Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  September 2, 2018 3:00pm-3:31pm BST

3:00 pm
this is bbc news, i'm rebecca jones. the headlines at three. theresa may dismisses calls for a second eu referendum, and insists she won't make compromises on her brexit chequers plan that aren't in the national interest. some in her party are unconvinced it is an incredible open sesame. you are not going to come to the house of commons and say, "that was not in the national interest," are you? the former prime minister gordon brown, has said the "soul" of the labour party is at stake in the dispute about the party's attitude tojews. the international holocaust remembrance alliance definition of semitism is something that we should support unanimously, unequivocally and immediately. it will be resolved and there will be a balance of acceptance as people want, but also exactly what other people have said as well,
3:01 pm
and lord sacks himself, that freedom of speech is important as well. the united states says it is cancelling $300 million of military aid to pakistan. the pentagon has criticised the country for failing to deal with militant groups. prison corruption — the number of prison staff caught smuggling drugs, weapons and mobile phones into jails is rising steeply. and coming up in half an hour, the click team look at new technology in home security. good afternoon and welcome to bbc
3:02 pm
news. good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. the prime minister has re—stated her opposition to a second eu referendum and says she won't accept anything in a deal with brussels that's against the national interest. writing in a sunday newspaper, ahead of mps returning to parliament this week, mrs may said she would not betray those who voted to leave in the referendum two years ago. here's our political correspondent susanna mendonca. she's shown us her moves can be unpredictable, but when it comes to the prospect of a second referendum, theresa may is standing firm and sticking to her tune. the prime minister told the sunday telegraph that two years ago, millions came out to have their say and to ask the question all over again would be a gross betrayal of our democracy. when it comes to her brexit blueprint forged at chequers, mrs may insisted she wouldn't be pushed into accepting compromises that were not in the national interest. but her former brexit secretary, who resigned over chequers, said he will vote against it and that her words leave the way open for compromise. except in the national interest.
3:03 pm
i mean, your commentators earlier were exactly right. that is an incredible sort of open sesame. you're not going to turn around in the house of commons and say "i agreed this, but it wasn't in the national interest." as parliament prepares to gear up for a new term, rumours of impending leadership challenges continue. as do the divisions among those who stayed inside the government tent, with the international trade secretary slapping down the chancellor's gloomy predictions about economic growth in the event of a no—deal brexit. to say what a gdp figure would be 15 years ahead is not a predictive power that i've known the treasury to have in my time in politics. pressure has been mounting throughout the summer from those who want the public to have a vote on the final brexit deal. and labour's opposition to a second referendum might be softening. my preference is a general election because then you vote on the issues and you vote on the team that will then do the negotiations. if she won't go for a general
3:04 pm
election we'll keep all options on the table and we'll see what happens in october november. what happens in october, november. this week, the cabinet will get back around the table and mrs may will embark on the final stretch before a deal with the eu does or doesn't get done. it's bound to be a long, tough road ahead. well, i spoke to susanna earlier, who explained that theresa may is facing opposition from both sides of her party. there has been a lot said about the brexiteers not being happy with the chequers deal and what we understand is they might be putting forward their own suggestions, their own plans and alternatives to the chequers deal in the coming weeks and months. but on the other side she has got the people who want to remain who are very unhappy with the chequers plan as well. nick bowles was quoted today in a newspaper as a
3:05 pm
humiliation. he says the whole idea would basically be one where we are being dictated to by brussels. we have got to worry though, simon robertson, talking about the idea that we cannot return to a second referendum being balderdash. she is getting opposition on both sides of the debate. there has been a lot of talk about plots and the possibility of borisjohnson talk about plots and the possibility of boris johnson replacing talk about plots and the possibility of borisjohnson replacing theresa may. what is going on inside the conservative party? we constantly hear about plots and people taking theresa may's plays and boris johnson's name is constantly linked to that. but this has come from the fa ct to that. but this has come from the fact that lynton crosby, who was very much involved in boris johnson's successful mayoral campaigns, involved in conservative party election campaigns, that he has been drafted in to basically work on a campaign that would be put
3:06 pm
forward as an alternative to the chequers plan, to show the chequers plan not to be the best idea, and that he will work on that. his involvement has raised questions about is this the beginning of a plot to replace theresa may with borisjohnson? plot to replace theresa may with boris johnson? an important plot to replace theresa may with borisjohnson? an important thing to note is what we heard from liam fox earlier on today on the andrew marr show. he said the thing about changing the leader is the arithmetic does not change. he means the conservative party does not have the conservative party does not have the numbers in parliament to be able to push through whatever it wants to push through an brexit. it needs consensus from within parliament from across different parties. whoever the leader is they would have to do that. although theresa may is constantly under pressure and talk of plots, at this stage it does not look as though this would happen, certainly before we get to the point where there is or is not a deal.
3:07 pm
the former labour prime minister gordon brown has weighed into his party's anti—semitism row. he says it should adopt an internationally agreed definition of anti—semitism. tensions within labour over the issue have intensified following the decision by the long—serving mp frank field to resign the party whip in parliament. mr brown has been addressing a meeting this lunchtime of the labourjewish movement in north london. i want to say to you very clearly today that the international holocaust of remembrance alliance definition of semitism is something that we should support unanimously, unequivocally, and immediately. applause not only must we unanimously agreed best definition of anti—semitism, we
3:08 pm
must take the proper procedures to discipline those who undermine them. equally at the same time we must be honest with ourselves and recognise that racism and anti—semitism is a problem of the jackbooted right in oui’ problem of the jackbooted right in our country, but it is also a problem of the conspiracy theory and thatis problem of the conspiracy theory and that is why we need proper education so that is why we need proper education so that our movement is cleansed of anti—semitism and racism in the future. anti—semitism and racism in the future. speaking to the bbc‘s andrew marr earlier, the shadow chancellor, john mcdonnell said he was confident that the row over the recognised definition of anti—semitism would be resolvd by labour when the national executive committee meets next week. i don't want to pre—empt the nec, but from what i have heard it will be resolved and there will be a balance of that acceptance as people want, but also exactly what others
3:09 pm
have said as well, and lord sacks himself, that freedom of speech is important as well. the ability to criticise policies that you disagree with. sorry to jump criticise policies that you disagree with. sorry tojump in. you are a big voice in the labour movement and people will be watching you and listening to you. if you yourself say that you think that definition should be accepted, that will have an effect. do you think it should be accepted? i do not want to interfere in the nec because anything you say could jeopardise what i think will be an historic agreement. let me put it as straightforward as i can. i think all sides will be satisfied with the proposal that will be discussed. that means acceptance on the one hand and acceptance overall andl the one hand and acceptance overall and i think also the commitment to freedom of speech and a recognition of the rights of palestinians. i think the nec are wise enough to come to that understanding. and then we can get on with the serious
3:10 pm
business of engagement with the jewish community, tackling anti—semitism in our society and as best we can bringing people together. we will resolve this matter and i hope we do it quickly and move on. our correspondent simonjones is at that jewish labour movement today — we canjoin him now. you get a sense of talking to people here today that they have had enough of hearing things from the leadership, but potentially things will change, they want to see action. very much people are pleased with what the former prime minister gordon brown had to say. it is pretty unusual for gordon brown these days since he stopped being an mp to intervene in domestic affairs and even more unusualfor him to intervene in goings within the party of labour. he felt he could not stand to one side. he felt he had to speak out and say something about the whole issue of anti—semitism. we
3:11 pm
can talk to one of the people who was listening to what he said, the vice chair of the jewish labour movement. what did you think of his speech? it was a fantastic speech from gordon brown. he sent a couple of clear messages out. it is a welcome message of support and solidarity. it is notjust important that we stand up in this fight, but we are fighting on behalf of the whole party and the country. people out there who want to make sure that the scourge of anti—semitism and hatred is uprooted from society. that was applauded by people here. but he sent a clear message that the labour party nec has two unequivocally, unanimously and immediately adopt the internationally accepted definition of anti—semitism. it is clear. had the nec done this in the summer, we might not have spent the whole summer might not have spent the whole summer talking about anti—semitism
3:12 pm
in the labour party and we would have gone out and got the tory party on its manifold failures. the vast majority of the jewish community say this is the definition that we want accepted. the shadow chancellor has said he thinks it will be resolved in the coming weeks. if the nec adopt the internationally recognised definition, will that be enough?m isa definition, will that be enough?m is a place to start, but we need to make sure it is implemented on and work on. there are a large number of cases, both high profile and not, that have stacked up at the moment. the party needs to take some action. what we hear across the whole co nfe re nce what we hear across the whole conference today is the mantra that it needs to work. when he says very rightly that people are trolling mps or engaging rightly that people are trolling mps orengaging in rightly that people are trolling mps or engaging in anti—semitism are not doing it in his name, we need to do some naming and shaming. we need to
3:13 pm
be proactive about it rather than just letting it sit. this is so important that we build trust with the jewish labour members and the whole jewish community. all sorts of sessions today discussing things like brexit and representation, but is it slightly depressing that you are having to spend most of your time and energy today discussing anti—semitism? time and energy today discussing anti-semitism? yes, of course it is. we try to cover refugees, brexit, representation in local government, loads of issues, but we are clear that the single issue facing the jewish members of the labour party is anti—semitism. it is depressing to have to talk about this and some of the things that go on online in the name of the labour party and the leader in 2018. it is absolutely disgusting. we would far rather not
3:14 pm
be spending ourtime disgusting. we would far rather not be spending our time talking about this and we would rather talk about how we take the fight to the tories and provide this country with a government it deserves. but we have to do the right thing by the community. as you can see, it is the issue that is dominating proceedings here. as regards the labour leadership, they say they are doing things to tackle anti—semitism within the party and as a whole. joining me know isjenny manson, the chair ofjewish voice for labour — an alternative group, which was set up to tackle claims of anti—semitism within the labour party. thank you for coming in. we have a more wider agenda than that, to look at the tradition of the labour jewish socialism. is gordon brown right that this issue of anti—semitism goes to the soul of the party and is indeed a stain which has to be removed? he is right
3:15 pm
that all forms of antiracism go to the soul of the labour party. i have heard people saying they have had enough and i have had enough. i'm anyjewish enough and i have had enough. i'm any jewish friends enough and i have had enough. i'm anyjewish friends in the labour party and outside the labour party who are not represented by this community would like facts look at about how much anti—semitism there really is in the party, whatjeremy corbyn has done, instead of these allegations hyped up by mr gordon brown. are you saying there is not a problem? no, i am not, there has been a problem, but it is less now thanit been a problem, but it is less now than it was in the past. i have not met its myself, but i live in north london where there are sophisticated constituents when it comes to understanding views. i have been challenged many times and i have beenin challenged many times and i have been in the labour party for many
3:16 pm
yea rs. been in the labour party for many years. all the evidence suggests it is at least as prevalent in other parties. they have the same problem, it is mostly on the far right, the disgusting things happening on social media are not coming from labour party members, but the allegations continue. i am concerned the media, including yourself, and commentators, are not questioning the so—called smear of anti—semitism. the so—called smear of anti-semitism. i wonder why the vetera n anti-semitism. i wonder why the veteran mp like frank field who has done a huge amount for the labour party, he has been a loyal and dedicated labour mp, why would he resigned whip after accusing the leadership of becoming a force for anti—semitism? leadership of becoming a force for anti-semitism? are you saying he is lying? he was not very convincing and then he moved on to being bullied in birkenhead. i know members in birkenhead who say there has been bullying on all sides. there is a lot of bullying in the party at the moment between very strong views. i have a lot of
3:17 pm
emotional connection with frank field because of his wonderful work, but in later years he has rebelled on things i think he should not have rebelled on, including brexit and welfare. he has been very tough on people receiving welfare and voted for the welfare cap. my kind of labour, the old, proper left wing in my view which protects people, the most vulnerable people in the country, frank field has let people like that down. let me quote jeremy corbyn writing in the guardian who is saying denying the continuing problem of anti—semitism does not help. labour staff have seen exa m ples of help. labour staff have seen examples of holocaust denial, crude stereotypes, conspiracy theories blaming 9—11 on israel, even one complaint is one too many. if the labour leadership is saying this, you must agree. i did say there is anti—semitism in the labour party.
3:18 pm
so far in only one case i know it was a labour party member. briefly, how do we resolve the issue? how does labour make this issue go away? the holocaust remembrance definition has been raised and never adopted until 2016 when people got excited about it. the people who wrote the exa m ples about it. the people who wrote the examples was an american and he says he should not have written them. if one compromise is reached, as long as palestinian rights and muslim riots and other people was ‘s rights are protected, the whole country will be with us. in my experience the whole country is aghast at one particular group... we have not got time and we are getting into detail. what you are basically saying is when labour's nec meets this week it
3:19 pm
should sign up to the international recognised agreement?” should sign up to the international recognised agreement? i am not saying that at all. if people feel they have to adopt it because that is the acid test of whether they are serious, they have got to have qualifications to make sure that freedom of speech on israel is protected and it is not. we have got to leave it there. there is always a lot to talk about. thank you. the headlines on bbc news... theresa may dismisses calls for a second eu referendum, and insists she won't make compromises on her brexit chequers plan that aren't in the national interest. the former prime minister, gordon brown, has said the "soul" of the labour party is at stake in the dispute about the party's attitude tojews. the united states says it is cancelling 300 million dollars of military aid to pakistan. the pentagon has criticised the country for failing to deal with militant groups. the united states says
3:20 pm
it is cancelling 300 million dollars of military aid to pakistan. the pentagon has criticised pakistan for failing to deal with militant groups operating in the country. the decision has been takenjust days before the us secretary of state is due to meet the newly elected prime minister, imran khan. let's cross now to washington where we can speak to our correspondent chris buckler. chris, tell us a bit more about why the us government is cancelling this aid. essentially america has been concern for a long time that pakistan is not tackling what the department of defence called terrorist groups, as in all terrorist groups, as in all terrorist groups. they are concerned in some ways pakistan is giving support of safety to some groups
3:21 pm
aligned with the afghan taliban. these groups operate near afghanistan and they have a network and they are particularly concerned about it. they feel strongly is that pakistan should be stronger in taking action, particularly since us forces have been killed as a result of the activities of these groups. asa of the activities of these groups. as a result, there has been this question of pressure going on. money was withdrawn this year of $500 million that would have potentially gone to pakistan in this csf funding. now another $300 million will be withdrawn, although that gets the approval of congress. but it is clear the defence secretary james mattis had a chance to put this money forward and approve it during the summer if he saw evidence that pakistan was tackling these militant groups. he clearly has not seen militant groups. he clearly has not seen it and the decision has been taken to withdraw at providing congress giving approval. what are the consequences of the withdrawal of this aid? there are two things.
3:22 pm
first, doing it at this time gives you an indication that they are trying to put pressure on pakistan because ultimately we have the us secretary of state going to meet the new pakistan prime minister, imran khan. potentially they could have conversations and tried to push through their agenda. but there is a question for pakistan and what it does next. there is anti—american sentiment, but they have a struggling economy and potentially they will have to see if they can try and form different allies with other countries. for america pakistan is ultimately very important because of its close links to afghanistan, because of the geography and the airspace. therefore, there are risks for america in some of this as well. but there has been growing frustration. donald trump has been very clear. he was talking about in return for billions of dollars pakistan give
3:23 pm
america nothing but lies and deceit. it is those words that sometimes anger pakistan and that is also a potential danger for the us. chris buckler in washington. chris buckler in washington. the islamist militant group al shabab says it's carried out a car bomb attack in somalia, killing at least three people. the attack happened in the capital mogadishu when a car containing explosives was driven towards a local government building. officials say that three soldiers who stopped the vehicle from entering the compound died in the explosion. the blast also badly damaged a nearby school and mosque. new figures show that hundreds of prison staff have been caught smuggling drugs, weapons and other banned items into jails in england and wales. the figures, obtained through a freedom of information request by the observer newspaper, show a 50% rise over the last six years. the prison service says it represents less than one per cent of all staff. ben ando reports. in july, inspectors found that
3:24 pm
wandsworth prison in london, the most overcrowded in britain, had stopped scanning visitors for drugs and other banned items due to a lack of staff. the same month a 25—year—old prison officer was jailed for smuggling contraband into forest bank prison in salford, greater manchester. now the minister ofjustice has admitted in figures released to the observer newspaper, that in the last 16 years the number that in the last 6 years the number of prison employees, notjust officers but health workers, trainers or other support staff, found smuggling illegal items like drugs, mobile phones, weapons or tobacco into prisons in england and wales, has gone up by more than a half. the figures show that in 2012, 45 prison staff were caught smuggling. but five years later, in 2017, that figure had gone up to 71. and the number of drug finds has trebled, now running at an average of 35 every day. what these numbers suggest is that the problem may be on the increase, but that is not a surprise because the actions of successive
3:25 pm
governments have created a perfect market for drugs in prison. campaigners say one problem is people. despite a recruitment drive to bring in 2500 new prison officers, the workforce has shrunk by nearly a fifth since 2010, when there were nearly 7000 more than now. prison bosses say these figures represent the actions of a tiny minority, and that most of their staff are ha rd—working and honest. but the government knows that with record levels of violence and drug seizures and suicides, increasingly the impression is of a prison service in crisis. ben ando, bbc news, at the ministry ofjustice. the specials singer neville staple has spoken of his "heartbreaking loss" after his grandson was stabbed to death. fidel, the son of mr staple's daughter melanie, was stabbed in croft road, coventry, in the early hours of saturday morning and later died in hospital. west midlands police have launched
3:26 pm
a murder inquiry and an arrested man remains in custody. police have confirmed that a man charged with the murder of a 68—year—old woman is the victim's son. celia levitt was found dead at a property in bromley in south—east london on friday. her 36—year—old son will appear in court on monday. a 16—year—old boy who was injured in a shooting in south—west london is now in a stable condition. the teenager suffered gunshot wounds in the incident which took place in the early hours of this morning on york road in wandsworth. police initially said the boy was in a critical condition but have since confirmed that he is stable. no arrests have been made. video games which allow players to make in—game purchases will have a warning icon on their packaging from christmas. a picture of a hand holding a credit card will appear on boxes. the aim is to warn parents and help them regulate how much money their children can spend.
3:27 pm
our news correspondent angus crawford has more. once out of the shop, the gaming can start. but so too can the spending. many games allow players to buy things like better guns, new characters or extra features, using real, not digital money. children can run up big bills, and some parents don't find out until it's too late. about 40% of parents apparently let their children spend money in the game. it is becoming more of a common thing in games, as digital downloads mean you can spend money in the game to get extra content, or there is the rise of these loop boxes and micro—transactions. the industry is aware of the problem. last year, after a public outcry, one game temporarily stopped all in—play purchases. now the european ratings body has decided to act. come christmas, video game boxes will carry a new icon warning parents
3:28 pm
that children can play and spend at the same time. but will it make any difference? if you have to buy the game and then within the game, to actually play the game, to get the most fun out of that game, you have to spend a lot more money, i think the customer should be informed about that. so yeah, i agree. all the games these days, they have... everything comes with add—ons in the cost. so, it's a good idea to warn people, but at the same time people should probably expected anyway, i think. regulators fear gaming can sometimes look more like gambling. this new icon perhaps a sign of the industry taking action before it's forced to. angus crawford, bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather with ben some warm weather for most of us today, but mixed fortunes in the
3:29 pm
sunshine stakes. western areas have more than their fair share of cloud. even here we saw a few breaks at times. cloud thickening up across northern ireland and western scotla nd northern ireland and western scotland ringing rain. it will sink further south eastwards overnight. underneath the cloud it will be a mild night. between 13—15. cooler in the south east with a mix of clear spells and cooler in north—west scotla nd spells and cooler in north—west scotland and northern ireland. it means tomorrow we'll start off sunny here. the weather front is wriggling around and clipping into the eastern side of scotland. a bit of rain at times. the south—east holding onto some warmth for now, but that will change as we get deeper into the week. it will turn cooler for all of us week. it will turn cooler for all of us with a chance of rain later in the week. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines: theresa may dismisses calls for a second eu referendum, and insists she won't make compromises on her brexit chequers plan that aren't in the national interest.
3:30 pm
the former prime minister, gordon brown, has said the "soul" of the labour party is at stake in the dispute about the party's attitude tojews. prison corruption — the number of prison staff

26 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on