute
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stroke unit and that's really important because it is partly weather delays were with the old targets that we had, so those patients would need a quick response and onward transfer are getting that. so it sounds like you are well staffed and you have good kit, is that the problem in other areas? would it be easy to solve it. we talk often about the fact that there is not enough money in the system to fund and get the right staff and the right kit. yes, one of the challenges is to get enough paramedics into the service. we invested very heavily five years ago. we set up a paramedic academy where we trained paramedics. so this year with taken on between 300 and 400 additional student paramedics to make sure that we continue to build our workforce for the future. so nationally where there is a shortage of paramedics we have been able to introduce a local solution by training our own paramedics,
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employing local people, and at the end of a two period we have some very good staff who stay locally and provide an excellent service for us. thank you very much for your time this morning, i really appreciate it. 7:18am is the time. here's alina with a look at this morning's weather. hello. good morning. this was the scene yesterday in lincolnshire, past of eastern england had the best sunshine and highest temperatures, 27 yesterday. we won't see those values over the next few days because everywhere will turn cooler and fresher by day and by night with and fresher by day and by night with an extra of sunshine and showers. today, general spells of rain, two of them, lincolnshire into the midlands, the second into northern ireland and scotland, heavy and persistent in northern ireland, and both of these areas of rain slowly move south—east through the day,
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becoming patchy as they do, so the showers and rein into northern england in the afternoon, eventually it will be dry in south—east england, but plenty of showers into northern ireland and northern and western scotland. quite a breezy date with a gentle to moderate breeze. temperature—wise 14 to 16 is the top ten project in scotland and northern ireland. 18 to 22 or 23 in england and wales. so this evening we will see most of the showers fading and they will keep going for northern ireland and northern and western scotland and maybe some into scotla nd western scotland and maybe some into scotland and northern england. elsewhere dry and clear skies and feeling fresh for england and wales with temperatures between nine and 12 celsius, seven to nine celsius in scotla nd 12 celsius, seven to nine celsius in scotland and northern ireland and some rural spots will be three or four degrees lower. we are in the cooler air on friday with the humidity moving to the continent and these blue colours here, on the north—westerly wind, in that direction we will see showers in northern ireland, western and
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northern scotland, into cheshire, northern scotland, into cheshire, northern england and filter into south and east areas with a brisk north—westerly breeze in the afternoon, maybe a rumble of thunder. dry on the eastern and southern coast and all of us in the mid—to—high teens, so much cool and fresher across the uk. fewer showers on saturday because of high pressure building. 0ne on saturday because of high pressure building. one or on saturday because of high pressure building. 0ne ortwo on saturday because of high pressure building. one or two will sneak across. most will be largely dry. some spells of sunshine. temperatures not much higher than 14 or 15 for scotland and northern ireland, and 18 to 20 england and wales. 0n ireland, and 18 to 20 england and wales. on sunday and we start to lose our area of high pressure. notice the front moving from the west. that will increase the cloud on sunday. eventually we will see our press of rain in northern ireland, south—west england late in the afternoon into western scotland. further south and east, staying driest, the the sunshine in the eastern coasts, not much higher than 16 to 19 degrees. if you are thinking about the bank holiday
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monday the rain will clear and it is an improving picture with spells of sunshine for many. it is back to you. thank you very much. there are going to be lots of nervous pa rents there are going to be lots of nervous parents and teenagers today. it's gcse results day in england, wales and northern ireland, and hundreds of thousands of pupils are nervously waiting to find out how they got on. naga, jayne and tim are at a school in uxbridge this morning. it's going to be a tense day there, naga? what is the atmosphere like? do you know, charlie, it is really, really buzzy, and are the getting my gcse results, it remember the stomach flipped that you had, well, the kids seem really happy. they have a really good bunch here. results. good morning, everyone. dominic, you did really ugly in your favourite subject, tell us about it, you have been smiling all morning. so i got a
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nine in drama. and you had some really good strong passes across the board as well, so feeling positive. very happy. serra, a really good variety as well, were you expecting them to be so good? honestly, i found the exams really hard i wasn't expecting it, but! found the exams really hard i wasn't expecting it, but i am so happy about them now, so good. well done. and i know that you were pleased with english and arabic results as well. well done with those. you have had, i have looked at your list, i won't show you the personal details, lots of 9s. well done. thank you. did you find the exams difficult, more difficult than expected?m did you find the exams difficult, more difficult than expected? it was a challenge with the curriculum and a challenge with the curriculum and a lot of revision effort was required, but i am really happy with my grades and there was a lot of support from the school with the mock exams that we did, so i found that incredibly helpful, also mentality wise for the psyche and also for the morale. and you are
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feeling positive this morning. kingsley, you might have seen him earlier, you did excellently, and you have signed up for the sixth form, you just enrolled? you have signed up for the sixth form, youjust enrolled? yes. feeling excited? yes. you're not the only one who is excited this morning. so, he did excellently, then he called his mum to tell her then he called his mum to tell her the news, as you do, shall we say she was pleased? just a little bit, listen to this. how did you go? i got 47s, 18, and 59s. 59s! -- five nines! i am not surprised, she was so pleased. it is stressful for pa rents. so pleased. it is stressful for parents. she has been very supportive as well i am legend. yes, very much so. well done. and, aaron, you did very well, and we are waiting for the mass results, how did you find it? they were harder
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than last year, but i think i did pretty well, so... you did pretty well? lots of nines. well done. let's speak with the principle of the school, nigel. lots of children talking about the psyche and the mentality because of the exams, 90% of gcses in england using this grading system, how did you prepare the pupils for that? the biggest shakeup in the gcse is in 30 years and we've got lots and lots of extra work into the students preparing them for the rigour of the broader and more detailed exams —— gsces. lots of rehearsal, preparation and extra time. the work has been unprecedented from students and staff to get them ready for this point. and the results of the stu d e nts point. and the results of the students are testament to that. and they are really buzzing, you are too. fantastic results. it is a
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great support network, thank you very much. and we've had a lot of support from bobby seagull. mr seagull. thank you. doing a phd en masse anxiety, which would have helped kim, jayne and me as well. —— on maths anxiety. how did you find it? it is what it is. someone has message to say, i won't say good luck, but it is not, is it, everyone has done amazing, everyone i spoke with has done well, they have put in so with has done well, they have put in so much work. i didn't quite put in the effort, but that's what makes it count. i think we all tried to put the effort in, but we had different constraints, being time, otherjobs, sleep, but there is also the attitude with maths, because you wa nted attitude with maths, because you wanted to do well for your kids. hopefully set an example is —— set
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an example. and whatever happens, people expect it, that is the case with any exam. and it is about getting rid of the maths anxiety as well. it can happen, nationally, we have an issue where it seems a cce pta ble have an issue where it seems acceptable to say you are bad at maths. let's get rid of that culture. this is the starting point. and you can hear the screeches. yes, you can see that. lots of big hugs over there. we will let you see all of the joy. they are enjoying it. we will be back in an hour or so i suppose with our own results. to you, steph and charlie. thanks, naga, and well done to everyone who has their results and talked about them. i think we havejust met, haven't we, some of the students who haven't we, some of the students who have been at the top end, and they are very happy to go on tv and announce it and i know that there will be lots of people who don't necessarily have the top, but they
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have done brilliantly, so well done from us. yes, because it is all about the achievement, not necessarily the best grade, but doing the best on the day, so it is worth always emphasising that. you're watching breakfast. still to come this morning: best known for her role in fatal attraction, remember that? hollywood superstar glenn close tells us how she'd like to remake the classic movie, this time from the point of view of the mistress. 0h, oh, i 0h, iam oh, i am up for that, definitely, that has to be made, doesn't it? yes. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. i'm sara 0rchard. police officers are being urged to record each time they are spat at while on duty. union, the police federation, believes the evidence will help convince the head of the met to issue spit guards to all frontline staff. the controversial restraints are being trialled across the capital, but are only used in custody suites. the home office says that spit guards are a tactical option to give officers protection from spitting and reduce the worst
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effects of biting. just over 50% of the public are expecting a no—deal brexit according to a survey by the financial services firm kpmg. they questioned 3,000 people and of those 54% said they thought a no—deal brexit was more likely than not. it comes as the brexit secretary dominic rab prepares to outline some of the government's contingency plans in the event of a no deal. all this week bbc london has been looking at wildlife across the capital, from cows at 0sterly park to slow—worms in finsbury park. now, all londoners are being urged to welcome wildlife to the city no matter how small their contribution. you don't have to keep the veg and the flowers separate, you can grow them together because you get the beneficial insects that come along, the butterflies and bees that come along that beat the baddies, it is a win—win, really. let's have a look at the travel situation now.
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we have severe delays on the ba kerloo we have severe delays on the bakerloo line. we have severe delays on the ba kerloo line. a we have severe delays on the bakerloo line. a good service elsewhere. we have cancellations on the trains and delays on great anglia services between liverpool street, cambridge and hartford following signal problems also impacting sta nsted express. following signal problems also impacting stansted express. 0n the roads, the blackwall tunnel southern approach is building from the woolwich road flyover. in cannes —— kentish town, there is blocked road at the kentish town station, while it is southwark bridge and westminster bridge works going on. let's have a check on the weather now with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. a little bit of everything weatherwise today. it's a very mixed picture but a warm and a humid start, once more, 19 celsius in central london. then we are going to see a cold front come through. it will give us a little bit of early rain. and behind that we will see some fresher conditions for this afternoon, but also good spells of sunshine around as well. this is the picture this morning. lots of thickening cloud around, then we see the cold front come through.
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outbreaks of rain just for a short while, not too much for south—eastern areas of the capital. maybe it is staying dry. but then brightening up. north—westerly breeze developing and some sunny spells. top temperatures of 22 or 23 degrees, but of course those values are lower than they have been in the sunshine over recent days — we have lost the warm, humid air. 0vernight tonight there maybe a couple of showers this evening. some cooler air coming through again. clear skies mostly overnight tonight and temperatures rurally as low as seven or eight celsius, 11 or 12 in the towns. so a cooler start to the day tomorrow, feeling fresher tomorrow, sunny spells and maybe some showers around, and generally dry with some sunshine over the bank holiday weekend, but feeling cooler. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it's back to charlie and steph. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast
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with steph mcgovern and charlie stayt. here's a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news. advice on what people and businesses can do if the uk leaves the eu without a trade deal will be released this morning. the brexit secretary, dominic raab, is expected to say the guidance will help make sure the economy continues to function smoothly in the event of a no—deal brexit, although he stresses he's confident an agreement will be reached. hundreds of thousands of teenagers in england, wales and northern ireland will find out their gcse results this morning. the exams have undergone a radical shake—up in england. more emphasis will be placed on final exams and most papers will be graded under a numbered system. wales and northern ireland are keeping the a* to e grades. some patients who have dialled 999 have had to wait more than 24 hours for an ambulance, according to a bbc investigation. the figures, which were taken betweenjune 2017 and june this year, also showed that in one case a patient faced a 62 hour delay.
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the patients association says the findings are extremely concerning. the labour leader jeremy corbyn will call for a radical reform of the media industry in a speech at the edinburgh tv festival later. he'll threaten big digital companies with a windfall tax unless they agree to help fund independent journalism. the conservatives say the ideas would lead to higher bills for consumers, but labour argues a digital license fee will help the bbc compete with the likes of amazon and netflix. these tech companies not only are not paying their taxes, not only are they undermining journalism, but it seems there almost unaccountable to our democratic institutions and this isjeremy corbyn saying we're not going to have a few billionaires dictate the media market of britain in the decades ahead. we need to change that. we need rigourous public interest journalism, and if the tech companies don't play their part in that, then we'll make sure that they do. the number of heart attacks and strokes linked to diabetes could rise by nearly a third in england by 2035
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because the number of people with the condition is increasing. the british heart foundation predicts that in two decades around five million people will have diabetes, resulting in 39,000 heart attacks and 50,000 strokes a year. the prime minister of australia, malcolm turnbull, who narrowly fought off a leadership challenge earlier this week, has said he'll quit if a second contest is approved by his party. his challenger peter dutton has called for another vote tomorrow, and several members of mr turnbull‘s cabinet have resigned, as pressure for him to stand down grows. the us has imposed a new round of financial tariffs on chinese goods, worth almost £12.5 billion. duties will be collected on products ranging from motorcycles to steam turbines in an ongoing trade war between the two countries. china has responded by imposing tariffs of equal value on goods from america. a british—built laser
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satellite has been launched into space on a mission to provide meteorologists with better weather forecasts. the aeolus been due to launch on tuesday but was postponed for 24 hours due to, you've guessed it, bad weather. the spacecraft blasted off late last night. the satellite, which was built in stevenage, is equipped with a powerful laser which will be able to directly measure wind speeds on earth from space. did you know that weather forecasts are the most accurate forecasts we give apparently, not us personally, but... we have economic forecasts, people who forecast lots of different things and it turns out the weather is the one... it's got
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me thinking. got to be better than a horoscope! good point. carol's here a lwa ys horoscope! good point. carol's here always spot on! we're going to talk about danny cipriani and draw a line about his recent problems. i am a fan of the club he signed for, gloucester. there was a difference between club and country in relation to how he would be treated. but as you say, there's a line. hopefully it's all been sorted out. danny cipriani won't be sanctioned by the rfu over an incident at a nightclub in jersey last week. cipriani was fined by the courts after pleading guilty to common assault and resisting arrest. he was also fined by his club gloucester. rugby‘s governing body has decided that's punishment enough, and he's free to make his gloucester debut in a pre—season friendly tonight. england captain joe root says his side are still in the driving seat for their series with india, despite a heavy loss in the third test at trent bridge. the final day lasted just ten minutes before england lost their last wicket. jimmy anderson the last man to fall. india winning by 203 runs, but are still 2—1 down in the 5—match series.
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we're definitely in the driving seat as far as the series goes. you know, we have to keep remembering that. we have got a little bit of time now to go away and reflect on what's been a difficult week, but in england we are a very good side at bouncing back from a tough couple of days. one thing you can never question about this group of players is the character and the way they can respond to a difficult period or passage of play. well, england will name their squad this afternoon for the next week's fourth test in southampton. this man, hampshire's james vince, is expected to be re—called as cover forjonny bairstow who's broken a finger. it was a busy night in the championship, and more problems for stoke city. another defeat, this time at home to wigan. they lost 3—0. stoke were in the premier league a few months ago but are yet to win this season. fans already booing and criticising the manager and the team. much better for aston villa,
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they're still unbeaten this season, but they needed a late equaliser against brentford. neal maupay put brentford ahead in each half at villa park, butjonathan kodjia was just as prolific, and rescued a point for villa deep into injury time. it finished 2—2. it was another night of british success at the european para—athletics championships in berlin. kare adenegan beat fellow brit hannah cockroft to win t34100m gold. at 17, she is already the world record holder but this is herfirst major title having been beaten into second place by cockroft at both the paralympics and world championships. there was gold too for shot putter vanessa wallace in the f34 event. it's her first international title afterfinishing fifth in rio and last year's world championships. let's have a look at something which might bring good luck, shall we? i
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don't know if you saw the fan of fcu rostov, who brought his carpet to a match. shall we have a look? —— fc. do you think he meant to bring his flag and he mixed it up and brought the wrong thing instead.” flag and he mixed it up and brought the wrong thing instead. i don't know! i think he brought his carpet to the match, it was so successful, they won 4—0 when he did it. so the club invited the fan and his carpet to their training ground and things escalated from there, to the point where they've released a new fourth kit featuring the design of the carpet. it's already got 500 orders. it is so different from normal. it is so different from normalm is so hideous. when is it going to be available ? is so hideous. when is it going to be available? i don't know! let me think of the fcu rostov fixtures in my head. does it work in the next game? —— fc. my head. does it work in the next game? -- fc. they have sold 500 shirts on pre— order, they aren't even out there, will get you one, charlie, and i will send you to
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their next game. i wonder if we will see more people turning up to matches with rugs now. you have to be careful what you take to the footy but you could easily get a rug in! and you could have a picnic on the way there or the way back.” will go and get you the fixtures now, charlie! we have been talking about business and specifically with regard to brexit. business wants information. they don't want the unease of what's going to happen. businesses hate uncertainty. this morning the government will publish advice for businesses, and the public, on what to do if we leave the eu without a trade deal. ben's gathered together a panel of firms to see what they're looking out for. ben, where are you? you've gone downstairs a couple of flaws.” nipped outside because there were so many this morning. i want to bring
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you different views across the debate about what could happen in the event of a no—deal brexit. we are on the sofas outside, a whole panel of businesses and experts with me. i want to introduce you to alex, from the freight transport association. alex, we were talking earlier about the logistics involved, you represent hauliers and lorries that go up and down the roads. we've seen headlines about the queues at the ports, could that happen? it could happen and we are dealing in scenarios and uncertainty, what we're looking for todayis uncertainty, what we're looking for today is more clarity and certainty about what no deal looks like. do you get that clarity? there's been talk about more information but will we getan talk about more information but will we get an answer? what we want to see what we expect is plain english descriptions of how this will work. we want a deal, logistics needs a deal, there are things that can't be resolved by going back on wto rules, for example, moving trucks and planes across uk/ eu borders. we
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wa nt planes across uk/ eu borders. we want a deal, but that said, if it is no deal we need to know the plans now so no deal we need to know the plans now so businesses can start making those plans to make it work. you're from kpmg and you've been doing research about consumer behaviour, what we might do in the event of a no—deal brexit. what does that tell you? some of it is pretty stark. it's interesting, we have commissioned a piece of research that looks at how consumers will respond in the event of a no—deal brexit. businesses are starting to think about that more and it's interesting that around 70% of consumers are interesting that around 70% of consumers are saying that they will change their spending habits in the event of a no deal. which we, up or down? it is down i'm afraid! -- which direction. a central spending, 40% of people say they will reduce spending on essentials —— essential spending. 50% say they will delay purchases on big—ticket items. spending. 50% say they will delay purchases on big—ticket itemsm that driven by pew uncertainty, the
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idea we don't know? people stepping back until we have clarity —— by uncertainty. yes, uncertainty. people are concerned about job security, they're not sure what will happen and reining back on spending, particularly non—essential spending, is one way to manage personal risk. jane, you run a children's personal meals company, talking about reining in spending, what goes through your mind when you hear those kinds of surveys ? mind when you hear those kinds of surveys? immediately worrying, we have children's food and parents prioritise spending on their children but that nervousness makes supermarkets nervous, you hope they continue to spend on your product but you don't know. more uncertainty. depending on the business, they say we have been through worse, recessions, global crises, we can deal with this. is there an element of truth in that?
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we carry on day to day because we don't know what's going to happen. we carry on day to day as we have been. but the level of uncertainty does affect us because we're in a stage of growth, we are reliant on supermarket contracts and various other contracts, so any uncertainty means people tend not to make decisions. for growth you need funding and finance, so if there's nervousness about that, people don't know what will happen. uncertainty breeds consumers not spending and supermarkets being slower to make decisions really. there's so many logistical elements but also the issue of what we're going to spend. next to me is ed sold, the managing director of a dairy company, talk about the logistics you're worried about the logistics you're worried about or having to contend with because lots of what you do our imports and exports and getting stuff to the factories when you need them —— sold. stuff to the factories when you need them -- sold. we have factories nationwide but we rely on imports as
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well. it's a real situation and there is no scaremongering here, but there is no scaremongering here, but the reality is consumers, businesses, millions of businesses and millions of consumers, joe public need the certainty and the deal to make sure they can have access to reliable, safe products into the uk. if i take a litre of goats milk from our business, on a british farm, british product on a british farm, british product on a british farm, british product on a british farm, made by british goats from a british farmer, that farmer relies on subsidies from europe. the medication it he might need comes from europe. if the exchange rate drops, the crude oil price goes up, the machinery in our factory comes from europe, the packaging comes from europe, the packaging comes from italy, the caps from germany. everything is affected by europe. although we don't want to say there's going to be the queues at there's going to be the queues at the ports, it's a real situation and with anything, people are worried
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out there and businesses are really worried. there's a lot of contingency planning going on around all of this. what we really need is uncertainty as to how we're going to move forward because money is tight, especially in the food industry, and we especially in the food industry, and we need to know where we can spend wisely in the coming months. ed, thanks very much and thanks to you all for now. more later. the issue is about certainty but one of the big problem is, of course, is finding out happen and when it's going to happen so businesses can make arrangements. some say short—term pain for long—term gain, but nonetheless, as we've heard from the panel, real issues for business to contend with on a day to day basis. we'll speak to more people in the next hour and share some of those views with you later. interesting to hear what people have to say. thanks very much. lots of different angles on it. here's alina with a look at this morning's weather. good morning. a bit of sunshine around this morning after overnight rain. this is west yorkshire. chilly
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start of the day. the rain hasn't gone very far. we have to make band of rain. the first is in lincolnshire, down the midlands into somerset. some heavy and persistent rainfora time. somerset. some heavy and persistent rain for a time. this will slowly sink south and east, along with the second band, bringing heavy rainfall northern ireland, into southern and western scotland. so these areas of rain slowly through the day starting to push south and east, weakening as they do, becoming more patchy, then dry in south—east england and east anglia in the middle of the day, with some heavy rain across parts of northern england in the early afternoon and behind it blustery showers moving, gusty wind at times for northern ireland and western scotland. elsewhere it is a gentle to moderate breeze. temperatures down on yesterday, particularly crossing when and wales, 19 to 23 celsius here, just 14 to 16 in northern ireland and scotland.
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showers over night, particularly for northern ireland, western scotland, filtering across to northern england, maybe the north midlands. elsewhere should be mainly dry, clear skies. further south and east. and a fresh night. we have lost the humidity, loads of six to seven in scotla nd humidity, loads of six to seven in scotland and 9012 in england, wales and northern ireland. —— nine to 12. we will see more showers in northern ireland, scotland and england, and brisk breezes, moving south and east through the day, with the rumble of thunder. always try on eastern channel posts, and mid—to—high teens, so much fresherfeel. and a cool start today on saturday. we will see an area of high pressure building. fewer showers around. that doesn't mean there won't be any. scotla nd doesn't mean there won't be any. scotland and wales could have one or two through the day. mainly dry with
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spells of sunshine after a fairly a chilly start in places. temperatures rising to between 14 and 20 celsius. then another change on sunday. we lose the area of high pressure. the fronts lose the area of high pressure. the fro nts m ove lose the area of high pressure. the fronts move from the west. that will increase the clout sunday. some places will be dry and bright with some sunshine. rain arriving into northern england, wales and south—west england, maybe scotland at the end of the day. the driest with the best of the sunshine that further east that you are but that is why be much higher than 15 to 19 celsius so it is a fresher feel by day and by night as we head into the weekend, charlie and steph. oh, alina, thank you very much. it felt very hot to me. 7:48am is the time now. over the counter medicines or more traditional remedies, including honey, should be the first line of treatment when suffering from a bad cough, according to new guidance from public health england. it says, in most cases, antibiotics will do little to speed up recovery and could even help strengthen harmful bacteria.
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we're joined by gp tessa lewis, of the national institute for clinical excellence, who jointly drafted these new guidelines. thank you very much forjoining us on the sofa. so this is about to many of us thinking antibiotics are what we should go to when we feel ill, is that it? yes, that's right. so the guidelines looked at the best way to treat common infections like a cough that's only lasted three weeks and we know a lot of it is caused by viral infection, it will settle over three weeks gradually, and if you are otherwise fit and well antibiotics won't be needed unless you have more serious symptoms. talk to us about the role that honey could play in this, because i think a lot of people know it has been linked to sort of healthy living to a large degree, honey drinks, you know, remedies of different kinds, but what is the science behind the benefits of honey? so, nice looked at treatment
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for acute coughs, because we know it will last and we want to settle the treatments, so we looked at the over—the—counter treatments and herbal remedies. we have to say that the evidence was quite limited. but it does suggest that honey might be soothing, it might reduce the frequency and severity of a cough. might be sounds quite vague in scientific testing terms. yes, it was based on three controlled trials which showed that it might reduce those severity of symptoms by about two points on the 7—point scale only on the short—term and the evidence is limited. how does it compare with other treatments you might be tempered to try? the studies we looked at were just looking at placebo and honey in particular, in terms of antibiotics we know that these are often viral infections and
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so antibiotics really don't have a role to play unless people have underlying conditions, or are seriously unwell. doctors prescribe antibiotics, socially if you go to a doctor it is up to them whether you get them or not, not the person with the virus. we are really worried about the amount of antibiotics that are being used and the bugs are becoming resistant, and it is harder to treat this infraction, so this is a problem for all of us, so we need to make that decisionjointly —— infection. the guidance tries to narrow down the people who are most likely to benefit from antibiotics. and it is kind of leaving the basis for people to share the decision between the doctor and the patient, it has to be a joint decision. do you think doctors have been overprescribing antibiotics?” think, i suspect, overprescribing antibiotics?” think, isuspect, i overprescribing antibiotics?” think, i suspect, i myself sometimes prescribe more than i should, but we... we have to be careful about
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how we are using our antibiotics, and we know that overall we are using them too often for these infections, which are self—limiting. so if someone is fit and well, otherwise... we want to see the cough settle, that the volume of phlegm is getting less, that it is getting lighter in colour and easing off over three weeks. that is what we off over three weeks. that is what we need to see and the people who need to see the gp other people where that is not happening, do they have more serious conditions? we will leave it there. thank you very much. thank you. it isjust coming up much. thank you. it isjust coming up to 7:55am and i am so excited and incredibly jealous you up to 7:55am and i am so excited and incrediblyjealous you got to do this interview. glen close is who we have talked about. we should explain that. yes! i was getting to it. glenn close has spent her career playing wronged women, most famously alex forrest in fatal attraction. everyone remembers the scene. and her new film the wife is no exception. there are similar themes.
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despite being nominated for an oscar many times, she's yet to actually win one. so could this role finally be the one to break that duck? she's been speaking to me about her life and career. glen close, lovely to see you. lovely to see you. welcome to our little balcony. we are at somerset house overlooking the thames. and over there the national theatre where you have performed in the past. is that right? i played a streetcar named desire. does it bring back happy memories? yes, working with trevor nunn at an incredible cast. i am aware of those indiscretions. please, don't paint me as indiscretions. please, don't paint measa indiscretions. please, don't paint me as a victim. i am much more interested in that. tell us about the wife. i say it is a story about a very complex marriage and in a way you could also say it is a kind of
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love story. your character i don't know how to describe, there is all of those phrases coming to mind like long serving, long—suffering, there is an element to that that you are on the lookout for. she is someone who... 0ne on the lookout for. she is someone who... one of my favourite scenes to shoot, well, actually, i love the whole process. but when i was standing there when we arrived in stockholm holding his coat. because that kind of shows her role in this marriage for a lot of years. and then there is the scene at a cocktail party when she is almost invisible. he kind of negates and doesn't introduce her to anyone. she has to introduce herself. and ijust think it is a situation that quite a few women will identify with on one level or another. inevitably, i asked the question, do you feel like you have ever... have you ever felt that yourself? i've certainly been in situations where i felt diminished and invisible, yes, and
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it is deadly. i mean... and that's all i'm going to say! it is intriguing. that is fascinating. people might be thinking giving your career and your role that it would be the reverse and that you might a lwa ys be the reverse and that you might always have been the focus. yes, but... yes. it kind of played into my... in some ways i think i was incredibly shy as a child and i have finally come to the point in my life where i realised that going into a roomful of people i don't know is not my favourite thing to do. you know. i am not my favourite thing to do. you know. iam more not my favourite thing to do. you know. i am more on the introverted side of life. so i understood that side of life. so i understood that side of life. so i understood that side of her as well. i wanted to ask you about fatal attraction because you about fatal attraction because you made the link between alex's character and how things totally fell for her and mental health issues and how we look at them now and how that film might be different if it were made now with the sensibilities we have. well, back in
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‘88, when that was made, mental illness, mental health was not talked about at all, basically, it really wasn't. and i think it would be fascinating to tell the exact same story from alex forrest's point of view because she was not, as she has been labelled, one of the great villains of all time. the bunny boiler. yes, i think nobody really... she was fascinating. you didn't quite know. but you did not know the why of her behaviour. and it is in revealing the why of her behaviour that i think would be... would be very interesting to people because i was not playing the greatest villain of all time, i was playing a very specific human being who was in crisis. she is a really interesting lady to talk to, it was an amazing experience in hollywood and just hearing her thoughts now on things she has done in the past is intriguing, isn't it? yes, she is called, definitely. —— cool.
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the wife is in cinemas from 26th september. coming up on breakfast this morning: from portly penguins to chubby chimps, it's the annual weigh—in for the residents of london zoo. we'll be there to hear how they go about monitoring the health of thousands of animals. the headlines coming up injust a moment. yes. good morning from bbc london news. i'm sara 0rchid. police officers are being urged to record each time they are spat at while on duty. union, the police federation, believes the evidence will help convince the head of the met to issue spit guards to all frontline staff. the controversial restraints are being trialled across the capital, but are only used in custody suites. the home office says that spit guards are a tactical option to give officers protection from spitting and reduce the worst effects of biting. the number of thefts at cash machines in london has gone up by nearly 60% over the last ten years. research by moneysupermarket found that since 2007 there were more than 1,400 robberies at atms in the capital, higher than any other
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city in the uk. the two worst hotspots for the crime were westminster and camden. all this week bbc london has been looking at wildlife across the capital. from cows at 0sterly park to slow—worms in finsbury park. now all londoners are being urged to welcome wildlife to the city no matter how small their contribution. you don't have to keep the veg and the flowers separate — you can grow them together, because you get the beneficial insects that come along, the butterflies and bees that come along that eat the baddies. it's a win—win, really. let's have a look at the travel situation now. 0n the tubes this morning, we've got minor delays on the bakerloo line. there's cancellations and delays on greater anglia trains between liverpool street, cambridge and hertford east following signal problems near cheshunt. services on the stansted express are also affected. 0n
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are also affected. the roads, there are southbound delays 0n the roads, there are southbound delays for waterworks. in kentish town, leighton road is blocked following a collision near kentish town station. the victoria embankment remains closed westbound from southwark bridge to westminster bridge for gas works. let's have a check on the weather now with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. a little bit of everything weatherwise today. it's a very mixed picture but a warm and a humid start, once more, 19 celsius in central london. then we are going to see a cold front come through. it will give us a little bit of early rain. and behind that we will see some fresher conditions for this afternoon, but also good spells of sunshine around as well. this is the picture this morning. lots of thickening cloud around, then we see the cold front come through. outbreaks of rain just for a short while, not too much for south—eastern areas of the capital. maybe it is staying dry. but then brightening up. north—westerly breeze developing and some sunny spells. top temperatures of 22 or 23 degrees, but of course those values are lower than they have been in the sunshine over recent days — we have lost all the warm, humid air. 0vernight tonight there maybe a couple of showers this evening. some cooler air coming through again. clear skies mostly overnight tonight and temperatures rurally as low
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as seven or eight celsius, 11 or 12 in the towns. so a cooler start to the day tomorrow, feeling fresher tomorrow, sunny spells and maybe some showers around, and generally dry with some sunshine over the bank holiday weekend, but feeling cooler. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. good morning and welcome to breakfast, with steph mcgovern and charlie stayt. 0ur headlines today. setting out the plans for a no—deal brexit. today the government will publish advice for people and businesses. companies will receive long—awaited advice today,
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but what could no deal mean for them, and are they ready to leave the eu? we've assembled a panel to find out what a no deal brexit could mean for them. new grades and tougher tests, hundreds of thousands of teenagers get their gcse results this morning. and we are at some of them here in uxbridge this morning, and the atmosphere is amazing, and we will get 0ur results as well! the waiting game — figures obtained by the bbc show that four ambulance trusts took more than 24 hours to answer some 999 calls. than 24 hours to answer in sport, danny cipriani won't be sanctioned by the rfu, after last week pleading guilty to common assault and resisting arrest. good morning, some of us seeing some sunshine to start the day, others having some rain, all of us with
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some fresh air about this afternoon —— some fresher air by this afternoon. it's thursday 23rd august. our top story. contingency plans for a no deal brexit will be outlined by the government today. brexit secretary dominic raab will say the uk is prepared to take "unilateral action" to maintain continuity whatever the eu does, but insists they're confident of securing a deal. jonathan blake has more. as well as summer holidays, government ministers have been away on business over the last few weeks, touring the capitals of europe to talk up their plan for brexit. the agreement reached weeks ago by the cabinet at chequers has not been warmly welcomed by officials in brussels, which has meant more talk about the possibility of britain leaving the eu without a deal. it does mean disruption to trade as we know it, and, as a consequence of that, a disruption to the level of economic activity. it makes sense to put those
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preparations in place for no deal, because we're in a negotiation. so we're taking sensible precautions, we're taking sensible measures, but we're working hard to get a good deal. hospitals and ambulance services have warned of a possible shortage of supplies. farms could be on the brink of collapse, according to the national farmers union. and a committee of mps said no deal would be a disasterfor the uk food and drink industry. the brexit secratary dominic raab said the government pass technical said the government's technical notices will tackle what he called hair—raising scare stories. here at westminster, talk of leaving the eu without a deal is a sensitive subject. some see it as no bad thing. for others, it's the worst of all worlds. everyone, though, will be looking closely to see how the government has decided people should prepare. as the deadline for departure looms, what life could be like outside the eu without a brexit deal is about to become a little clearer. jonathan blake, bbc news.
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let's get more on this now from our political correspondent iain watson, who is in westminster this morning. iain, there have been lots of warnings about no—deal, will this put people's mind at rest? it isa it is a hard balance, isn't it, not telling everyone that there could be no deal? that's right. i think dominic raab will be trying to walk that tightrope later on this, and morning he's going to be saying that a good deal is within sight but of course the government prepares for every eventuality. indeed a senior minister within government said that this worry that perhaps every contingency had not been planned for was the worry so there will be some reassurance in the speech today that there is an intriguing phrase in the speech, which is about taking unilateral action in the event of no
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deal. translated, ithink unilateral action in the event of no deal. translated, i think what that actually means is that next year after brexit if there is no deal, what will actually happen is that the uk will voluntarily continue to follow many eu rules to keep disruption to trade and transport to a minimum — and that might shock some people who campaigned to leave the eu. i think dominic raab might also be suggesting that the government would take over some payments to the farming industry which otherwise would come from brussels. so i think the message will be one of reassurance under any circumstances. but political opponents are saying is that labour says this would be a disaster, no deal, but the liberal democrats are saying that they are trying to make no deal sound so unattractive that anything theresa may agrees would look good by comparison. thank you very much! hundreds of thousands of teenagers across england, wales and northern ireland will receive their gcse
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results later today. in england, there have been major changes, with a new grading system and less coursework. elaine dunkley reports. as and bs, yes! that's good! under new changes, this is a thing of the past for gcse students in england. from today, it's out with letters, which have been replaced with numbered grades. most gcse subjects are now graded on a new scale from nine to one, as opposed to a* to g, with nine being the highest grade. i think we're used to it now, it's only teachers and students that are really used to it. like, parents or some employers might not understand. i found it definitely a lot more challenging but also interesting, because obviously it was a whole new system. and it's notjust the grades that are changing. there's less coursework and more emphasis on final exams to make gcses more challenging. fewer grade 9s will be awarded than a*s, meaning it will be harder to get top marks, and a grade 4 is broadly
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equivalent to a c grade. there's been very significant change in education with a—levels and as we're seeing today at gcse, that's put pressure undoubtedly on teachers, who haven't been able to rely on past papers in the way that they would, but it's also put huge pressure on young people, many of whom are doing six or more additional papers, they'll be doing 20 or more papers with a great emphasis on exams and they're worried that they're the guinea pigs in the system. there has been criticism that the reforms will lead to confusion amongst employers used to the old grading system, but the government says the new 9—1 grades are a better way to differentiate between the abilities of students. elaine dunkley, bbc news. for people who are getting their results today, you can find advice and support on the bitesize website at www. bbc.com/bitesize/support. lots of advice there on what you
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have to do weather you got the results you want it or not. we have a lot of pressure on these days but for a lot of people it does not mean a thing at all in the end. some patients who have dialled 999 have had to wait more than 24 hours for an ambulance, according to a bbc investigation. services across the uk have had to leave patients with non life threatening conditions waiting as they deal with an increase in emergency calls. the patients association says the figures are "extremely concerning". matt graveling reports. category 1, the highest priority 999 call. the ambulance response in seven minutes or less can mean the difference between life and death. but calls like this mean that other patients may have to wait. it's my wife, she's fallen off a step and broke her wrist
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or leg or something, she can't move at all... this was not classed as category 1. sylvia had broken a hip but had to wait on the floor while ambulances were diverted to more urgent calls. her daughter called again... unfortunatley we don't have any vehicles currently assigned at the moment. oh god, oh... unfortunately we have been exceptionally busy in the area. i know, but two hours? south central ambulance service has apologised, saying there were nine patients in the local area with more serious or similar injuries awaiting a response, too. it took three and half hours for sylvia's ambulance to arrive, but our figures show that some patients have had to wait much longer. betweenjune 2017 and june 2018, ambulances from four different services took more than 24 hours to reach patients. these included people with breathing difficulties and mental health problems. the longest delays in the uk were recorded by the welsh ambulance service, which kept four patients waiting for more than 50 hours each. the service said the numbers were not typical. the trusts involved have said the longest waits were for less serious calls and said they had
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to prioritise resources to life—threatening emergencies. the government have recently announced an additional £36 million of funding to boost ambulance crews and improve ambulance fleets. matt graveling, bbc news. the number of heart attacks and strokes linked to diabetes could rise by nearly a third in england by 2035 because of soaring numbers of people with the type 2 version of the condition. the british heart foundation predicts that in two decades, around five million people will have type 2 diabetes, which could result in 39,000 heart attacks and 50,000 strokes a year. the labour leader, jeremy corbyn, will call for a radical reform of the media industry in a speech at the edinburgh tv festival later. he'll threaten big digital companies with a windfall tax unless they agree to help fund independentjournalism.
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the conservatives say the ideas would lead to higher bills for consumers, but labour argues a digital license fee will help the bbc compete with the likes of amazon and netflix. these tech companies not only are they not paying their taxes, not only are they undermining journalism, but it seems they‘ re almost unaccountable to our democratic institutions and this isjeremy corbyn saying we're not going to have a few billionaires dictate the media market of britain in the decades ahead. we need to change that. we need rigourous public interest journalism, and if the tech companies don't play their part in that, then we'll make sure that they do. the prime minister of australia, malcolm turnbull, who narrowly fought off a leadership challenge earlier this week, has said he'll quit if a second contest is approved by his party. his challenger peter dutton has called for another vote tomorrow, and several members of mr turnbull‘s cabinet have resigned, as pressure for him to stand down grows. the us has imposed a new round of financial tariffs on chinese goods, worth almost £12.5 billion. duties will be collected on products ranging from motorcycles
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to steam turbines in an ongoing trade war between the two countries. china has responded by imposing tariffs of equal value on goods from america. we're joined from singapore by asia business correspondent karishma vaswani. extraordinary backdrop of the docks there and a easy shipping lane, this isa there and a easy shipping lane, this is a strange time in terms of international trade? absolutely, is a strange time in terms of internationaltrade? absolutely, i could not have put it better myself, it's very strange and scary and a lot of business out in this part of the world where i am currently standing here in singapore against the backdrop of singapore port, one of the busiest in asia, many businesses are extremely concerned about what appears to be a ratcheting up of this trade war between the world's two superpowers, the us and china. unfortunately many
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countries in this part of the world are caught up in the crossfire. businesses from the asia—pacific region often send their goods off to china to get assembled into the final package, if you will. that then gets sent to the united states. some of those products are now having tariffs applied by the us and the concern is that this could get much worse. for the moment, thank you. 0ver—the—counter medicines or more traditional remedies including honey should be the first line of treatment when suffering from a bad cough. according to new guidance from public health england and the national institute for health care excellence, the use of antibiotics will do little to speed up recovery and could even make harmful bacteria stronger. those are the main stories this morning just let's go back to the gcse results. it is a nerve—racking
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day four people, including our naga, jayne and tim! naga is at a school in uxbridge with them this morning and you are going to be finding out your maths gcse results in not long andi your maths gcse results in not long and i don't envy you, i'll be honest! i know you don't, steph! half an hour or honest! i know you don't, steph! halfan hourorso, honest! i know you don't, steph! half an hour or so, we're going to get our results, jayne and tim and myself sat our maths gcse a few months ago. here we are at uxbridge high school, lots of people have been opening their results this morning just 90% of gcses and now i using this new grading system where it isl-9 using this new grading system where it is 1—9 instead of the a*s and the as. employers apparently want stu d e nts to as. employers apparently want students to be better prepared and more ahead of entering the
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workplace. these students have been opening their results and it has been a mixed bag. i have been looking at some comments on twitter about the new grading system and the new exam system, less coursework, more exams, how it has affected people and their mental health as well just lots to talk about with the schools minister, who joins well just lots to talk about with the schools minister, whojoins me now from westminster just the schools minister, whojoins me now from westminsterjust nick gibbs, thank you very much for joining us this morning on brea kfast. joining us this morning on breakfast. let's talk about the issue of mental health and exams, more examination time, less coursework, what was the idea is a net well, we wanted to improve the standard of the gcse, we have had complaints from employers about school leavers not being at a sufficient level in english and maths particularly and also there was too wide a gap between the gcses and the a—levels just so these are more demanding exams based on a more demanding curriculum, we looked around the world and we wanted to make sure our exams were on a par
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with the best education systems in the world. of course, these exams, like any exams, always have an element of stress. the best schools, of course, equip young people to deal with that stress and to be better prepared. but there will a lwa ys better prepared. but there will always be stressed, of course, when young people are taking exams like gcses and a—levels. young people are taking exams like gcses and a-levels. of course they will but lots of people and teachers also saying that the level of stress thatis also saying that the level of stress that is now being put on pupils is disproportionate and this is going to come at a cost ofjust i don't wa nt to to come at a cost ofjust i don't want to use social media as a barometer but there is a lot of disturbing reports about how pupils and parents are dealing with this and parents are dealing with this and how stressful they have found it — does that not concerned you? and how stressful they have found it - does that not concerned you? of course, it would concern me if our young people were facing undue levels of stress and we as a government take mental health issues very seriously with social media in particular adding to the stress that
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young people face. we take it seriously, that's why we have had a paper recently about mental health and funding schools to help deal professionally with the levels of anxiety that pupils are facing generally in life in a modern society. but in terms of the stress of these exams, we want schools to help children deal with that stress. which are also bringing in relationship and sex education curriculum and parts of that content are about teaching about mental health, how to tackle anxiety and mental health issues. let's talk about grade boundaries this year. a four,which is considered a standard pass, i think the equivalent of a c, you need 21%. to get a nine requires 84%. 21% for a standard pass, that seems acceptable to employers you have spoken to? well, that will depend on the subject. what we
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wa nted depend on the subject. what we wanted to make sure was that in the year when we are introducing these more demanding gcses, that this particular year group were not disadvantaged. so, the regulators had a system in place since about 2010 called comparable outcomes to make sure that when you introduce a new exam , make sure that when you introduce a new exam, broadly speaking, the proportions getting the different grades is the same as previous yea rs. grades is the same as previous years. and the grade for lovell, some exams might have quite a low pass mark. now, what we expect to see in the time going forward, in the years ahead, is that percentage figure rising. —— grade four level. they will be rising as a schools get better used to teaching that curriculum. so, you think the exams will get harder? i sat the maths gcse and it does seem significantly more difficult... good luck, we're waiting to see your results, naga,
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ina waiting to see your results, naga, in a little while. but yes, we did wa nt to in a little while. but yes, we did want to make sure that the gcses we re want to make sure that the gcses were preparing our young people as best as the school system can. and there were complaints about the standards of gcse in the past and thatis standards of gcse in the past and that is what we have responded to. we have worked with head teachers and academic experts around the world and we have taken seven years to get to this point, where these young people are waiting for their results in these new gcses. a couple of questions, people thinking that it arts are now losing out and sciences are winning? well, actually the proportion of young people taking at least one arts gcse has remained stable over the last few yea rs, remained stable over the last few years, at a time when the proportion taking at least two science gcses has risen from 63% in 2010 to 91% now. so that's a very good results. but the arts have remained stable. we saw last week that the proportion taking artand
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we saw last week that the proportion taking art and design a level has increased, as has the proportion taking music a—level. 0ver increased, as has the proportion taking music a—level. over 60,000 young people are taking art and design figures at gcse. those were the figures from last year. so, the a rts the figures from last year. so, the arts remain important to a creative commonly like britain and i suspect they will remain important in the yea rs they will remain important in the years ahead. we're spending £500 million on extra art and music provision in our schools between 2016 and 2020, that the second biggest curriculum division, second to sport, but we are providing for our schools. you are the only minister we are talking to on the programme this morning, we have been talking about the prospect of a no deal, 218 days to go to brexit. there are reports that if there is no deal there could be a shortage of medicine, food and fuel, can you guarantee that this isn't going to happen if we have no deal? well, the
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government has been preparing for the prospect of a no deal arrangement with the european union. we don't want a no deal, we want there to be a good deal with the european union and we are optimistic that their will be a deal with the european union about our future trading arrangements. but of course any prudent, cautious government will, of course, have to have plans in place in case there is not a deal. and that is what dominic raab will be announcing later today, his 84 technical papers setting out all the detail of what happens if there is no deal. mr gadd, schools minister, thank you were talking to us. thank you and good luck, naga! back to you. time for the weather with alena. good morning, everyone. we have had
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some rain overnight and this is pontefra ct some rain overnight and this is pontefract in some rain overnight and this is pontefra ct in west some rain overnight and this is pontefract in west yorkshire just a couple of hours ago. we have still got some rain around at the moment. also a second band coming from the eastern side of england and down towards south—west england. a fairly damp start here today in lincolnshire. there are two distinct bands of rain. this persistent area across northern ireland and western scotland. both of these are pushing south—eastwards over the coming hours, tending to weaken and become a bit more patchy as they do so. quite a windy day here in northern ireland, elsewhere, a gentle to moderate breeze. 0nce ireland, elsewhere, a gentle to moderate breeze. once the rain clears away from south—east england we should have some good sunshine. but it will be feeling fresher for all of us. still a few showers
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around this evening and overnight, chiefly for northern ireland, western and northern scotland. elsewhere it should be mainly dry and some fairly clear skies the further south and east you go. so, a much fresher feeling night. further south and east you go. so, a much fresherfeeling night. and we are all in the much fresher air tomorrow, a noticeable north—westerly wind, which will be bringing quite a few showers. given the strength of the wind, some of those showers will felt further south and east during the day, heavy, maybe even thundery if you catch one. nowhere really getting above the mid—to high teens so, a much cooler feel to the end of the week. on saturday there will still be one or two showers but most people having a dry day. temperatures recovering after that
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cool start. 0n temperatures recovering after that cool start. on sunday the high pressure slips away and we see a front moving in from the westbridge will increase the cloud through the morning. it will bring some out rates of rain later in the morning and into the afternoon. further east, mainly dry. so, we're all going to notice some fresher feeling days and nights over the coming days. i was just thinking days and nights over the coming days. i wasjust thinking i am looking forward to the fresher days because it has felt very muggy. and the nights as well because it has been quite uncomfortable, particularly across england and wales. from penguins to spider monkeys, today is the day hundreds of animals hit the scales at london zoo for their annual weighing day.
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the sizes of the creatures are recorded by keepers every year so they can monitor their health and well—being. iimagine it i imagine it is quite an operation trying to catch them all, the penguins, the monkeys, quite a job! it's quite a heavy task to undertake and our reporter marc ashdown is there to see how it's done. where are you? well, i am in the bird display, welcome to london zoo, good conditions i am told for what is the most important day in the calendar, the start of the weighing. they take down every vital statistics for every animal tune note what kind of health they are in. siobhan is here with us to explain more but firstly, introduce us to several? she is a red legged... they will be found all across south america, more in the grassland areas. very well-behaved.
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he is at the moment! i can't imagine what it is like trying to weigh a lion or a tiger, some are easier than others is a nap yeah, but of course we do as much training as possible. penguins, for example, they will do their routine every day so it is quite easy but squirrel monkeys on the other hand can be quite difficult because they will all try andjump on quite difficult because they will all try and jump on the scales at the same time. can we try and weigh.? and the same time. can we try and weigh. ? and you the same time. can we try and weigh.? and you share the same time. can we try and weigh. ? and you share this data with zoos weigh. ? and you share this data with zoos around the world? we do, we share it on a database and all the information we get will be shared throughout the world with other zoos as well as conservation efforts in the wild as well. obviously, it is not proving easy to weigh several! they've only got another 18,000
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animals to go! now it is time for the news and weather where you are. hello, good morning. yesterday we got to 27 celsius in lincolnshire but we will not see temperatures like that for a good few days because it is turning much cooler and fresherfor because it is turning much cooler and fresher for many of us over the next few days. there will be a mixture of sunshine and showers. this morning we start with the rain in the south—east of england eventually clearing in the afternoon. frequent showers moving into scotland and northern england and the north and west of wales, sunny spells in between, looking dry in the south—east during the afternoon. temperatures down on what they have been in recent days, 16 or
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17 degrees in the north, 21—23 further south. tonight we continue with showers, particularly around scotland, northern ireland and far north west of england, much cooler night compared to previous nights, especially in the south—east, more co mforta ble especially in the south—east, more comfortable for sleeping. temperatures in rural areas getting down to fairly low single figures. 0n down to fairly low single figures. on friday we will see further showers into scotland, northern ireland, north—west england and wales, a few showers dotted around elsewhere but there will be bright spells, sunshine in between, feeling cooler again. we have some greens on the map, the oranges and reds com pletely the map, the oranges and reds completely disappeared. temperatures at best on friday about 15, 16 degrees in the north, 17—19d further south across england and wales. that cooler feel will continue into the weekend, that north—westerly wind. 0n weekend, that north—westerly wind. on saturday a ridge of high pressure keeps things relatively fine and dry but this area of low pressure will
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move in during sunday so things will turn cloudy up during sunday. chance of rain in north and western areas. there will be sunny spells on saturday and into bank holiday monday. those temperatures staying on the rather lower side, 17—19dc. bye— bye. this is business live from bbc news with maryam moshiri and sally bundock. a $16 billion ramping up of tensions — that's the amount the us is imposing on chinese goods — and beijing has responded in kind. live from london, that's our top story on thursday 23rd august. total tariffs imposed by both china and the us now total $100 billion — what can be done to ratchet back tensions before they further impact global trade?
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also in the programme. the brexit back—up plan — the uk government unveils its contingency preperations in the event there's no
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