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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  September 4, 2018 6:00am-8:31am BST

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good morning. welcome to breakfast with louise minchin and dan walker. our headlines today: politicians head back to parliament, as the labour party faces crunch talks over anti—semitism. a call for plain english. doctors are told to write letters that are easier for patients to understand. a free childcare scheme in england is closing nurseries, according to an education charity. supermarkets, pubs and restaurants have all benefited from the hottest summer on record. have all benefited from the hottest summer on record. but clothes sale had taken a bit of a hit. and in sport... "no gas left in the tank". england's record run—scorer alastair cook will retire from international cricket after this week's final test against india. it isa it is a dry and fine start to tuesday. across some parts of england and south—east scotland, some drizzle and light rain to start your day. the full forecast here on brea kfast. it's tuesday the 4th of september. our top story — after months of arguments over antisemitism, labour's ruling body will meet today to try to put the issue to rest. they'll vote on adopting the
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full international definition of antisemitism, which was partially incorporated into the party's code of conduct injuly. here's our political correspondent ben wright. jewish group ‘s were called and loud in their protests, as were many labour mps in their protests, as were many labourmps and in their protests, as were many labour mps and peers. injuly, the ruling body the nec decided not to reproduce all 11 examples of anti—semitism, as defined by the international holocaust remembrance online. following the outcry, the party decide to consult further on its code of conduct over the summer, which was dominated by the toxic row over anti—semitism within the labour party and the leadership‘s inability to deal with it decisively. in recent weeks, trade unions and leading labourfigures recent weeks, trade unions and leading labour figures have recent weeks, trade unions and leading labourfigures have urged the party to act. on sunday, the former labour leader gordon brown added his voice, saying the
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definition should be adopted unanimously, it unequivocally and immediately. the shadow chancellor john macdonald said the full definition and its examples should be accepted, but indicated the party they also spell out that criticism of israel and its policies would still be legitimate. mps from all parties returned to westminster today, with brexit set to dominate the agenda. theresa may's plan for trading with the eu after brexit is under assault from many in her party and the eu has severe doubts about it too. with little time left to negotiate our exit from the eu, politics is set for a very turbulent autumn. universities are urging the government to introduce new rules allowing international students to work in the uk for up to two years after graduation. under the proposal, the universities would sponsor their graduates to look for work without any restriction on the type ofjob they can apply for. the government says it already has variety of routes to allow international graduates to stay in the uk. it was officially the joint hottest
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summer on record it was officially the joint hottest summer on record this year. it has had an impact? i don't know. are not here to talk about that. —— i am. the reason why it we have brought the weather into this story is because it really dictates how we spend our money. or we have seen from the latest retail statistics is that we have been spending a lot more in pubs and restaurants. we have been enjoying more evenings out, saying let's go out to the pub and have a few drinks. which means that it and have a few drinks. which means thatitis and have a few drinks. which means that it is not that we have been spending more money across the board, we have cut act on other things. we are seeing clothes sale
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is not growing as fast as they had been. there has been various people this morning, looking at what has happened this year in terms of our spending and they are saying here that now customers are planning to tighten their little bit more because we have had such a good summer. because we have had such a good summer. this is, for example, delays with buying autumn clothes just yet. at the end of the summer you would go out and buy your bits and bobs for the coldest season. but because it is still warm and people are enjoying it, people are not spending necessarily as much as they would haveif necessarily as much as they would have if we had not had the good weather. —— had we not had the good weather. —— had we not had the good weather. it doesn't feel like autonet. you were right. -- autumn yet. 1996, 2003 and 2006. anyhow we
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say since records began? when did they begin? 1910. —— you know how we say since records began? nearly half of nursery providers in england say the government's scheme to provide 30 hours of free childcare has had a negative financial impact on their business. however, the free provision for 3 and a—year—olds, introduced this time last year, has proved highly popular with parents, as olivia richwald reports. it was a vote—winning offer, 30 hours a week of free childcare for working parents of three and four—year—olds in england, and it saved families thousands of pounds a year. i don't pay a penny now, because of the 30 free hours. it's, like, nearly £300 a month in money i've saved. the government has been accused of not funding it properly. 8,000 members of the preschool learning alliance were sent a survey. 1,300 replied and, of them, 843 said the fees paid
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by the government were less than their hourly rate, and more than 400 said the scheme was putting a strain on theirfinances. we are seeing closures almost on a daily basis, settings that have been around for 20—25 years, that, frankly, have just said that the new offer, the 30—hour—funded places offer, is just the final nail in the coffin. like many involved in the scheme, this bradford nursery is now asking parents for top—up fees. here it's £3 a day, but elsewhere it can be up to £10 a day. if we're not viable, then we disappear, and lots of providers have disappeared. my parents have been very, very understanding. they are willing to pay because they love our nursery. the department for education says the rate it pays is for childcare only, and not for additional services and meals. it says it has commissioned new research looking into the costs of childcare, and adds that 80% of providers around the country have been willing to take part this scheme. been willing to take
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part in this scheme. olivia richwald, bbc news. an american football player who protested against racial injustice by kneeling during the us national anthem has been revealed as the face of nike's new advertising campaign. colin kaepernick first protested in august 2016. other players followed his lead by kneeling during the anthem, leading to criticism from president trump. kaepernick hasn't played since 2017 and is currently suing the nfl claiming he is being kept out of the league because of his part in the protests. the bbc radio 5 live presenter rachael bland, who has terminal cancer, has revealed on social media that she has "only got days" to live. she was diagnosed with breast cancer in november 2016 and had documented her journey throughout her illness on the podcast ‘you, me and the big c'. last night she tweeted: and if you want to hear her pod
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cast, talking about over the last few months, all of —— will of her feelings and the rest of it, it is a lovely pod cast to listen to as well. her positivity and the way she has inspired so many people through that pod cast, it will continue as well. much love to her and all of herfamily. doctors are being urged to write letters in clear, simple english that's easier for patients to understand. new guidance has been issued by the academy of medical royal colleges, encouraging consultants to stop using latin phrases and medicaljargon. it comes after gps reported that some patients were having to book appointments just to have technical terms explained. let us know what you think about that. plain english? you can agree,
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right? being around to see your 102nd birthday is cause for celebration, but imagine having your twin by your side too! that's exactly what has happened to ann and gussie crumby. the sisters turned 102 in may, but have just got round to throwing a party with family and friends. after moving apart to have families of their own, the twins found their way back to each other in the late 90s and have been inseparable since. as you can hear, they're taking their birthday in their stride. i don't know where they are from. why do i want the answer to so many questions? i just why do i want the answer to so many questions? ijust want why do i want the answer to so many questions? i just want to know what they are putting on their cornflakes! you think if you are 102 you still have cornflakes?” cornflakes! you think if you are 102 you still have cornflakes? i don't
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know. well, i don't know whether... are you ingrained in something different? i don't know. i've got no idea why i made that come and. —— comment. i wonder what alastair cook has for his breakfast. alastair cook has called time on his record breaking england career. that was 12 years ago we saw him on the left, in fairness he hasn't aged a great deal. really interesting to hear what people are saying about his career, the reaction that is coming asa his career, the reaction that is coming as a result. the overriding feeling seems to be that we probably won't appreciate his achievements, as is often the way, until he is gone. we probably will not see a batsmen like him as well. a dying
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breed. the new format of the game is getting runs quickly, but for alastair cook it was for the shots that he didn't make, or left. sad times as he hangs up his bat. the former captain holds the record for most test runs and most test catches by an england player, and will play his final test at the oval against india which starts on friday. roger federer is out of the us open. the five time champion made 75 unforced errors as he lost in the last 16 to australia's john millman. he's been racing since he was a kid and next season teenager lando norris will make his debut in formula one for mclaren. at 19 he'll become britain's youngest driver to race at the highest level. we are going to speak to him at 8:30 a.m.. mo salah has been shortlisted for fifa men's player of the year. the liverpool forward scored 44 goals in all competitions last
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season and is joined in the top three byjuventus' cristiano ronaldo and luka modric of real madrid. he was the player of the tournament at the world cup. one absentee, lionel messi. a big—name. verity is, mohamed salah, deserving of his place. —— there it is. mohamed salah, deserving of his place. -- there it is. now we know where those twins come from. we don't know what they see. i do know. i will try to get to the bottom of that. —— don't know. the hot weather may now be a distant memory, but yesterday meteorologists announced that 2018 was officially the joint hottest summer on record in the uk. in a six—week spell from june to august daytime temperatures in parts of the country consistently topped 30 degrees according to the met office. let's have a look back at some of the highs and the lows. ended up with a question, was it too
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hot to handle? surely not. never. never too hot to handle. it was enjoyable while it lasted. certainly one that will go down in the memory books for a long time, but things have changed and for the rest of the week we are shaking up the seasons, with a feel of autumn through the week, as things turn cooler, and later wet and windy. shaking up the weather systems across the uk is what's happening in the pacific, at the moment we have this cloud, this isa the moment we have this cloud, this is a typhoon making landfall across japan, this is dragging tropical moisture and heat further north, that will shake up the weather systems in the upper atmosphere and eventually bring a change. back to our shores, you can see this cloud, that brought rain yesterday, it is
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still with us in south—east england and will, into north—east england, rent or drizzle possible. —— south—east england and wales. we couldn't rule out one or two showers. damp in england and scotland. scotland and northern ireland, clear and sunny start to tuesday, with temperatures below freezing in places. quite big variations in temperatures from one place to the next. some areas of scotla nd place to the next. some areas of scotland around 11 degrees. scotland, northern ireland, the best of the sunshine. cloudy in western northern ireland later, showers in the hebrides, cloudy in northern, central england, east wales and the south—west, sunny in the south—east with temperatures down on yesterday, still above 20 41 or two. it is a largely dry nights to come —— 20 or 22. in between, clearskies largely dry nights to come —— 20 or 22. in between, clear skies around to ta ke 22. in between, clear skies around to take us into wednesday morning,
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and it will be another cool one for the northern half of the country, won't be surprised to see frosting places to start the day. so for tomorrow a lot more brightness across england and wales, more sunshine developing, but thick cloud into western scotland, northern ireland later on will bring outbreaks of rain and temperatures still foremost in the mid—to—high teens, maybe 20 with sunshine in the south. the sha keup teens, maybe 20 with sunshine in the south. the shakeup of the weather patterns evident in the jet stream which shows the undulating pattern in the north atlantic, moving into the south of the uk and in that deep down we see the big area of low pressure, which will dominate the pressure, which will dominate the pressure for the end of the week —— dip down. it means raincloud and eventually something cooler and windy too. let's look at the details on thursday before we go. sunshine around at times. the greater chance of showers. longer spells of rain for the north—east scotland. avoiding the heaviest showers in the far south of the uk. note
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temperatures on friday, only around 13 to 19 degrees. feeling cooler thanit 13 to 19 degrees. feeling cooler than it does this time of year and certainly a big change from the summer. certainly a big change from the summer. you are right, thank you. it is gone. a shame. steph and mr watson here to look at the papers. i don't know why i called you mr watson. the daily express following with boris johnson's watson. the daily express following with borisjohnson's attack on the prime minister's brexit plan and many reflect on chris evans decision to leave radio 2. and england star player alistair cook we've been talking about announcing he will retire from international cricket. the guardian reports figures from public health england suggesting 80% of adults have hearts that are more damaged than they should be and doctors have urged those to ditch unhealthy doctors have urged those to ditch
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u nhealthy lifestyles, doctors have urged those to ditch unhealthy lifestyles, and you can see mr evans on the front of that. yes and on facebook this morning we are discussing jane's story about her heart and kidney transplant, she has been talking there as well. something we are debating not only on facebook, but on the programme, phones in schools, do you think they should be entirely banned in schools? completely banned in france, should it be in the uk? yes. yes. they are a distraction. in our household, they would say no way. you have a tablet. that is my point, what about tablets? lots of schools, home work, schools, you know, come on tablets, so you embrace technology, where do you draw the line? there isn't racing technology and then playing rudeness, text in
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in the lesson —— there is embracing technology. you are not going to chat to your friends on your tablet, whereas you might be with your phone. you can have social media on your tablet. is it monitored by the schools' internet? does it always work? not necessarily. you would allow the phones in schools?” work? not necessarily. you would allow the phones in schools? i would rather that they were not, but we need to look more widely, and see what they are doing. we need to make sure they don't use their phones in lessons. the pressure on young people if they have phones and there are so many people if they have phones and there are so many distractions, how can they concentrate ? are so many distractions, how can they concentrate? that's part of the argument. if i were teenagers now, i would want a phone in school. where do you put your phones as well, lock them up? it is the beginning, john. we should be doing this over the drink. where is your phone, dan? i am not in school, i am working. that
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is what they would say. you are the most distracted person on the show. what are you talking about? let's look at the papers? laughter. 0h, touchy! there is a story that a lot of people would be pleased to hear, that the water companies will be spending more on investment to try to stop leaks, which they're saving could mean bills coming down, so this is a rather good graphic in the daily telegraph, it shows you around the country how much water companies are investing and how much the bills have changed, are changing, as a result of that, and it is interesting to see the differences between them, and of course you can't choose your water company, you have the company in the region where you are in, and that can mean, obviously, there are concerns about whether they should bring down prices and if it is unfair because you can't have competition as you would in other sectors. talking
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about alistair cook, to illustrate how good he has been, how many runs he has caught, the leading run scorer he has caught, the leading run scorer for england, you can see graham gooch behind him on a thousand 900 runs, alistair cook is on 12,254, which illustrates how good he has been —— 8900 runs. and they will miss him when he goes. and a big moment in the ashes when he did the business down under. so many of those, yeah. i suppose many want to talk about this too, the daily politics, look at the panel, the daily mail's verdict, that's what they say, it looks like loose women, they say, it looks like loose women, the all—female panel for politics show, i don't know why we are laughing, ron burley said to critics i have zero shame about the all women panel, the best lineup was
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all—female, if you have a problem with that, you have a problem. he says he chose them all on merit rather than wanting to make a splash on one of his first programmes. would you like to see and 84—year—old woman doing the splits? the headline is neymar —— nanna splits. good on her. still going strong, all sorts of exercises in the gym, that's mightily impressive, and by the way down here, look, the original sooty puppet sold for £14,500. i've tried to do this several times, this one, look up, really tricky. louise has tried this. it is like a yoga move. where is her head? elbow wedged into the knees. the desk is ready. i am not
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sure that you are appropriately dressed. that is why i said later. thank you very much, see you later. good morning. it may sound like something out of a science fiction film, but police are now increasingly using powerful artificial intelligence tools to solve complex crimes. the techniques include cctv facial recognition and programmes that can scan hundreds of thousands of documents for incriminating information. our home affairs corresponspondent danny shaw was given exclusive access to the serious fraud office to see how it works. this is the computer software helping fraud investigators join the dots. it trawls through e—mails and electronic documents to identify patterns in communications. working fast — faster than a human. patterns in communications. working fast — faster than a humanlj patterns in communications. working fast - faster than a human. i don't have to think a lot and have to actually work out who is involved or why they are involved, i click a couple of buttons and it takes me directly into what i would be interested to see. the serious fraud
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office hardly ever allows cameras in here. the crimes it investigates a sensitive and complex. there are tens of millions of documents to read in each case. some material has to be screened out by barristers. they work through 300 documents a day. so how many can the computer do? the computer was going through 600,000 a day. you can find the hot documents faster and the system, because of machine learning and ai capabilities, can learn from that so you tell what is relevant and not and it will help you find things on the same lines. in the same way that amazon might suggest something you might like to buy based on what others have bought who have similar taste to you. the serious fraud office is one of the first law enforcement agencies to use ai office is one of the first law enforcement agencies to use al to examine computer files and documents. but ai is being used in other ways as well to help solve crimes. among the cases was that of
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an airmen who went missing on a night out. police asked a technology company to trawl through hours of cctv footage. i can take a specific image, for example when this crime occurs. in a separate case analysts use a separate attack in sweden to show how the system works. it is able to match faces and movements from one camera to another to track suspects more easily. using the person detection tool we can get to the relevant pieces of footage much quicker than looking in all the wrong places. but there are concerns that the new technology may be unreliable. is there any fear that ai is going to lead to terrible miscarriages of justice ai is going to lead to terrible miscarriages ofjustice and mistakes being made? i am a lawyer, lawyers are inherently conservative people, we will test and retest and make sure this is an appropriate use of technology before we let it out anywhere near a criminal court. technology before we let it out anywhere near a criminal courtm is early days, but artificial
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intelligence seems to be the only realistic solution to sorting through the vast amounts of data in crime investigations. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. we have a packed programme today. right now, we've got to do something else. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. are you in a minute. —— see you in a minute. good morning. i'm asad ahmad. we are having news that 80 firefighters are tackling a blaze at one of the largest schools in the country. scotland yard was called to reports at a school in dagenham in east london. there are no reports of injuries. road closures are in place. pupils or not to return until tomorrow. in other news: transport for london has launched an investigation after footage emerged of a tube train driving with its doors open. it happened at the weekend,
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on the jubilee line between finchley road and west hampstead. tfl said the doors were open for one stop and that no passengers onboard were hurt. it added that the train was immediately ta ken out of service. a boxing club which was on the first floor of the grenfell tower and was being used just hours before the fire started is to move into a new venue. the dale amateur boxing club has had some help from the bbc‘s diy sos programme, to rebuild the legendary club. it's produced a world champion and olympic gold medalist, and the duke of cambridge realises its importance to the community. i think everyone is playing catch up, trying to work out how to deal with such a truly horrendous situation. for the community they are reliving it all the time. progress needs to happen. the community coming together is the first important part of fixing that. and you can see the full transformation of the dale boxing club in west london and meet some of the characters who've made it
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such a success on diy sos at 9:00pm tomorrow night on bbc one. let's have a look at the travel situation now. the central line has no service between white city and leytonstone eastbound and between white city and ealing broadway westbound due to a signal failure. on the roads, euston road has a lane closed eastbound at kings cross station. that's for gas main works. in south london in clapham, traffic lights are out, so you might want to avoid that area. let's have a check on the weather now with lucy. hello, good morning. starting to see the temperatures dropping off as we move through the next few days. today a touch cooler than yesterday. temperatures not doing too badly. still in the high teens, low 20s and it looks like it'll be dry and bright. we will see more cloud today than yesterday. patches of mist around first thing should lift quickly. a dry and bright day with
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patchy cloud and hazy sunny spells. temperatures at a maximum of around 22. warm in the sunshine with a north—easterly breeze. this evening, late spells of sunshine. overnight, it will be mostly dry. a few clear spells here and there. the chance of one or two patches of mist with the clear skies. temperatures not falling far. overnight low of 14 degrees. tomorrow, patchy cloud. there will be sunny spells as well. temperatures are little cooler than today. a maximum of around 20 degrees. temperatures dropping off a touch further as we move towards the end of the week. va nessa vanessa feltz is on bbc radio london in halfan vanessa feltz is on bbc radio london in half an hour. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. goodbye for now. hello, this is breakfast with louise minchin and dan walker. it's 6:30am on tuesday 4th september. we'll have the latest news and sport injust a moment, but coming up later in the programme: the summer holidays are over and it's time for our mps tackle some of the big issues dominating the headlines whilst they've been away.
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we'll be in westminster to discuss conservative brexit battles and labour anti—semitism splits. nearly three—quarters of children starting secondary school this week own a smartphone, but as parents raise concerns about peer pressure and cyberbullying, is it time we followed the french in introducing a total ban on phones in school? and he's spent the last twenty years entertaining the world and shaping the music industry as fatboy slim, we'll be joined by norman cook to talk about his new project, turning giant arenas into your favourite nightclubs. all that still to come. but now, a summary of this morning's main news. after months of arguments over anti—semitism, labour's ruling body will meet today to try to put the issue to rest. the national executive committee will decide whether different whether to adopt the fall definition of
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anti—semitism. it was incorporated injuly but anti—semitism. it was incorporated in july but the anti—semitism. it was incorporated injuly but the shadow chancellor john mcdonnell has urged the committee to go further. nicola sturgeon will set out her plans for the coming year at the scottish parliament later that day. the first minister is expected to announce a dozen new pieces of legislation, with focus expected to be on mental health, the environment and sustainable growth in the economy. the snp's opponents have dismissed her plans as "pie in the sky" and say the party is "running out of ideas". universities are urging the government to introduce new rules allowing international students to work in the uk for up to two years after graduation. under the proposal, the universities would sponsor their graduates to look for work without any restriction on the type ofjob they can apply for. the government says it already has variety of routes to allow international graduates to stay in the uk. nearly half of nursery providers in england say the government's scheme to provide 30 hours of free childcare has had a negative financial impact on their business. the free care for 3 and 4—year—olds, introduced this time last year, has proved popular, with 95% of eligible parents using the scheme.
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the government say they're researching the cost of childcare but that the majority of providers have been happy to take part in the scheme. president trump's nominee for the us supreme court is expected to face hostile questions from democrat politicians in washington today. brett kavanaugh is a controversial figure due to his perceived views on abortion and lgbt rights. if he passes his confirmation hearing it's expected he would make the supreme court more socially conservative for years to come. an american football player who protested against racial injustice by kneeling during the us national anthem has been revealed as the face of nike's new advertising campaign. colin kaepernick first protested in august 2016. other players followed his lead by kneeling during the anthem, leading to criticism from president trump. kaepernick hasn't played since 2017 and is currently suing the nfl claiming he is being kept out of the league because of his part in the protests. the bbc radio 5 live
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presenter rachael bland, who has terminal cancer, has revealed on social media that she has "only got days" to live. she was diagnosed with breast cancer in november 2016 and had documented herjourney throughout her illness on the podcast ‘you, me and the big c'. last night she tweeted: you have been so many messages of support right across the bbc, particularly to 5 live, so many people wishing her family well. it must be shut —— it must be such a difficult time for all of them. our thoughts are with them at this time. doctors are being urged to write letters in clear, simple english that's easier for patients to understand. new guidance has been issued by the academy of medical royal colleges, encouraging consultants to stop
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using latin phrases and medicaljargon. it comes after gps reported that some patients were having to book appointments just to have technical terms explained. 80 firefighters are tackling a large fire at in east london today. it started at just before fire at in east london today. it started atjust before five o'clock this morning, the fire brigade says more than half of the single—storey building is currently on fire. more that when we get it. —— more on that. doctors are being urged to write letters in clear, simple english that's easier for patients to understand. new guidance has been issued by the academy of medical royal colleges, encouraging consultants to stop using latin phrases and medicaljargon. it comes after gps reported that some patients were having to book appointments just to have technical terms explained. doctors have developed a new online tool which they claim can assess a person's risk of having
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a heart attack or stroke. the test asks people over the age of 30 to answer a series of questions about their lifestyle and then generates their ‘heart age'. a heart age older than your actual age can indicate an increase health risk. public health england says nearly 2—million people have completed the test so far. if you are going back to school today, good morning, welcome back. i saw a report this week, 40% of pa rents saw a report this week, 40% of parents think that the school holidays are too long. judaic? -- do they. guest. this man has had a number of great summers over the yea rs number of great summers over the years but no longer in a test arena. he has announced his retirement, some would say no surprise given the series that he has had. if you step back and look at his career more broadly, he has been batting of the orderfor england broadly, he has been batting of the order for england and staring down the world ‘s best bowlers for 12 yea rs. the world ‘s best bowlers for 12 years. the appreciation of the pressure it takes to be at the top level and competing at that level, doing what he did for such a long time, he will be sorely missed. 12 years playing for england, the stats speak for themselves. since his debut in 2006 when tony blair was prime minister,
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he's played in 160 tests, is england's highest ever test run scorer and one of only six batsmen to have scored over 12,000 runs, he's scored more test centuries than any other englishmen, and has made more catches than any of his countrymen. team matejonny bairstow described him as: former captain michael vaughan said: and indian cricketing royalty sachin tendulkar describes him as "one of the finest batsmen to have represented england". it's against india that alastair cook will bid farewell to international cricket, the test at the oval which begins on friday. to new york, where in the hour roger federer has gone out of the us open. our tennis reporter david law was watching at flushing meadows. and david, it was an
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uncharacteristically poor performance from federer? we had all been penning the draw between federer and djokovic, but he looked his 37 years of age do not. he has been trying to win this tournament for the last ten years u nsuccessfully. tournament for the last ten years unsuccessfully. he started out well, but then suddenly his game disintegrated. he only got 31% of his service, missing balls he would never see him miss. 77 errors throughout the course of the match. he did serve for the third set at 5-4, he did serve for the third set at 5—4, didn't take his opportunity and that was the theme of the match all the way through. he kept on missing shots that he normally wouldn't miss. his opponent from australia was superb and deserved the win. he eventually got it in the fourth set ona eventually got it in the fourth set on a successive —— second successive tiebreak. that are a part of that scene, wondering what happened to know. —— federer.
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there's a new hotshot to look out for in formula one, and when you see these pictures it's clearly lando norris had talent from a young age. he's been promoted by mclaren and wll become britain's youngest driver next season. this was him doing donuts in his go kart as a youngster. we'll be talking to him live just after 08:30. iam sure i am sure he is going to be extremely excited about what is to come next season. liverpool forward mo salah is on fifa's shortlist for the world player of the year award. he scored 44 goals last season, unsurprisingly he's joined by champions league winner cristiano ronaldo and luka modric who was player of the tournament at the world cup. one man who might be feeling left out lionel messi, the five time ballon d'or winner is a notable absentee. it's been a good week for salah's club mate andrew robertson, he was named scotland captain. he'll lead his country in a friendly against belgium on friday, and then in the uefa nations league against albania on monday. you would be pretty livid if you are
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sacked just one game after the new season. “— sacked just one game after the new season. —— if you were. leicester tigers have had enough of head coach matt o'connor after an opening day defeat at exeter. assistant coach geordan murphy has been put in temporary charge. you think you might get more than one game at, with the season only one game at, with the season only one game at, with the season only one game old, to turn things around. see later on. —— see you later on. receiving a letter from your doctor can sometimes be a confusing experience, filled with abbreviations and complex medical language. now there are calls for hospital doctors to personally write to patients in plain english. it comes after gps reported that some patients were booking appointments just to have letters explained to them. dr hugh rayner is a kidney specialist who first started writing directly to patients in 2005. good morning. did you do that off
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your own back? i was a bit sceptical as to whether this was the easy or right thing to do. my colleague said we should do this, it is wrong that we should do this, it is wrong that we copy the patient in and write about them to the doctor. he piloted it and got fantastic feedback. so you address it to the person is at out. that sounds to make perfect sense. “— out. that sounds to make perfect sense. —— it is about. out. that sounds to make perfect sense. -- it is about. white? it is a long—standing tradition that the patient would be referred to the hospital by their gp and you right back to say thank you. things have moved on now and it is more of a partnership. presumably some of these letters are quite serious as well. to get something that perhaps you do not understand may have series implications, it can be quite devastating. they can come across as serious. i look after a patient with chronic kidney disease. if you say toa chronic kidney disease. if you say to a patient they have got that, it sounds really bad but it could be a mild thing. chronicjust means it is
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corn on a long time. that confusion and misunderstanding can be unnecessarily upsetting. that is before you start potentially throwing in latin terms. that is just abbreviations we use about prescriptions. we know that hospitals, doctors, nurses are stretched at the moment. do you have to do more work because of this order you actually find it in some ways, time—saving? order you actually find it in some ways, time-saving? is a bit more work to start with because it is unfamiliar. it takes a few goes to get familiar, a new repertoire of terms to use. but for the gp, if it says the patient to have to make a separate appointment because they have got the letter, that will save everybody time and worry. ecu trialled it and you got a good response, what of feedback?” trialled it and you got a good response, what of feedback? i had a letter written to me by a lady who saidi letter written to me by a lady who said i wanted to say thank you, it
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made me feel better, like a person and not a case of. —— a case. i thought someone has gone through the trouble, that is an amazing. doctors will be in courage that to do this, do you think they will be keen to do this? some will be open to it and some will be anxious and that is why we have provided this guidance from the highest body of medical professionals in the country. it is all doctors and also written by patients and that is why we have called it please, write to me. have you had any doctors coming back to you, responding you can't through this to us, we have got so much on our plate. i think doctors are cautious. i was likewise cautious to start with it, they do want to risk getting it wrong, but following the guidance, it is very similar, it has the campaign, i think they will find it is not as difficult as they once thought. looking at one of these words he. oedema of the legs. no,
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your legs are swollen the. are swollen. acute. thatjust means it has come along quickly. swollen. acute. thatjust means it has come along quicklylj swollen. acute. thatjust means it has come along quickly. i don't have a cute oedema, but thank you. you can understand if you got that letter, you would start to tell your family you are in a far worse condition than you are and you go to your doctor and ask them to explain the letter, which is a waste of time! let's here's matt with a look at this morning's weather. goodbye for now. 0h, oh, yes, moody skies, more to come this week, good morning, it will be a week of a step really well and truly into autumn for many of you, turning cooler through the week and also work as well. bringing about the change is what's happening at
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the change is what's happening at the moment notjust on our shores but over the pacific, let me show you japan, this cloud is a major typhoon that has brought 80 mph wind and two inches of rain for some, it will push tropical air into the northern hemisphere, disrupting weather patterns higher in the atmosphere and that will eventually bring a change to our shores. at the moment fairly quiet with some cloud extending from south—west england to the south—east of scotland. on that we have lots of low cloud, it is the bit misty on the hills, patchy light rain or drizzle, bright in the south and east, one or two showers in kent and east, one or two showers in kent and south—east london can't be ruled out, and sunshine across england and wales, sunny sunshine in northern ireland and scotland, but in the clear skies we have a chilly start with temperatures in parts of aberdeenshire and south—east of northern ireland drop—down below freezing overnight. of course you are rewarded with the sunshine to start the day and plenty of sunshine around for scotland and northern ireland today. in the west of northern ireland and the hebrides
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and highlands we will see showers the morning, early afternoon, bright skies in east anglia and the south—east, with more cloud than yesterday but the area from the south—east scotland, through northern england, midlands to the south—west it is cloudy and perhaps a little bit damp all day long. temperature not much fire off yesterday, cooler in the south—east than yesterday, and into tonight, one or two spots of rain in parts of england, and behind it clear skies in scotland, northern ireland, northern england, temperatures low enough for a touch of frost. much more sunshine for england and wales tomorrow compared to today. cloudy in western scotland, northern ireland with outbreaks of rain, and go. temperatures starting to drop a little on wednesday by our degree or so little on wednesday by our degree or so and that drop will be more by the end of the week. it will disrupt the weather patterns in the upper atmosphere, thejet weather patterns in the upper atmosphere, the jet stream will dip
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around and in the dip we will see low pressure develop, which will sit around until the end of the week and into the weekend. whenever you see low pressure on the tight you can usually expect rain clouds will never be far away and that will be the case on thursday. quick look at the case on thursday. quick look at the details, don't take them to literally because areas of rain will move around by thursday, but potentially heavy rain around eastern scotland, heavy, thundery showers elsewhere, sunshine in between in the south and east, but with temperatures of 13 to 19 degrees, the warmth we experienced will be a long, distant memory. degrees, the warmth we experienced will be a long, distant memorylj wa nt to will be a long, distant memorylj want to ask you, matt, where is your mobile phone? it is in the office somewhere. very good, you are! i wasn't trying to catch you out. i am asking because on breakfast we are discussing france introducing the blanket ban on phones in schools and we are wondering if schools should follow suit, yes or no. i guess it
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isn't as simple as that. i have done a little poll... using his mobile phone while he is clearly at work.|j am using this for work purposes. there are four options, then the phones in schools, none at all, ok at break time and then ok for useful learning and 60% have said to ban them in schools. if you want to take pa rt them in schools. if you want to take part in the survey, sent in your thoughts, people have said on my twitter feed that they can go to school, but turned it off during lessons. is that an option? no, there are only four options. you might have seen something about the new drama, wanderlust, allowing the boundaries of marriage to be slightly more extended than they normally would be, and steve mcintosh, the star of the programme, which hasn't even been on tv out, and it is in most of the papers. we shall discuss that later, and so too
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norman cook, fat boy slim, gonna dear, turning huge venues in tonight —— into nightclubs. a social media post designed to promote a brand went viral for all the wrong reasons over the weekend. steph's been looking into this for us. steph? and this can happen quite often. yes, it is all to do with celebrity endorsements. brands and businesses have turned to so—called social media influencers. for example people with lots of followers on instagram or youtube can be paid thousands to post about a product or service. but it can backfire and this is a story i want to tell you about. however, when scarlett dixon, aka scarlett london, posted this image, supposedly of her enjoying her morning in bed, while a bottle of mouthwash was perched on her bedside table, if i can point at it,
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the reaction was not what she had hoped. steven bartlett runs the marketing agency social chain and joins me now. good morning, thank you forjoining us. so, just explain why everyone kicked off about the picture? so i think it is really sort of symbolic of the age we live in when it comes to social media and the desire to stage the certain elements of your life and portray that to the world andi life and portray that to the world and i think that is happening at the same time when there is a counter movement in society and there is cynicism and scepticism around what's true and authentic, driven around the fake news time that we live in, the term truth is up, authenticity is up 70% on the back of the fake news era, so i think the fa kery of the fake news era, so i think the fakery and of the fake news era, so i think the fa kery and the of the fake news era, so i think the fakery and the lack of authenticity that we see causes people to almost
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protest the lack of relate ability and truth, but this is where we are at with a lot of social media advertising, it has got to a point where it is lacking the fundamental of good advertising which is authenticity and relate ability, but it is nothing against her. it is just a very unrealistic image of modern life. nobody wakes up looking quite so perfect, with a good morning sign, and a photo of yourself in bed with a cushion that says the word" dream" and this photo isa dream, says the word" dream" and this photo is a dream, to be honest. it is the balloon that confuses me, but she is one of many people doing this, and she has had a really awful time, she has had death threats, which seems extreme, so how do you think... what impact do you think this will have in terms of how we see this type of
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marketing change now? sure, so, like, for everyone involved here, in many respects it wasn't a good idea, because if you think about what the objective was, it was to get people to believe that she loves listerine, or is to believe that she loves listerine, orisa to believe that she loves listerine, or is a big user of listerine, because it lacked authenticity, no one is actually going to believe she loves listerine. the brand don't get the payoff and her audience will think she has compromised the integrity by selling out per se so it's not an effective... she defended this, though, saying she wouldn't promote a product she doesn't use, so does it make a difference? not really in the eyes of the audience, because you've already lied to me in one respect, so already lied to me in one respect, so everything thereafter is also ha rd to so everything thereafter is also hard to believe. if you were doing this, what would you do differently? i would try to make it real, right? so, in the modern day, someone's
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morning was like the two—year—old clambering over them saying, "smell my breath," which would be a more humourous way to convey the message that listerine is good for bad breath, potentially, you know? fascinating, thank you for your time this morning, lou, you wake up like that in the morning? laughter . ijust laughter . i just wake laughter .ijust wake up, thinking, no, there is chaos, nothing on the surfaces, no, idon't. there is chaos, nothing on the surfaces, no, i don't. surely eve ryo ne surfaces, no, i don't. surely everyone has a bedspread like that, don't they? thank you, that was absolutely fascinating, that deconstruction, thank you very much. big brother is a programme that thrives on generating controversy but the show is now at the centre of a domestic abuse row after former emmerdale actor roxanne pallett quit the house, alleging she was punched by housemate and actor ryan thomas. this in the background is... oh, i think it was. yes, we might try to play that again, actually. she's since apologised, saying she "overreacted" to his playfighting. the incident has lead to more than 10,000 complaints from viewers to the tv regulator ofcom. let's take a look at what happened.
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i've got a little to howl that i'm going to use. ow! woman beater. go on, get inside. just a little bit in shock. i went from being upset to angry now, because i am... a boy has punched me repeatedly, unprovoked, com pletely punched me repeatedly, unprovoked, completely deliberate. he actually punched me like a boxer would punch a bag. and we were not play fighting. it wasn't banter, it wasn't a joke. there was no exchange. big biro wants you to know that you are being listened to and doesn't want you to think that you are not being listened to.|j doesn't want you to think that you are not being listened to. i can't believe you let someone stay who has done that. she has come out of the house and she has
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done various interviews and we will see some of that in a moment. we're joined now by pyschologist linda papadopoulos, who has worked on previous series of big brother, and nikki grahame, who has twice been a big brother contestant, joins us from our london newsroom. ijust want i just want to talk from your point of view, nikki, you've seen what happened, didn't happen, what do you make of it, and when you're in the house, what happens, do you see what imean, how house, what happens, do you see what i mean, how do you explain what's gone on? well, i mean, it'sjust shocking, there hasn't been a scandal like this in big brother since the shilpa shetty incident and it was just shocking. she was so convinced by her own lies it was actually, she was believing what she was saying in the end, and it was scary, it really was. i mean, it is very easy to get, you know, kind of, in that environment and completely forget about the outside world ones
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you are in there. —— once you are in there. but, yeah, she obviouslyjust got caught up in these lies. lots of people have been having a pop at roxanne not only for the way she acted but the apology yesterday as well. do you think the finger should be pointed at big brotherfor well. do you think the finger should be pointed at big brother for not stepping in early enough? interesting question, because, you have to understand, with reality tv shows, there is conflicting — they wa nt shows, there is conflicting — they want to make conflicting tv and it has to be sensational, it needs to create controversy. at the same time they have a duty of care. when i was looking at it, i thought this is similarto looking at it, i thought this is similar to those new football rules. now we have the technology to say, look, this is what happened. and i wonder if she was taken aside and they said, look at this perception of what happened, here is the video, would you like to continue, it would have helped. the problem is you don't want to undermine someone's
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perception. the person listening to it at the moment, if they didn't see it, the last thing they want to do is undermine heron it, the last thing they want to do is undermine her on air and this is where it becomes confusing. you know, when i was the psychologist on the first series of big brother and it isa the first series of big brother and it is a very different show, reality tv is different to what it was then, the fact of the matter is people go in being much more savvy, they know if they want airtime, they have to be the middle of the controversy, andl be the middle of the controversy, and i think the things that we would have selected, these sort of extreme personalities, now they are selecting them in to some extent because it makes better viewing. and nikki, it has had such a big impact particularly on her, roxanne, and with everybody, you know, on social media, on so many real... real criticism of her. how do you cope with that, i suppose, when you come out of the house and you're suddenly inundated with all this information and all these critics? well, i mean, she's had no choice but tojust and all these critics? well, i mean, she's had no choice but to just face it full on and that interview that
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she did with emma last night, emma asked all the right questions and, you know, we got to hear those a nswe rs you know, we got to hear those answers that we've been waiting for. imean, answers that we've been waiting for. i mean, she's just answers that we've been waiting for. i mean, she'sjust got answers that we've been waiting for. i mean, she's just got to face the public now and deal with the consequences. she was potentially gonna rule and another colleague's career, his life, and she didn't give it a second thought so now she has to pay the price. thank you very much, and, linda, you are here later to talk about mobile phones in schools. that is something that has got you going this morning, and what about this one, to reality tv shows put ratings before the duty of care to co ntesta nts ? put ratings before the duty of care to contestants? plenty to discuss this morning. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. headlines here are 7am. good morning, i'm asad ahmad. am breaking news for you:
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a fire has broken out in at a primary school in east london, which is one of the largest in the country. it started at roding primary school in dagenham at around 5:00am this morning. 80 firefighters are at the scene on hewett road. there are no reported injuries and pupils were due to return to the school tomorrow. and there it is more on that fire with vanessa feltz on transport for london has launched an investigation after footage emerged of a tube train driving with its doors open. it happened at the weekend, on the jubilee line between finchley road and west hampstead. tfl said the doors were open for one stop and that no passengers onboard were hurt. it added that the train was immediately ta ken out of service. a boxing club which was on the first floor of the grenfell tower and was being used just hours before the fire started is to move into a new venue. the dale amateur boxing club has had help from the bbc‘s diy sos programme to rebuild it. the club has produced a world champion and olympic gold medalist, and the duke of cambridge realises its importance to the community.
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i think everyone is playing catch up, trying to work out how to deal with such a truly horrendous situation. for the community they are reliving it all the time. progress needs to happen. the community coming together is the first important part of fixing that. and you can see the full transformation of the dale boxing club in west london and meet some of the characters who've made it such a success on diy sos at 9:00pm tomorrow night on bbc one. let's have a look at the travel situation now. the central line has no service between white city and leytonstone —— minor delays. adding to the traffic is a collision on the a13. and in clapham,
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traffic lights are out at lillieshall road. now, weather check on the weather now with lucy. hello, good morning. starting to see the temperatures dropping off as we move through the next few days. today a touch cooler than yesterday. temperatures not doing too badly. still in the high teens, low 20s and it looks like it'll be dry and bright. we will see a bit more cloud today than we did yesterday. patches of mist around first thing, that should lift quickly. a dry and bright day with patchy cloud and hazy sunny spells. temperatures at a maximum of around 22 degrees. so feeling warm in the sunshine with a north—easterly breeze. this evening, late spells of sunshine. overnight, it will be mostly dry. a few clear spells here and there. the chance of one or two patches of mist with the clear skies. temperatures not too falling far. an overnight low of 14 degrees. tomorrow, patchy cloud. there will be some sunny spells as well. temperatures are a little cooler than today. a maximum of around 20 degrees. seeing the temperatures dropping off a touch further as we move
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towards the end of the week. or, more on the fire in dagenham which i mentioned in the primary school on the website and on bbc radio london. goodbye. good morning. welcome to breakfast, with louise minchin and dan walker. our headlines today: labour faces crunch talks over antisemitism, after months of division in the party. a call for plain english. doctors are told to write letters that are easier for patients to understand. almost three quarters of children starting secondary school this year own a smartphone. a new study says parents are worried about the risks. a month after the bank of england raises interest rates, not even half of savings account providers have passed on the increase. i'll have the details. and in sport: one of england's greats, alistair cook, will retire from test cricket after the final match of the series against india this week.
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it isa it is a drier and fine start to tuesday for most of you but for parts of northern and western england and south—east wales, a little bit of drizzle to get your day under way. i have a full forecast on break. —— breakfast. it is tuesday 4 september. our top story: after months of arguments over antisemitism, labour's ruling body will meet today to try to put the issue to rest. it comes on a day when mps from all parties return to westminster with brexit, set to dominate the conservative agenda. our assistant political editor norman smith is in westminster. norman, is the political world set for a turbulent autumn? i think honestly this is going to be one of the most unpredictable, combustible, volatile moments in modern british political history, with both the main leaders facing possible threats to their position, and really no one having a clue what
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is going to happen with brexit. on the labour side, mr corbyn is facing another potential uprising by labour mps unhappy at his handling of the anti—semitism row. it probably won't result in another leadership challenge but we could see more labour mps sitting as independent mps. and for mrs meir, of course, she is now battling to save her chequers brexit plan, facing hard—line opposition, not just chequers brexit plan, facing hard—line opposition, notjust the brexiteers but some remain mps. if the plan is defeated in the commons, mrs may may well fall. and if that happens, the question is what happens, the question is what happens to brexit. we could have no deal, we could have a delay to brexit, we could even have a general election. it is kind of hold your seat. thank you for that. i am sure you will guide us through. nicola sturgeon will set out her plans for the coming year at the scottish parliament later today. the first minister is expected
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to announce a dozen new pieces of legislation, with focus expected to be on mental health, the environment, and sustainable growth in the economy. the snp's opponents have dismissed her plans as pie in the sky, and say the party is running out of ideas. universities are urging the government to introduce new rules allowing international students to work in the uk for up to two years after graduation. under the proposal, the universities would sponsor their graduates to look for work without any restriction on the type ofjob they can apply for. the government says it already has variety of routes to allow international graduates to stay in the uk. an american football player who protested against racial injustice by kneeling during the us national anthem has been revealed as the face of nike's new advertising campaign. colin kaepernick first protested in august 2016. other players followed his lead by kneeling during the anthem, leading to criticism from president trump. caroline rigby reports. "believe in something, even if it
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means sacrificing everything." the words of former nfl quarterback colin kaepernick, part of an advertising campaign for the sports brand nike. kaepernick was at the san francisco 49ers when he began kneeling during the national anthem in the 2016 nfl season, a protest against racial injustice and police brutality, what he saw as state oppression against african—americans and people of colour. his actions sparked a wider movement and national debate, criticised by some, including president trump, for being disrespectful to both the american flag and the military. now a free agent, kaepernick is suing the nfl, alleging team owners colluded to prevent him from signing with another team. being chosen as the face of nike's latest advertising venture is likely to be welcomed by many, but raise eyebrows too.
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in a statement, the company said... news of kaepernick‘s involvement comes just days before the first game of the new nfl season, where protests could once againflare up. this advert yet more proof that sports continues to be a frontline in the american political and racial divide. caroline rigby, bbc news. doctors are being urged to write letters in clear, simple english that is easier for patients to understand. new guidance has been issued by the academy of medical royal colleges, encouraging hospital consultants to stop using latin phrases and medicaljargon. it comes after gps reported that some patients were having to book appointments just to have technical terms explained. earlier on breakfast, one consultant told us doctors may take a while to get used to the new system. it's a bit more work to start with,
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because it's unfamiliar. it takes a few goes to get familiar, a new repertoire of terms to use. but for the gp, if it saves the patient to have to make a separate appointment because they've already got the letter, that will save everybody time and worry. 80 firefighters are tackling a large fire at a school in east london. the blaze at roding primary school in dagenham started just before 5:00am this morning. the london fire brigade say around half of the single—story building is currently alight. nearly half of nursery providers in england say the government's scheme to provide 30 hours of free childcare has had a negative financial impact on their business. however, the free provision for three— and four—year—olds, introduced this time last year, has proved highly popular with parents, as olivia richwald reports. it was a vote—winning offer — 30 hours a week of free childcare
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for working parents of three— and four—year—olds in england, and it saved families thousands of pounds a year. i don't pay a penny now, because of the 30 free hours. so it's, like, nearly £300 a month in money that i've saved. but the government has been accused of not funding it properly. 8,000 members of the preschool learning alliance were sent a survey. 1,300 replied, and of them, 843 said the fees paid by the government were less than their hourly rate, and more than 400 said the scheme was putting a strain on theirfinances. we are seeing closures almost on a daily basis, settings that have been around for 20, 25 years, that frankly have just said that the new offer, the 30—hour funded places offer, is just the final nail in the coffin. like many involved in the scheme, this bradford nursery is now asking parents for top—up fees.
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here, it is £3 a day. but elsewhere, it can be up to £10 a day. if we're not viable, then we disappear, and lots of providers nationally have disappeared. my parents have been very, very understanding. they're willing to pay, because they love our nursery. the department for education says the rates it pays are for childcare only, and not for additional services and meals. it says it has commissioned new research looking into the costs of childcare, and adds that 80% of providers around the country have been willing to take part in this scheme. olivia richwald, bbc news. mps are back in parliament today after their six—week summer recess, with two big rows dominating the headlines. theresa may's brexit plan, thrashed out at chequers earlier this summer, hangs by a thread. and for labour, accusations of anti—semitism have caused divisions in the party and threatened the leadership. its national executive commitee is expected to vote later on whether to adopt in full the internationally recognised definition of antisemitism. it is the lack of clarity around this issue that has caused
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the drawn—out row. will the changing seasons lead to changing fortunes? from westminster, i'm joined by the spectator‘s katy balls, and stephen bush from the new statesman. good morning to both of you. back to school, not really a case of easing their way in. let's start with the anti—semitism row first. do you think it will appease those who are currently upset about this if that new definition was adopted?” currently upset about this if that new definition was adopted? i think appease might be a bit of a strong word here. it might calm things down or at the very least stop things from escalating further. if the definition is not adopted we are hearing some labour mps might decide tojump ship. we have heard that a few times before but it sounds more serious this time. i think by adopting it the labour leadership would buy some more time with moderates who are thinking about departing. on the issue ofjumping
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ship, there have been statements that if this doesn't happen we will do this. do you think if it is the case it will push them over the line? yes, although we have heard it before, i think we are in a different situation now because of the summer they have had. for many labour mps alone has been crossed. evenif labour mps alone has been crossed. even if they do adopt the definition, which looks likely. they may end up ruining the fact that they had this summer row. and what position could put jeremy they had this summer row. and what position could putjeremy corbyn in as leader? will there be a challenge? i don't think there will bea challenge? i don't think there will be a challenge, because i think most labour mps grudgingly admit that the membership is still with jeremy corbyn, and that's why even though you have had all of these torrid headlines over the summer, even though mps are buried miserable, the option of staying with that leader or going elsewhere as an independent or going elsewhere as an independent or starting a new party. i think a challenge is unlikely because it would be unsuccessful. so labour have all of that to think about and conservatives are concentrating on brexit and this chequers deal. what
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do the pairof brexit and this chequers deal. what do the pair of you think about whether that is likely to be rejected? well, it has already been rejected? well, it has already been rejected by the eu 27, and it is clear when you talk to conservative mps that there are not enough numbers for it to pass the commons. labour mps numbers for it to pass the commons. labourmps are numbers for it to pass the commons. labour mps are not going to want to bail out what they see as a deal without a high enough standard of access to european markets. so i think chequers is dead. it is a question of what replaces it and what happens when the deal gets the parliament. at the moment it would definitely be voted down. parliament. at the moment it would definitely be voted downlj parliament. at the moment it would definitely be voted down. i think numberten definitely be voted down. i think number ten still hope, optimistically, that when theresa may comes back with a deal that will change everything. you heard yesterday one conservative mp described it as more unpopular than the poll tax. i don't think we are there yet, but it is hard when remainers doesn't like it, brexiteers don't like it, and brussels doesn't like it. both sides
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of the negotiations, raab and barnier, think it is rubbish. we describe it as the end of the summer recess but there hasn't been a break at all in politics, has there? theresa may did at least get to go away a little bit. jeremy corbyn's problem with the labour party is not about what happens in this place. whereas for theresa may, when parliament is not sitting, it looks fine, the second it comes back, the crisis starts again. can she survive? stephen, you are halfway there an answer. no, i don't think she can survive. once it gets back to parliament, either it will pass with labour votes, which will be very destructive to conservative unity, and she will have to go, or it fails. either way, she will have to go. i think it is increasingly difficult for her. she has surprised us before. lots of us thought after
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the disastrous snap election she wouldn't hang on, but even as she gets her brexit deal over the line, i think the conservative party in general will still want a new leader by the time of the next election, and that is a big problem for her. i don't see how she goes much more than a year. we will be talking about those sort of things with andrea leadsom, leader of the house of commons. hot weather might have been a distant memory. yesterday it was announced that it was the joint hottest weather in the uk, tied with a heatwave in 1976, 2003 and 2006, with daytime temperatures in parts of the country consistently topping 30 degrees. let's look at some of the highs and lows. so, that was the summer that was.
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same again next year, when we? i know that there have been some issues. i am going to remember it fondly, but it isn't like that any more, is it, matt? it will last long in memory, caused by a static jetstrea m in memory, caused by a static jetstream to the north, they have given us a shake as things turned cooler and wetter and windier into the second half of the week, and bringing about the change could be what's happening in the pacific, a major typhoon onshore in japan what's happening in the pacific, a major typhoon onshore injapan over the last few hours, here it is, pushing tropical air north, which will impact the jetstream in the atmosphere, it will eventually bring changes to our sure. out there at the moment in the uk you can see
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cloud from south—west england to south—east scotland, the remnants of yesterday's weather front here it is ingrained and drizzle. keeping up the temperatures. brightness in the east and south—east, small chance of a shower. we have some clear skies to be found in north—west england, northern ireland and scotland, the sunshine even though you've had a a chilly start. some temperatures dropped close to if not below freezing overnight. dry and freezing weather overnight and throughout the day. the cloud will increase through the hebrides, producing one or two showers, and patchy rain or drizzle on the line of cloud from south—west england to south—east scotland. even in this, most places will be dry, getting bright in the afternoon, and temperatures similar to yesterday, the teens and low 20s in the south—east, even that's a couple down on what we saw yesterday. tonight we could see showers close to east anglia and the south—east.
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one or two to east anglia and the south—east. one ortwo in to east anglia and the south—east. one or two in western scotland, northern ireland. most places will be dry. with clear skies developing overnight, this is where we see temperatures dropping to single figures with a touch of lost for some in the morning. england and wales have more sunshine tomorrow. it is bright for eastern scotland. northern ireland, expect more cloud and there will be some rain at times as well. temperatures similar to today. starting to drop away day by day. towards the end of the week the jetstrea m day. towards the end of the week the jetstream is disrupted. you can see it wandering around. we have a little dip in that in the south of the uk. and when you see that, you have areas of low pressure developing. that will dominate from thursday, through friday and into the start of the weekend. we will see some breezy conditions at times. also some showers. a quick look at the forecast on thursday. some outbreaks of rain developing from central, northern england
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northwards, heavy and persistent we think at this stage in the north—east of scotland, distinctly chilly here, sunshine on thursday, and on friday and saturday, but even with that, temperatures lower than they used —— they are used to, most places sticking to the teams, so a change from the long and distant memory of some already. it is indeed, isn't it, thank you. distant, but font for many. yes. 7:19am, good morning if you are up and having a cup of tea. let's have a look at the papers. boris johnson's attack on the pm brexit plan in the daily express with the picture asking if he is making a bid for number ten and the many papers talking about chris evans yesterday announcing he'd be leaving radio 2 sop --. and alistair cook announcing he is to retire from international cricket on the fun of the daily
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telegraph. the front of the guardian reporting on figures from public health england suggesting 80% of adults have hearts that are more damaged than they should be and doctors are urging those with older hearts to ditch unhealthy lifestyles, and the teacher is mr evans leaving radio 2 yesterday. surrounded by reporters. on facebook we are discussing jane's story, we spoke with her yesterday about her heart and kidney transplant, and something in the papers this morning, some of you will have seen on social media yesterday, the sad news about a colleague and friend, rachael bland, announcing she has had terminal counter and revealing yesterday that she has only days to live. she was diagnosed with breast cancer in november 2016, documented her journey throughout her cancer in november 2016, documented herjourney throughout her illness on the podcast many of you would have listened to, you me and the big see, and then she tweeted yesterday,
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i only have days, thank you so much for all of the support i have received and that made lots of the papers this morning —— you me and the big c. many of you getting in contact and responding to social media as well, lots of people talking about the fact that even though she was ill, it was the immediacy of it for her and for the family, just days to live and so many people, important to say, have been helped by her honesty and the way that she has discussed things not only on the podcast but social media as well and i willjust read one from a student nurse who said i survived breast cancer three years ago. ifeel lucky to be here and to com plete ago. ifeel lucky to be here and to complete my nursing degree. she is an inspiration and an incredible lady. my heart goes out to her. she is doing a charity walk and she says i will do it all for those in the charities rachel supported as well. it is great to hear. so many of you have been inspired by her. thoughts are with her and of course her family as well. it is 7:21am.
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it may sound like something out of a science fiction film but police are now increasingly using powerful artificial intelligence tools to solve complex crimes. the techniques include cctv facial recognition and programmes that can scan hundreds of thousands of documents for incriminating information. our home affairs corresponspondent danny shaw was given exclusive access to the serious fraud office to see how it works. this is the computer software helping fraud investigators join the dots. it trawls through e—mails and electronic documents to identify patterns in communications. working fast — faster than a human. i don't have to think a lot and have to actually work out who is involved or why they are involved, i click a couple of buttons and it takes me directly into what i would be interested to see. the serious fraud office hardly ever allows cameras in here. the crimes it investigates are sensitive and complex. there are tens of millions of documents to read in each case.
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some material has to be screened out by barristers. they work through 300 documents a day. so how many can the computer do? the computer was going through 600,000 a day. you can find the hot documents faster, and the system, because of the machine learning and ai capabilities of it, can learn from that. so you tell what is relevant and not and it will help you find things on the same lines. in the same way that amazon might suggest something you might like to buy based on what others have bought who have similar taste to you. the serious fraud office is one of the first law enforcement agencies to use artificial intelligence to examine computer files and documents. but ai is being used in other ways as well to help solve crimes. among the cases was that of an airmen who went missing
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on a night out. police asked a technology company to trawl through hours of cctv footage. i can take a specific image, for example when this crime occurs. in a separate case analysts use a separate attack in sweden to show how the system works. it is able to match faces and movements from one camera to another to track suspects more easily. using the person detection tool we can get to the relevant pieces of footage much quicker than looking in all the wrong places. but there are concerns that the new technology may be unreliable. is there any fear that al is going to lead to terrible miscarriages of justice and mistakes being made? i am a lawyer, lawyers are inherently conservative sort of people, we are going to test and retest and make sure this is an appropriate use of technology before we let it out anywhere near a criminal court. it's early days, but artificial intelligence seems to be the only realistic solution to sorting through the vast amounts of data in crime investigations. we are going to continue the theme
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of talking about technology. nearly three—quarters of children starting secondary school this week will own a smartphone but as parents raise concerns about peer pressure and cyberbullying is it time we followed the french in introducing a blanket ban on phones in school? our reporter ali fortescue is at a school in dewsbury. morning. yes, that time of year. this is quite a unique school. phones are bad across here. let's chat with the headmaster. someone you might recognise in yorkshire. good morning, mr burton. there is a ban on phones, why is it? we have had it for a number of years. we see that mobile phones in lessons are a distraction and unnecessary. this is
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backed up by internet matters research which shows 60% of parents are supportive of this in school and something that we see is that it won't benefit learning. it is something we choose to do and stu d e nts something we choose to do and students are on board. we involve them in the decision—making processes such them in the decision—making processes such as them in the decision—making processes such as that. and we make sure we work with absolute clarity. and how has it gone down with people? it has never not been the case, so it's been fantastic. they are incredible human beings and we are incredible human beings and we are very are incredible human beings and we are very proud of them. thank you very much. for now, let's head to the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm asad ahmad. a fire has broken out in at a primary school in east london, which is one of the largest in the country. it started at roding primary school in dagenham at around 5am this morning. 80 firefighters are at the scene, on hewett road. there are no reported injuries and pupils were due to return to the school tomorrow. and you can find about that with
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va nessa and you can find about that with vanessa feltz at bbc radio london will stop transport for london has launched an investigation after footage emerged of a tube train driving with its doors open. it happened at the weekend, on the jubilee line between finchley road and west hampstead. tfl said the doors were open for one stop and that no passengers onboard were hurt. it added that the train was immediately ta ken out of service. a boxing club which was on the first floor of the grenfell tower and was being used just hours before the fire started is to move into a new venue. the dale amateur boxing club has had help from the bbc‘s diy sos programme, to rebuild it. the club has produced a world champion and olympic gold medallist and the duke of cambridge realises its importance to the community. i think everyone is playing catch up, trying to work out how to deal with such a truly
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horrendous situation. for the community they are reliving it all the time. progress needs to happen. the community coming together is the first important part of fixing that. and you can see the full transformation of the dale boxing club in west london on diy sos at 9pm tomorrow night on bbc one. let's have a look at the travel situation now. iam glad i am glad to say it is a good service on all problems after the delays on the central line. on the roads, in dagenham, expect delays because of the school fire in the area and also adding to traffic is a collision on the a13 westbound just before the goresbrook interchange. euston road has a lane closed eastbound for gasworks. let's have a check on the weather now with lucy. hello, good morning. starting to see the temperatures dropping off as we move through the next few days.
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today, a touch cooler than yesterday. but temperatures not doing too badly. still in the high teens, low 20s, and it does look like it'll be dry and bright. i think we will see a bit more cloud today than we did yesterday. a few patches of mist around first thing, that should lift quickly. a dry and bright day with patchy cloud and hazy sunny spells. temperatures at a maximum of around 22 degrees. so feeling warm in the sunshine with a north—easterly breeze. through this evening, some late spells of sunshine. and then, overnight, it will be mostly dry with patchy cloud. a few clear spells here and there. the chance of one or two patches of mist where we see the clear skies. temperatures not too falling far. an overnight low of 14 degrees. tomorrow, then, some patchy cloud. i think there will be some sunny spells as well. temperatures are a little cooler than today. a maximum of around 20 degrees. seeing the temperatures dropping off a touch further still though as we move towards the end of the week. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour.
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hello, this is breakfast, with louise minchin and dan walker. here is a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news: after months of arguments over antisemitism, labour's ruling body will meet today to try to put the issue to rest. the national executive committee will decide whether to fully adopt the international holocaust remembrance alliance's definition of antisemitism. it was partially incorporated into their rules injuly, but the shadow chancellor, john mcdonnell, has urged the committee to go further. nicola sturgeon will set out her plans for the coming year at the scottish parliament later today. the first minister is expected to announce a dozen new pieces of legislation, with focus expected to be on mental health, the environment, and sustainable growth in the economy. the snp's opponents have dismissed her plans as pie in the sky, and say the party is running out of ideas. nearly half of nursery providers in england say the government's scheme to provide 30 hours of free childcare has had a negative financial impact on their business.
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the free care for three— and four—year—olds introduced this time last year has proved popular, with 95% of eligible parents using the scheme. the government say they are researching the cost of childcare, but that the majority of providers have been happy to take part in the scheme. universities are urging the government to introduce new rules allowing international students to work in the uk for up to two years after graduation. under the proposal, the universities would sponsor their graduates to look for work without any restriction on the type ofjob they can apply for. the government says it already has variety of routes to allow international graduates to stay in the uk. an american football player who protested against racial injustice by kneeling during the us national anthem has been revealed as the face of nike's new advertising campaign. colin kaepernick first protested in august 2016. other players followed his lead by kneeling during the anthem, leading to criticism from president trump. kaepernick hasn't played since 2017 and is currently suing the nfl, claiming he is being kept out of the league because of his part in the protests.
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doctors are being urged to write letters in clear, simple english, that is easier for patients to understand. new guidance has been issued by the academy of medical royal colleges encouraging hospital consultants to stop using latin phrases and medicaljargon. it comes after gps reported that some patients were having to book appointments just to have technical terms explained. earlier on breakfast, one consultant told us doctors may take a while to get used to the new system. it's a bit more work to start with, because it's unfamiliar. so it takes a few goes to get familiar with it, to get a sort of a new repertoire of terms to use. but for the gp, if it saves the patient to have to make a separate appointment for a gp discussion, because they've already got the letter, that will save everybody time and worry.
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80 firefighters are tackling a large blaze at a school in east london. the fire at roding primary school in dagenham started just before 5:00am this morning. the london fire brigade say around half of the single—story building is currently alight, but there are no reports of any injuries. doctors have developed a new online tool which they claim can assess a person's risk of having a heart attack or stroke. the test asks people over the age of 30 to answer a series of questions about their lifestyle and then generates their heart age. a heart age older than your actual age can indicate an increased health risk. public health england says nearly 2 million people have completed the test so far. the strongest typhoon to hit the country of japan in 25 years has hit. 300,000 people in the western
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city of kobe have been advised to evacuate the area. matt will tell us about the weather later. and the tv show wanderlust, which hasn't been on yet. relaxing the accepted bounds of marriage. i love the way you explain this. you have to be careful, it is only 7:30 a.m.. playing the straight bat. lots of reaction from alastair cooke's announcement that he is quitting international cricket. this is his debut in 2006. perhaps the writing was on the wall than that success would follow, and he will end his career with this match to follow. only five other players
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have scored more international runs than he has. the stats speak for themselves. since his debut in 2006, when tony blair was pm, he has played in 160 tests, he is england's highest ever test run scorer, one of only six batsmen to have scored over 12,000 runs, he has scored more test centuries than any other englishmen, and has made more catches than any other england player jonny bairstow described him as a true legend, who set the benchmark on and off the pitch. former captain michael vaughan said no player has given more to the england shirt. no player has got more out of their ability. and indian cricketing royalty sachin tendulkar describes him as one of the finest batsmen to have represented england. it is india, of course, that alastair cook will face in his last match later this week. expect a big send—off. to new york, where roger federer has crashed out of the us open, beaten in the fourth round. our tennis reporter david law was watching at flushing meadows. frankly he looked his 37
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years of age tonight. he's been trying to win this tournament for the last ten years, unsuccessfully. he started out well, but then suddenly his game disintegrated. started well enough, did better. he only got 31% of his service, missing balls we would never see him miss. 77 errors throughout the course of the match. he did serve for the third set at 5—4, didn't take his opportunity, and that was really a theme of the match all the way through. just kept on missing shots that he normally wouldn't miss. his opponent, john millman from australia, was superb, and deserved the win. he eventually got it in the fourth set, on a second successive tiebreak. federer departed the scene really wondering what happened tonight. there is a new name to look out
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for in formula one next seson, and when you see these pictures, it is clear lando norris had talent from a young age. he has been promoted by mclaren, and will become britain's youngest driver in f1 next season. this was him doing donuts in his go—kart as a youngster. we will be talking to him live just after 8:30am. liverpool forward mo salah is on fifa's shortlist for the world player of the year award. he scored 44 goals last season. he isjoined by champions league winner cristiano ronaldo and luka modric, who was player of the tournament at the world cup. and imagine being sacked afterjust one game of the new season. that is what has happened to matt o'connor, who was head coach at leicester tigers after their opening—day defeat at exeter. assistant coach geordan murphy has been put in temporary charge. the guillotine has fallen. one game,
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and you are out. almost three quarters of children starting secondary school this year own a smartphone. but now, despite having supplied the devices, parents say they are increasingly worried about the risks of cyber bullying and pressure to use social media. from this month, the french government has implemented a total ban on phones in schools. so is it time we followed their lead? ali fortescue is at a school in dewsbury for us this morning. good morning to you. hello, good morning. lots of excitement here, of course, because it is the first day back at school. how do we feel about the first day back at school? good, really good. a little bit of enthusiasm. this is a really interesting school because there is a ban on phones across the school. we will have a chat to the headmaster in a moment. first let's give you some of the figures from the new research. 72% of children in
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year7, so the new research. 72% of children in year 7, so that it 11 —year—olds, own a smartphone. you may have seen in the news in the last few days that there is now a in france on phones in schools. 59% of parents think that is a good idea, that we should implement similar rules. having said that, 49% of parents feel children should be able to carry phones to and from school. let's have a chat to the headmaster. it is his first day on the job, and you may recognise him if you watch educating yorkshire. how is it going? so far so good, at 7:30 a.m.. tell me about why you introduced this band. it is not something i have introduced, it is something we have introduced, it is something we have had since the time i have been here, and for us it really works. what is really important is that six out of ten parents are in favour of phones not being allowed in schools, and it works for us. it is really important that whatever the school's rule is, that parents work with the
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school. the internet matters, and the research they have conducted is really important. at what is really fundamentally important is that children are safe online. it is about government, parents and schools working together to ensure thatis schools working together to ensure that is the case. the big question is what do children think about all of this? let's have a quick chat to leia and oliver. how did you find a ban on phones? i think it is a really good idea because it means people are not distracted in lessons. you are not really going to text anybody that is outside of school during school hours anyway, so school during school hours anyway, so it is a good idea. do your classmates agree with that?” so it is a good idea. do your classmates agree with that? i think the majority would, yes.” definitely agree with oliver, because i feel like school is a time where you should be social and build your schools are, like, confidence levels increase, obviously, because you are talking to people all the time. i feel like
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you are talking to people all the time. ifeel like it you are talking to people all the time. i feel like it is a good idea not to have phones in school. how much do you think you would be using your phone in school, if you are allowed ? your phone in school, if you are allowed? probably all of the time, but i think it is good that we are not, because we have a break. otherwise we would always be on them. and what are your big concerns? is it online bullying, things like that? yes, i feel like you have to live up to the expectations society has for us nowadays, so it is better if you are not on your phone. so lots of food for thought. clearly this is something that teachers and parents are talking about, but children as well. will we see a ban in other schools like this? thank you very much. you have been doing your own survey. how is it going? 60 odd % say ban on all phones entirely from schools. psychologist linda papadopoulos joins us now. do you think they should be banned? do you think they should be banned? do we know that they can get in the
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way of learning? yes, we do. so if the intention is to ensure that kids learn in the best possible environment, it is probably something for schools to look at. schools have to have their own policies, but this is what i feel. with internet matters, we do a lot of research, and 70 to 80% of pa rents a re of research, and 70 to 80% of parents are very concerned about the impact. don't forget especially in year7, impact. don't forget especially in year 7, when kids are going into secondary school, think about how many things are happening. they are taking the bus for the first time, it is new relationships, and all of a sudden you have these gadgets, these phones, which means you are navigating new social relationships, and like the kids said, you can feel under pressure. so all of this stuff is going on and if you have a safe haven of a few hours where that isn't a part of your consciousness, thatis isn't a part of your consciousness, that is probably a good thing. loads of comments on this. i will read a few which encompass most of the major issues. one teacher said previously phones were allowed at
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ra ke previously phones were allowed at rake and lunch only, for now all phones must be off and away throughout the school day. joe says they are great if used responsibly. jea nette they are great if used responsibly. jeanette says she didn't know they we re jeanette says she didn't know they were allowed in schools in the first place. another viewer says parents who think phones are allowed in school also think it is fine to text their kids during school. some children need them to avoid danger on the way home. difficult that students' lines are so intertwined with social media. denise says my son encourages positive use of phones in school. if they are used inappropriately they are confiscated and you have to pay £1 to charity to give them back. and from keran, i find it funny that people saying the ban phones are pretty much everyone over the age of 50. times are changing. it is not... iam over the age of 50. times are changing. it is not... i am not sure thatis changing. it is not... i am not sure that is the case. it is not our
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fault and you have to change with them. do phones have a place? absolutely they do. do they have a place in absolutely every part of your life? i place in absolutely every part of yourlife? iam place in absolutely every part of your life? iam not place in absolutely every part of your life? i am not sure that is the case. again, what is the issue here? this is what we find time and time again. every thing else you teach your child, the drive, to cook, you have done it first. when it comes to the online world, and this is being picked up on with viewers, they feel out of their depth. so parents are responding to... again, internet matters are trying to understand social media which they don't understand as well as their kids. are we saying there is a place? yes, but you need to speak to your kid, you need them to understand why they are as addictive as they are, that their social lives on it, but these rules of what you value as a family, whether it is not having them at the dinner table or having time out when you are studying law at school, i think those need to be discussed. you are studying law at school, i think those need to be discussedm is interesting, isn't it, because if you say we are going to take them away, there is genuinely a sense of panic with some children, because this is part of their everyday life.
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it is an important part of their lives, isn't it? it is absolutely, andi lives, isn't it? it is absolutely, and i don't think this is what is coming up with the research at all. i don't think anyone is saying ban phones. i think they are saying when you are involved in a certain action, we know now... people keep speaking about social media and mental health. we speak about cognitive health as well. we know that your memory will be compromises if you are checking your phone while learning. so i think what is happening here is educators are responding to this. i think the idea of having a phone when you are coming back and forth from school, think that is a great idea, and there is for that. own it is the bbc‘s new service helping young people to stay healthy and happy online. it's all available at bbc.co.uk/ownit. you can get the weather on your phone, or you can get it from matt. it is better from matt. yes, put out
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your phone, please. good morning. the weather, a little change, but early this morning, look at this lovely scene in keswick. the skies and the waters may be a little bit different, certainly more choppy, towards the end of the week, the weather will undergo change, to bring about the change is what is happening injapan, bring about the change is what is happening in japan, they bring about the change is what is happening injapan, they have seen a major typhoon, this cloutier, reaching landfall, but in doing so it has dragged tropical, warm air north into the upper atmosphere —— cloudier. that will impact the jet stream, its position, which will change what is happening here. at the moment not much is moving around. we have a weather front which was there yesterday from south—west england to south—east scotland. lots of cloud, quite misty start, miles, light rain and drizzle, either side of it sunshine and cloud around, called to the west of wales into cumbria where as you saw there were sunny spells overhead. northern ireland sunniest
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of all and temperatures below freezing overnight. warming up now the sun is out of course and it will bea the sun is out of course and it will be a fine day for many in scotland and northern ireland. later on in western northern ireland and into the hebrides and ireland we could see one or two showers. stay in bright in the south—east. we couldn't rule out an isolated shower. the cloudy zone extending across the west of england, scotland, patchy and light drizzle, many will be dry and temperatures not far from what we saw yesterday, in the mid—to—high teens, maybe low 20s in the south—east, where it will be cooler than yesterday. tonight, showers to the south—east, showers in western scotland, northern ireland, most will be dry, cloud brea ks ireland, most will be dry, cloud breaks tonight, and from northern england into scotland, northern ireland, temperatures could be low enough for a touch of frost, but a sunny start to the day and sunshine tomorrow for england and wales. the chance for showers close to the eastern coasts, and western scotland
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and northern ireland more cloud with the chance of outbreaks of rain in the chance of outbreaks of rain in the afternoon especially, and temperatures down on today's values but also similar to what we've seen. isaid but also similar to what we've seen. i said thejet but also similar to what we've seen. i said the jet stream will see the impact of the typhoon. what will happen is weird world undulate across the north atlantic. —— is that it will undulate. it will be stuck over the south of the uk. that means the low pressure will develop and hang around thursday, friday, into the start of the weekend, so expect showers and a bit cooler as well. concentrating on thursday first of all. we can't pinpoint where the rain will be this far ahead. most likely from north wales northwards, the most persistent likely to be in eastern scotland. some sunshine in between. even where you have the sunshine, look at the temperatures, 13 to 19 degrees, lower than they have been in the uk for some time, and for some it is cooler than expected for the first week of september. there is certainly a change on the way.
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change, change, thank you very much, matt. steffi is with us looking at whether the savers are seeing the benefit to the savers are seeing the benefit to the bank of england interest—rate rise. good morning. it is not great news to be honest. let me explain why. good morning, it yes. it's been a month since the bank of england announced the base interest rate was to go up to 0.75% — in theory this should mean anyone with a tracker mortgage would see their repayments go up but also anyone with savings should get a bit more back for their money. however, a month later, out of 119 variable rate savings accounts, only 52 have passed on the increase to their customers. some of those increases are as small as 0.05%. however, if we look at mortgages, 48 out of 81 providers have already increased their standard variable rate. some of the increases have been as low as 0.05 %. joining me now is anna bowes, director of the savings champion website, joins me now. thank you very much for coming in to
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see us. are you surprised by this? u nfortu nately, see us. are you surprised by this? unfortunately, no, not surprised, the last base rate rise we had last year we saw the same thing, in fact, 50% of all variable rate savings accou nts 50% of all variable rate savings accounts didn't increase at all, and we see the same this time. it is not just about the fact that 50% of providers haven't told us what they are doing, most of them are not changing the rates on all of them. it isa changing the rates on all of them. it is a bit ofa changing the rates on all of them. it is a bit of a lottery. you might get nothing, you might get 0.05, you might get 0.025, so look at what you are seeing. the whole point of the bank base rate is to influence the rates that we as consumers get, so why isn't it feeding through? well, it is supposed to, and a lot of people will think when the bank of england base rate moves, so will the savings rate, and they will expect that at the same level, but we had the funding for lending scheme that came in, and that was a lot of money
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pumped into the system to give borrowers, to give lenders cheap money, for lending out, and what that means is that there was a severing of the link between the base rate and the savings rates, because providers didn't need our money any more, so because providers didn't need our money any more, so they cut rates anyway. so not great news for savers, who had a tough time anyway, is there any point saving in a bank account these days? obviously there is because there is nowhere else, what can you do, put it under a mattress, at least your money is safe in a bank or a building society and you are earning something. the critical thing is most of us keep our money with the high street bank and they are paying the worst rates possible. so you could look at earning on £10,000 30 quid or £135, so earning on £10,000 30 quid or £135, so there are better rates available, so so there are better rates available, so you have to look at what you're earning and you have to move that so that you can earn some interest on your hard earned cash. so we are not
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seeing the savings providers particularly quickly putting up rates. on the other side you are seeing mortgage providers, they quickly put them up, if you have a variable rate mortgage, you will have the letter in the post sharply after the bank of england puts it up. and that is why people are so disappointed and perhaps confused and assume that if you see a mortgage rate rise of 0.025% you should see the savings rise, but it isn't the case. it is annoying for all of the savers out there, isn't it, thank you. that is it for me for now. thank you very much, so, steph, the next half an hour, we will be joined by steven mackintosh to speak about wanderlust. and to talk about his new series wanderlust and dj norman cook, better known as fatboy slim. but we couldn't wait until then so we've got them into the studio early. good morning. what's it like to be pa rt good morning. what's it like to be part of a bbc series that hasn't even been on yet and there has been so even been on yet and there has been so much... it is all over the papers. i know! lots to discuss. it
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is exciting! were you surprised by the reaction? i am inevitably not surprised because of the subject. but it is... yeah, it is fun. listen, i but it is... yeah, it is fun. listen, lam proud but it is... yeah, it is fun. listen, i am proud of it. i am happy to talk about it. it is sort of organised unfaithfulness outside marriage. i suppose, possibly, maybe it might be a way to describe some of it, yeah. obviously there has been lots of focus on that element of it. it is about the stuff of life, it is relationships, it is marriage, it is, yeah, it is poignant. human nature. exactly. and you are going from what, smaller venues to huge venues. yeah. how is it going to work? experimenting in arena raving. the experiment. i always shied away from arenas
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because i thought that they are kind of sort of cavernous and not solve all places, but we experimented at the 02 and we worked out a way to do it, so, yeah, arena raving. you once described yourself as a lunatic headiness, have you changed a bit, do you think? possibly i am older and wiser —— hedonist. do you think? possibly i am older and wiser -- hedonist. do you change between the dj and the father?- the difference between the father of two and fatboy slim with the mental age of about 16, so it is good to have the different characters. fatboy slim and norman cook, still one of your loves is brighton and you must have loved the season so far. lots to love about that kind of behaviour, yes, it has been great. we are learning the joys of being in the premiership for the first time ever. yes, we are loving it. and do
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you go to every game, how dedicated aru? every home game when i am in brighton, which is two so far —— are you7 brighton, which is two so far —— are you? so exciting. yes. one more thing to ask you about. we will discuss it later on. talking a lot about social media today. so much of tv is, we talked about your programme before, then when it is on there will be quite a big social media reaction. no doubt. are you prepared for that, will you watch the screen? no, that's not a pleasurable experience for me, i don't think. i would just like to watch it and then... i don't know if i would eat into that stuff. it is a can of worms. it is the world we live in. it is where we are at. it is part of the whole watching experience now. yes. yeah. laughter. you sound worried. not at all. i am excited to see what people say about it. it is genuinely, yes, it is a
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really refreshing series, this, it is different and that's what excites me, really. you will be turning off your phone, just like we did a few seconds ago. lovely to see you. thank you. we will see you at 8:50 am, we will see you at 8:40am. thank you. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning. i'm asad ahmad. a fire has broken out in at a large primary school in east london. around half of the single storey roding primary school in dagenham is alight. it started at 5:00am this morning. 80 firefighters are at the scene on hewett road. there are no reported injuries and pupils were due to return to the school tomorrow. the cause of the fire isn't yet known. and there's more on that on our radio session bbc radio london.
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now, more news: transport for london has launched an investigation after footage emerged of a tube train driving with its doors open. it happened at the weekend on the jubilee line between finchley road and west hampstead. tfl said the doors were open for one stop and that no passengers onboard were hurt. it added that the train was immediately ta ken out of service. a boxing club which was on the first floor of the grenfell tower and was being used just hours before the fire started is to move into a new venue. the dale amateur boxing club has had help from the bbc‘s diy sos programme to rebuild it. the club has produced a world champion and olympic gold medallist and the duke of cambridge realises its importance to the community. i think everyone is playing catch up, trying to work out how to deal with such a truly horrendous situation. for the community they are reliving it all the time. progress needs to happen. the community coming together is the first important part of fixing that. and you can see the full transformation of the dale boxing club in west london on diy sos at 9:00am tomorrow night on bbc one. let's have a look at
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the travel situation now. if we look at the tube board, we see it is now a good service on all lines, problems on the central line have cleared up, but the overground is part suspended, we have more on that later. on the roads, in dagenham, expect delays because of the school fire in the area and also adding to traffic is a collision on the a13 westbound just before the goresbrook interchange. on the roads, euston road has a lane closed eastbound at king's cross station. that's for gas main works. let's have a check on the weather now with lucy. hello, good morning. starting to see the temperatures dropping off as we move through the next few days. today, a touch cooler than yesterday. but temperatures not doing too badly. still in the high teens, low 20s, and it does look like it'll be dry and bright. i think we will see a bit more cloud today than we did yesterday. a few patches of mist around first thing, that should lift fairly quickly. a dry and bright day with patchy cloud and hazy sunny spells. temperatures at a maximum of around 22 degrees.
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so feeling warm in the sunshine with a north—easterly breeze. through this evening, some late spells of sunshine. and then, overnight, it will be mostly dry with patchy cloud. a few clear spells here and there. the chance of one or two patches of mist where we see the clear skies. temperatures not too falling far. an overnight low of 14 degrees. tomorrow, then, some patchy cloud. i think there will be some sunny spells as well. temperatures are a little cooler than today. a maximum of around 20 degrees. seeing the temperatures dropping off a touch further still though as we move towards the end of the week. so, as! so, as i said, more on the school fire in dagenham on bbc radio london and online. i will be back in half and online. i will be back in half an hour. good morning welcome to breakfast with louise minchin and dan walker. our headlines today: labour faces crunch talks over anti—semitism — after months of division in the party. a call for plain english. doctors are told to write letters that are easier
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for patients to understand. blood cancer kills more people than prostate or breast cancer every year. double olympic medalist dame kelly holmes will talk to us about losing her mum to the disease. the boss of the bank tsb is stepping down after customers faced problems with its mobile and online banking for the second time this year. i'll have more in a few minutes. and in sport... one of england's greats, alistair cook, will retire from test cricket after the final match of the series against india this week. it's a dry and find tuesday for many of you, but the day begins across south—west england, south east wales, the midlands and northern england with a bit of drizzle, i will have your full forecast. it's tuesday 4th of september. our top story: after months of arguments over anti—semitism, labour's ruling body will meet today to try to put the issue to rest. the party's national
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executive committee signed—up to the international holocaust remembrance alliance guidelines injuly, but not all of its examples were included. our assistant political editor norman smith is in westminster. plenty to discuss. let's start with the labour party and move on to the conservatives in a moment. how big an issue is this for them today considering all the discussion there has been in the past few weeks and months? it's a huge issue because in pa rt months? it's a huge issue because in part it has been such a massive distraction for the labour party during these long summer months when they have been embroiled in this row over anti—semitism and all the signs are they will not be able to put a lid on it today. although they will accept the international code, it looks like they are going to add some of their own words, some of their own phrases, to protect those who want to criticise the israeli government. that will not go down well with many in thejewish community who are saying, "for goodness' sake, just accept the recognised code on anti—semitism". the question is whether that will
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prompt a further uprising of labour mps with many now talking about possibly sitting even as independent mps. from the other side of the house of commons you have got theresa may, it's back to school but back to brexit and the troubled waters surrounding that again. mrs may now battling to save her checkers brexit plan amid signs of mounting opposition notjust plan amid signs of mounting opposition not just amongst the brexiteers but even amongst some former remain remainers unhappy it gives too much away to the eu. the question, can she sell it in parliament, and if she can't. many believe that if it goes down then mrs may too can also go down. the question is what happens to brexit, could we leave with no deal, could be mps who are trying to delay brexit, could even end up with a general election? you would have more chance trying to guess the lottery numbers than trying to guess what is going to happen with british politics in the next few months.
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that is probably a very good analysis, thank you. we will speak to andrea leadsom, the leader... later. nicola sturgeon will set out her plans for the coming year at the scottish parliament later today. the first minister is expected to announce a dozen new pieces of legislation, with focus expected to be on mental health, the environment and sustainable growth in the economy. the snp's opponents have dismissed her plans as "pie in the sky" and say the party is "running out of ideas". in the last few minutes, the boss of the troubled bank tsb has announced that he is stepping down. steph has more. you mentioned it in your headline. it is one of those stories that brea ks it is one of those stories that breaks and you have to react to it quickly, what more can you tell us this is not a surprise because the company has had so many it problems that have caused chaos for customers. there has been another one this week. on monday, there were customers who were locked out of their accounts. some of them ended up their accounts. some of them ended up having duplicate transactions.
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for some customers, it can really cripple them if they've not got money in the account they should have or they can't pay for things. there's so many different parts of life it can affect if you can't have your bank account working properly. this is not the first time it has happened to them. remember in april, they were all over the headlines because 1.9 million customers had been affected by a century it meltdown. they transferred from one system to another and it meant that it didn't properly work. people locked out of accounts for a long time. various other problems with fraudsters being able to get details and things. so many issues for customers at the time and cost tsp a small fortune. they had to pay out £176 million in compensation to people. rightly so. because they have been really impacted by this. given we have had another it problem, it's been announced this morning that paul pasteur, the ceo is stepping down. they have
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apologised again, they said they sorted out the problem they had this week but essentially his head has had to roll and it is the ceo that has gone because of this. it makes it very difficult to people accessing their own money. nearly half of nursery providers in england say the government's scheme to provide 30 hours of free childcare has had a negative financial impact on their business. the free care for three— and four—year—olds, introduced this time last year, has proved popular — with 95% of eligible parents using the scheme. the government say they're researching the cost of childcare but that the majority of providers have been happy to take part in the scheme. doctors are being urged to write letters in clear, simple english that's easier for patients to understand. new guidance has been issued by the academy of medical royal colleges, encouraging hospital consultants to stop using latin phrases and medicaljargon. it comes after gps reported that some patients were having to book appointments just to have technical terms explained. earlier on breakfast, one consultant told us doctors may take a while to get used to the new system. it's a bit more work to start with,
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because it's unfamiliar. it takes a few goes to get familiar with it, to get a new repertoire of terms to use. but for the gp, if it saves the patient to have to make a separate appointment because they've already got the letter, that will save everybody time and worry. japan's weather agency says the strongest typhoon to hit the country in 25 years has made landfall with recorded windspeeds of more than 130 miles per hour. the agency has warned of high waves, flooding and mudslides caused by typhoon jaybe. 300,000 people in the western city of kobe have been advised to evacuate the area. 80 firefighters are tackling a large blaze at a school in east london. the fire at roding primary school in dagenham started just before 5am this morning. the london fire brigade say around half of the single—storey building is currently alight but there are no reports of any injuries. universities are urging
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the government to introduce new rules allowing international students to work in the uk for up to two years after graduation. under the proposal, the universities would sponsor their graduates to look for work without any restriction on the type ofjob they can apply for. the government says it already has variety of routes to allow international graduates to stay in the uk. an american football player who protested against racial injustice by kneeling during the us national anthem has been revealed as the face of nike's new advertising campaign. colin kaepernick first protested in august 2016. other players followed his lead by kneeling during the anthem, leading to criticism from president trump. caroline rigby reports. "believe in something, even if it means sacrificing everything" — the words of former nfl quarterback colin kaepernick, part of an advertising campaign for the sports brand nike. kaepernick was at the san francisco 49ers when he began kneeling
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during the national anthem in the 2016 nfl season, a protest against racial injustice and police brutality — what he saw as state oppression against african—americans and people of colour. his actions sparked a wider movement and national debate, criticised by some, including president trump, for being disrespectful to both the american flag and the military. now a free agent, kaepernick is suing the nfl, alleging team owners colluded to prevent him from signing with another team. being chosen as the face of nike's latest advertising venture is likely to be welcomed by many, but raise eyebrows too. in a statement, the company said... news of kaepernick‘s involvement comes just days before the first
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game of the new nfl season, where protests could once again flare up. this advert yet more proof that sports continues to be a front line in the american political and racial divide. caroline rigby, bbc news. be huge story in america. absolutely. theresa may's brexit plans remain under sustained attack from both wings of the conservative party as mps return to the commons today after their summer break. the prime minister's chequers proposals have been rejected by negotiators in brussels and savaged by former foreign secretary borisjohnson in his newspaper column. meanwhile, calls for a second referendum or so—called "people's vote" are continuing to grow. so, what's next for brexit? joining us from westminster is leader of the house of commons, andrea leadsom. good morning, thanks forjoining us. there has been so much criticism
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from people in the leave camp and remain, justine greening saying this chequers plan is more unpopular than the poll tax with the british public, is this theresa may's poll tax? not at all, this is a negotiation. it is a very complex negotiation. it is a very complex negotiation. the prime minister's proposal sticks to what i and more than 17 million people voted for, which was that we would be out of the single market, out of the customs union, we would be taking back control of our money, our laws and borders and we will be leaving the common agricultural policy in the common agricultural policy in the common fisheries policy is. it achieves those things but cleverly, it alsojessie achieves those things but cleverly, it also jessie is achieves those things but cleverly, it alsojessie is the commission's red lines. it is not another that they can ignore —— it also addresses they can ignore —— it also addresses the commission's. they need to look at it seriously is trying to get a good deal that will make our transition out of the eu as smooth as possible that protects jobs and
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businesses. what is your evidence that they are looking at it seriously? jacob rees—mogg is saying that michel barnier, on monday, suggesting that he agreed with him that the plan was absolute rubbish. what is your evidence they are taking this seriously? if i had my list of quotes i could give you a whole set of quotes of european leaders who have said this is a good plan to work from. it shows clear determination from the uk to find a deal that works for the european union as well as the united kingdom. but the point about this is that it's a negotiation. dominic raab the brexit secretary has spent a lot of time in brussels over the summer discussing all issues with michel barnier. they are making progress but it is a complex negotiation and they need to be given the chance to work through it and make sense of it. talking about making sense of it, it was widely reported when the chequers deal was unveiled that you hated it but you like it now? no, the key point is that i would like us to be leaving the eu in such a
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way that we are completely untethered to it in any way whatsoever. but i'm also a pragmatist. having looked carefully at the checkers deal, seeing that actually it does stick to the redlines that i voted for, so we are getting back the money that we want to spend on our nhs. we will be back in control of immigration. it will be uk courts that take precedence over all of our laws in the future. these are the things that i really wanted. for a pragmatic brexit, being able to deal with the concerns of businesses that have been talked about so frequently about the worry that businesses have in the complicated supply chains, which have grown up over many years, not doing harm to those. very importantly, looking after the border between northern ireland and the republic of ireland, making sure we don't have to have a hard border, those pragmatic of those are all pa rt those pragmatic of those are all part of that chequers agreement and
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thatis part of that chequers agreement and that is why i am able to support it. is it brexit in name only, then? no, not at all. as i had said, we will be taking back control of billions of pounds that we will be able to spend on our priorities. we won't be paying those sums over to the eu any more. we will have control back of our borders and we will decide who comes to this country to work and to live and we will have our uk courts that will take precedence over any other court. those things are incredibly important and those are the basis of what people voted for when they voted to leave the eu. they are very important and the prime minister has been absolutely clear. on the 29th of march, 2019, we will be leaving the european union. it is not brexit in name only. we will absolutely be an independent, sovereign, globally trading, globally relevant nation, once again. i'm so excited about that. let's talk about a criticism, for example, boris johnson and
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that. let's talk about a criticism, for example, borisjohnson and this co nsta nt for example, borisjohnson and this constant criticism. how damaging is that for the prime minister and do you think she should be tougher at cracking down on her critics? boris has a weekly column, i believe. he will always give his strong views. he resigned over the chequers deal, he doesn't believe it means what he voted for but i differ with him in that regard. i believe it does stick to the red lines. it gives us back the sovereignty and control that we we re the sovereignty and control that we were looking for in voting to leave the eu. we don't agree on that point. on the other hand, boris is absolutely entitled to his views and no doubt will continue to express them, as will plenty of other cabinet and non—cabinet members.“ that damaging? that they continue to do that? i don't think it is. i think everyone would agree she has shown the most amazing tenacity and been determined to get a good deal for the uk that works for everybody
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here. for those who voted to leave, who are the majority, but also for those whose jobs depend on close—knit supply chains, for those in ireland who are concerned about the border, the prime minister is doing something extraordinarily complicated and at the moment her proposal is the only serious one on the table. my message is the european commission need to take it seriously, stop the rhetoric around we don't like it and we don't approve of it. unless they have a serious alternative to offer, they need to look at the chequers proposal and make sure they are doing everything they can to accommodate a smooth exit which is in all of our interests. andrea leadsom, thank you for your time. it has just leadsom, thank you for your time. it hasjust gone leadsom, thank you for your time. it has just gone quarter past eight, good morning. let's find out what's happening with the weather. maybe a bit grey out there for some
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of you, but for others it is cracking. rings will change later this week and it won't look quite so calm, i suspect. this week and it won't look quite so calm, isuspect. bringing this week and it won't look quite so calm, i suspect. bringing about that change is what's happening injapan. there is a major typhoon which has made landfall. here is a swirl of cloud, and that will have a big knock—on impact to weather patterns across the northern hemisphere which ultimately will change how things look here as we go towards the end of the week. we can see the cloud extending from south—west england to south—east scotland. making it misty and grey over the hills, keeping temperatures up here. a bit more cloud in east anglia and the south—east compared to yesterday, the small chance of a shower. much of scotla nd the small chance of a shower. much of scotland and northern ireland dry. this artichoke leaf some of you with frost in some places in
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scotla nd with frost in some places in scotland and northern ireland but the reward is you have blue skies overhead, shaping up to be a fine day. a bit more cloud and some isolated showers. the cloud that sits there between south—east scotla nd sits there between south—east scotland and south—west england will hanging around into the afternoon. call than yesterday across the south—east corner, otherwise temperatures on par with what you saw yesterday afternoon. with the light winds and clear skies around tonight, more clear skies across england and wales, temperatures will drop back into single figures in the countryside. a few showers to take us into tomorrow across the far west of scotland, some cloud for northern ireland and a greater chance of rain tomorrow during the afternoon but elsewhere eastern scotland stays fine and dry, and for much of england and wales a better chance of
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seeing the sunshine tomorrow. from then on, that change i mentioned, then on, that change i mentioned, the jet stream starts to get the more undulating pattern across the northern hemisphere. we saw a bit of it down to the uk as well and low pressure is set to push its way in. it will hang around through thursday, friday and into the start of the weekend. when you see low—pressure, think outbreaks of rain. pinpointing their exact position on thursday is very difficult but we could seek some rain affecting north east scotland, one to watch. we will be dragging in cooler air as well so note the temperatures on thursday, 13 to 19 degrees, which is cooler than we have experienced uk wide for some time and a big difference from those fond memories of the recent summer. we can still remember though, thank
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you. it's a condition that kills more people than prostate or breast cancer every year but new research suggests only 10% of us would recognise the symptoms of blood cancer. double olympic gold medallist dame kelly holmes lost her mum pam to the disease last year, and is now leading a campaign to increase awareness of the warning signs. she'sjoined by dr adrian bloor from the christie cancer centre. i know this is important to you. tell us a bit about your mum. my mum had multiple myeloma and had no idea what it was when she was diagnosed. we were hoping she would be one of the ten year statistics but passed away two years after her diagnosis. it was the worst day of my life, as
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it is with most, and that's why i wa nted it is with most, and that's why i wanted to be part of the make blood cancer visible campaign. we are very aware of breast cancer and prostate cancer, may be leukaemia is a word a lot of people know but given the fact... the doctor knows a lot more than me, but there are over 100 blood cancers out there, when my mum got myeloma we had no idea. only now that we went through it, we started to realise that my mother had pneumonia a couple of winters but we just thought it was a bad cold. she then started getting a bad backache or being a sports person i suggested
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she have amassed large. —— a massage. then some broken ribs and they said it was because of the dog pulling. it would be easy to start worrying and say i've got a cold, get checked, but if the symptoms over time are really regular that is when i would see. it is the fifth biggest cancer in the uk, and the third biggest killer, and if you just think about that it is the numbers. on the website, the make blood cancer visible website, there are some mini videos by patients and my story about my mum. they are so emotive because you hear of people's
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stories and journeys. i look back, you see them going through this. my mum was so you see them going through this. my mum was so positive, she took in everything the doctors said she had to do and she would do it. we lived with hope occurs there is always a next treatment. you go through the hope and it's only then when she started to deteriorate. she has been a massive part of my life, she died when she was 64, hearing her cry that she didn't want to die because she was too young. seeing her deteriorate quickly in her last bout, she passed away quickly and it is horrible. i cannot say any more than that. you know an awful lot about it but there is still this lack of awareness about not only how many people are struggling with blood cancer but how many people are killed each year. i agree, it is something in the public awareness it
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isn't there to the same extent as breast cancer or bowel cancer. although it is the fifth most common type of cancer the numbers are still relatively small, 10% of cancer in the uk. that is still 30,000 people in the uk getting blood cancers. the other thing we come back to is the prognosis for it. although treatment has improved significantly over time, more patients die of blood cancer than other cancer conditions. state cancer, 95% are still alive after five years. also talk a little bit about the symptoms because kelly was talking about the different things going on. are there obvious symptoms people should be looking out for? i think it is joining the dots and the symptoms can be very nonspecific. tiredness, backache,
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infections, things that people get all the time, especially as they get older. patients often develop this in later life and the symptoms are quite common but it is the severity thatis quite common but it is the severity that is important. if you are feeling you are really not able to do things, not putting it down to getting older. why am i having three episodes of pneumonia in the last six months when i have not had it before western market is pushing for it because with appropriate tests it is not that difficult to diagnose most common types of blood cancer but it is getting those tests done at an appropriate time, early. with most cancer, early treatment is critical. the earlier they are treated, the prognosis is better. it's one of the reasons cancer outcomes in uk are not as good as they are in other parts of the world. kelly, you said that you have
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an incredibly strong bond with your mum. how are you coping now? i know this is the first time you have spoken about it on television. it is anniversaries and things like that that make it harder. i'm not good with the thought of death anyway and i haven't dealt with it very well at all to be honest. mainly because there is always this common thing, just because you are in the public eye that you are not human and i wa nted eye that you are not human and i wanted to be about this could be anyone's life. it is anyone who is going through it and actually it is real. it was the anniversary on the 7th of august and her funeral on the 29th of august. i haven't coped with it at all well. that is my own way of dealing with it, to talk about the fact that i want more people to be aware of it because, you know, as we have seen with rachel and lots of
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other people, seeing the stories is really ha rd—hitting, but other people, seeing the stories is really hard—hitting, but also the more you can get the awareness out there for people and actually maybe their life can be prolonged or saved in some circumstances. with my mum's, myeloma is currently incurable. it is treatable and the fa ct incurable. it is treatable and the fact is by having the diagnosis when she had it, we were maybe lucky that she had it, we were maybe lucky that she had it, we were maybe lucky that she had two years. she could have had it for five years for all we know. for me, i really want people... so please, go on the website of the make blood cancer visible campaign because it has some beautiful stories and people will see that other people are coping and dealing with it and some people are living positive lives with it. it has to have hope as well as the sadness. thank you for coming to
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talk to us. and it will make a difference, you telling your story, to many people out there. you are watching bbc brea kfast. out there. you are watching bbc breakfast. get in touch if you would like to. good morning. it's been a cold night across parts of northern ireland and scotland, both balmoral and braemar in aberdeenshire dropped below freezing. that's because we're in some cold air behind this cold front, which is still with us. still sinking its way slowly south—eastwards. it's a weaker affair than it was yesterday. still bringing in quite a lot of cloud across northern england, down through the midlands and into parts of wales in south—west england. some patchy drizzle for a time through the midlands, south wales and south west england.
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more cloud than we've seen recently across eastern and south eastern parts of england and still a fair amount of cloud for the scottish borders. that for much of scotland and northern ireland, we should lose the showers from the western isles of scotland, may be picked up one or two for the far south—east of england. elsewhere, dry and a mixture of variable cloud and clear spells, some mistyness in places where you have clearer skies. six or seven celsius the overnight low for parts of scotland and northern england, 10—14 celsius elsewhere. for most of us tomorrow it's a mainly dry day, light winds, some spells of sunshine, some cloud coming and going but that cloud will increase across parts of northern ireland, western scotland through the day, bringing some outbreaks of rain eastwards through the afternoon. this is business live from bbc news with ben thompson and sally bundock. mission to beijing. the leaders of virtually every african country are in china on a trip designed to boost trade. but is it a level playing field? live from london, that's our top story on tuesday 4th of september. africa sells billions of dollars
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worth of commodities to china — and spends even more buying in chinese goods. we'll hear from our africa business editor. as to whether it really is a win— win. also in the programme:
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