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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  August 29, 2018 11:00am-1:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. these are the top stories developing at 11: ministers are urged to address a "crisis in children's mental health", after a study suggests one fifth of girls aged 1a had self harmed in the last year. with the young people we work with across the country, there is still a lot of stigma about these kinds of mental health issues. it's still really hard to ask for help. something like self harm, which can be quite private, is one way of dealing with those feelings, but not necessarily a good way. british boats demand government protection after clashes with french vessels over scallop fishing rights. a manhunt continues for 21—year—old janbaz tarin, as it emerges that one of the two women who were stabbed to death in solihull was on the phone to police as she was attacked. theresa may visits nigeria on the second day of a trade mission to africa, aimed at strengthening economic ties ahead of brexit. officials in puerto rico say that almost 3000 people died as a result of hurricane maria last september.
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that's almost 50 times the original estimate. the hurricane was the most powerful storm to hit the region in nearly a century. british gas pays £2.65 million in refunds and compensation after wrongly overcharging some customers who switched to new providers. good morning. it's wednesday 29th august. welcome to bbc newsroom live. there are calls for ministers to address what's being called a "crisis in children's mental health" , after a study found that 22% of girls aged 1a said they'd deliberately harmed themselves in the year prior to the survey. research by the charity, the children's society, found that gender stereotypes
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and worries about appearance were contributing to unhappiness, as ricky boleto reports. bethany started self harming when she was 13. it is something she is happy to talk about today. she wants to open up to other young people. i don't think there was really a reason why but the bullying made me feel really, really depressed, so i think that was kind of a response for me. such a magnet or something that i could control. starting secondary school was difficult. bethany said she felt isolated. she kept what she was doing a secret from her mum. i got a phone call from her teacher when i was on the bus on my way home from work. he said i need to have a chat with you. and he told me that he had found out that day that beth was self harming, and so that was a bit of a shock. five years on, she has stopped harming herself with the support
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of the harmless charity. i think there are a lot of reasons why, the pressure of school themselves, with having the gcses and all of the work that we have, it can be quite stressful. definitely social media, we see a lot of things where, you should look like this, you should wear that, you should have this make up. there is a lot of stigma associated with how girls should carry themselves. the children's society surveyed 11,000 children about their lives. they say a closer look at the data suggests one in four girls aged 14 have self harmed last year. across genders, one in six reported self harming at the same age, and from that the charity estimates that 110,000 14—year—olds all over the uk may have self harmed in the last 12 months. what we found is that since 2009 children have become more unhappy with the lives overall and particularly that has been
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driven by girls feeling more and more unhappy with their appearance. the government say they are spending £1.11 billion transforming young people's mental health by 2020, with an additional 300 million to provide more help in schools. so how have you been going? i used to do it when i was little. bethany is focusing on the future. of course, the scars won't disappear. her recovery is ongoing. i feel really confident now. iam happy. i feel i have got myself back. with me in the studio is lucy capron, public affairs manager at the children's society. tell us more about why you think it is that more kids are harming themselves. what we found in this research that some of the societal pressure that is put on young people
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is quite significant. particularly around gender stereotypes. the young people that were surrounded by images and thought about boys having to be tough and matchup, girls having to be pretty and look a specific way. those children that we re specific way. those children that were surrounded by those perceptions did have low were surrounded by those perceptions d id have low levels were surrounded by those perceptions did have low levels of well—being. there needs to be a big societal conversation about children's mental health and the pressures on young people. do you think more kids are self harming or more are actually speaking up about it? it's not a com pletely speaking up about it? it's not a completely new phenomenon. it's certainly not a new phenomenon, there is a growing need amongst young people. different statistics support that, there has been a rise in hospital admissions for self harm. what's really encouraging is that more people are able to talk about their mental health. this is something that we support. there is still u nfortu nately something that we support. there is still unfortunately a stigma around
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mental health, around teenagers in particular. teenagers are struggling to ask for help. word—mac why do some piece of fine? there are different reasons, children and young people say that it is about pressure, pressure to conform, to be a certain type of person that they don't fit into, and some groups are vulnerable. those groups who were attracted to the same gender or both genders. around half of the german people around 1a years old said they self harmed. there are particular groups that we are concerned about and who are at risk. can mental health services cup? children have really long waiting times and very high thresholds. you have to be very severe in order to get access to mental health services. this is why at the children's society we are asking for more help in schools, more counselling, well—being,
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support. this is so children have someone they can trust, an adult who they can talk to where they are. it is that only help that is important. it's doesn't rely on kids going to a trusted adult and saying that they wa nt to trusted adult and saying that they want to access help. where most of the kids that you contacted speaking up the kids that you contacted speaking up and where they getting help? that was something that we didn't ask. but we do know that these people know that they are harming themselves. they know that they have awareness and that they are self harming. there are more young people trying to access mental health services than before. what we need to do asa services than before. what we need to do as a society is make that help available when children first ask for it. schools need to have an approach to well—being in the whole school environment. this is important so it doesn't feel like you're putting your hand up and asking for help by yourself will stop it is a societal conversation.
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could many of these could be doing things that their parents don't know about? that is possible. self harm isa about? that is possible. self harm is a private coping mechanism for young people. they try to hide it. they need adults and parents who they can trust and have a conversation with about any struggles that is people might be going through. they need to know that mental health isn't a topic that mental health isn't a topic thatis that mental health isn't a topic that is off the table and they need to be able to talk about it. it means adapting, as parents, can be quite difficult. parents now from how things were many years ago. what advice would you give to a parent thatis advice would you give to a parent that is worried about their child but doesn't know how to start the conversation? there shouldn't be pressure on parents to have conversations, but to take small steps to talk about things more generally and then bring it into the family situation. there are also
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support lines available for parents. young minds have a helpline for pa rents young minds have a helpline for parents if they are struggling. despite teenagers having more and more influence outside their pa rents, more influence outside their parents, family life was the most important factor around children's well—being. parents can make a huge difference in starting these conversations. thank you lucy, from the children's society. thank you lucy, from the children's society. and if you have been affected by any of the issues raised, you can find details of organisations which offer advice and support on the bbc actionline website at bbc.co.uk/actionline. british fishermen are asking for government protection after being attacked by their french counterparts off the coast of normandy. 35 french vessels gathered on monday night to stop british scallop dredgers, who they claim are "pillaging" the shellfish stocks. the local fisherman threw rocks and smokebombs to deter the british boats, despite them being legally entitled to fish in the area. lebo diseko has more. this is what's being called
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the "scallop wars." french fishermen clash with their british counterparts in the sea off the normandy coast. rocks and smoke bombs just some of the things reportedly thrown at english and scottish vessels in the early hours of tuesday morning. essentially, we are fishing a0 miles off the french coast when a flotilla of french fishermen came out, surrounded the vessel, along with mine and other uk vessels. they were throwing missiles, tried to put ropes in the propellers and essentially foul the gear. i mean, it was pretty much short of piracy. we had to evacuate the area. now, there was a french naval vessel alongside that watched the whole thing but didn't intervene in any manner. so we are very shocked about the whole situation. go! it is the latest instalment in ongoing tension over fishing in these waters.
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french law says its fishermen can only harvest scallops here between october and may. the brits face no such restrictions, and the french fishermen, like this one, think that's not fair. translation: they have no hours, no quotas, they just fill their boats. they come, scrape and leave. they start working a month before us and they leave us the crumbs. in previous years, the two sides have been able to come to an agreement to harvest more fairly, but this year that didn't happen. with about 35 vessels to five, the french far outnumbered the british, and ultimately chased them away. now uk fishermen are demanding government protection. lebo diseko, bbc news. theresa may will visit africa's biggest economy, nigeria, this morning on the second day of a trade mission to africa aimed
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at strengthening economic ties ahead of brexit. the prime minister announced £4 billion of extra british support for african economies during the first leg of her trip yesterday. mrs may will meet victims of modern slavery and unveil a series of measures to cut illegal migration into europe from west africa. we can cross now to lagos, where theresa may will visit later today, and speak to our correspondent there, mayenijones. there is interest on both sides, how was this visit being seen in nigeria? the visit has encouraged a lot of excitement in nigeria, most newspapers were living with it this morning. they were focusing on something that theresa may said in her speech yesterday. despite the fa ct her speech yesterday. despite the fact that many african economies including nigeria were doing well economic league, the majority of the
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population was living in poverty. 87 million people here live on less than £1.15 per day. much more needs to be done to encourage distributional of wealth as economies grow. it is a combination of talking about trade and investment and aid in the economy in the different african nations. what does nigeria need? and implement is a big problem in nigeria, particularly amongst the elections coming up in february. many people are looking to see what candidates are looking to see what candidates are offering in terms of strengthening the economy. nigeria will want to get assurance, as the uk leads the eu, nigeria will become a trading partner. it is currently the uk's second to trading partner in africa. there will want assurance
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that this trade will yield economic dividends. in terms of the aspects of investment and british business investment that would be fruitful for britain, what is it that could be done in nigeria? is it more about investment, infrastructure, creating jobs... how much of the market is therefore imports from the uk?|j think therefore imports from the uk?” think the main thing in nigeria is that it think the main thing in nigeria is thatitis think the main thing in nigeria is that it is a huge exporter of oil. the government have been trying to invest more in agriculture and infrastructure, both huge employment generators. what they will want from the uk is if it might be able to an help them invest in those areas, provide more employment for young people. there is also a lot of demand for services here. there is a
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growing class that consumes a lot of services and goods from the uk. these currently trade quite extensively in nigeria. what will we'll be looking for is to have some sort trade commission ship with the uk -- sort trade commission ship with the uk —— trade relationship with the uk. a mother and daughter killed in a suspected double murder in solihull were on the phone to police as they were attacked, according to detectives. police are continuing to search forjanbaz tarin. after his former partner, 22 —year—old raneem 0udeh and her mother khaola saleem, were fatally attacked in the early hours of bank holiday monday. jenny kumah reports. the manhunt continues. police believe 21—year—old janbaz tarin, an afghan national here legally, is responsible for the murder of two women. his former partner, raneem 0udeh, seen here on the left, and her mother, khaola saleem. both were syrian nationals. raneem had a two—year—old son
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and was one of six siblings. the women were stabbed to death in the early hours of monday morning here in the family's home. police have now revealed that raneem 0udeh was on the phone to them when she was attacked. she'd made a number of calls to them on sunday. 0fficers tried to find her but couldn't. when contact was made again, the situation quickly escalated during the phone conversation. the force say officers were dispatched immediately and arrived within minutes. west midlands police has referred itself to the independent 0ffice of police conduct over its conduct with the family. despite a strong public response to the police appeal, and a number of raids on properties, there's been no sign of the suspect. police are asking anyone who does see mr tarin not to approach him but to contact them immediately. jenny kumah, bbc news. the headlines on bbc news.
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ministers are urged to address a "crisis in children's mental health", after a survey finds that a fifth of girls aged 1a said they had self harmed. british boats demand government protection after clashes with french vessels over scallop fishing rights. a manhunt continues for 21—year—old janbaz tarin, as it emerges that one of the two women who were stabbed to death in solihull was on the phone to police as she was attacked. and in sport. the football association has submitted its bid to stage the women s euro 2021 championship. manchester city's academy stadium would be one of eight venues for the matches. uefa will decide on a host in december. the scottish fa are meeting today to decide whether or not to stay at their spiritual home hampden park in glasgow or move internationals and cup finals to rugby's home murrayfield, in edinburgh the british number onejohanna konta is out of the us open, beaten in the first round by the sixth—seed caroline garcia.
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there are no british women left in the singles draw, andy murray and cameron norrie play later today. a full update in 15 minutes. the northern ireland fire service says there are "grave concerns" that an historic building in the heart of belfast city centre could collapse. around a hundred firefighters have been tackling a blaze in the primark store inside listed bank buildings since yesterday morning. there are fears the five—storey building could now collapse. 0ur ireland correspondent chris page has more. all over the city, people saw the smoke in the sky. but most didn't realise how bad the blaze was until pictures like these appeared. let's move, let's go! shoppers and about 150 staff were evacuated from the primark store within minutes of the fire breaking out. the lifts were on, it was very busy. it was a race for people to come down the lifts and the stairs.
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so i kind of ran out as quick as possible. no—one was injured but the interior of the building disintegrated as the fire ripped downwards. several times it seemed firefighters had got the blaze under control, but every now and again there were what sounded like small explosions within the store. with each one, the flames burst out again. this is an extremely dramatic and really very unnerving sight. a major store reduced to a blackened shell by the most severe fire here in belfast city centre for many years. the building has quite a history. it's been here since the late 18th century, and there's been a bishop's residence and a bank in the past. primark had spent £30 million on a renovation project, which was just about to finish. but business leaders now fear retailers in this area are facing a big financial hit. there's going to be a period of major disruption. heartbreaking to be honest. not much more i can say than that. hundreds of people who work and shop in northern ireland's
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capital will be affected. this blaze was the most sudden of blows, but its consequences will be felt for a long time. chris page, bbc news, belfast. let's go live to belfast and speak to our ireland correspondent emma va rdy. i , a dramatic fire. it's extraordinary that everybody got out 0k. is it clear what caused the fire? that is still the unanswered question. no clues and no statement from the fire service about exactly what caused this place. we know that there was refurbishment work going on in the building and that fire, starting on the top floor of the building. they had just been coming to the end of a £30 million piece of refurbishment work. it could have been devastating for many people who
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work in the building and many prospective staff who were meant to start very soon. today, a lot of sadness in belfast. it is such a focal part of the town's high street. this historic 200—year—old building, now standing as a blackened shell. people are looking on with dismay and still are as it burns down yesterday. just now, there are about 100 people here who are taking a look. it is expected that it could be at significant cost to the city, there is still a police cordon around the fire and the building. asa cordon around the fire and the building. as a result of that, many of the shops in the city centre are closed and the fire service had said that this might have to be the case for the next few days. structural engineers have had a look at this building today and have made an initial assessment, saying that the exterior of the building is intact. they say that part of the inside are still collapsing and they expect this to happen throughout the day.
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for the safety of pedestrians and neighbouring businesses, this police cordon around the heart of the city centre will remain in place. this woman has been imprisoned in iranfor this woman has been imprisoned in iran for almost two years now. she was released for three days to visit her daughter and her husband. she is now back in prison after having that brief release and we are just hearing that she has been admitted toa hearing that she has been admitted to a prison clinic in tehran after what her husband said was a second panic attack in two matches. in a statement to the bbc, it was said that she blacked out in and attack this morning. she was visited by a prison governor after the panic attack and he was due to meet the
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prosecutor to find out why the brief period of being allowed out ofjail over the weekend was not extended. she has suffered several panic attacks during her incarceration in iran and her psychiatrist has said that she needs to see a neurologist, but that has not yet happened. her husband says the panic attacks are getting more frequent. the next landmark in her case will be in mid september, that will be when she has served half of her five—year sentence. this is when she will be eligible for her and complete conditional as with mac release. the authorities want to extend that three—day exit from prison and they didn't do so, it was crushing. hurricane maria — which struck the caribbean almost a year ago — was the most powerful storm to hit the region in nearly 90 years. it devastated the island territory of puerto rico, and officials now say that almost
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3000 people died as a result of the storm — that's nearly 50 times the original estimate. many died as a result of poor health care facilities and a lack of clean water. 0ur north america correspondent, david willis has more. hurricane maria was the most powerful storm to hit the caribbean island in almost a century. a monster of a weather system, which made landfall with winds of 250km/h, leaving millions of dollars of damage in its wake. comparing the storm to katrina in 2005, president trump initially marvelled at what appeared to be a relatively low loss of life. but now it seems that the death toll from maria might dwarf that of the hurricane that devastated new orleans. a study undertaken by researchers here puts the number of people who died either directly from the storm's wroth or from its aftermath at nearly 3,000. we are officially changing...
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we are actually putting an official number to the death toll, and we will take the 2,975 number as the official estimate. hurricane maria took what little this impoverished island had and reduced it to rubble. power supplies were knocked out, power lines were cut, roads became impassable. worst affected were the poor and the elderly. the governor concedes puerto rico wasn't prepared for a storm like maria, but hopes it can learn from the experience. translation: it's a time to show solidarity with all those who have lost family and friends. it's also a time to reflect on what we did well and what we did badly so that we can have a better response in future. making such improvements won't be easy.
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parts of the island are still without power nearly a year after the hurricane, and some 60,000 homes are still said to be a lacking proper roof. the trump administration has said it will continue to support the island's government, but puerto rico was bankrupt long before maria pitched up on its shores and its best hope may be to pray that such a disaster never happens again. 0fficial warning letters have been sent to some company pension schemes telling them to take extra care with staff members wanting to remove their funds. there has been a sharp rise in the number of people cashing in valuable salary—linked retirement pots and managing the money themselves. the pension regulator warns that overly generous pay—outs could damage the schemes' remaining funds. the arteries of teenagers who drink and smoke show signs of hardening even by the age of 17, according to new research published in the european heartjournal. this can be an indicator that blood
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vessels are being damaged, increasing the likelihood of heart disease or stroke in later life, but the impact can be reversed if teenagers give up the habit. here's our health correspondent dominic hughes. it seems the damage to health from smoking and drinking starts early and being young provides no protection. researchers found evidence of damage to the arteries of teenagers who both smoked and drank. they measured the rate at which the heart's pulse passed around the body. by the age of 17, those who smoked and drank had arteries that were more than 10% stiffer. this matters because it is a sign that blood vessels are already being damaged, which can lead to heart problems or stroke in later life. every child who started smoking would have had a horrible experience of their first cigarette but very quickly get over that and crave it. it's damaging. it is also releasing carbon monoxide which in the short term narrows the blood vessels.
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so they are endangering themselves not only with all the cardiovascular problems, stroke, etc, but they also going to affect their long gross, their breathing capacity. —— lung growth. there is some good news, the arteries of those teenagers who gave up cigarettes and stopped drinking returned to normal, providing an added incentive to quit. dominic hughes, bbc news. time for a look at the weather with simon king. there has been wet weather across the south—east of england, northern and western parts of england and wales as well. that rain is clearing through and be icing some sunshine. plenty of sunshine across scotland and northern ireland, just some showers in western areas. the rain in the south—east will clear and the patchy rain in northern and western
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parts will disappear. we will see some sunshine developing here. maximum temperature is up to 17—21 celsius. in tonight, there will be some clear spells, some mist and fog forming. with the clear skies, it'll be quite chilly. temperatures down to single figures. it means that says they will start off on a sunny note. there will be some more cloud into the afternoon, a dry day with highs 17—21 celsius. this is bbc news. our latest headlines... ministers are urged to address a "crisis in children's mental health" , after a study suggests that a fifth of girls aged 1a have self harmed in the past year. british boats demand government protection after clashes with french vessels over scallop fishing rights. one of two women stabbed to death in solihull was on the phone to police as she was attacked —
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as a manhunt continues for 21—year—old janbaz tarin. theresa may visits nigeria on the second day of a trade mission to africa aimed at boosting economic ties ahead of brexit. and british gas pays out two point six five million pounds after wrongly overcharging some customers who switched to new providers. sport now, here's 0lly foster the football association has submitted as bad to host the 2021 european championship. wembley will host the final whistle and other venues host the final whistle and other venues put forward to stage matches, including manchester city's ‘s training ground. austere and ulrich expected to bed as well in december.
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i think it is enormous to have a major championship and less on home soil across major cities all across england. i think it will inspire a generation of young people to play the game. by then, by 2021, we will have built a whole and structure of opportunity forjobs have built a whole and structure of opportunity for jobs which to have built a whole and structure of opportunity forjobs which to play to the rubik cities and find somewhere to play. after 100 years of international football and cup finals in hampton, the scottish football association board will decide whether to move to the home of scottish rugby, murrayfield in edinburgh. it has a stadium with many stories to tell, this is the famous european cup final of 1960. rialto died, seven, anchored frankfurt, three. its upkeep is proving too costly for the f f eight, they could vote to stay move
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elsewhere. i've got a big jacket, it is one of these big went of course. and a stadium as a man who can be at the thought of moving away.” and a stadium as a man who can be at the thought of moving away. i am embedded in this place, as i've said before, that is the reason i am supporting hampton. idoso i do so because there's so much embedded a footballing culture to have a disappear would previous loss. kodak this is the other option, a 50 miles east down the mph motorway. it isa miles east down the mph motorway. it is a bigger stadium and could be financially more attractive. it is the dilemma that is dividing a nation. a decision which could change your national team for ever. hal robson kanu has retired
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from international football. the striker announced the news in a statement after he was left out of the wales squad to play the republic of ireland and denmark in nations league qualifiers. robson—kanu made 44 wales appearances, scoring five goals, including two at the euro 2016 finals — famously scoring the second in their 2—1 win over belgium in the semi—finals. johanna konta's poor run at grand slams has continued at the us open she lost in the first round to the french sixth seed caroline garcia. the british number one reached last years wimbledon semifinal but from a career high number 4 in the world she is only just inside the top 50 which is why she got suchy a tough draw. she was beaten in straight sets. there are no british women left in the singles draw. temperatures of 38 degrees and 50% humidity saw five ‘heat related
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retirements' in the men's draw. novak djokovic described the conditions as brutal for the first time an extreme heat policy is in place for the men, the wimbledon champion took a mid—match ice bath during his 4 set—win over marton fuscovics. we were not both in one piece bath. isaid we were not both in one piece bath. i said that very clearly, there were two ice pass, one next to another. it shocks your body and a way, because as it is so warm, it feels like everything is boiling in your body. mark cavendish is taking an idefinite breakfrom cycling after being dignosed with the epstein—barr virus. it can cause glandular fever and extreme fatigue. his dimension data team say he been training and racing with the illness over recent months. he has won 30 stages at the tour de france but had to withdraw half way through this year's race . he says ‘i'm glad to now finally have some clarity as to why i haven't been able to perform
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at my optimum level‘. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. syrian refugees who fled to neighbouring lebanon in order to escape the war are being told to go home — despite international warnings that it s not safe to do so. the united nations says the situation for those who have crossed the border into lebanon is only getting worse, with many living in poverty. newsbeat‘s james waterhouse sent this report from close to the syrian border. an impromptu game in an impromptu setting. ten miles away from their homeland. this camp has been set up for syrian refugees in lebanon. there is little water or electricity. the un says that three quarters of the refugees are living in poverty, on less than $4 a day. many have been here for years and have no idea when they will be able to beat on home. translation: i might be here for another months, three months, or a year. it depends on the safety.
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i don't want to go back where there is still a war going on. for some time now, more than a million syrians have been living in lebanon in conditions like these. the president here says that he wants them to go home, the assad regime wants them to come back, but the united nations says that is not safe to do so. this is one perosn unlikely to go back. he left government—controlled damascus almost two years ago to pursue his music. he is now going to canada with his acoustic group on a scholarship but is still haunted by what he left behind. even if it's more safe now back in syria, even if the war stopped — you can't just forget what you have been through. the war in syria is complex. the future of its people is likely to be just as difficult.
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after all, a nation will have to be rebuilt. the eu referendum has highlighted divisions in society, politics and within political parties, it's also brought to prominence a woman who most of us hadn't heard of before. gina miller is the businesswoman who led the successful supreme court case which forced the government to seek parliamentary approval before it could start the process of leaving the eu, inspiring both admiration and hate. she has written a book about how she became the person she is today — it's called rise: life lessons in speaking out, standing tall & leading the way. gina joins me in the studio now. bthis book goes far beyond the alleged that we possibly all have a view as a result of you haven't been propelled overnight. yours is a story of being a victim,
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of being and a abusive marriage, of being a victim of rape of having a daughter with disabilities. you were homeless rioting, you slept in your car. i must think these difficult pa rt car. i must think these difficult part of your life but you have endured, it seems, tough times.” don't seem itself as a victim. i see myself as somebody who has embraced inferior at the lack of failure and carried on. nobody comes from nowhere, it takes hard work and determination. i also wanted to the of my life in a very open way to see that the people who might be feeling hot, especially young women, to say that, you can succeed if you find the strength to pick yourself up. if you learn from your failure. it is a
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sort of arm around people. it also says, this is who i am. now i have that over, and listen to what i have two c? 0ver that over, and listen to what i have two c? over the years, a lot of people have painted their versions of my life. did you feel it was important to do that? people have been quite abusive to you based on what they think you are.” been quite abusive to you based on what they think you are. i think it is important, to those people have been negative to me but also to the people who have been supportive. to say, this is how you can also achieve a voice. i think at the moment, we are provided. i think it is important that all of us find a voice and speak up for what we see around us. using the lens of my life, my failure, howi around us. using the lens of my life, my failure, how i have ove rco m e life, my failure, how i have overcome figures is what i wanted to share with people. it is another
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thing to prepare yourself to another level entirely, they level but you have propelled yourself to a spearheading this campaign against the government. what was the moment that you decided that that is what you were going to do? there was something fatalistic about it, i decided that it would be me, to stand up to the government and say, you cannot put yourself above the law. you have to follow parliamentary policy. everybody else was going to do it that i was wanted it. when i was started, it wasn't only going to be me. 0nce it. when i was started, it wasn't only going to be me. once the court had made me delete claimant, i wasn't going to drop the battle. it wasn't going to drop the battle. it was right thing to do. was it frightening? it was frightening at times, especially the unexpected backlash. i have been a campaigner for many years, i'm experienced of
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dealing with the backlash. i didn't know it would be on such a violent level. the depth of the violence was something i never expected. when you see bylines, disgrace on the things you were the receiving end of. there was a biker who went to prison for kicking a high fees and 20 my head. saying, if i think i am drawn art, i should be barred at the stake. i should be barred at the stake. i should be barred at the stake. i should be beheaded, my children should be beheaded, my children should be beheaded, my children should be killed. these sort of things that are notjust online. they come in letters, in parcels, in graphic comic book strips. the offline worries me more than the online. something has changed that a number of people think it is ok to act like that, they think that it is their right under freedom of speech to incite sexual and racial
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violence. it is not acceptable. could like what impact has that had a new? fsg highlife. iwalk around ona a new? fsg highlife. iwalk around on a low was. it is exhausting to a lwa ys on a low was. it is exhausting to always be on alert. it is changed our freedom of how we go out. we contemplate when you go places, how we love our base has completely changed. this is politics, the seed that you were never a binary, remain. do you think that we can have a good leave? when parliament returns, i think it is an impossible task intends time to get a good deal from every now. the divisions of particular parties, all of that has
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to be put side. politicians across the spectrum have to be completely honest and straightforward, plain speaking to the people of great britain. they must say that, would you have time in ten weeks to resolve this. we need to have a plan to do that. they are becoming up with anything. second referendum? i don't know what will happen. we are on one side of the table, they are on one side of the table, they are on the other side. we are two years end and we do have different information now. there has been some talk talking of you potentially taking over from fans talk talking of you potentially taking overfrom fans keep up talk talking of you potentially taking over from fans keep up with mac vince cable as leader of the liberal democrats. that is very flattering. i have no idea where that rumour comes from. i have no intentions of going into official politics. why not? it would be too
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constraining for the boys that i have. i believe i will be more visible as an independent campaigner. what you think of to band how she has handled it? she was put ina band how she has handled it? she was put in a impossible situation. i wish that i'd be a cross—party committee. this affects every single person and every single region of every single political persuasion. brexit will affect everyone. that hasn't happened. i feel like mrs may and the government should come clean to the british public. do think there is in a way that brexit will be stopped now? i think it has it be the division of the british people. i think it has been morally and democratically right. pretty people should have a say in validating on whatever mrs may comes back with.
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there has to be an acknowledgement. there has to be an acknowledgement. the majority voted to leave because there was unhappiness domestic league and with the eu. in terms of what you want people to take from your book, why you bought it, one of the chapters that you wrote is entitled hashtag me to. do not see yourself as a victim? why did you do a chapter titled hashtag me to?” think that things get conflated. definitely, women need to speak out, it doesn't mean that men are bad. i just wanted to put it into context. foie gras. speaking at a small things can delete change, we need cultural change. we need equality
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rather than a shaming, they are right we are wrong. what i call dichotomous thinking is not helpful to anyone. how would you like people to anyone. how would you like people to describe you? you have been described in different ways by two people. how did we see do?” described in different ways by two people. how did we see do? i am very simple. when i see something wrong, i will speak up. i am not someone who's afraid to up. in a moment we'll have all the business news, but first the headlines on bbc news: ministers are urged to address a "crisis in children's mental health", after a survey finds that a fifth of girls aged 1a said they had self harmed. british boats demand government protection after clashes with french vessels over scallop fishing rights. a manhunt continues for 21—year—old janbaz tarin as it emerges that one of the two women who were stabbed to death in solihull was on the phone
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to police as she was attacked. in the business news: british gas has paid £2.65 million in refunds and compensation after wrongly overcharging more than 94,000 customers who switched to new providers. an 0fgem investigation found the energy firm "failed" and "unfairly penalised" customers who were coming to the end of their fixed term contracts. british gas said those affected were "refunded and paid an additional goodwill gesture". uk shop prices have risen for the first time in five years, according to the latest data from the british retail consortium. it's also warned that more price rises are to come, if the uk quits the european union without a trade deal. more on this in a moment. stark warning from the pensions regulator that generous lump sum payputs could be putting pensions at risk. earlier this year it contacted 14
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schemes encouraging them to consider making reductions as a record £21 billion flowed out of defined schemes in the year to march. let's return now to that story on shop prices. according to the latest data from the british retail consortium uk shop prices has risen for the first time in five years. it says shop prices rose by 0.1% in august, breaking a run of 63 months when prices actually fell. this comes after the rising cost of food jumped to a seven—month high, going up by nearly 2% after the recent heatwave which hit crops. brc warned of much steeper price rises if the uk quits the european union without a trade deal. joining us now is rachel lund, head of retail insights and analytics,
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at the british retail consortium. letters explain this for people. we say that it into giving up but not bya say that it into giving up but not by a lot. it is significant because this is the first time in a burial vomiting. matters right. we have had more than five years following shop prices. what is happening to food and what is happening to unwanted. and understood they have been going on for some time, what has happened this month is that the rate of the fall in the pre—season has lived quite a lot. that has boosted just anti—inflation territory. s why is that non—food prices have fallen. why are afraid that might non—food prices do what they are doing? there
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isa prices do what they are doing? there is a lot of competition in retail. in recent years, retailers have had to compete very hard and that is why we have had year on year falls to compete very hard and that is why we have had year on yearfalls in prices. when we talk about those falls, will people feel that end pockets when you go through the doors and shops. the should notice that. they can change what they buy, rather than buying the same product each year, they may upgrade to a higher spec one. its consumers stop to the same basic basket we would see those following year by year. those that see every leave the european union and the deal that would put prices up in shops as well why is that? . believe without a we would default to world trade towers. and some cases, there could be as
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high as 30 or 40% extra. that would be passed on to the consumers but the retailers will have to pass on a little but of that. thank you for that ritual. luxury car—maker aston martin says it could sell a stake in itself on the stock market, the first flotation of a uk car maker in years. the move could value the firm at up to £5 billion. if successful, the listing will mark a big turnaround for the company, which returned to profitability under new boss andy palmer. the uncertainty of brexit? earlier he told me the firm is relatively immune from the risks facing other uk car makers. we are aston martin, we're relatively impervious. we're an exporter and a hard brexit will
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tend to weaken the pound, that is good for us, i guess. we export 25% of the our cars to the eu, 30% into the united kingdom. so you may have a downturn on one side but you may have an upswing on the other, ferrari, for example, would be importing into the uk. so, net net for us, it's pretty neutral and that is one of the reasons it makes it relatively attractive as a stock. if you talk about the industry as a general point of view, most of the car companies that are based here are exporting into europe and any kind of trade tariffs or, as we all fear, non—trade tariffs is a concern and this concern will make the uk less competitive. and a reminder: you can hearfrom more top bosses every weekday on bbc business live. that's on the bbc news channel every
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monday to friday at 8:30. a look at what the markets are doing. ftse100 ftse 100 not ftse100 not doing a huge amount, keeping an eye on what is happening in north america and canada of that deal that the us has signed with mexico. the canadian foreign minister is in washington trying to do eddie deal there. that's all the business news. thousands of aretha franklin fans have been paying their last respects to the queen of soul, in her hometown of detroit. aretha franklin's body is lying in an open casket at the city's african—american history museum
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before her private funeral on friday. rajini vaidyanathan has been talking to the crowds who are there to celebrate her life. singing for fans of our beef franklin, it has been the ottoman pilgrimage. trials lined up from the early hours as they waited to say a final farewell to their allotted queen of soul. before she said goodbye, she made a last grand entrance. for those waiting patient to see her, the mood here was melodic. why have you decided you too big
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your last respects? i could have died at for a better person. she was all that and a ball of soup. and awning covered today. she means a lot to me, to my family. she is between sale, she paved the way for a lot of black singers. our beef franklin will lie in state at the city is african american history museum for another day. on show for one last time. it was good. she looked like she was just sleeping. she had on red shoes, her dress was so eloquent. she looked so pretty, orface so eloquent. she looked so pretty, or face looked like she was just relaxed. river franklin will be
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remembered as america's voice in more ways than one. she fought for gender and racial equality, supported charities that she could about, and remains a voice for detroit and beyond. she was a global superstar who never forgot our home templates. this week, her hometown issuing the world that they will not forget our beef franklin. time for a look at the weather with simon king. it has been a wet start to the day, mainly south eastern parts of england. heavy rain moving through this morning from the continent. that is that it clear now to the east. another band of patchy rain in western parts of england and wales, thatis western parts of england and wales, that is filling away. we have some sunshine between those areas of
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rain. some shower clouds and western areas. in aberdeenshire, clear blue skies. that rain across the 60s will continue to clear away, away from those coastal areas. patchy rain clearing away. a bit of cloud moving south eastern direction. a few shows in the west of scotland, maximum temperature is about 17—21d. through the night, some patchy mist and fog drifting here and there. it is going to turn quite chilly. temperatures in the glens in scotland could get into one — three degrees. some ofs
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fudge starting quite chilly, little sunshine in the morning. as the day goes on, we find more cult building up goes on, we find more cult building up in the afternoon. perhaps the risk of a shower or two in western parts but temperatures about 17 to 21. on friday, high—pressure building up, uncertainty of how far east it will go. perhaps some outbreaks of reading in his far eastern areas. for most of us, it will be a mostly dry day. some sunshine building into the afternoon. temperatures into the high teens. it will do even warmer as we head into the weekend, especially in southern areas. a few
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bright spells, mostly dry, temperatures getting into the 20s. goodbye. this is bbc news. these are the top stories developing at midday: ministers are urged to address a crisis in children's mental health, after a survey finds a fifth of girls aged 14 said they had self—harmed. with the young people we work with across the country, there is still a lot of stigma about these kinds of mental health issues, it is still really hard to ask for help, and so something like self harm, that can be quite private, is probably one way with dealing with those feelings, but not necessarily a good way. british boats demand government protection after clashes with french vessels over scallop fishing rights. a manhunt continues for 21—year—old janbaz tarin as it emerges that one of the two women who were stabbed to death in solihull was on the phone to police as she was attacked.
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theresa may is due to arrive in nigeria on the second day of a trade mission to africa aimed at strengthening economic ties ahead of brexit. officials in puerto rico say that almost 3,000 people died as a result of hurricane maria last september. that's almost 50 times the original estimate. the hurricane was the most powerful storm to hit the region in nearly a century. and british gas pays out more than £2.5 million in refunds and compensation for wrongly overcharging some users switching suppliers. good morning.
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it is the 29th of august. i'm joanna gosling. welcome to bbc newsroom live. there are calls for ministers to address what's being called a "crisis in children's mental health" — after a survey by the children's society found that 22% of girls aged 14 said they'd deliberately harmed themselves and gender stereotypes and worries about appearance were contributing to unhappiness. a closer look at the data suggests one in four girls aged 14 had self—harmed in the year 2015—16. across genders, one in six reported self—harming at the same age, and from that the charity estimates that 110,000 14—year—olds all over the uk may have self harmed over the same period. ricky boleto reports. bethany started self harming when she was 13.
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it is something she is happy to talk about today. she wants to open up to other young people. i don't think there was really a reason why, but the bullying made me feel really, really depressed, so i think that was kind of a response for me because it was something i could control. starting secondary school was difficult. bethany said she felt isolated. she kept what she was doing a secret from her mum. i got a phone call from her teacher when i was on the bus on my way home from work. he said that he needed to have a chat with me. and he told me that he had found out that day that beth was self harming, so that was a bit of a shock. five years on, she has stopped harming herself with the support of the harmless charity. i think there are a lot of reasons why, the pressures of school themselves, with having the gcses and all of the work that we have, it can be quite stressful. definitely social media, we see a lot of things where, you should look like this, you should wear that, you should have this make up. there is a lot of stigma associated with how girls should carry themselves as well.
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the children's society surveyed 11,000 children about their lives. they say a closer look at the data suggests one in four girls aged 14 we have found that people, children have been unhappy with their lives. what we found is that since 2009 children have become more unhappy with their lives as a whole overall, and particularly that has been driven by girls feeling more and more unhappy with their appearance. the government say they are spending £1.4 billion on transforming young people's mental health by 2020, with an additional 300 million to provide more help in schools. so, beth, how long have you been drawing for? years. i used to do it when i was little. bethany is now focusing on the future. of course, the scars won't disappear. her recovery is ongoing. i feel really confident now. iam happy. i feel i have got myself back. ricky boleto, bbc news. we will be speaking to a
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psychologist at 12:30pm. and if you have been affected by any of the issues raised, you can find details of organisations which offer advice and support on the bbc actionline website at bbc.co.uk/actionline. british fishermen are asking for government protection after being attacked by their french counterparts off the coast of normandy. 35 french vessels gathered on monday night to stop british scallop dredgers, who they claim are "pillaging" the shellfish stocks. the local fisherman threw rocks and smokebombs to deter the british boats, despite them being legally entitled to fish in the area. lebo diseko has more. this is what's being called the "scallop wars". french fishermen clash with their british counterparts in the sea off the normandy coast. rocks and smoke bombs were just some of the things reported to have been thrown at english and scottish vessels in the early hours of tuesday morning. essentially, we are fishing 40 miles off the french coast when a flotilla of french fishermen came out, surrounded the vessel, along with mine and other uk vessels. they were throwing missiles, trying to put ropes in the propellers
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and essentially foul the gear. i mean, it was pretty much short of piracy. we had to evacuate the area. now, there was a french naval vessel alongside that watched the whole thing but didn't intervene in any manner. so we are very shocked about the whole situation. go! it is the latest instalment in ongoing tension over fishing in these waters. french law says its fishermen can only harvest scallops here between october and may. the brits face no such restrictions, and the french fishermen, like this one, think that's not fair. translation: they have no hours, no quotas, they just fill their boats. they come, scrape and leave. they start working a month before us and they leave us the crumbs. in previous years, the two sides have been able to come to an agreement to harvest
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more fairly, but this year that didn't happen. with about 35 vessels to five, the french far outnumbered the british, and ultimately chased them away. now uk fishermen are demanding government protection. lebo diseko, bbc news. a mother and daughter killed in a suspected double murder in solihull were on the phone to police as they were attacked, according to detectives. police are continuing to search forjanbaz tarin, after his former partner, 22—year—old raneem 0udeh and her mother, were fatally attacked in the early hours of bank holiday monday. jenny kumah reports. the manhunt continues. police believe 21—year—old janbaz tarin, an afghan national here legally, is responsible for the murder of two women. his former partner, raneem 0udeh, seen here on the left, and her mother, khaola saleem. both were syrian nationals. raneem had a two—year—old son and was one of six siblings.
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the women were stabbed to death in the early hours of monday morning here in the family's home. police have now revealed that raneem 0udeh was on the phone to them when she was attacked. she'd made a number of calls to them on sunday. 0fficers tried to find her but couldn't. when contact was made again, the situation quickly escalated during the phone conversation. the force say officers were dispatched immediately and arrived within minutes. west midlands police has referred itself to the independent 0ffice of police conduct over its contact with the family. despite a strong public response to the police appeal, and a number of raids on properties, there's been no sign of the suspect. police are asking anyone who does see mr tarin not to approach him but to contact them immediately. jenny kumah, bbc news. 0ur correspondent dan johnson is in solihull.
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in this revelation that one of the women was on the phone to police when she was being attacked, what is the latest‘s when she was being attacked, what is the latest's yes, that is why the independent office of police conduct has been involved in this investigation right from the start. they said west midlands police, that they had referred themselves to the police watchdog because they had previous involvement with the family. it wasn't specified what that level of involvement was what timescale that was but now they have clarified that it did receive calls from raneem 0udeh on sunday evening and that she was on the phone as she was being attacked. i will be due a bit from the west midlands police statement which they have put out. they want to clarify some of the speculation will stop they say there we re speculation will stop they say there were a number of calls on sunday evening and we tried to physically
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locate her but were unsuccessful. they say contact was being made to the raneem 0udeh, the situation escalated and the dispatcher immediately sent officers. this is the scene outside the family home where the women were found stabbed to death. that man —— that manhunt is still ongoing. they have had help from the public, they said the response has been positive and helpful but they still haven't found him. they have located the van they think he was driving. neighbours say he drove away in a van after the attack on sunday night. they found that vehicle and some computers and mobile phones and they are being examined now. they also think they have found the murder weapon but they have still not found jam buster in himself. how far are they
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searching? we don't actually know, but i think it is fair to assume that an alert will have gone out right across the country. all police forces will have been alerted. it is safe to assume that officials at ports and airports will be on alert to look out forjanbaz tarin but he could have escaped very quickly in the early hours of monday morning before they were able to spread the word. we did not even get a description of him until the end of the day on monday. it has taken time for details to emerge. he is 21 yea rs for details to emerge. he is 21 years old, living in the uk legally, he lived in birmingham. this manhunt has been widening, growing and intensifying over the last few days. thank you very much. theresa may will visit africa's biggest economy, nigeria, on the second day of a trade mission to africa aimed at strengthening economic ties ahead of brexit. the prime minister announced £4 billion of extra british support for african economies during the first leg of her trip yesterday. mrs may will meet victims of modern slavery and unveil a series of measures to cut illegal migration
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into europe from west africa. a british—iranian woman jailed in iran has been taken to a prison hospital after she "blacked out". nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe was jailed for five years in 2016 after being convicted of spying, which she denies. her husband richard ratcliffe said his wife had suffered several panic attacks yesterday and today. the northern ireland fire service says there are grave concerns that an historic building in the heart of belfast city centre could collapse. around a hundred firefighters have been tackling a blaze in the primark store inside listed bank buildings since yesterday morning. there are fears the five—storey building could now collapse. 0ur ireland correspondent chris page has more. all over the city, people saw the smoke in the sky. but most didn't realise how bad the blaze was until pictures like these appeared. let's move, let's go! shoppers and about 150 staff were evacuated from the primark store within minutes of the fire breaking out.
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the lifts were on, it was very busy. it was a race for people to come down the lifts and the stairs. so i kind of ran out as quick as possible. no—one was injured but the interior of the building disintegrated as the fire ripped downwards. several times it seemed firefighters had got the blaze under control, but every now and again there were what sounded like small explosions within the store. with each one, the flames burst out again. this is an extremely dramatic and really very unnerving sight. a major store reduced to a blackened shell by the most severe fire here in belfast city centre for many years. the building has quite a history. it's been here since the late 18th century, and there's been a bishop's residence and a bank in the past. primark had spent £30 million on a renovation project, which was just about to finish. but business leaders now fear retailers in this area are facing a big financial hit.
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there's going to be a period of major disruption. heartbreaking to be honest. not much more i can say than that. hundreds of people who work and shop in northern ireland's capital will be affected. this blaze was the most sudden of blows, but its consequences will be felt for a long time. chris page, bbc news, belfast. 0ur ireland correspondent emma vardy says authorities are still not sure what caused the fire. no real clues yet and no statement from the fire service about exactly what caused this place. we know there were refurbishment works going on in the building. that fire started on the top floor of that building. it had been coming to the end of a £30 million a piece of refurbishment work so devastating for many people who have worked on the building and lots of prospective staff who would you to start their
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jobs are very soon. today, a lot of sadness in belfast because it is such a focal part of the town's high—street, this historic 200—year—old building now standing there as a blackened shell. people looked on with this may really as it burned down yesterday. you can't see on camera, but there are about 100 people standing here nowjust to ta ke people standing here nowjust to take a look. it is expected that there could be significant cost to there could be significant cost to the city because of this. today there is a 45 metre cord in which remains in place around the building and asa remains in place around the building and as a result of that, many of the shops in the city centre are having to be closed. fire services say that this order may have to remain in place for the next few days. the reason for that is structural engineers have had a look at this building today, they have made an initial assessment and save the exterior of the building is intact but parts of the inside of the collapsing and the expected those colla pses to collapsing and the expected those collapses to continue throughout the day. for the safety of pedestrians
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and neighbouring buildings, this huge gordon remains in place. the headlines on bbc news: ministers are urged to address a "crisis in children's mental health" after a survey finds that a fifth of girls aged 14 said they had self harmed. british boats demand government protection after clashes with french vessels over scallop fishing rights. a manhunt continues for 21—year—old janbaz tarin as it emerges that one of the two women who were stabbed to death in solihull was on the phone to police as she was attacked. sport now. the football association has submitted its bid to host the 2021 women's european championship. wembley would host the final with seven other venues put forward to stage matches, including manchester city's academy stadium ground. austria and hungary are also expected to bid with uefa choosing the hosts in december.
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i think it is enormous to have a major championship like this on home soil. across the tees across all over england. i think in terms of fa ns over england. i think in terms of fans and inspiring a generation of young people to play the game, fantastic. by 2021, we will have built a whole infrastructure of opportunity for youngsters to play. so they will be excited and they will be able to go and find somewhere to play. after more than 100 years of international football and cup finals at hampden park in glasgow, the scottish football association board are meeting to decide whether or not to move to the home of scottish rugby, murrayfield in edinburgh. let's get more from bbc scotland's senior football reporter chris mclaughlin. as you say, this place behind me has been the home of scottish football for over a century. it is owned by the scottish lower league side
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queens park. they lease it to the scottish fa. that lease is due to end in 2020 but it is that it is in need of major refurbishment and they cannot afford to fit the bill. so they have been looking at other options. 0ne they have been looking at other options. one option is to buy the stadium out right take on some kind of commercial business venture to help them meet the costs of refurbishment, all move 50 miles east to the home of scottish rugby, murrayfield. some say it has better infrastructure, transport links, it is certainly a bigger stadium, but the seven man and women board who are meeting behind me have a huge decision to make because if they decide to move to murrayfield, it is not beyond the imagination that in two yea rs' not beyond the imagination that in two years' time, instead of seeing ca rs two years' time, instead of seeing cars behind me, we could see bulldozers behind me. thank you. hal robson kanu has retired from international football. the striker announced the news in a statement after he was left out of the wales squad to play
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the republic of ireland and denmark in nations league qualifiers. robson—kanu made 44 wales appearances, scoring five goals, including two at the euro 2016 finals, famously scoring the second in their 3—1 win over belgium in the quarter—finals. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. thank you very much. see you later. in herfirst british interview, the american mother of a nine—year—old boy who says her son took his own life after enduring homophobic bullying at school, has told the bbc that she never wants any other child or parent to go through what her family is experiencing. before he returned to school after the summer holidays, jamel myles from colorado had told his mother he was proud to be gay, and wanted to tell his classmates. jamel‘s mother, leia rochelle pierce said the nine—year—old took his own life just days later.
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she's been speaking to the victoria derbyshire programme. you might find some of what you're about to hear, upsetting. he was magic. this little boy could walk into any room and make any person feel so loved and so special. he had this pizazz about him. he wasjust magic. if you feel bad, he would do anything to take your pain away just to make you happy. and is the toy that you are holding, is that significant? it is my son's bee. he cut off the ears so it would be different like him. he just said he was proud of who he was and he didn't mind telling people, and i am pretty sure he told someone who had that whole persona of "that is not ok." and decided to pick on him. i have sat here and seen kids pick on kids for less. so i am pretty sure hejust told one person and it spread and it became a worse situation.
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i don't want no one else to feel the pain. tomorrow is the last day i get to see my son. and it is not fair. ifeel so bad for any other parent who experiences this and i never ever want anyone to ever experienced this. i never want a child to feel alone. i never want a parent to feel broken. i want everyone to feel loved. my son said he wanted to make a change in this world and he wanted to show people love. and he can't speak right now, but i am speaking words he spoke for everyone to hear because everyone needs to hear it. because a gentle kind soul just left this world because of something so cruel. and i want my son to know he made a change for the better because of his genuine person. thank you very much for giving us your time today. we are really, really
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sorry for your loss. i am sorry too. this world doesn't get to see what a true, true treasure he is and what he could have been. he was greatness in the making. a statement on behalf of the school said "we are deeply committed to ensuring that all members of our school community are treated with dignity and respect, regardless of sexual orientation, gender identity or transgender status." "we also know, however, that we as a society have a long way to go to ensure that no child ever is bullied or treated with disrespect because of their self—identification" hurricane maria — which struck the caribbean almost a year ago — was the most powerful storm to hit the region in nearly 90 years. it devastated the island territory of puerto rico and officials now say that almost 3,000 people
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died as a result, that's nearly 50 times the original estimate. many died as a result of poor healthcare facilities and a lack of clean water. 0ur north america correspondent, david willis has more. hurricane maria was the most powerful storm to hit the caribbean island in almost a century. a monster of a weather system, which made landfall with winds of 250km/h, leaving millions of dollars of damage in its wake. comparing the storm to katrina in 2005, president trump initially marvelled at what appeared to be a relatively low loss of life. but now it seems that the death toll from maria might dwarf that of the hurricane that devastated new orleans. a study undertaken by researchers here puts the number of people who died either directly from the storm's wroth or from its aftermath at nearly 3,000. we are officially changing...
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we are actually putting an official number to the death toll, and we will take the 2,975 number as the official estimate. hurricane maria took what little this impoverished island had and reduced it to rubble. power supplies were knocked out, power lines were cut, roads became impassable. worst affected were the poor and the elderly. the governor concedes puerto rico wasn't prepared for a storm like maria, but hopes it can learn from the experience. translation: it's a time to show solidarity with all those who have lost family and friends. it's also a time to reflect on what we did well and what we did badly so that we can have a better response in future. making such improvements won't be easy. parts of the island are still
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without power nearly a year after the hurricane, and some 60,000 homes are still said to be a lacking proper roof. the trump administration has said it will continue to support the island's government, but puerto rico was bankrupt long before maria pitched up on its shores and its best hope may be to pray that such a disaster never happens again. british gas has paid £2.65 million in refunds and compensation after wrongly overcharging more than 94,000 customers who switched to new providers. an 0fgem investigation found the energy firm ‘failed' and unfairly penalised customers who were coming to the end of their fixed term contracts. british gas said those affected were refunded and paid an additional goodwill gesture. 0fficial warning letters have been sent to some company pension schemes telling them to take extra care with staff members wanting to remove their funds.
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there has been a sharp rise in the number of people cashing in valuable salary—linked retirement pots and managing the money themselves. the pension regulator warns that overly generous payouts could damage the schemes' remaining funds. the arteries of teenagers who drink and smoke show signs of hardening even by the age of 17, according to new research published in the european heartjournal. this can be an indicator that blood vessels are being damaged, increasing the likelihood of heart disease or stroke in later life, but the impact can be reversed if teenagers give up the habit. here's our health correspondent dominic hughes: it seems the damage to health from smoking and drinking starts early and being young provides no protection. researchers found evidence of damage to the arteries of teenagers who both smoked and drank. they measured the rate at which the heart's pulse passed around the body. by the age of 17, those who smoked and drank had arteries that were more than 10% stiffer.
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this matters because it is a sign that blood vessels are already being damaged, which can lead to heart problems or stroke in later life. every child who started smoking would have had a horrible experience of their first cigarette but very quickly get over that and crave it. it's damaging. it is also releasing carbon monoxide which in the short term narrows the blood vessels. so they are endangering themselves not only with all the cardiovascular problems, stroke, etc, but they also going to affect their long growth, their breathing capacity. there is some good news, the arteries of those teenagers who gave up cigarettes and stopped drinking returned to normal, providing an added incentive to quit. dominic hughes, bbc news. the government is to invest £92 million in the development of an alternative to the eu galileo satellite system. galileo has been the source of a major row over the level of access the uk will have
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after brexit to the public regulated service, a navigation and timing signal intended for use by government agencies, armed forces and emergency services. the most "inspiring, dynamic and dedicated" volunteers in grassroots sport will be shortlisted for an award at the bbc‘s sports personality of the year. 0lympic heptathlete jessica ennis—hill admits she couldn't have got to the top without the help of an unsung hero — her grandad. she explained how important volunteers are at all levels of sport. whether it is a friend at school who helps coaching at the track down at your local football club or someone who volunteers at weekends to help organise competitions, it is all those little things that people do that you kind of aren't aware of that you kind of aren't aware of that just that you kind of aren't aware of thatjust happen. that you kind of aren't aware of that just happen. and just that you kind of aren't aware of thatjust happen. and just make sure you vote for those people and help them to be recognised for the amazing work that they do. now time for a look at the weather.
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thank you very much. we have had some poor weather this morning across east anglia and the south—east of england. here in suffolk, for example. sammy has not seen any sunshine just yet but it will arrive. the wet weather is creeping eastwards back across the north sea and across the channel. behind that, we have got a band of cloud moving across england and wales. that might bring a few showers. sunshine following that. typical temperatures around 18 or 19 celsius. nothing specialfor typical temperatures around 18 or 19 celsius. nothing special for this time of year. that cloud moves through the south east possibly bringing 12 spots of rain. dry and clear and hardly any wind overnight but a cold one. in rural areas we could be down to around three or four celsius. tomorrow should be a fine day on the whole. good spells of sunshine and a top temperature of
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around 21 celsius. this is bbc news. our latest headlines... ministers are urged to address a "crisis in children's mental health" — after a study suggests that a fifth of girls aged fourteen have self harmed in the past year. british boats demand government protection after clashes with french vessels over scallop fishing rights. a manhunt continues for 21—year—old janbaz tarin — as it emerges that one of the two women who were stabbed to death in solihull was on the phone to police as she was attacked. theresa may is due to arrive in nigeria on the second day of a trade mission to africa aimed at boosting economic ties ahead of brexit. and british gas pays out £2.65 million after wrongly overcharging some customers who switched to new providers. gina miller is the businesswoman who led the successful supreme court
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case which forced the government to seek parliamentary approval before it could start the process of leaving the eu — inspiring both admiration and hate. she has written a book about how she became the person she is today — it's called rise: life lessons in speaking out, standing tall & leading the way. earlier i spoke to gina and she told me... i think it is impossible task to get a dealfrom where i think it is impossible task to get a deal from where we are now in about weeks' time. politicians on both sides, divisions in both parties has to be fitter side. politicians across the spectrum need to be is honest and straightforward and plain speaking to the people of great britain and say, we do not have time in the ten weeks to resolve this. we need to come up
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with a plan with what we do with that and they're not coming up with anything. a second referendum? i don't know what will happen in the political landscape. we are all on one side of the table and there are others on the other side. but i think it should be given back to the people. we are two years and we do have different information now. there has been some talk about you taking over from vince cable and the liberal democrats? it is very flattering but it is no. i have said it before and i will say today, i have no intentions of going into official politics. why not? it would be too constraining for the voice i have. i think i can be more useful being independent and being a campaigner. that is where i feel more comfortable, being independent. what do you think of theresa may and
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how she has and all that? she was put in an impossible position. i wish there had been a cross—party committee that was negotiating brexit, because this affects every single person in every single region of every single political persuasion. brexit will affect everyone. that has not happened. i would like misses me and how government and all political leaders to come clean with the british public. there are calls for ministers to address what's being called a "crisis in children's mental health" — after a survey by the children's society found that 22% of girls aged 14 said they'd deliberately harmed themselves and gender stereotypes and worries about appearance were contributing to unhappiness. a closer look at the data suggests one in four girls aged 14 had self—harmed in the year 2015—16.
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across genders, one in six reported self—harming at the same age, and from that the charity estimates that 110,000 14—year—olds all over the uk may have self harmed over the same period. these are young people who know they are deliberately harming themselves. we know there are young people trying to access mental health services than ever before. but what we need to do as a society is make that help available when children first pass credit. schools having a good approach to well—being is important so does not feel like you aren't putting your hand up and singling yourself out asking for help. could many of these kids then keeping it head on and their parents do not know? that is possible. self harm is a private coping mechanism for young people. what is really
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important is that adults and parents and trusted adults and those children's lives feel they can have a conversation about any struggles there are young people may be going through and mental health is not a topic of the table, they can talk about it and be open to conversation. let's go live to manchester where we can speak to consultant child & adolescent psychiatrist dr sandeep ranote, who is also the nhs's child and adolescent mental health services lead for greater manchester. thank you very much forjoining us. tell us first of why it is that somebody would actually harmed themselves if they are struggling with something, what is it that makes them actually do that to themselves? first of all, good afternoon and thank you are asking me to come along. it is such an important issue you are talking about and self harm should always be taken seriously. it could be a number of factors. we know that self harm is behaviour or symptom. it can
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be linked to more serious mental health illness like to present orders or disorders are eating disorders are a number of things. that is why it is really vital that we understand this as at unification by young people of extreme distress. as you have heard from lewsey before me, it is a way they are coping with that emotional pain and it is distress and they are communicating that. it is important we do not dismiss that, that we support pa rents dismiss that, that we support parents ourselves. 0ur young people and teachers to be able to manage this. and like lucy said, access the right help and help at the right time. that can be in a number of ways. lucy mentioned that vital support in schools where we can do more of that prevention work but also self—knowledge meant. the additional investment in children's mental health services by the government is very welcome to
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buyers. we must do more. the challenge as they are. and we must be able to support all young people from all backgrounds and all areas. so we are working much closely with schools to be able to do that. to be able to access counselling on site at schools, but also to equip schools and parents and families wheats whose —— with toolkits. they might also need to access specialist mental health services quickly and thatis mental health services quickly and that is important to do that and that is important to do that and thatis that is important to do that and that is why we are working much more closely with schools to enable that access to be much smoother and smoother than it has been. we are very aware of that. there are lots of online resources. we're working much more closely with colleagues from launching community sectors will be become one system working together to help support young people and families and parents. for families out there, it is important to note there is so much out on the
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internet. as well as being a professional i am a parent. i have three children of school age. so it is worrying as a parent and it is an important issue to me personally as well. it is important to know what an easy, good information website out there. there are some. young minds, royal college of psychiatrists, the mix, the samaritans, they have good resources and toolkits. they also have helplines for parents, teachers and young people. that is important for people to know, not to suffer in silence and not to feel blamed and that they are being taken seriously. you say it is a visual sign to anybody around the child that is self harming, that something is going wrong? but how adept kids at sometimes covering it up are not seeking help? as lucy said, that is
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obviously a possibility that there are still young people who are self harming who are not reporting it, who are not confiding are not sharing. but what is important to note is that awareness of and —— mental health conditions and self harm and what that is an indication of is much better than before. so that awareness that this is not theirfault, that that awareness that this is not their fault, that they can get help and how they can get that is more important. doing that work in schools and key immunities, making that information accessible to all young people means that that awareness is greater and that we are seeing more young people talk about it, talk about it. sorry to enter not, one somebody gets to the point of self harming, harrow likely is that they have bent struggling, how quickly does someone get to the stage that they will do that if they have had issues? that is variable
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and no two individuals are the same. it would be difficult for me to say and give you a timeframe, it varies for different people. some people it will be longer than others and some people will get support quickly. we are seeing more people more quickly than we have done previously. and in terms, obviously the number of kids reporting, is increasing. do you think overall the numbers that are actually doing this are increasing our isn't that we are sort of getting better at talking about mental health issues, parents are getting better at spotting it, schools are getting better, it is not a new phenomenon, is it? no, it is certainly not a new phenomenon. and i think some of what you have already said, it is a number of factors. we are getting better at reporting, we are more aware, young people are more aware and schools are more aware. it will be a mixture
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of factors. we are also living in a different world today. with a number of factors that young people report themselves as their top ten when he factors, things that they feel under pressure because, everything from exams 2 billion to cyber bullying to relationships and to body image and concerns about the way they work. so it isa concerns about the way they work. so it is a number of factors that we need to take into account and factor. thank you very much. and if you have been affected by any of the issues raised, you can find details of organisations which offer advice and support on the bbc actionline website at bbc.co.uk/actionline. syrian refugees who fled to neighbouring lebanon in order to escape the war are being told to go home — despite international warnings that it s not safe to do so. the united nations says the situation for those who have crossed the border into lebanon is only getting worse, with many living in poverty. newsbeat‘s james waterhouse sent this report from close to the syrian border. an impromptu game in an impromptu setting. ten miles away from their homeland.
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this camp has been set up for syrian refugees in lebanon. there's little water or electricity. the un says three quarters of the refugees are living in poverty on less than $4 a day. many have been here four years and have no idea when they'll be able to return home. translation: i might be here for another month, three months or a year. it depends on the safety. i don't want to go back where there is still a war going on. for some time now, more than 1 million syrians have been living in lebanon in conditions like these. the president here says he wants them to go home. the assad regime wants them to come back. but the united nations says it is not safe to do so. one person looking unlikely to go back is mayir mahmood, he left government control damascus almost two years ago to pursue his music.
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he's now going to canada with his acoustic group on a scholarship, but is still haunted by what he left behind. even if it is more safe now back in syria, even if the war has stopped, you can'tjust forget what you've been through. the war in syria is complex. the future of its people is likely to be just as difficult. after all, a nation will have to be rebuilt. james waterhouse, bbc news, lebanon. ministers are urged to address a "crisis in children's mental health" — after a study suggests that a fifth of girls aged 14 have self harmed in the past year. british boats demand government protection after clashes with french vessels over scallop fishing rights. a manhunt continues for 21—year—old janbaz tarin — as it emerges that one of the two women who were stabbed to death in solihull was on the phone to police as she was attacked. an advert on social media
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for an app that provides a natural alternative to contraception has been banned by the uk's advertising standards authority. claims that it was "highly accurate" and "provided a clinically tested alternative to other birth control methods" were found to be misleading. the swedish firm behind the natural cycles app says it respects the outcome of the investigation. in an exclusive interview, our reporterjean mackenzie has been to meet one woman, rebecca woodhead, who got pregnant while using the app. when did it all start to feel real? probably this scan. that's the 12 week one. so that's our first one where it actually looks like a human. but when the kicking started,
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i think that was... i mean, that was like, "wow! what is that?" how many months are you now? 34 weeks. so, yeah, about five to go. rebecca wasn't planning on having her first child for a few years. i was looking for a sort of alternative to hormonal contraception at the time. i suffer from depression and anxiety and hormone related contraception just seemed to really escalate that. she came across the contraceptive app natural cycles which tracks women's fertility over the month and tells them when they can and cannot get pregnant. she said she started using it after seeing using it after seeing an advert on instagram, claiming it was 99% accurate. was it based on that 99% that you decided to use it? yeah.
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i was sort of sucked into this 99% effective. you know, even more effective than the pill. i mean, what could possibly go wrong? sorry about the mess. it's a tip, but obviously we are moving. rebecca says she had been following the instructions perfectly for three months when she found out she was pregnant. so these are... some presents from work. think this is might have to be the going home outfit. hi, world. just talk to me about the impact that this has had on you over the last eight months? it has been quite high stress levels. i suppose selling the flat at the moment and then trying to buy somewhere new. and going to have to move in back with mum temporarily. yeah, just, you know, everything all at once. well, because you weren't ready for it? yeah, exactly. as much as i am excited, you know, i'm only 26.
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a lot of my friends are just starting to get engaged and everything but no one is having babies. you know, i'm sort of sort to meet people on basically tinder for mums and things like that, so that i can have someone to talk to. you know, there just quite a few things that i would have liked to have done. my career as well, to have sort to be slightly further ahead in that than i am. there's been a lot of, you know, things that i would have done differently. i guess it'sjust the decision being taken out of your hands. yeah, completely. and that is it. and that was... and that was something i found really unfair. yeah, i have days where i'm like, "oh, that stupid app!" and i am really annoyed about it.
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but... but everything happens for a reason. and i know that is so cheesy and, but i have to believe that. will you use the app again to try and prevent a pregnancy in the future? no. i may use it to get pregnant! butl... no, i won't. i don't think there was much more we could have done and i don't, i still don't know why it didn't work. the advertising watchdog has warned that the app cannot be marketed as highly 99% effective because the evidence from users shows in fact a 7% chance of getting pregnant. the company says it has removed the advert in question and many of its current adverts now reflect this.
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if you had been sold it as seven out of a hundred women every year will get pregnant, using this, would you have used it? no. i mean, seven out of 100 seems quite scary. do you feel that the apps let you down? well, yes. i mean, if you are telling me now that they have changed the stats to say that is 93% effective, whereas a year or so ago when i saw it on instagram, i was led to believe it was 99% effective, then, yes, i think then that is definitely misleading. 0ak, ash and birch are just some of the trees native to britain. over the years other varieties have been imported and, while this adds diversity to our woodland, it can also bring problems in the form of pests and diseases. 0ur correspondent tomos morgan is has been finding out what is being done to protect british trees. so what we have here is a white
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fringe tree which is a non—native tree, but what we have noticed is that it has these rather severe dieback symptoms. alongside the white fringe, the mock privet and its narrow leaf sibling are another three species infected with ash dieback in the uk. it is a fungal disease where leaf loss and a slow death inhibits greenery, but in the heart of gloucestershire specialists are helping the process of saving those affected breeds. we have been researching notjust the ash tree, byt the pathogen that causes dieback, and we have discovered tolerance in ash so we are hopeful in future we can select and breed tolerant ash trees so that we can replant. it is notjust ash type
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that risk in the uk. according to the british plant health register there are 1000 pests and diseases across the uk and around 30% of those pose a danger to the future of our trees. and many of those infecting our forests originate from abroad, which has led to the government last week putting a ban certain types of oak trees from being imported into the uk. the number of pests and diseases coming into the uk that impact on trees has risen exponentially over the last few years. have we been a bit slow in dealing with that issue? we saw the impact 50 years ago with the introduction of dutch elm disease, where elms have disappeared from many landscapes, so we are acting now to make sure that doesn't happen to our most iconic tree species, particularly the oak. trees of ash dieback are not usually taken down as the disease is so widespread and when a species developed
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symptoms with the disease they are kept for monitoring and research purposes. there are scenarios where trees with diseases are felt, say if the risk of spread is very great. some local authorities are using new methods in a bid to save our trees. in london, a method called bio—char technology is used on oaks in bexley. it is thought injecting the ground with purified charcoal helps soil quality improve, trees become healthier and in turn their defence is stronger to deal potential diseases. and here they have seen significant results. so last year the trees had pale and yellow leaves, as soon as spring came around in the first flush of its leaves it was unrecognisable, dark shades of green, the limbs started to lift up, it just looks like a brand—new tree. the science behind the reliability
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of methods like bio—char are up for debate but the process of protecting the great woodland has already begun. police shut part of the road in times square in new york yesterday when a large number of bees gathered on a hotdog cart. andy beatt has the story. times square gets its fair share of visitors, but not normally like this. tens of thousands of bees taking over this corner of new york. it is hard to say exactly how many were in this swarm, but it's thought to be between 20,000 and 30,000 settled around and on top of this hot dog stand. and while they made it a little tricky for the vendor to do business, they certainly caused quite the buzz with locals and tourists alike. literally the craziest thing i've ever seen. and i'm allergic to bees. i want to see it but keep my distance away from it.
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but it's definitely the craziest thing i've seen. it's fantastic that they should develop in an atmosphere like this. it's a bit scary. it's scary. what's it doing in the middle of town? police had to close the intersection for around an hour while they waited for back—up. a specially trained officer led this sting operation, vacuuming them up using a specially adapted machine called the beevac. the bees were then taken to another hive, well away from the square. it is not known for certain exactly where they came from or why they chose this spot. but the nypd bee unit says they probablyjust wanted to cool down on what was a hot and humid day. the policejoked on twitter, the buzzing guests probablyjust wanted to grab a drink and take a break before moving on to a new home.
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andy beatt, bbc news. things have been getting a bit messy in the spanish town of bunol, with thousands of revellers taking part in spain's annual tomato fight. the tomatina festival attracts more than 20,000 people to the little town near valencia, where they hurl around 160,000 kilos of tomatoes at each other. more than 140 tonnes of tomatoes were shipped in for the occasion, with the tomato battle set to go on for hours — after which the towns streets are expected to be submerged in red mush. in the moment it is time for the one o'clock news with jane hill. and it will be time to say goodbye to viewers on bbc two. time now for the weather with dan bet. the storm is keeping to the east of the uk. that is moving through and then we went
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to the atlantic to see a cloud like this coming our way, it is getting blocked off with a high pressure. as the high pressure becomes more established this evening, most places will end fine and dry. some sunshine, there is more cloud heading away from the midlands, the south west of england towards the south west of england towards the south east, maybe some spots of rain. broken cloud follows, a few scattered showers coming into the north of scotland with the cooler and fresh air. those showers will fade away overnight tonight and on the ball we will have clear skies, there is hardly a breath of went out there is hardly a breath of went out there at all overnight so it will get quite chilly and quite chilly quickly as well. in towns and cities, 9 degrees, maybe chillier than that. in rural areas we will find temperatures around for degrees. a few more of those cold nights to come. some sunshine to greet the day on thursday, patchy
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cloud bubbling up. this cloud will arrive in the south—west, some showers in west wales, and for western scotland. on the whole it will be dry is with sunny spells. it will be dry is with sunny spells. it will be dry is with sunny spells. it will be a little bit below par for this time of year. high pressure across the uk stopping this where into the south—west. we end up with a weather front drape towards the west of the uk. it will bring more cloud towards northern ireland with little or no rain. it will catch some rain in the far south—west of england. a dry dave swells of sunshine again. 0ut towards the west is this band of rain approaching, stronger southerly winds. lighter winds further east. temperatures not changing a lot, around 19 degrees in scotland. into the weekend, the cloud coming in from the atlantic, might bring some pockets of rain and drizzle. but the south will be drier
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and bright and warm. there have been been fights between british and french fishermen in the english channel, in a row about shellfish. there were skirmishes overnight off the normandy coast where uk boats are allowed to fish. before we knew it, we had around ten, maybe 15, other french boats surrounding us, throwing rocks at us, flares. we'll have the latest live from brixham where many of the uk boats are based. also on the programme: theresa may arrives in nigeria, as part of her trade mission to boost ties with african countries after brexit. more than a fifth of 14—year—old girls say they've self—harmed, according to new analysis. a children's charity says worries about physical appearance are contributing to unhappiness. hopes that the facade of one of belfast‘s most historic
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