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tv   Beyond 100 Days  BBC News  September 5, 2018 7:00pm-8:01pm BST

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you're watching beyond 100 days. britain demands an urgent meeting of the un security council after charging two russians with the salisbury poisonings. the pair are understood to be russian military officers almost certainly acting on orders from the kremlin. police say these cctv images show the two men came to britain in march with the intention of killing sergei skripal. tech bosses from facebook and twitter admit they were too slow to act against political meddling, but they tell us senators they are fixing the problem. if we don't find a scalable solutions to the problems we are now seeing we lose our business and we continue to threaten the original privilege and liberty we were given to create twitter in the first place. a string of top white house officials refute the damning accounts in bob woodward's book on president trump — but he has hours of tape recordings and stands by the reporting. also on the programme. all we get from pakistan, says donald trump, is "lies and deceit".
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he has just cancelled $300 million in aid. so what hope is there of mike pompeo resetting the relationship with new premier imran khan? and 13 years after they were stolen, the fbi turns up dorothy's ruby red slippers. the wicked witch of the west is not a suspect. and you can get in touch with us using #beyond100days. hello and welcome — i'm katty kay in washington and christian fraser is in london. the cctv footage shows two men strolling through salisbury on a spring morning. it all looks so innocent. but british police say they are intelligence officers, sent by moscow to murder the former russian spy sergei skripal. the official finding appears to confirm what many suspected all along. but the uk government has now filled in details that it says point the finger at, quote, a senior level of the russian state.
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the kremlin, predictably enough, denies the charge. here's our security correspondent gordon corera. these two russians now stand accused of the salisbury nerve agent attack. police say they entered the country as alexander petrov and ruslan boshirov but those are thought to be false names used by undercover operatives. the government has concluded that the two individuals named by the police and cps are officers from the russian military intelligence service, also known as the gru. the gru is a highly disciplined organisation with a well established chain of command so this was not a rogue operation. it was almost certainly also approved outside the gru at a senior level of the russian state. the two men, police say, carried out a remarkably sophisticated attack. they flew in from moscow
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and are seen here in salisbury shortly after it was alleged they smeared nerve agent on sergei skripal‘s front door, and this is what was believed to have been there weapon, the perfume bottle used to carry the novichok nerve agent. three months later dawn sturgess would die after handling the discarded container. eventually the search led to its discovery. the announcement by the crown prosecution service is the most we will be seeking to circulate interpol notices. prosecutors say they have enough evidence to charge the two with conspiracy to murder sergei skripal, attempted murder of sergei skripal, his daughter yulia, and detective sergeant nick bailey, a police officer who went to the house. use and possession
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of novichok contrary to the chemical weapons act, and causing grievous bodily harm with intent to yulia skripal and nick bailey. the gru, based in this building is the intelligence arm of the russian military with a long track record of undercover operations around the world. undeeradimir putin, seen here visiting the headquarters, observers say it has become even more aggressive, accused of hacking america's 2016 election and now using nerve agent in britain. the prime target of the salisbury operation was sergei skripal. himself a former officer in the gru. sergei skripal, it is thought, was targeted by former colleagues in the gru because they viewed him as a traitor for working for the british secret service, mi6. today was about much more than just naming two individuals, but also in the eyes of the government, exposing the role of the gru
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and the prime minister made clear that, as well as the public accusation, british intelligence would be asked to do more to counter the gru's activities out of sight. today, russia's deputy ambassador was summoned to the foreign office. moscow said it did not recognise the names of the men accused. the british government acknowledges there is no real chance they will be extradited but it will be hoping that today increases the pressure on moscow. with me now in the studio is ben emmerson qc — who represented the widow of alexander litvinenko at the public inquiry into his murder. it is an almost exact replay of the murder of alexander living in court? yes, there are notable differences, in the latvian court case the assassins, one of them was a former member of the kgb, the other a bit ofa member of the kgb, the other a bit
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of a loser who was an associate of his. they made themselves known to alexander let them go by here it is a much more calculated and militaristic attack, in and out very quickly with the delivery of the fatal nerve agent, efficiently with no mistakes. what remains to be seen is whether as in the other case they have left a trail of forensic traces in the various locations in london where it is now known the wearer because in that case it was i expect the thoroughness with which this attempted murder has been investigated will reach the same very high threshold. there is the same reckless indifference to the
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general public with the novichok been poured down the sink of the hotel bathroom. yes. indeed there had been a number of cases of contamination of other people and places in the other case, fortu nately places in the other case, fortunately none of them fatal. in this instance tragically there has been a fatality and there will have to be an inquest and that raises some very difficult and questions for the prime minister and how she should be acting. a european arrest warrant has been issued and should these men travel to the eu they could end up in the uk for prosecution. that is unlikely, it was being suggested in the report that things could be done behind the scenes, things perhaps we do not see in retaliation. in europe the lead
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manager experience having dealt the litvinenko case, could that happen and what could that be? it is not simplya and what could that be? it is not simply a european arrest warrant, there is an international arrest warrant and there is an international arrest warrantand an there is an international arrest warrant and an interpol red notice which means if either of these gentlemen using their real names or lecs travel outside the borders of russia they would be liable to arrest. that's not much of a restriction retaliation given that in the case of the murders of alexander litvinenko one was made an mp and given a medal of honourfor services to the motherland. in case of what is likely to happen behind the scenes i think we know that the united kingdom intends to raise this issue at the security council at the united nations, one would expect that would be with a view to essentially making diplomatic protestations in the hope of potentially building a consensus for action under chapter seven of the un
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charter which could include sanctions or increased sanctions against russia. in reality being a permanent member of the security council russia will have the right of veto over those sanctions so from a diplomatic level the un may find itself paralysed by its own structural imbalance in the decision—making. what we are much more likely to not see in effect is the scenes breakdown of cooperation which is pretty substantial already, but is likely to become absolute. the gru is one organ of the state but it's very likely that these assassinations were authorised politically within the kremlin itself. interesting, thank you very much for being with us. it's interesting that theresa may today said she wants to apply more pressure with this un security council meeting and she has talked about more sanctions but as we've discussed many times there are several european countries that want
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to go the other way when it comes to sanctions, the likes of italy and austria, so whether she can maintain solidarity within europe indeed within the west given the position donald trump has adopted regarding russia, remains to be seen. the us congress would like to do more here but they keep running up against the white house who are less keen so court donated action on a big scale even after these revelations today seems pretty unlikely. a tangential issue also concerning russia. top executives from facebook and twitter have acknowledge they've been too slow to act against fake accounts and political meddling. appearing before us senators today, facebook‘s sheryl sandberg told the hearing they'd learned lessons, and were acting to fix the problem. twitter‘s chief, jack dorsey, said the company had been "ill—equipped" to cope with fake news, as well as the number of campaigns using the site to manipulate public opinion. we found ourselves unprepared and ill—equipped for the immensity of the problems that we have acknowledged. abuse, harassment,
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trawl armies, propaganda through bots andjim and trawl armies, propaganda through bots and jim and coordination, misinformation campaigns and divisive filter bubbles. that's not a healthy public square. worse, a relatively small number of bad faith actors were able to gain twitter to have an outsized impact. and joining us now from capitol hill is the bbc‘s technology correspondent dave lee. was this a good day for the text companies, did they equip themselves well? it's not theirfirst companies, did they equip themselves well? it's not their first time out before members of congress. certainly not, this is the fourth time these detect companies have been brought to the capital building to a nswer been brought to the capital building to answer questions about manipulation and interference on the platforms, they now know the cheat codes, how to talk the way,
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repeating phrases about learning a lot and being slow to react but are getting better at it. what they did not manage to do today particularly convincingly is sure they are going to be completely on top of any threats which may come up during the run—up to the midterms in november. i don't think senators were convinced of that and facebook indeed was asked for almost extra help from the government and law enforcement with some of those challenges. four earrings down, we are not too far along in making much progress. but at least the discussions are ongoing. at one point we saw jack dorsey there, the founder and ceo of twitter, he was askedif founder and ceo of twitter, he was asked if a social media company should represent specifically american values. it might seem to some viewers around the world as a curious question, should companies represent the values of their home country, how did they respond and did it strike you as odd?”
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country, how did they respond and did it strike you as odd? i think it's an interesting line of questioning because there are several different avenues that question has taken. 0n the one hand you have someone question has taken. 0n the one hand you have someone like twitter who wa nt to you have someone like twitter who want to uphold the freedom of speech values but equally it is under pressure to remove people behaving badly on the platform. we have also seen accusations badly on the platform. we have also seen accusations against google who are said to be working more closely with china in a way that perhaps would not align with what people here might think as american values as well. i think what these companies are facing is they have tried all this time and have been successful u p tried all this time and have been successful up to this point at being global companies, having won policy which fits all the market it operates in, know as we are seeing the platform is being manipulated in this way it's almost as if senators are seeing his side are you on? are you an american company supporting american values or not? i think that isa american values or not? i think that is a big question. notable that
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there was no big figure from google today, an empty chair, what went on there? it is what pr professionals would call terrible optics for google today, an empty chair. the committee had asked them to send the chief executive or at the chief executive of google's parent company alphabet but google wanted to send their top lawyer ken walker but the senate said that was not good enough, they wanted someone more senior and google decided they were not going to do that. they were accused must immediately as the hearing got under way of being disappointing and senator mark warner the vice—chairman of the committee the google leadership were showing they did not take this problem seriously. there is a question further down the line of whether there might be a subpoena issued to compel google to send the chief executive using legal routes
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in orderfor that to chief executive using legal routes in order for that to happen. dave, thanks very much. "a con on the public" — that's what president trump says about the latest book to disparage his administration. bob woodward's new tome, fear — trump in the white house — isn't even out yet but it's already rocking washington and it seems the president himself. a string of senior white house officials have condemned the book — including mr trump's defence secretary james mattis, and his chief of staff john kelly, who denies calling the president "an idiot". lets speak to our north america correspondent nick bryant. i suppose one of the things which shines through from this is this idea that the top officials in the administration are almost saving the country from the president himself, we can put up a couple of quotes, this from rob porter, a senior staff are... it is that idea that top officials
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are somehow protecting the country from the president. don't be fooled by the backdrop of bright, sunny weather at the white house because harry kane woodward has just ripped through the city. the recurring theme of fear is that the president's top advisers saw part of theirjob to protect the united states from the president of the united states and repeatedly you have stories of people nabbing documents off his desk, trying to stop him putting his name to policies like unilaterally withdrawing from nafta, ignoring orders like trying to assassinate
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the syrian dictator bashar al—assad. it's this kind of access of adults sometimes that are doing it, people like the defence secretary james mattis, he's been very strong in his denial. he described this book is fiction, i unique brand of washington literature as he put it. but the problem is it's hard to win a credibility contest against bob woodward, he's written about eight presidents, he's been critical of republicans and democrats but has a reputation for being incredibly rigorous and very fair. if you talk to administration officials from the past who have read the books they usually say do you know what, he got it right. and he does in this case he says have hours of tape recordings with the people he interviewed which potentially could back up some of what he is saying, let's play another odd legs another quote from the book. this is a conversation between donald trump
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and tom bossert on his national security team who is trying to explain cyber issues to the president and the president said... again, i've is an unflattering portrait of a president who doesn't particularly wa nt portrait of a president who doesn't particularly want to learn the issues. yes it is a portrait of a president who is intellectually incurious, who is not a full participant in his own presidency, a presidency as we said where senior white house officials are taking it upon themselves to not implement his orders, to not put his actions, his orders, to not put his actions, his orders into action. it paints a portrait of white house in chaos. we have read these books before, fire and fury was a similar thing, but bob woodward as i say is very
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different kettle of fish than the offer of that book and he is very ha rd to offer of that book and he is very hard to tag with the kind of blanket condemnation ofjournalists as fake news. it is telling i think that although donald trump has accused bob woodward of being a democratic operative, he is accused him of a conjob on the operative, he is accused him of a con job on the american people he operative, he is accused him of a conjob on the american people he is not used the phrase fake news which is is go to phrase in situations like this. thanks very much. and of course we are weeks away from the midterms and this book will play into that. as the president deals with the drama from woorward's book, members of his administration are busy doing theirjobs — including the secretary of state. mike pompeo is in pakistan trying to reset fragile relations. it was the first meeting between the new prime minister, imran khan, and a senior american. relations have soured since donald trump's administration cut more than a billion dollars in security assistance earlier this year — accusing pakistan of failing to act decisively against militant groups. let's talk to alyssa ayres —
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a senior fellow focusing on pakistan and the south asia region at the council on foreign relations. iam i am worried it might not make a very big difference, we see a situation in pakistan were over the yea rs situation in pakistan were over the years it's been quite clear that it is the military establishment to have control of the country's foreign and security policies. we have deceived that remains the case, iimagine it have deceived that remains the case, i imagine it would, there is no reason to think otherwise, but there is one benefit to imran khan being in place, somebody who was by all accou nts in place, somebody who was by all accounts the armies favourite candidate. it looks like the moment at least there will not be enormous civil military tension in the country because the military has their favoured choice in country because the military has theirfavoured choice in the minister office. america has or has been a hugely important ally even if
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it's been a tricky relationship for the pakistanis but to what extent now is pakistan starting to think this relationship with america is too complicated, it goes up and down too complicated, it goes up and down too much particularly under this president, we will look elsewhere, particularly the chinese. they have been looking at the chinese, the pakistan china relationship and it strengthens ties are not entirely new, there has been a tendency recently for people to take a look at the china pakistan economic quarter, enormous infrastructure investments china is making in pakistan and see this as a new shift. it's a shift only on the scale of the resources being put towards pakistan but the china pakistan relationship goes back decades so the overall complexity of pakistan and its ties with china is not a new dimension here. the pakistanis would say they are being made a scapegoat for 17 years of american failure in afghanistan, still taliban controlling huge areas of the country, is that a fair criticism? i sure don't think so! i
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think most americans wouldn't think so think most americans wouldn't think so either, there has been ample evidence which shows there are simply has not been enough action taken on the part of pakistan to target the many different terrorist and militant groups that are having and militant groups that are having a safe haven on pakistani territory and which create further problems for bringing about situations of stability in afghanistan and which also create problems for pakistan's relations with india and iran. how well equipped is mike pompeo when it comes to dealing with these issues? when you hear of him and you have seen when you hear of him and you have seen him in action, is he impressive? he has a background as the director of the cia. so he knows what he's dealing with? exactly, there will be no delusions here. i think his messages on the question of pakistan and the central issue here which is the importance for pakistan to tackle this issue of terrorism for the country's own
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good, its own interests, as well as greater stability in the region, i think he will continue with that message. thank you for coming in. they are one of the most famous pair of shoes in the history of cinema. the ruby slippers worn byjudy garland in the wizard of oz, are finally back home. the shoes — insured for $1 million — were stolen from a museum in minnesota 13 years ago, and now they have been found by the fbi. well, 2005 wasn't the first time someone stole the slippers — or at least tried to. have a look at this if you're brave enough. you can have your old slippers but give me back total! i knew you'd see reason. i'm sorry, i didn't do it, cani reason. i'm sorry, i didn't do it, can i still have my dog? no, though aslam, i can i still have my dog? no, though as i am, i should have remembered.
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those slippers will never come off as long as you are alive. is she gone? we have some explaining to do, christian need some therapy now. she's gone, the bad lady has gone. iam she's gone, the bad lady has gone. i am totally phobic about the wicked witch of the west, i've never watched the film, i watched the first ten minutes as a child and its traumatised me because i lived in an area where there were historically which is in the north of england, around pendle. iwatched which is in the north of england, around pendle. i watched this and i was convinced as a child she would come up the drive and i would disappear ina come up the drive and i would disappear in a puff of smoke. so the idea of watching the wicked witch of the west today has brought it all back. i'm still phobic. cani back. i'm still phobic. can i go back and say something, you know which is not real, right? you just said you grew up in an area where there were a lot of which is, they do not pick exist. there has never been a witch like
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the witch in the wizard of oz, the way she swept in on the broom, my nightmares have been full of it. some people it's spiders and snakes, for me it's the wicked witch of the west. this is beyond 100 days from the bbc. coming up for viewers on the bbc news channel and bbc world news — is there any future for a european iran deal? we talk to one of its original negotiators. and why eating out may be about to be ruined forever. that's still to come on beyond 100 days. the weather ‘s been on a gradual
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cooldown since the weekend but still very pleasant, some sunshine as many of us this from hampshire, the satellite pictures shows parts of the country stayed underneath the cloud, some cloud elsewhere but large breaks allowing sunshine, this cloud quite clearly for northern ireland, northern and western scotla nd ireland, northern and western scotland has been producing outbreaks of rain. clearing from northern ireland and scotland in two parts of northern england, north wales and maybe the midlands, turning increasingly like an apache as it does so. the temperatures where clear will dip into single figures, after the rain in single scotla nd figures, after the rain in single scotland down to single figures. tomorrow's weather starts dry and sunny for many of us, showers developing in scotland, some heavy possibly thundery and some for northern ireland and northern england with sunny spells. it might start cloudy and damp with patchy
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rain, that feeds further south during the day saw the picture at 4pm still has sunshine and warmth into east anglia and south east england but thicker cloud across much of south west england, wales and the midlands and patchy rain or and the midlands and patchy rain or a few showers moving through. north across much of northern england, northern england and scotland it's broken cloud, sunny spells but showers particularly in scotland which can be quite heavy and rumbles of thunder. looking at the big picture as we go from thursday to friday developing early low pressure sta rts friday developing early low pressure starts to take shape in the north sea and if you are closest to that it will be much cooler and breezy and there will be rain around. uncertainty in the detail but most likely to see rain in parts of eastern scotland into north—east england, also a spell of rain affecting some of us in the northern isles, elsewhere although it's a breezy day, it's a cooler feeling day, many of us could remain dry with some sunny spells around but those temperatures have come down a
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little bit further. as we look at the picture for the weekend, low pressure caused by particularly in scotland, cloud and patchy rain and the structural system taking a spell of rain. keeping it quite cool and breezy, at the moment it looks like sunday will be more dry, showers and sunny spells. this is beyond 100 days. with me katty kay in washington, christian fraser is in london our top stories. two men named by police as suspects in the nerve agent attack in salisbury on a former russian spy are officers in the russian military intelligence service, the gru. is the nuclear deal with iran all but dead without the united states? we speak to one of the lead negotiators to see what comes next. coming up in the next half hour: donald trump's pick for the supreme court brett kavanaugh, is questioned on how far he thinks presidential powers should be allowed to go. plans to make all restaurants show the number of calories of everything on the menu — will it tackle obesity orjust ruin the experience of eating out?
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let us know your thoughts by using the hashtag ‘beyond—one—hundred—days‘. so we now know that the two assassins sent to south west england in march, to poison former spy sergei skripal, were active officers in russian military intelligence. prosecutors have accused the men of attempted murder. the counterterrorism police have pored through thousands of hours of cctv footage, and have cross—referenced the results with passport data. today they produced a detailed timeline of events together with a photograph of a perfume bottle that was used to carry novichok nerve agent. at 3pm on friday the 2nd of march, the two suspects arrived at gatwick airport having flown from moscow on an aeroflot flight. from there police think they travelled by train into london, arriving at victoria station at around 5.40pm on the same day. the two suspects then travelled on public transport to waterloo station,
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making their way to the city stay hotel in bow road, east london, where they stayed on the friday night. the next day they left the hotel and took the tube to waterloo station, from where they caught a train to salisbury, arriving at approximately at 2.25 in the afternoon. they returned to london on the saturday. but the following day they returned back to salisbury. its believed they then placed the deadly novichok nerve agent on the front door of the skripals' house, before leaving the scene, and going back to russia. jon kay has the latest from salisbury. exactly six months to the week since sergei skripal was apparently attacked here at his home in salisbury. the police tents are still there and it is still a crime scene. for those six months people have only had that property to look at and they have wondered how much do the police know about what happened here and who carried out this attack and why, what has gone on? there was lots of frustration that there wasn't more information
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and cynicism as well about progress and then today, i think people are quite overwhelmed by the amount of information and the amount of images they've suddenly got in front of them. pictures of the two suspects, pictures of these two men flying into london, flying out of london a couple of days later and seen on the streets of salisbury before and after the moment of this apparent attack at the skripals' home. pictures finally of the perfume bottle, the fake perfume bottle which is believed to have contained the novichok. and questions for the community. did anybody see that bottle between it being used at the skripals' residence in march and then been found in a bin by charlie rowley and contaminating him and his girlfriend dawn sturgess in june. where was it in between? the police will be hoping these images, in a way provide some of the answers and some reassurance for people in this community but it might also prompt more information, more evidence to come forward. i think people here also want to know what happens now? if it is highly unlikely these two
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men will be extradited and face the charges, that there will be a court case, people here will want to know, what happens? where does this go, how does it end? i think almost as many questions tonight as there were at the beginning of the day before this information was released. as he said, a lot more questions, both about, this is interesting after such a long investigation and there are things we don't know about there are things we don't know about the details but i guess dubbed the biggest question is what happens now? what can the uk do to try and make sure this doesn't happen any more on british soil, having it happened twice in the last decade? will we be maintaining the same solidarity we have seen so far in
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europe and washington because congress is happy to put those sanctions in place and there are more coming in november but no such inclination from the president. he doesn't like the sanctions. it will be interesting to see the response she gets if this security council meeting is held. president trump is to chair meeting on iran at the un security council later this month to highlight what he claims are the country's "violations of international law". the 2015 iran agreement secured a long—term deal on the country's nuclear programme with the us, uk, france, china, russia and germany. it came after years of tension over iran's alleged efforts to develop a nuclear weapon. president trump has been less than complimentary about the deal, calling it "horrible" but he also says he's willing to meet with iran. the iran deal was a ridiculous deal. i do believe they will probably end up wanting to meet and i am ready to meet any time they want to. and i don't do that from strength or from weakness, i think it is an appropriate thing to do. if we could work something
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out that is meaningful, not the waste of paper that the other deal was, i would certainly be willing to meet. joining us is baroness cathy ashton, who spent four years chairing the negotiations that led to the iran deal. welcome to the studio. when you finalise the deal with iran and you are finalise the deal with iran and you a re pretty finalise the deal with iran and you are pretty much to the end, did you do it in the knowledge it was imperfect? it was a deal but said it would do what it said on the tin, which was to give a peaceful nature in the uranium programme. it had a very effect for monitoring system. people forget it was a deal only designed to do that one thing and it did it. where i think some of the grave concerns about iran go much more broad and are real. in must
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frustrate you after the blood, sweat and tears that went into this long negotiation that is being unpicked. president macron has signalled he wa nts to president macron has signalled he wants to keep it alive but is it possible to keep the deal alive when the us is applying so much pressure? at the us is really important to the agreement, without question. the elements for the iranians were very significant, was the opportunities they would get for the economy and back comes down to the right kind of business environment where business feels comfortable to invest. if they feels comfortable to invest. if they feel it is not worth it or they think there will be consequences to their interesting, they won't. so it is not dead, it is on life support? it is challenging for the other countries. but also what was lost was the collaboration between the p five which i think is unique in this
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context. we showed the clip of donald trump speaking a few minutes ago in the white house and one of the other things he said in the course of that, was that iran is a much different place than when i took over the presidency. i don't know how much you follow the internal workings of iran still, is the president right about that and could it make every working of the deal more or less likely? when you spend a number of years working on an agreement, i worked on it to two regimes. you get an estimation in a sense of what you think is possible and practical. the agreement that was reached was a good agreement for the purposes for which it was set up. ithink the purposes for which it was set up. i think it is hard to see how you can go forward without recognising that all of that work took considerable time and effort
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and the importance of the other countries who are engaged with it as well. it is hard to see how we go forward with a new agreement without recognising what we have lost. the president also said he would be prepared to meet the iranian leaders so prepared to meet the iranian leaders so do you think president trump meeting the iranian leaders might help? he was very keen to tout the singapore summit where he met kim jong—un of north korea?|j singapore summit where he met kim jong-un of north korea? i have a lwa ys jong-un of north korea? i have always been in favour of people meeting but from the iranian perspective it will be interesting to see how they view any such meeting. from their viewpoint, they will think they have negotiated on good faith with the us and now they are ina good faith with the us and now they are in a different place. if this does collapse, do you get the sense they will return to this programme very quickly? you should never
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speculate about what people will do in circumstances we didn't foresee at the time. we were conscious there we re at the time. we were conscious there were people with different viewpoints on this agreement... within iran? but more broadly other issues that were not tackled within the agreement and deliberately so. we're very grateful your time. it is interesting when we talk about iran in the context of korea, if they had half a deal they secured on iran in korea, people would be cock—a—hoop? that is what we have heard from people on this programme from people who watch the north korean programme that the chances of getting any deal with the north koreans are minimal to start with, but the fact the north koreans are watching closely what has happened in iran is also true. they know you can do a deal
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and it can get reversed and that would make the likelihood of the north korean signing up to anything along these lines less likely than it might have been if the americans had stuck with the jcp away. earlier we discussed the fallout from bob woodward's explosive book about the trump administratiion. welljust a short time ago the president responded while meeting with the emir of kuwait in the oval office. the book is a work of fiction. if you look at his past, he has had similar problems. but we have done more than any other administration in less than two years. it would be easy to dismiss this book if there wasn't so many quotes attributed to so many officials within the administration. and apart from bob woodward, the people have spoken to officials bob woodward spoken to officials bob woodward spoke to and he also says he has
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tape—recording is and memorandums, so tape—recording is and memorandums, so he has other documentation that he could potentially produce now the president has treated it is time to change the libel laws in the light of this book. maybe it is because the president is concerned bob woodward will produce those tapes, but it would have an impact on producing those tapes. something else the president is looking at... if brett kavanaugh is confirmed to the us supreme court he will arguably have more impact on american life than donald trump and indeed whoever succeeds him as president. at the age of 53, he potentially has another 30 years on the bench in what is a lifetime appointment. so, after they got through now familiar protests, senators today did try to drill down into what mr kavanaugh actually believes about some of the most controversial issues in america. they asked about gun control and abortion and the power of the president. mr kava naugh‘s answers were cautious and well rehearsed, so how much did we actually learn? let's find out from jonathan turley.
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i sat watching the hearings, once we got past the protest, past the democrat's protest and i wondered, what is the point of this? we will have two days of rigorous questioning and we know which way the senators will vote and we know mr kavanaugh is not going to say very much, so what is the point?m has the warmth and understanding of a shotgun wedding. everyone is in theirfor a shotgun wedding. everyone is in their for a a shotgun wedding. everyone is in theirfor a different a shotgun wedding. everyone is in their for a different purpose than their for a different purpose than the outcome. a lot of democrats who wa nt to the outcome. a lot of democrats who want to run for president and a lot of people running interference for the current president. in fairness of mr kavanaugh, his non—ansah a nswe rs a re of mr kavanaugh, his non—ansah answers are not that dissimilar than other democratic nominees. they use a rule that you shouldn't have to a nswer a rule that you shouldn't have to answer questions about an issue that might come before you. well any
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issue can come before you. it has reduced these hearings into a bizarre form. they have got less and less su bsta nce bizarre form. they have got less and less substance to it. what you see is therefore the senators, that is what the senators daily—macro hearings are about. it is a shame, given how important this man is going to be. he was asked about the idea of subpoenaing the president, from one of the democrats. can a sitting president be required to respond to a subpoena? that is a hypothetical question and it is a matter for the canons of judicial independence. i can't give you an answer on that hypothetical question. i think we heard mr kavanaugh said this is a hypothetical question, but it might not be a hypothetical question with this president? mr kavanaugh is known to be deferential
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to executive power. his stiff opposition is in article two. so every expectation is he is a good replacement for president trump. but it is hard to treat these as hypotheticals when you have a president who is basically running around the capital with his hair on fire. he is tweeting about this book, about the investigation and it makes this less hypothetical than it would normally be. it is also careful and deliberate, that it got me thinking has he been careful and deliberate to his entire career? at what point are you on the fast—track to the bench of the supreme court and does it influence the decisions you make thereafter? mr kavanaugh has been groomed for this moment, much likejohn has been groomed for this moment, much like john roberts has been groomed for this moment, much likejohn roberts was groomed. he has always been quite cautious. the interesting thing is he has let his guard down on a couple of occasions. and when he has it has
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caused him a great deal of trouble. at one point he suggested he agreed with roe v wade, antagonistic towards robi wade with the right to choose. he also suggested this famous case, against nixon, might be wrong. when he has lowered the guard, there was a great deal revealed and much of these hearings is his effort to try and control these moments. thank you very much for coming in, we will be watching those hearings for the rest of the week to see if we can learn anything at all. this is beyond 100 days. still to come — restaurant menus in the uk could soon help you with that calorie count. but not everyone is so pleased about printing the numbers. uk mps are expected to vote later on government's plans to ban what's known as upskirting — when a photo or video is secretly taken up a woman's skirt. some mps are backing an amendment
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to the proposed law, which would see misogyny classed as a hate crime, meaning those convicted of upskirting could face tougher sentences. sima kotecha reports. being harassed for being a woman. it happened to rosie. we were dancing sort of in a group with all my friends and there was these guys literally just going along and swiping everyone's bums as they went along. and now some politicians want tough punishments for those guilty of misogyny — the hatred, contempt or prejudice of women. someone just seeing you as an object completely, as if they're just allowed to touch you in whatever way they feel appropriate. they have not thought about your feelings, your emotions, or you as a person. this evening, mps are due to vote on amending a new bill that would ban secretly taking pictures up women's skirts. the change would include misogyny as an aggravating factor. what we really want to do, because we know it is not just about upskirting, is to have a review of hate crime and include misogyny in that, so we can say to men and women equally, you can walk
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the streets without fear. two years ago, police here in nottinghamshire became the first force in the country to start recording cases of suspected misogyny as a hate crime. the local university has analysed nottinghamshire police's data to see how the pilot went. our responses were overwhelmingly positive. of those that reported, 100% said they would report again and 75% had a very positive experience from the police and the key thing is that women feel like the police are taking them seriously at last about this issue. but some people have raised questions around equality, asking whether hatred of men should also be a hate crime. if the amendment is passed, it could be a huge challenge for the courts — how to prove where male inappropriate behaviour ends and hatred of women begins. the department of health here in the uk is thinking of making
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it compulsory for restaurants to put calorie counts on menus. but some business owners are worried about the cost implication, estimated to be up to £500 for each dish on a menu. the government says the plan could help tackle child obesity, and make people more aware of what they're eating, but does counting the calories take the fun out of a night out? we've put together a quick quiz. here are five different foods. we have a pizza, a chicken korma — my personal favourites, a sushi set and katty‘s favourite combination — seafood pasta and a chocolate souffle. which of these foods would you say is the one with the highest calories? well a whole pizza of course has the most calories, but consider the competitors, that sushi actually has more calories than my chocolate souffle. but does this make it healthier? well let's talk more
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about that with the fitness blogger lucy mountain, who's here in the studio. said this idea of putting calories and food information on a menu, it is designed to make consumers make a more informed choice? it is positive that we are starting to become more informed with food choices and we are getting more information about the food we eat. but equally it is important to take a wider approach with our food. there important to take a wider approach with ourfood. there is more to important to take a wider approach with our food. there is more to food than just its calorie content. with our food. there is more to food thanjust its calorie contentlj thanjust its calorie content.” have learned a lot, i have to say because i have been looking at your instagram account. i thought gi was an american soldier but it stands for glycaemic index. it is a marker
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which can be useful in certain foods and for certain groups of people that often it is taken out of context. like with calories, we cannot just look at one context. like with calories, we cannotjust look at one aspect of food and think, this is healthy, this is not healthy. you are disappointing me now because i want to show the gi index of two foods. i wa nt to to show the gi index of two foods. i want to show snicker bar and a parsnip. i don't like parsnips but i do likea parsnip. i don't like parsnips but i do like a snicker bar. so the snicker has a low gi and the parsnip has a high gi. can i eat as many snicker bars as i once? it is another example why people demonise chocolate bars and different things and it is important we look at the wider context. with things like
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vegeta bles wider context. with things like vegetables and things we deem more virtuous, we put them on a pedestal but equally there is nothing necessarily bad about having a bit of chocolate or chocolate souffl or sushi and things like that.” of chocolate or chocolate souffl or sushi and things like that. i would have thought it complicates the information you put on a menu? i know, because i love the point you make on your instagram feed you have to be eating a lot of broccoli to get x amount of protein and not much peanut butter to get a protein, so it questions whether food is efficient in delivering the things that are good for us. it is more complicated than a number on a restau ra nt complicated than a number on a restaurant menu might lead us to believe? definitely. it is useful information, but it is important we look at our diets in the wider context. looking at single foods and single meals can be really useful to determine whether it is going to be appropriate at that point in time.
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but a chocolate bar in a day of nutrient dense foods and hitting our micronutrient requirements, does it make the chocolate bar bad? does it mean you have had something you have enjoyed and you are having a balanced diet? i have learned a lot from your instagram account so thank you for coming in. i am from your instagram account so thank you for coming in. iam not convinced that if i go to the chip shop i want to know what calories are in what i am eating. if i go to the chip shop i have made an informed choice that it will probably not be good to me. you also somebody who cycles 100 miles, so you shouldn't be worried about a trip to the chip shop. i love lucy because she has just told me not to worry about eating my chocolates souffl . and it is interesting how you get your energy from food. there
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isa you get your energy from food. there is a whole range of illnesses associated with eating issues, i'm worried i'll be doing a disservice to our kids. this is kind of related... now, how would you react as a parent, if you were offered airbrushing in the school photo of your five year—old child? this makes my blood boil. that's exactly what happened to one dad in dallas. he posted this picture on twitter — see circled in red, the offer of retouching, which promises to smooth skin and whiten teeth. all for the bargain price of $12. ‘cos that's exactly what preschoolers need. not. my my daughter is 12 and she is going off to school today. i spotted this item on twitter and she is having her school photo taken today. what we should be teaching our children is exactly the opposite of the fact
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they need to look perfect. what image are we setting them up for it we are saying, you're not quite perfect enough, so for $12 and we will buy perfection but it is only superficial on how you luck with your teeth and your skin. it is bonkers. i wonder what they were bake—offjunior fraser who goes to school with his shirt out, pen down his front and his hair all over the place. it is more realistic, more realistic of the person he is and thatis realistic of the person he is and that is the whole point. if we try and encourage our children to be perfect we are doing the wrong things. when i did my research on confidence in girls, it is the desire to be perfect and when it comes to things like social media, even as young as five, girls are aware of social media and if they think they have to look perfect, pa rents a re think they have to look perfect, parents are somehow colluding in this idea they had to look perfect, it sets them up with the wrong m essa g es it sets them up with the wrong messages about taking risks and trying to do things that make them
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look less perfect like athletes, running and getting dirty. clearly, we didn't like that idea. no, if we still had our football cards, we didn't like that idea. no, if we still had ourfootball cards, that would be getting a red card. anyway, thank you for being with us, we will see you have the same time. our weather has been on a gradual call cooldown since the weekend. this was sent in earlier from hampshire. the satellite picture shows part of east anglia and sowerby ‘s england stayed under the cloud. large breaks allowing sunshine but you can pick—up this area of cloud clearly from northern ireland, northern and western scotla nd ireland, northern and western scotland which has been producing some outbreaks of rain. hearing from northern ireland and scotland eventually into the night away bridges into northern england, north wales and maybe the midlands later turning light and patchy as it does
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so. turning light and patchy as it does so. as for the temperatures they will be dipping into single figures, after the rain in eastern scotland, down to four or 5 degrees. tomorrow sta rts down to four or 5 degrees. tomorrow starts dry and sunny for many, showers developing in scotland. some heavy and possibly thundery and some in northern ireland and northern england with sunny spells. the south sta rts england with sunny spells. the south starts dumper patchy rain about feeds further south during the day so feeds further south during the day so the picture at 4pm still has sunshine but that the cloud across sub listing of time, wales and the midlands and patchy rain and a few showers moving through. across much of northern england, northern ireland scotland, broken cloud and sunny spells but though showers in scotla nd sunny spells but though showers in scotland could be heavy and there could be rumbles of thunder. as we look at the big picture from thursday to friday, the developing area of low pressure starts to take shape in the north sea and you are closest to that it will be much
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cooler, more breezy and there will be rain around. some uncertainty of the detail but most likely to see rain across parts of eastern scotla nd rain across parts of eastern scotland into north east england and a spell of rain affecting some in the northern isles. elsewhere, it is breezy, a cooler feeling the northern isles. elsewhere, it is breezy, a coolerfeeling day, many could remain dry with some sunny spells around but yesterday's temperatures have come down further. as we look at the picture for the weekend, low pressure close by, particularly in scotland. this frontal system working from perhaps northern ireland across england and wales taking a spell of rain. keeping it quite cool and breezy and at the moment, it looks like sunday will be the driest, still a few showers and some sunny spells. this is bbc news. i'm carole walker. the headlines at 8pm: two russian intelligence officers are named as suspects in the poisoning of former spy sergei skripal and his daughter yulia in salisbury.
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after an extensive study of cctv and other images, scotland yard says there's sufficient evidence to charge the two men. the two individuals named by the police and cps are officers from the russian military intelligence service, also known as the gru. we are three friends, we're also bloggers. we all have one thing in common — we all have or have had cancer. the bbc 5 live presenter rachael bland dies at the age of a0 — less than two years after being diagnosed with breast cancer. labour's parliamentary party agrees to adopt the international
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