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tv   BBC News  BBC News  August 25, 2018 2:00pm-2:30pm BST

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i'm anita mcveigh live in dublin — the headlines at 2. pope francis has arrived in ireland, for the first papal visit in almost a0 years. in the past hour he has said he is ashamed of the catholic church's failure to adequately address the "repellent crimes" of sex abuse by clergy. translation: the failure of ecclesiastical authorities, bishops, religious superiors, priests and others adequately to address these repellent crimes remains a source of pain and shame for the catholic community. i myself share these sentiments. i'm rebecca jones — the other headlines this hour. women in england are to be allowed to take the second of two early abortion pills in their own homes instead of in a clinic. holidaymakers arrive home after being flown back early from an egyptian hotel, following the unexplained deaths of a british couple.
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thousands of rohingya muslim refugees have taken part in a demonstration marking one year since their exodus from myanmar, following a military crackdown. and later, we'll hearing from five witnesses about their involvement in extraordinary moments in 20th century history. that's coming up in witness. hello from dublin. our continuing coverage of the visit of pope francis to dublin, the
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beginning of a two—day visit to the country. hundreds of thousands of people are expected to welcome the pope over the course of this weekend. the official reason for the visit, his attendance at a regular catholic event which celebrates the role of the family in the church, a world meeting of families is held in a different country every three yea rs a different country every three years and this year it is the turn of ireland and dublin to host the gathering. of course his visit is dominated by the scandal of the abuse of children by priests and in other catholic run institutions, other catholic run institutions, other scandals that the catholic church has had to confront in recent yea rs. church has had to confront in recent years. so we heard from him a bit earlier, here at dublin castle, where i'm speaking to you from. addressing this issue but is it to the satisfaction of those who want the satisfaction of those who want the church to do more customer we will get some reaction to that in a
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moment. first this report from emma vardy. descending on dublin this morning, shepherd one, the papal plane. this is ireland's first visit from the pope in four decades. and welcoming the head of the catholic church has been a much anticipated moment. ireland was once known as the most catholic country in the world. but rocked by scandals, the church has fallen from grace. in dublin, pope francis spoke of the sexual abuse of children by catholic priests and the failure of the church to address it. translation: the failure of ecclesiastical authorities, bishops, religious superiors, priests and others adequately to address these repellent crimes has rightly given rise to outrage and remains a source of pain and shame for the catholic community. i myself share those sentiments. pope francis will meet with survivors of clerical abuse during his visit. some say his condemnation of these crimes is not enough. it has to be zero tolerance and that means every abusive priest,
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bishop and those who covered it up, be sacked and removed from the church immediately. half the population of ireland turned out to see pope john paul in 1979. back then, homosexuality, contraception and divorce were illegal. now ireland is very much changed. an ireland that is very different from 1979 when a pope was last among us. an ireland i suppose a bit more divided in terms of social issues and religious issues and so on. but i think everybody will be touched by the warmth of pope francis, by his sense of proximity particularly to vulnerability. the famous popemobile will come through the centre of dublin this afternoon and there is certainly a sense of celebration and excitement building here. because despite a decline in the church's authority, this is still predominantly a catholic country where the pope has
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the power to draw the crowds. his visit also draws protests with campaigners voicing frustration on issues such as the church's refusal to ordain female priests. but the feel—good factor of this visit is gaining momentum. for many the pope's presence brings hope that confidence in the church can be renewed. with me at dublin castle i have arrested hannigan, former political editorfor arrested hannigan, former political editor for tv three arrested hannigan, former political editorfor tv three in ireland and lg bt editorfor tv three in ireland and lgbt container and the ambassador to the holy see of the vatican. thank you forjoining us today. we heard those two speeches from the irish prime minister leo varadkar and from pope francis. leo varadkar said
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above all this and to the victims, we must now ensure that from words come actions and that was a very clear demand, delivered calmly but nonetheless a demand. it was a stunning speech and i was so impressed because it was cleverly crafted, his tone was respectful and he was diplomatic and yet did not pull any punches but delivered them almost in a velvet glove. going back to the pope you just mentioned, he hit all those controversial issues and he was looking for action now. so he really got away with it, he put it up to the pope but in a very nice way. and leo varadkar speaking, to what people in ireland want?” thought it was interesting because he did not divorce church and state or church and society but presented it as
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or church and society but presented itasa or church and society but presented it as a collective using the phrase we and he also identified the failings of the state because often it was the state that put children or vulnerable women into these institutions. i thought the way that he brought together and we did, i thought both his speech and the response from the pope pointed to a desire for action and also a desire for a reset button on the broader relationship between church and state. so i thought leo varadkar really pulled it off in his speech. and in terms of the response from pope francis, did he give us anything that we have not heard before? no and that is why i was underwhelmed by his speech, i was hoping that he would seize the opportunity to say something but instead for me his speech seemed to send out the signal but it was business as usual because he said nothing more than we had heard. what would you wanted to hear? even some
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indicator of an action plan because we've had these words are four of repentance and contrition, we've had all that. they have it all worked out what they need to do but the problem is they have not done it. and people are looking to pope francis to show the courage and leadership and unfortunately on this issue he has not shown that. francis, was this then a missed opportunity for the pope to say something that went beyond what he said before in terms of apologies to the victims of abuse? we have 36 hours and we are just in the first hours and we are just in the first hours of this visit and this pope is difficult to predict. but if you we re difficult to predict. but if you were to look at pope benedict and his visit to britain he did not mention abuse in westminster hall but in his sermon in westminster cathedral. that was on the saturday of that visit so i would say something will come later, i cannot imagine it will not be addressed in
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the context of his sermon in phoenix park to the catholic faithful. this isa park to the catholic faithful. this is a broader address so he touched oi'i is a broader address so he touched on it, he addressed it in this specific audience but i think over the 36 hours do not believe that this will be the last time this will be addressed. so your hunch is holed up be addressed. so your hunch is holed up thought and we might see something more. i would expect to hear more on the basis of previous papal visit. and the meeting with the irish visit —— ships, the very end but also you have the sermon tomorrow afternoon in phoenix,. —— phoenix park. and that speech she gave just within the last hour, he we nt gave just within the last hour, he went off script as he does and we will see more of that laid out in the context of this visit. ursula, on the inclusion of lgbt people in the catholic church, we heard
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earlier this week that this was one of the fringe talks around the world meeting of families. we have heard that pope francis has appointed a liberal bishop to be vatican communications secretary. in terms of what pope francis had to say on theissue of what pope francis had to say on the issue do you think that he is more liberal in his thinking than many others in the church? he is credited with this phrase, who might tojudge and credited with this phrase, who might to judge and this credited with this phrase, who might tojudge and this is bounced credited with this phrase, who might to judge and this is bounced around the world but the problem is the catholic church das judge the world but the problem is the catholic church dasjudge lgbt people and cause them intrinsically evil and disordered and it also judges theirfamilies evil and disordered and it also judges their families then they're not realfamilies. judges their families then they're not real families. as leo varadkar mention. yes and i was delighted to see that and also to pack the whole with such a diverse range of groups. so physically he was making his
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point but going back to james martin, i was disappointed with what he said in his speech because we have a catholic priest talking to a group of catholics and telling them to be nice to our gp catholics at a meeting that excluded them. — lgbt catholics. so that is crazy. james martin has not so far called for a change in the teaching of the church on human sexuality. james martin, his approach is softly softly, a very strategic locations approached by the vatican and he is asking us for compassion, asking catholics to show compassion to lgbt catholics. compassion is that is in the gift of the victor and allows the dominant one to continue looking at lgbt people as if they were objectively disordered and that is the problem with that. we must leave it there
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for now and thank you both very much. much more coverage of the visit to dublin coming up throughout the day. we will indeed be checking in with you through the course of the afternoon. women in england will be allowed to take an early abortion pill at home, under a government plan due to take effect by the end of the year. at present, women ending a pregnancy in its first 10 weeks must take two pills at a clinic, 2a to 48 hours apart. the move will bring england into line with scotland and wales. ena miller reports. at the moment in england, women who want to end a pregnancy before ten weeks have to take two pills, up to 48 hours apart and at a clinic. but some people like zoe have experienced bleeding and cramping on their way home. it was so traumatic and so unexpected. the pain and the nausea was so extreme that i had to get off the tube.
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i lay down on a bench and basically just decided that i wasn't going to move any further. changes to the law will help minimise the distress. the department of health says by the end of the year it will allow women to take the second pill in the familiar surroundings of their own home, but abortion has been legal for many years. why has the decision happened now? this tiny change has taken so long because ministers and civil servants, i think, have exaggerated, they have an exaggerated sense of what the opposition to abortion is. most people, even if they don't like the idea of abortion, recognise that it is legal and it should be allowed as safely as possible. 180,000 women have an abortion each year in england and four out of five of those are early medical terminations. the move has been welcomed. this is a way in which girls and women can access the second part or the second pills in their early medical abortion in a safe,
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effective and compassionate way. england will fall in line with wales and scotland. in northern ireland, abortion is still illegal unless there is a serious risk to a woman's health or life. campaigners say they're ready to make the changes now and the government's end of year deadline couldn't come fast enough. ena miller, bbc news. joining us now is professor lesley regan, president of the royal college of obstetricians and gynaecologists thank you for coming in to talk about this in the studio. as with all you welcome this move, what difference is it going to make to women? i welcome it greatly and i know that my colleagues do because it isa know that my colleagues do because it is a safe, highly effective and it is a safe, highly effective and it provides some compassionate of the most compassionate care we can offer. so having to take the second
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bill in clinic at the moment means a second visit which is unnecessarily from a medical point of view and often end up with nasty side—effects on the journey often end up with nasty side—effects on thejourney home, often end up with nasty side—effects on the journey home, on the train or bus or in the car and we are trying to move away from that. you say it is safe, is there any danger in perhaps taking this second bill at home away from any medical supervision at all? no because in fa ct if supervision at all? no because in fact if you like the bleeding and pain woman may experience is identical to what she would experience if she'd taken the pill in the clinic because it takes some time to act. and we are providing all kinds of back—up to ensure women are supported and can contact the clinic and health professionals if they need additional help. why has it taken so long because my understanding is that england is a long way behind the rest of the world on this? some countries yes, france for example have had this since 2004 and the states since 2000 but i think the most important
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example and the evidence that has come from our neighbours in scotland, they started this in october of last year and the evidence is really reassuring from there that there is no increase in there that there is no increase in the number of complications and most importantly that women really want this. it really makes a difference to them because for many who find it difficult to access a clinic and the second visit then is the important step forward. nonetheless some people have reservations about this and the society for the protection of the unborn child for example has said they fear that the move will further trivialise abortion, have they got a point? i do not think so, ido they got a point? i do not think so, i do not think it trivialises anything, we're using exactly the same regulation for abortion, were not changing how you access this, the consent or medication we're just saying instead of making the woman come back to the clinic for the second visit and take their second
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drug in front of health care team they can now take it in their own family surroundings at home. we're not changing the way we regulate abortion in any way. some people listening may think that if it is so safe then why has it taken until now? it takes time for government to change their mind and ijust welcome the fact that the new secretary of state has done so this time and we look forward to helping roll—out this programme is quickly as possible for girls and women in england. good to talk to you, thank you. the headlines on bbc news. pope francis is in ireland, for the first papal visit in almost 40 years. women in england are to be allowed to take the second of two early abortion pills in their own homes instead of in a clinic. holiday—makers arrive home after being flown back early from an egyptian hotel, following the unexplained deaths of a british couple. workers at the train company
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northern have begun a 24—hour strike in a long—running row over driver—only operated trains. people attending major events on saturday, including manchester pride, creamfields and leeds festival, are told to be aware of a reduced service. northern says it will be operating about 30% of its usual services. the first holidaymakers to be flown home early from the egyptian hotel where a british couple died have arrived back in the uk. john and susan cooper from burnley were staying at the steigenberger aqua magic hotel in hurghada. thomas cook says the circumstances surrounding their deaths remains unclear. katy austin reports. arriving home, all of thomas cook's 300 customers from the aqua magic hotel have now left. nearly half have flown back to the uk, while others
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have moved hotels. when you find out at ten, 10:30pm at night that two people have died two days ago, and nobody knows why and they obviously came down ill quite suddenly, haven't had a chance to get a doctor first. then yes, i'm wondering what's happening to my kids when they're sleeping. some people were quite irate and upset because they didn't have instant answers. you cannot give instant answers because it's speculation. thomas cook did what they could and everything they did was spot on, if you ask me. john and susan cooper, both in their 60s, died after being found ill on tuesday at the hotel in the hurghada area of egypt. their daughter, kelly ormerod, has told the bbc something doesn't add up about their death at the 5—star resort. egyptian authorities said it was initially thought that the couple died of natural causes. the hotel
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dispute reports of raised level of illness among scarce. the foreign office told us today we continue to support the family of a couple who died in egypt and remain support the family of a couple who died in egyptand remain in support the family of a couple who died in egypt and remain in contact with thomas cook. anyone staying at the hotel should follow the advice of their tour operator and the local authorities. egypt's tourism minister has told the bbc investigators will report within ten days. the family of a british—iranian woman are waiting to find out if her temporary release from a prison in tehran will be extended. nazanin zagahri radcliffe, a charity workerfrom north london, was granted a three—day release and is due to return to jail tomorrow. well we can go to our edinburgh studio now to speak to nazanin‘s husband — richard ratcliffe. we are grateful for your time. do you have any news on whether there
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might be an extension? not really is the honest answer, where we are is that tim three lawyers want the prosecutors office and the deputy prosecutors office and the deputy prosecutor was not there and he was told to come back tomorrow. so he will go tomorrow and we're still on tenterhooks. if no decision comes then she would have to go back to prison and today obviously has been more nervous day than in previous days when we were all euphoric and happy. now we're thinking, we will see. i was wondering how both she and you are dealing with the uncertainty? it is hard, the first day it was just euphoric and yesterday she had lots of relatives coming to visit and that was lovely. today she was saying, she has a
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dishwasher in her stomach as she put it. she's pretty uneasy. she went out of the house today, went to have a copy so it is a chance to see normal life going round the shops and just reminding her of being back in england. so an elementjust of keeping ourselves distracted. gabriella of course is your daughter who lives with nazanin at the moment. how much contact are you able to have because i know that she's not able to speak to media? she cannot do any interviews but obviously she is allowed to speak to me and we've had full contact. now i can call her on skype and see her smiling face and it has been lovely. in fact today gabriella went to nursery and wanted her mother to
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ta ke nursery and wanted her mother to take so she could show her friends you see, i have a mother and that is nice. we had a change of foreign secretary in recent weeks of course from borisjohnson to secretary in recent weeks of course from boris johnson to jeremy secretary in recent weeks of course from borisjohnson tojeremy hunt andi from borisjohnson tojeremy hunt and i wonder if that has changed, had any influence on this temporary release? i think he has been unlucky charm for us and certainly since jeremy hunt has come along he has been clear with his statements in public about this case and very strong two days ago asking for her permanent release. and clearly he ca res permanent release. and clearly he cares deeply. so certainly good things have happened on his watch and let's hope step by step it will continue. not to put you on the spot but perhaps you did not think boris johnson cared so deeply?” but perhaps you did not think boris johnson cared so deeply? i would not claim that, i think when we met at
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christmas is clearly mattered to him and he did his best. it felt like we lost momentum at some point and this could be a fresh start and a chance to reset. nothing to do with the personalities involved. i'm pleased with everything that has happened and he has been strong so far in the case of nazanin. in some ways as you say a difficult day for you today but i wonder how hopeful you are that progress can be made now? well her lawyer is still very calm and reassuring and that is a calming influence. until we have the piece of paper saying it is extended then we do not have that and we have to stand by waiting. am i helpful, i'm
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more uncertain than it was yesterday but i still have hope. you have not seen but i still have hope. you have not seen your but i still have hope. you have not seen your wife or two years, i can imagine you spend a lot of time answering questions about how she is but i just wondered answering questions about how she is but ijust wondered how answering questions about how she is but i just wondered how your managing? a bit tired today, it was lovely to see her on skype but to see her face lovely to see her on skype but to see herface a couple lovely to see her on skype but to see her face a couple of days back, yes, it is quite tough watching tapes of her body seems much closer now to a happy ending. stay in touch and let us know if there is any news. have to leave it there and thank you your time. president trump has called off the us secretary of state's visit to north korea because he feels insufficient progress has been made in dismantling pyongyang's nuclear programme. mike pompeo was due to visit next week. in a tweet mr trump also blamed china for the cancelled visit, saying the country was not doing enough to pressure north korea, due to ongoing trade
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tensions with america. thousands of rohingya muslim refugees have held protests to mark the first anniversary of their exodus from myanmar. angry protesters marched through a camp in the cox's bazar district of bangladesh, chanting demands for justice. some wept as they recalled the brutal treatment inflicted on them following the military crackdown in myanmar which sparked the refugee crisis one year ago. as the syrian war grinds to a halt, people are returning to their homes. raqqa was infamous across the world as the ‘capital‘ of the so—called islamic state group. the united nations says nearly eighty percent of the city was destroyed in the united states—led campaign to remove them which ended in october last year. since then, there's been a steady stream of families moving back, as dina demrdash reports. packing up to go home.
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she and her nine children are returning to the syrian city of raqqa. they have been on the move for five years. translation: some relatives couldn't get a tent. the situation was very bad in the camp. that's why we're going back. if you see our house, you would probably wonder how we can return to it. but we're not comfortable here. at least it's a house. it's just a two hour drive to raqqa. most of it lies in ruins. it was the capital for the so—called islamic state group. a united states led campaign removed them last year and life is slowly returning. her home is badly damaged, and they all have to live in one room. translation: thank god we have returned home. the house is destroyed, but it's better than being displaced. there's a shortage of electricity and water in raqqa. as well as the risk of unexploded devices. but the smiles on the faces of her
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family tell a different story. nearly 150,000 people have returned, and feel it's worth the risk. translation: the most important thing is that we're back home, thank god. raqqa used to be the best province. our plan is to repair our home and try and return to normality. is there anywhere better than home? no, there is in. the united nations says it expects more people to return over the next few months. it is trying its best with local ngos to rebuild the city and care for the population. this weekend, visitors to the notting hill carnival will walk though ‘knife arches' for the first time in the event's history. it's in response to the number of stabbings in london this year — although police stress, there isn't a specific threat. they say they just want to deter people from bringing weapons. karl mercer reports.
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after a few false starts, the annual ritual of carnival begins. on sunday and monday, more than a million people are expected on these streets and locals are well used to their own security measures. but this year for the first time at carnival, police will be bringing these, knife arches which they say will be put at strategic points on the route. we don't select people to go through the knife arches. they'll be put in the middle of busy streets on approaches to carnival, and people just flow through them. we'll have other officers there who can look at the behaviour of people approaching knife arches to understand if there's any reason at all why people don't want to go through the knife arches. that would tell us that they are coming to carnival for a reason that we don't want. the local mp wasn't told by police about the latest move. she says that although she understands why they want to bring in the arches, she's not sure they will work. there are all kinds of ways of doing damage to people
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if you want to, and knives is not the only one. so i have concerns and i'm not sure how effective it will be. we want people to be safe, and i know the police are working hard on that. at a lot of major events and small events, we've seen it now. london and the uk as a whole is operating against the backdrop of increased knife crime. i don't think it's unique to notting hill carnival. there will be more than 6,000 police officers on duty for each day of carnival, slightly more than last year. but the met says it has no reason to believe there will be a specific threat to the event. now it's time for a look at the weather with alina jenkins.

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