Skip to main content

tv   Breakfast  BBC News  September 6, 2018 6:00am-8:31am BST

6:00 am
good morning. welcome to breakfast, with naga munchetty and jon kay. our headlines today: the men accused of the salisbury novichok attack. the uk aims to turn up the heat on russia at the un security council. the pair are believed to be members of russia's military intelligence. we will be live in moscow with reaction. a truce in the scallop wars, but some british fishermen say it is a victory for the french. a new energy price cap will be announced in the next hour. it is hoped it will cut the bills of millions of customers who don't shop around. the world's largest offshore windfarm officially opens today. it covers an area bigger than the island ofjersey, and will generate enough electricity for 500,000 homes. i will show you how it works. just thinking about it gives him goosebumps. ian poulter makes europe's ryder cup team as one of the captain's wild cards. and talking goosebumps, a rather cold start to your thursday morning.
6:01 am
while many will get to work dry, cut her and see it will stay that way as we will see rain pushing in from the west. i will have your full forecast here on break. —— wreckers. —— brea kfast. it is thursday 6 september. our top story: british and russian officials will come face—to—face as the un security council discusses the novichok attack, after theresa may said moscow agents were behind the poisoning. police and prosecutors announced they have enough evidence to charge the men over the poisoning in salisbury in march. lucinda adam has more. we now know the faces of the two russian men accused of the novichok poisonings. it is understood british police may know their true identities, but cctv shows them arriving in the uk under the names alexander petrov and ruslan boshirov. they are seen travelling to salisbury, where it is believed they used this fake perfume bottle to deploy the novichok nerve agent, which would later kill dawn sturgess and contaminate her partner, charlie rowley. theresa may said months
6:02 am
of investigation show this was not a rogue operation. the men are officers of russia's military intelligence service, the gru. the actions of the gru are a threat to all our allies and to all our citizens. and on the basis of what we have learnt in the salisbury investigation, and what we know about this organisation more broadly, we must now step up our collective efforts, specifically against the gru. moscow said the two suspects mean nothing to them, and accused britain of manipulating information — this the response on the facebook page of their foreign ministry. the woman on the right, maria zakharova, is their head of communications. to reveal so much detail of the investigation so publicly is designed to increase diplomatic pressure on russia. the uk wants more european sanctions, but must struggle to convince eu allies. britain and france have agreed the principles of a deal that
6:03 am
would end a dispute over scallop fishing in the english channel. boats from both countries collided with each other during confrontations last week when french fishermen accused british boats of fishing unfairly. here is our environment correspondent claire marshall. heading out from brixham, a very different boat to the huge dredgers that left from this same harbour last week, and clashed with french fishermen. we were taken to a secret location with divers that gather scallops by hand. they showed us their technique. there is no large machinery involved. they select the right ones, and leave the rest. there is another way to get scallops that leaves the sea bed intact, and the growing success of businesses like this shows that more and more people are caring about how their scallops are fished. if you don't leave sort of enough breeding stock to breed, then you can't keep fishing. and this so—called scallop war is about dredging, industrial boats that catch huge amounts. the british were fishing legally,
6:04 am
but french fishermen say they will leave them with no catch in the bay de seine this year. this blue boat is a 200—ton british trawler, crashing into a french boat. british fishermen say these smaller vessels deliberately got in their way. it took four hours of negotiations, but a deal of sorts was done. i'm very pleased that we've negotiated a deal that satisfies the honour of both sides, that our fishermen will be fishing where they want to fish, the larger vessels and the smaller vessels, and from i october. this is brixham harbour. locally caught scallops are being sorted. there is scepticism about the plan. the level of compensation wasn't decided. that is down to a summit in paris on friday. all british scallop boats have been asked to voluntarily stay away from the contested area until a formal deal is signed. so, at the moment, it is up to the skippers whether or not to comply.
6:05 am
claire marshall, bbc news, brixham. a senior white house official has claimed that members of the trump administration deliberately hinder some of the president's actions in an effort to curtail his impulsive behaviour. writing anonymously in the new york times, the source portrays a sense of chaos in the white house. the president has dismissed the opinion piece as gutless, calling the newspaper phony, as chris buckler reports. each day seems to bring new claims about what is happening behind the doors of this white house, and the unconventional president in charge here. the new york times says it was a senior official in donald trump's own administration who wrote its damning opinion piece, although the author insisted on remaining anonymous. they claim the president's leadership style is impetuous, adversarial, petty and ineffective, that many are working diligently from within to frustrate parts of his own agenda and his worst inclinations, and that the root of the problem is the president's amorality. and god bless you,
6:06 am
and thank you, mr president. mr trump was meeting a group of sheriffs when he was forced to answer questions about keeping control, in what has been painted as a lawless white house. if the failing new york times has an anonymous editorial — can you believe it? anonymous, meaning gutless, a gutless editorial. we're doing a greatjob. the poll numbers are through the roof. 0ur poll numbers are great, and guess what. nobody is going to come close to beating me in 2020, because of what we've done. but fear, a new book written by bob woodward, one of the journalists who exposed the watergate scandal, is making similar allegations — that many are working to protect america from its president. the new york times said it was proud to publish the piece, which it insisted gave the public
6:07 am
a real insight into the workings of the trump administration, from someone in a position to know. a strong earthquake injapan‘s northern island of hokkaido has caused a landslide, engulfing several houses. nearly 50 people have been injured and at least 32 are missing. 3 million buildings are without power. japan's prime minister, shinzo abe, says his government has set up a sea rch—and—rescue taskforce. a cap on energy prices is expected to be announced within the next hour. the energy regulator, 0fgem, says it is to protect customers who don't shop around, but remain on their supplier's standard variable tariff, and end up paying more than they should. the cap will come into effect in december, and will be reviewed and updated every six months. 0fgem says the move will benefit 11 million customers in england, scotland and wales. ben is at a windfarm in cumbria this morning. what more do we know? it is interesting you are there, when you talk about renewables and how that might actually come into
6:08 am
how that might actually come into how much we are paying for our energy. yes, you are right. i mean, the challenge here is for the big energy firms to still be able to make a profit as a result of this. they have objected to the idea of an energy price cap, they say it will limit their ability to make a profit. but essentially you ran through the details that. we knew that this was coming, at 7am this morning is when we will get the detail of what level that cap will be set at. as you say, affecting 60% of households currently on what is known as a standard variable tariff, and that for most customers is the most expensive tariff that those firms off. and so in the conservative party manifesto they said they were prepared to issue a cap, a limit on how much customers could be charged as a maximum over the course of the year. so we will get the detail of how much that cap will be a little later. but for the big firms themselves and the big
6:09 am
energy suppliers, they have objected to it. the government says if you are viable and well—run business this will not affect your ability to make a profit, and expect a lot of reaction to that when we get the news at 7am this morning. later we will be speaking to 0fgem's chief exectutive. that is at 8:10am. english heritage is asking for the public‘s help in identifying world war i nurses who served at england's first wartime country house hospital. no formal records exist for many of the women who worked at wrest park, in bedfordshire, but it is hoped they will be recognised by relatives in photographs which have been transformed into colour. jane—frances kelly reports. no formal records have ever existed of these nurses, who answered a call to serve at this wartime country hospital. they are in effect the forgotten women of the first world war. now, this recollection of black—and—white photographs have been transformed into colour, in the hope they will help people to
6:10 am
recognise the faces that feature in them, and the stories they tell. after the outbreak of the war, wrest park in bedfordshire was offered directly to winston churchill as a co nvalescence directly to winston churchill as a convalescence home. but as casualties mounted on the western front, it was transformed into a much—needed hospital, with an operating theatre and x—ray equipment. despite looking relaxed in many of the photographs, the women worked long, emotionally draining shifts. we hope to find out more about these incredible images. we have had a great group of volu nteers we have had a great group of volunteers at wrest park but we had hit a brick wall. we can't find out anything more about these nurses. it is remarkable converting a black—and—white photo into colour. it brings a whole new life, a sense of humanity to these pictures. 1600 men were treated on the hospital's awards before a fire broke out in september 1916, forcing it to close. the unofficial way it was established and its sudden closure meant no proper records were kept of the 100 plus nurses who had worked
6:11 am
here. english heritage hope identifying them will highlight the enormous contribution women made to the war effort. so get in touch with english heritage if you recognise any of those pictures. we want to follow up with some real names and details of those people. we will talk about one of my favourite subjects. i was avidly waiting for this announcement. pleased with the wild ca rd announcement. pleased with the wild card picks thomas bjorn has gone for. he embodies the ryder cup, he has so much passion and a great present in the team. that is one of the reasons he would have been picked. you are fully behind his inclusion? yes. when the ryder cup rolls round, he is someone you want on the team.
6:12 am
ian poulter‘s ryder cup record earned him a place in the team. he has helped europe win the cup four times. he said it meant absolutely everything for bjorn to pick him as one of his wildcards. novak djokovic made it into the semi—finals of the us open by beating john millman, the man who knocked out roger federer. djokovic will face kei nishikori. and, after naomi 0saka also made it through, japan have a man and a woman in the semi—finals of a grand slam for the first time. and ryan giggs takes charge of his first competitive match as wales manager tonight. they play the republic of ireland in the uefa nations league. that is a new tournament that uefa have introduced, the idea being... do you remember we used to have lots of dud friendlies which didn't matter too much. the idea of this is a new tournament, so we actually have something to play for, and lesser nations can qualify for the euros. it is replacing the old dud
6:13 am
friendlies. so it all matters. there is something on the line. it should have mattered anyway. they should be playing or pride. we will look at the stories dominating the papers in a moment. here is matt with a look at this morning's weather. did you say there would be goosebumps? for some. a little bit on the chilly start and temperatures down on what you would expect but for many a lovely start to the day, the picture behind me is a hint of what is to come. some rain developing here and there. while we have the clear skies across many areas, these clumps of cloud into the north—west highlands will bring showers, stuff bring ireland bringing longer spells of rain. clipping the south of northern ireland this morning spreading into parts of wales. as many of you start the day dry, noticed the blue developing and that brain sliding across affecting south—west england and the midlands. towards is anglia towards the afternoon, looking at the details, the band is fragmented,
6:14 am
the details, the band is fragmented, the rain will come and go. heading further north, midlands, best chance of some sunshine to the afternoon but a scattering of showers across northern england and scotland, some of those could be on the heavy side, a chance of the odd rumble of thunder. the northerly breeze is not especially strong but cool, temperatures around 12— 15 degrees across scotland and northern ireland. some showers into the evening rush hour, some evening rain across parts of it is anglia that will clear tonight. rain into eastern part of scotland but in between we see clearer skies the temperatures dropping into low single figures in the countryside, these ideal city 70 —— these are your city centre temperatures. for tomorrow, still low pressure and thatis tomorrow, still low pressure and that is what bringing —— what is bringing outbreaks of rain. to the east of us, cool north—westerly wind and persistent rain across the east coast of scotland sliding across the
6:15 am
north and north—east england may have a wet time from mid—morning onwards. away from it, a few showers running down from that restart if you live across the cheshire gap towards the midlands. some of the south will stay dry and have a brighter day then you do today. temperatures in the breeze held back somewhat, particularly when you are out in the sun, at best, 19— 20 degrees in the south—east corner. into the weekend, a low pressure nearby, another system pushing in, a quick look at what is to expect. if you have any plans, southern areas looking less likely to have rain. how much rain on the south coast is open to uncertainty, further north probably your brightest day of the weekend with a few showers around but still on the poolside. sunday, still seem showers around this time around central and northern areas, southern areas having a dry and bright afternoon but still a bit on the breezy side, at least by sunday
6:16 am
temperatures should be up a few degrees on what we should have today. i'll be back with more in the morning. it is just after quarter past six, let's look at the front pages of. —— front pages. let's take a look at today's papers. there is just one story in town, the russian nationals who've been named as suspects in the attempted murder of the skripals. the daily mail is among several papers to carry a cctv image showing the two walking through salisbury after the attack in march. the sun uses the same headline as the mail calling the suspects "smiling assassins". the telegraph carries a different image and quotes whitehall sources saying the pair were part of a russian military intelligence squad. that will be the case that they will
6:17 am
ta ke to that will be the case that they will take to the un today. the daily express says the men are believed to be in russia and unlikely to stand trial in a british court. the paper also has a picture of the bbc presenter rachael bland, who died yesterday from breast cancer. and there was a huge reaction to rachael's death on social media yesterday. bbc radio five live posted this tribute to her. she was a familiar voice on the station and also co—hosted ‘you, me and the big c', a podcast about cancer. we'll be talking to her co—hosts later. a lot of love for rachel in this building because she worked in this building. that morning to you john, what you have in the papers? alastair cook, the former england captain, announced his retirement so the last match in the series against india will be his last. expect some tea rs. india will be his last. expect some tears. interesting at the end here, sirmick tears. interesting at the end here, sir mickjagger of rolling tears. interesting at the end here, sir mick jagger of rolling stones fame what has offered £20,000 to a
6:18 am
cricket charity if any player scores a century or takes a five wicket haul. is that unusual? i have not heard of that before. i've not come across that. he is a cricket fan and he maybe he thinks it will galvanise the players or make it look more interesting, but he has offered to donate money to charity if somebody scores a century. it will certainly bring some satisfaction. sorry everybody! will you redeem yourself? a dispute with a danish football tea m a dispute with a danish football team over money and commercial rights and the financial reasons, let's say. a number of the first—team players will not be playing for their country, but, they will have to pick five aside players. because they are playing in
6:19 am
this nation ‘s league, they could face wales and it means that wales potentially face an easier side and if the dispute is resolved then they go on to play the republic of ireland. the irish fans are seething that they will potentially face a much tougher team when they come around to playing them. mickjagger needs to come to the rescue, doesn't he? he could transform all sorts of sports. i love this in the sun today. 0liver having a birthday party in norfolk, you know they have those foam bullets that you get, they are having a battle in the back garden, neighbours thought it was real gunfire, called the police, we'll cops turned up and it turned out not to be not that. which is weird, they don't make proper noises? i have never shot one. only
6:20 am
real bullets for her! who do you think rules the roost in the garden, which bird? robin. blackbird, that makes a lot of noise of. the sparrow. makes a lot of noise of. the sparrow. it is the biggest bully in the garden. size does matter because the garden. size does matter because the bigot you are of these smaller birds, they get the best grain. they have done an experiment where they have done an experiment where they have put out bird feed and see who gets the best, tastiest morsels, the house sparrow wins, if you are a blue—chip you will not win, you get the nest —— the less nutritious seeds. the dregs of. we are getting to that time of year where we start to that time of year where we start to think about putting bird feed it out into the garden. who would have thought the smallest of the most power? we could all work on something from that. no comment. it
6:21 am
is 21 minutes past six. as we know it's been a record breaking summer, the joint hottest on record in fact, and although we've been enjoying the increased temperatures, they've raised a few questions. how much of the good weather can be attributed to climate change? and is this year's heatwave a sign of things to come? graham satchell has been to the met office to get some answers. now we officially know it has been a joint hottest summer on record, what does this year ‘s heatwave tell us about the future? this is where they crunched the numbers, the met office in exeter. it wasn'tjust a hot summer, but a sign of things to come. we are seeing a change in climate and climate in the uk has warmed by just climate and climate in the uk has warmed byjust under a degree over the last 50 years or so. with a warming climate, we do expect the number of hot days and heatwave incidences to increase going into
6:22 am
the future. those sorts of conditions may become more normal for the 2040s. if what we saw in the climate this summer becomes more normal, the impact will be felt everywhere. food, for example, is it already expected to be 5% more expensive this year. building regulations may have to change to protect vulnerable people with heart and lung problems. scuttles will have to plan for summary emergencies. and there are other impacts. it is generally meant that we have seen higher numbers of jellyfish, bluefin tuna. we have certainly recorded more minke whales taking west channels in the oceans and we have recorded hundreds of dolphins. these pictures were taken off the dorset coast this summer. and this remarkable shot is a
6:23 am
thrasher shack in the english channel is more commonly found in the atlantic. the explosion of another of jellyfish, the atlantic. the explosion of another ofjellyfish, like these, means we have seen more another ofjellyfish, like these, means we have seen more unusual visitors to this coast. this is a sunfish. but a warmer sea is not good for everything, the white beet dolphin has suffered a. they are a coldwater species, their stronghold is being in the north sea, so we have to start thinking about this lower edge of this population is range and what impact high see tempertaures will have. we need to think about other threats that may be potentially contracting these species and trying to limit those as best as possible so we are not imposing too much pressure and threats onto the species. so are we ready for more frequent heatwaves? report this summer by a group of mps says that from the environment to transport, environment to health,
6:24 am
not enough is being done. iam not i am not surprised people are asking questions now. we are told that we will be getting hotter summers and there is talk we may even get warm weather in the autumn, and you can see things changing. i was lucky enough, i came away from a few days abroad, came away yesterday and as we we re abroad, came away yesterday and as we were flying into heathrow you could see the scorched land from the summerandi could see the scorched land from the summer and i haven't seen that in yea rs. summer and i haven't seen that in years. i have a question, are those jellyfish still bear? they look absolutely terrifying. —— of there. —— there. we'll be continuing our look at climate on tomorrow's programme, when we'll be finding out what could be done to reduce the number of heatwave related deaths. it is 24 it is 21l minutes past six. you're watching breakfast. still to come, we'll get an exclusive look at some iconic film memorabilia that'll be up for auction in london later this month. marc ashdown is in the prop store for us this morning, what have you got? good morning. this is a aladdins
6:25 am
cave for film good morning. this is a aladdins cave forfilm props. this is indiana jones of‘ had. marty mcfly‘s hover board from back to the future to make. 600 items today. join me later when you can find out today how you can get your hands on some of this. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. may the force be with you. good morning from bbc london news, i'm charlotte franks. a woman has died and two other people have been taken to hospital overnight following london's third fatal house fire in a week. up to 60 firefighters tackled the blaze in centurion square, in woolwich, which prompted more than 20 emergency calls. it broke outjust before 1:30am this morning and ripped through three floors of the property. the cause of the fire is not yet known. a 27—year—old man has been charged with murder after a 22—year—old was stabbed to death in deptford
6:26 am
almost two weeks ago. shevaun sorrell died from a stab wound to the chest after reports of a altercation in creek road in deptford. dana powell will appear before magistrates on thursday. it has foiled some of the most high—profile armed robberies in history, and today the met‘s flying squad is celebrating its 100th birthday. its officers intercepted an attempt to steal a £200 million diamond from the millennium dome in 2000, and they ambushed thieves trying to seize gold bullion from a warehouse at heathrow. the man in charge of that operation says he is proud of the squad's rich history. it isa it is a unique unit. it is a specialist unit. it takes a certain quality of officers to serve on it, it always has done since day one when frederick wensley, the man at the day at the end of the first
6:27 am
world war, got together a crew. that methodology and ideology hasn't changed at all. you still need good quality detect this and when you get them into the flying squad, you develop their skills. let's have a look at the travel situation now. there is a good service on the tube this morning. 0nto the roads: in wanstead, the green man tunnel is closed eastbound at the green man roundabout following a collision overnight. northbound traffic on the blackwall tunnel southern approach is slow from blackwall lane. and in the city, fenchurch street is closed between aldgate high street and fenchurch street station for various gas works. let's have a check on the weather now, with lucy martin. hello. good morning. the best of the dry, bright weather through this morning, but it doesn't look set to last, the cloud will increase as we move through the day, some patchy outbreaks of rain later. said this morning there could be a few patches of mist around, some early cloud, that will clear fairly quickly and we we re that will clear fairly quickly and we were secretive sunshine for a
6:28 am
time. cloudy skies will work in from the west as we move to the afternoon and we will start to see some showery at rates of rain with that as well. to temperatures generally in the high teens, low 20s, maximums of 21 celsius with a north—westerly breeze. through this evening and rush—hour, you could need your umbrella for a time but we will see the skies clearing through the overnight, clear spells and temperatures falling to an overnight low of 7— 11 celsius. tomorrow we are looking at a fresh but right start to the day, tending to see cloud bubble up for a time, to temperatures at a maximum of around 20 celsius. as we move into the weekend, it looks that we he showery outreach for a time on saturday and sunny spells for sunday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it is back to naga and john. hello, this is breakfast, with naga munchetty and jon kay. it is 6:30am. we will bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment.
6:29 am
but also on breakfast this morning: two russian nationals have been accused of carrying out the novichok attack in salisbury, but how likely is a prosecution? we will discuss it after 7:00am. we are expecting a cap on energy prices to be announced this morning. we will talk to the energy regulator, 0fgem, just after 8:00am. and around 9:00am, comedian david baddiel will be here to tell us about life as a children's author, as he celebrates one million book sales. good morning. here is a summary of today's main stories from bbc news: british and russian officials will come face—to—face as the un security council discusses the novichok attack, after theresa may said moscow agents were behind the poisoning. police and prosecutors announced they have enough evidence to charge the men, named as alexander petrov and ruslan boshirov, over the poisoning in march. the prime minister told mps it was sanctioned at a senior level by vladimir putin's regime.
6:30 am
britain and france have agreed on the principles of a deal that would end a dispute over scallop fishing in the english channel. video footage recorded last week showed boats from both countries colliding. the new agreement will not allow british vessels to take scallops from the bay of seine between may and october, when the french are not allowed to harvest. a senior white house official has claimed that members of the trump administration deliberately hinder some of the president's actions in an effort to curtail his impulsive behaviour. writing anonymously in the new york times, the source is highly critical of mr trump and portrays a sense of chaos in the white house. the president has dismissed the opinion piece as gutless, calling the newspaper phony. if the failing new york times has an anonymous editorial — can you believe it? anonymous, meaning gutless, a gutless editorial. we're doing a greatjob.
6:31 am
the poll numbers are through the roof, our poll numbers are great, and guess what. nobody is going to come close to beating me in 2020, because of what we've done. a strong earthquake injapan's northern island of hokkaido has caused a landslide, engulfing several houses. nearly 50 people have been injured and at least 32 are missing. 3 million buildings are without power. japan's prime minister, shinzo abe, says his government has set up a sea rch—and—rescue taskforce. it was the year of the woman at last night's g0 men of the year awards. the actress rose mcgowan, became the first woman in the history of the men's magazine awards to receive the inspiration prize. she spearheaded the #metoo movement to get justice for victims of sexual abuse, after going public with her claims that harvey weinstein raped her. we are talking ryder cup. there is
6:32 am
no other tournament like it, i know all the criticisms about golf being boring and a bit too sedentary, but this is the competition that gets eve ryo ne this is the competition that gets everyone fired up. loads of people who don't watch golf regularly or play golf love the ryder cup. it is in france this year. yes, up against the usa, and they absolutely battered europe last time out. europe need to bring the big guns this time around. and that is one of them right there. they announced four wild card picks. he was in there. and he was mr ryder cup, his passion comes through. and sergio garcia has not been playing that well, so that is the kind of, should he have been in, shouldn't he? what he have been in, shouldn't he? what he has the experience. thomas bjorn has also picked ian poulter, paul casey and henrik stenson. thomas bjorn said sergio garcia
6:33 am
was the heartbeat of the team, even though he has failed to make the cut in all four majors this season. we talk about european team rooms, we talk about what they are, and it is really difficult to pinpoint, but for some reason he is right at the centre every time. he just has this ability to make other people better. novak djokovic was up againstjohn millman in the quarter—finals of the us open tennis, the man who knocked out roger federer, but he came through in straight sets. the scoreline didn't tell the full story, though, with the match lasting almost three hours. djokovic faces kei nishikori next. he came through a five—setter against marin cilic, who beat him in the final at flushing meadows four years ago. and it was an historic day forjapan, who have a man and a woman in the semi—finals of the same grand slam for the first time, thanks to naomi 0saka's victory over lesia tsurenko. she will take on madison keys next.
6:34 am
and it was a mixed day forjamie murray. he and bruno soares are out of the men's doubles, but he is through to the mixed doubles final with bethanie mattek—sands. wales play the republic of ireland tonight in the new nations league. what is that, you ask? well, it has been devised by uefa to try to make friendly matches more appealing, and there is a rather large carrot involved. here is how it works. all 55 of uefa's members will compete in the competition. they will be spilt into four leagues, with the best teams in league a, down to the lowest ranked teams in league d. and, as the tournament goes on, there will be promotion and relegation between them. there will be four groups in each of the leagues. and here is the carrot. there is a place at the european championship in 2020 available in all four leagues, giving lower—ranked sides a rare opportunity to qualify for the euros. well, wales and the republic of ireland are in league b,
6:35 am
and they meet in cardiff tonight. it will be ryan giggs's first competitive match in charge of wales. we know what we're up against. we know we are up against a team who is going to work hard, who is going to make it difficult for us. so proud moment for me. can't wait. just like asa moment for me. can't wait. just like as a player, you know, the build—up to it, you've got to do it, but really you can't wait for the game to come. england's record run—scorer alastair cook admits he cried when he told his england teammates he was retiring. the fifth test against india, which starts tomorrow, will be cook's last. but he says he won't get too emotional when he walks out to bat for the final time. it was hard, it was tough at times, and it is not easy playing international sport, any international sport, any international sport, any international sport, because of how ha rd international sport, because of how hard you have to work. but i've had a hell of a time doing it and hard you have to work. but i've had a hell ofa time doing itand i shared some amazing experiences with some great people. there might be tears afterwards,
6:36 am
in the change room, but walking out there i will be determined to score runs. england's rugby union boss eddie jones says fly—half danny cipriani will be judged on his performances on the pitch and not his recent trouble with the law. cipriani admitted common assault and avoiding arrest after an incident injersey last month. he's been disciplined by his club and the rugby football union — but he could play for england this autumn. we feel it's been dealt with. it was a situation you wouldn't like to have, you wouldn't like to have it again. danny understands that, and now we are just again. danny understands that, and now we arejustjudging again. danny understands that, and now we are justjudging him again. danny understands that, and now we arejustjudging him by his by. now we arejustjudging him by his rugby. you got to find out what really happened. you see so many things in the paper these days that aren't necessarily true, so you've just got to find out the facts. britain's simon yates still leads the tour of spain, but only just. he's one second ahead of the spanish rider alejandro valverde after he finished two minutes off the pace on stage 11, which was won by alessandro de marchi.
6:37 am
david beckham has revealed the name of his new major league soccer team, after he was awarded an mls franchise in january. and he's gone for club internacional de futbol miami, or inter miami for short. there is the crest. their crest is designed to celebrate miami's diverse, inclusive and ambitious spirit. i think that is two herons, not flamingos. the club are due to make their league debut in 2020. we area we are a new team, but we are a city with a lot of history, and i think that that is what we wanted to create with this crest. but also, the authenticity, the south american flavour that we wanted in there, we also wanted that modern twist in there as well, because it is what
6:38 am
miami is all about. you get a lot from a crest. well, it is all about the brand, about the business, about marketing. surely that interview was notjust business, about marketing. surely that interview was not just about the crest. it is a lovely crest. more pressing matters to come, like who is going to play and their aspirations, but we wanted to highlight that crest. and david beckham is such a big draw to any football team. and in fairness it has taken ages to get off the ground for them. they have had loads of stadium issues and problems. a lot of crest issues. do you go herons or flamingos? these are the big questions. matt will have the weather in five or six minutes' time. family, friends and colleagues have been paying tribute to bbc presenter rachael bland, who passed away yesterday. she was a0 and had breast cancer.
6:39 am
rachael spoke candidly and with humour about living with the disease on the podcast, you, me and the big c, which became a huge hit. it hit the number one spot this week, which apparently delighted her. athena lamnisos from the eve appeal charity worked with rachel and her fellow podcasters to reduce the stigma around cancer. we'll speak to her in a moment, but first let's take a look at the unique style and flair that made the show so popular. we are three friends, we are also bloggers, we all have one thing in common. we all have all we have had cancer. rachael, who was 40, joined the bbc in 2001 and she soon became pa rt the bbc in 2001 and she soon became part of the on—air team here at 5 live. we thought we would come back you with a bang and talk about death and dying. and mainlyi
6:40 am
you with a bang and talk about death and dying. and mainly i think we really wa nt and dying. and mainly i think we really want to talk about this subject because people don't talk about it. no, they don't. it was on about it. no, they don't. it was on about her. she didn't want any personal fame. it was a crusade to help other people get through cancer. i am now you're it could be worse person. we have all got one. i like to provide a service. i like to help people out. i love a good death joke, because you have got to find your humour in everything. the call came through and said, you know, i am really sorry. it is the cancer. it is back. ijust couldn't believe it, and little freddie wasjust playing innocently away in the barn, andi playing innocently away in the barn, and i was just, playing innocently away in the barn, and i wasjust, like, poor, poor little fred, and all the way home i was just saying to freddie, little fred, and all the way home i wasjust saying to freddie, i'm little fred, and all the way home i was just saying to freddie, i'm so sorry, i'm so sorry. unfortunately, for rachael's cancer, herjourney has ended, but what she has shown as she has lived, and she has lived an
6:41 am
absolutely worthwhile, purposeful, amazing life, but has had an impact on so many amazing life, but has had an impact on so many people. athena lamnisosjoins us now. firstly, sorry. you have lost a friend, and someone who worked very closely with you. so tell us how you got in touch with rachael and what she meant in terms ofjust raising the awareness of the everyday rubbish that goes with cancer. yes, raising awareness of those things, but also raising awareness of the need for information, the need to start a different conversation around the disease. so i came across rachael through her blog, and that was a really, really different way that she was writing about how she was coming to terms with her disease. also really coming to terms with the complicated issues around her diagnosis, her treatment, and really trying to understand them, and then translate them for a wider audience. it was one of her skills
6:42 am
asa audience. it was one of her skills as a journalist, was in to break down very complicated medical diagnoses, and things that people sometimes, when you are hearing the diagnosis, and many people don't know what they are hearing, it is just a load of medicaljargon and words that don't make sense, and i don't know how to relate to my life. and that is absolutely what stands out. she knew how to ask the right questions, and you see that on the pod cast over and over again, asking the right questions and getting the right kind of expert information into the room. quite often when you are being diagnosed and when you are in front of clinicians, they are giving you very complicated information. they often make the complex more complex rather than more accessible. and i think what rachael did, in a very different way, was both tackle the taboos, bring some humour and humanity into the discussion, but also a really, really vital role of bringing expertise but in an accessible way.
6:43 am
i don't know manyjournalists who could be that effective. he humanity as well as herjournalism, wasn't it? how influential do you think she will prove to be? well, i think that one of the things that attracted us to each other, really, and why she found the eve appeal and we found her, was that we were absolutely determined to change the conversation, turn it away from the kind of head cocked on one side, sympathetic look, which is important. it is important. but there are many faces to cancer, and tackling the taboos, getting rid of the stigma, and also bringing some proper information into the discussion, but in accessible forms, is really important. and i think she has done that. the conversation needs to continue, but i think that she has done that, and i think the pod cast has brought that to a much wider audience very, very quickly. if you think the pod cast only
6:44 am
launched earlier on this year, and i do think we have got some qualitatively different discussions around a lot of the issues, particularly end of life, but also around treatment, and the understanding that cancer is not one disease, but many, many, many different diseases, and that is really important for people to understand. yes, rachael had one of the most common forms of cancer, eve ryo ne the most common forms of cancer, everyone has heard of breast cancer. she actually had a very unusual diagnosis, and that is something people need to understand. cancer is not one thing. and also talking about early detection and being aware of the science, as well. because she found a lump in her armpit. well, it wasn't so much a lump. she felt a kind of soreness, and she was uncomfortable, and it wasn't the kind of... you know, again, the stereotypical, it is a distinct lump. and that is very, very important. and that is one of the reasons why, again, she was so passionate about the eve appeal‘s
6:45 am
work, and she voiced and presented our radio4 work, and she voiced and presented our radio 4 appeal earlier on this year, which seems extraordinary, that that was only six weeks ago and this has happened now. she was an absolute champion for medical research. that is where she saw the hope for the future, and that is what she felt needed more profile and more funding and more support. because people need choices and options when they've got a very unusual diagnosis, and that is what she wanted other women, as she put it, the mes of the future, the women of the future, to have. isa is a cost which really struck me, she said we are here to talk about the highs and lows of cancer there can be highs, i have never had anybody put it like that, but it was that connection, that honesty. air. i think that is really important when you are facing a very brutal
6:46 am
diagnosis or you are diagnosed with the disease like cancer, it used can react —— you can react in different ways. but one of the ways is to start living. that is very important, what she showed us, that dying is part of living and my goodness, did she lives and make a difference after diagnosis. —— did she leave. they kiss and much for talking to us this morning. —— so much. —— thank you so much. —— did she live. you can listen to ‘you, me and the big c‘ on the bbc radio 5 live website. it is the number—1 pod cast in the uk week, a fitting legacy for rachel. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the headlines: uk officials will face their russian counterparts later as they brief the un security council on two men suspected of the salisbury nerve agent attack. the government has agreed
6:47 am
the principles of a deal with france about scallop fishing which it's hoped will prevent further clashes in the english channel. let's check in with the weather. morning. morning to you both. blue skies across many parts of the uk, but it isa across many parts of the uk, but it is a rather cool start, temperatures down to two or three degrees in parts of scotland and it won't be a day where the skies remain blue because we have got cloud pushing in from the west, showers pushing into northwest scotland which will get more widespread through the day and this zone of cloud to ireland will bring outbreaks of rain across the south. showers in the north become a bit more frequent and widespread across scotland and eventually into northern england. 0utbreaks across scotland and eventually into northern england. outbreaks of rain developing this morning across wales will spread into the midlands, eventually east anglia and southern parts of england. look at the
6:48 am
detail, you would notice that rain band is fragmented. some in the south—east towards east anglia will remain dry towards the end of the afternoon, temperatures to one degree but feeling cooler elsewhere. bright and today, north wales, northern england but with a few heavy showers, showers in northern ireland in scotland you will be to avoid the showers. there will be some sunshine in between. a north—westerly breeze, not strong but it adds to the caulfield, temperatures 13 or 14 at west. into tonight, some showers into the evening rush hour. that will eventually clear into the morning and with clear skies later in the night temperatures will drop, another chilly night, temperatures well down into single figures almost. towns and citiesjust well down into single figures almost. towns and cities just about the upper single figures of. we will start to see rain by the end of the night and into tomorrow morning, into this low pressure system into the east. window flowing
6:49 am
anticlockwise means we have a northwest wind for many of you. most likely to be worked to the north—east of scotland. north—east of england and see persistent rain as well. one or two showers drifting across northern ireland into other areas of england and wales, but most places will be dry here if not especially warm, we see tempertaures getting close to —— close to 20 degrees in central london. and then the weekend is upon us. if you are eyeing up what to expect, expect a little bit of rain, this is the chart for saturday, the low pressure in the east pushing a wave another system working from the west. england and wales likely to have cloud, outbreaks of rain coming and going. the winter weather could shift north and further south, some s. park st stay dry, keep checking the forecast. southern ireland with isolated showers. for sunday, northern areas most likely to she showers. further south,
6:50 am
northern areas most likely to she showers. furthersouth, one ortwo showers. furthersouth, one ortwo showers but generally a brighter day than saturday. 0n showers but generally a brighter day than saturday. on sunday, temperatures will be up just a little bit compare to what we are seeing at the moment. —— compared to. i am looking at that map because i need to know about the wind off cumbria today. how is it looking? not particularly strong but it will pick up this weekend. he can cope with it. what about the wind in aberystwyth? a bit warmer today. what about in norfolk? much lighter than you will see in aberystwyth. we are asking about wind. the world's largest off—shore wind farm officially opens off the coast of cumbria today. we've sent ben over to have a look, how's it going ben? not much blows me over. we are fine
6:51 am
and waited down the. good morning. —— weighted down. the world ‘s largest wind farm opens off the coast of here. you measure would to see it because it is 19 kilometres off the coast of cumbria, but it is absolutely huge. 20,000 football pitches is the equivalent size, it will generate enough power to keep 600,000 homes going. as you will see, i have finally found something that is taller than me. growing investment in recent years has made the uk a world leader in the wind technology. last year, wheat and provided 15% of
6:52 am
britain's's electricity, more than from coal. the walney extension wind farm from coal. the walney extension wind fa rm covers from coal. the walney extension wind farm covers 145 square kilometres. it took engineers nearly three years to build it and it is already generating enough power for to build it and it is already generating enough powerfor half a million homes. in total, there are 87 turbines, the biggest is 194 metres tall. that is taller than the blackpool tower or 98 times higher than me. 98 times me. mathew is the boss here this morning. good morning. talk to us this morning. good morning. talk to us about why it is here, we are talking about the wind and clearly this is a good place to put it. offshore, that must come with a lot of logistical problems, getting these turbines out to sea. what you need is a high wind speed and shallow water at. here in the irish sea and the north sea we are blessed with having some of the best
6:53 am
conditions in the world for offshore wind. we are here because of that, fundamentally. talk to me much this generates a. i said 600,000 homes, it is not huge if you compare it to what cole has traditionally powered, it is not a lot but it is a contribution. it is a big contribution, but our vision across the uk is to have about 30 gigawatt by 2030 and that would be about one third of our power needs of. it can be very significant in the context of the overall energy mix. a good success story for british manufacturing because i know you get a lot of the bits that you need to assemble from right here in the uk. that is absolutely right and we having trying to drive up that uk content. over all over the life of a project you are looking at about 50% of the value is from uk companies. on this project, some of the blades we re on this project, some of the blades were made on the isle of wight, some of the other blades were made in
6:54 am
hull, some of the towers made in scotland. the transition pieces made in the north—east and then buries all of the electrical equipment. real manufacturing jobs here in the uk supporting our industry. fascinating. mathew, thanks very much. let's introduce you to gavin, because it is hisjob to keep it running. talk to me about some of the stuff that is here because these are some of the ships they go out and maintain the turbines, how do you get it out there in the first place? basically what happens is, every evening guys will have everything the vessel for the next day, in the morning the guys will come on, they will board, it takes about an hour half get out to the wind farm, once we are out there, materials are craned from the vessel to start work. essentially you have got to think these things under the sea. it is about piledriving into the head of the ocean and a lot of
6:55 am
concrete and start building. how long does something like that take? basically, when we were walking on the walney extension project, we we re the walney extension project, we were looking at a couple of days for each turbine to be erected. wants they have been driven in, about 80 metres protruding from the sea and they built on top of that incrementally. the first section, the second section, then the sale and then install the blaze. for now, thank you, will have a look later. you will see how busy it is off the coast now. it takes them quite a while to get there, 19 kilometres offshore to get to this windfarm. at absolutely vast and a key contribution to all that power that we have, 600,000 homes will benefit from this. i will show you a little more around a little later and will get you more personal with the wind turbines at. it looks like a very
6:56 am
slick operation. the world 's largest wind farm but that must be the worlds smallest lifejacket. laughter. it is very compact! it is four minutes to seven. before we see the news where you are, we have to tell you that the comedian david baddiel is go to be talking to us, so breaking 1 million book sales. —— celebrating. i have read his new book, it is funny. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. see you soon. good morning from bbc london news. i'm charlotte franks. a woman has died and two other people have been taken to hospital overnight following london's third fatal house fire in a week. up to 60 firefighters tackled the blaze in centurion square in woolwich, which prompted more than 20 emergency calls. it broke outjust before 1.30 this morning, and ripped through three floors of the property. the cause of the fire
6:57 am
is not yet known. a 27—year—old man has been charged with murder after a 22—year—old was stabbed to death in deptford almost two weeks ago. shevaun sorrell died from a stab wound to the chest after reports of a altercation in creek road in deptford. dana powell, will appear before magistrates later today. it's foiled some of the most high profile armed robberies in history and today the met‘s flying squad is celebrating its one hundredth birthday. it's officers intercepted an attempt to steal a 200 million pound diamond from the millennium dome in 2000, and they ambushed thieves trying to seize gold bullion from a warehouse at heathrow, the man in charge of that operation says he proud of the squad's rich history. it is a unique unit. it is a specialist unit. it takes a certain quality of officers to serve on it,
6:58 am
it always has done since day one, when frederick wensley, the dc! of the day at the end of the first world war, got together 12 proven thief—takers. let's have a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tube this morning. onto the roads, in wanstead the green man tunnel is closed eastbound at the green man roundabout following a collision overnight. northbound traffic on the blackwall tunnel southern approach is slow from blackwall lane. and in the city, fenchurch st is closed between aldgate high st and fenchurch street station for various gas works. lets have a check on the weather now with lucy martin. hello. good morning. the best of the dry, bright weather through this morning, but it doesn't look set to last, the cloud will increase as we move through the day, some patchy outbreaks of rain later. so this morning there could be a few
6:59 am
patches of mist around, some early cloud, that will clear fairly quickly and we will see plenty of sunshine for a time. cloudy skies will work in from the eest as we move to the afternoon and we will start to see some showery at rates of rain with that as well. temperatures generally in the high teens, low 20s, a maximum of around c1 celsius with a north—westerly breeze. through this morning and rush—hour, you could need your umbrella for a time, but we will see the skies clearing through the overnight, clear spells and temperatures falling to an overnight low of 7—11 degress celsius. tomorrow we are looking at a fresh but bright start to the day, tending to see cloud bubble up for a time, temperatures at a maximum of around 20 celsius. as we move into the weekend, it looks like we could see showery outbreaks for a time on saturday and sunny spells and showers for sunday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. good morning. welcome to breakfast, with naga munchetty and jon kay. our headlines today: the men accused of the salisbury novichok attack. the uk aims to turn up the heat
7:00 am
on russia at the un security council. the pair are believed to be members of russia's military intelligence. we will be live in moscow with reaction. a truce in the scallop wars, but some british fishermen say it is a victory for the french. a new energy price cap will be announced in the next few minutes. it is hoped it will cut the bills of millions of customers who don't shop around. the world's largest offshore windfarm officially opens today. it covers an area bigger than the island ofjersey, and will generate enough electricity for 600,000 homes. i will show you how it all works. just thinking about it gives him goosebumps. ian poulter makes europe's ryder cup team as one of the captain's wild cards. and talking goosebumps, it is a little on the cool side out there
7:01 am
this morning but while it is a nice start for most, there is rain on the horizon as well. i will have your full forecast in breakfast. it is thursday 6 september. our top story: british and russian officials will come face—to—face as the un security council discusses the novichok attack, after theresa may said moscow agents were behind the poisoning. police and prosecutors announced they have enough evidence to charge the men over the poisoning in salisbury in march. lucinda adam has more. we now know the faces of the two russian men accused of the novichok poisonings. it is understood british police may know their true identities, but cctv shows them arriving in the uk under the names alexander petrov and ruslan boshirov. they are seen travelling to salisbury, where it is believed they used this fake perfume bottle to deploy the novichok nerve agent, which would later kill dawn sturgess and contaminate her partner, charlie rowley. theresa may said months
7:02 am
of investigation show this was not a rogue operation. the men are officers of russia's military intelligence service, the gru. the actions of the gru are a threat to all our allies and to all our citizens. and on the basis of what we have learnt in the salisbury investigation, and what we know about this organisation more broadly, we must now step up our collective efforts, specifically against the gru. moscow said the two suspects mean nothing to them, and accused britain of manipulating information — this the response on the facebook page of their foreign ministry. the woman on the right, maria zakharova, is their head of communications. to reveal so much detail of the investigation so publicly is designed to increase diplomatic pressure on russia. the uk wants more european sanctions, but may struggle to convince its eu allies.
7:03 am
we can speak now to our moscow correspondent steve rosenberg. steve, good to see you. you are better placed than anyone of us at the moment to tell us how much diplomatic pressure russia is really going to feel after these assertions. it is a good question. i mean, that is why britain has called this meeting, to try and increase the diplomatic pressure through the un security council. of course, russia is a permanent member of the un security council, and you can expect russia to hit back at any accusations and try to undermine the case that is presented by the uk. i was reading through some of the pro— kremlin russian newspapers this morning and it is clear that the russian authorities are trying to discredit the evidence that was presented in london yesterday, to try to find inconsistent these, to sow doubt, and to present the whole thing as some kind of anti— russian western plot. the country's most
7:04 am
popular tabloid today declared there is no proof at all, and it quoted a former russian intelligence officer, saying that what happened to the skripals, as presented by london, looks more like a cheap soap opera than the work of real intelligence agents. so what impact will the face—to—face meeting with officials at the un security council, or evidence being presented at the un security council, what impact could that have? well, i think as far as the british government goes this is a first step, because theresa may also indicated that britain will push for more eu sanctions against russia. but is there an appetite across europe for more sanctions? i don't detect that, and in fact some european countries have said quite publicly that they want less, not more. they want fewer sanctions, they want better relations with russia. so i think it is going to be quite difficult, actually, for the british government to maintain the sort of unified position within
7:05 am
europe on russia. thank you very much for explaining it all for us. a senior white house official has claimed that members of the trump administration deliberately hinder some of the president's actions in an effort to curtail his impulsive behaviour. writing anonymously in the new york times, the source portrays a sense of chaos in the white house. the president has dismissed the opinion piece as gutless, calling the newspaper phony, as chris buckler reports. each day seems to bring new claims about what is happening behind the doors of this white house, and the unconventional president in charge here. the new york times says it was a senior official in donald trump's own administration who wrote its damning opinion piece, although the author insisted on remaining anonymous. they claim the president's leadership style is impetuous, adversarial, petty and ineffective, that many are working diligently from within to frustrate parts of his own agenda and his worst inclinations, and that the root of the problem is the president's
7:06 am
amorality. and god bless you, and thank you, mr president. mr trump was meeting a group of sheriffs when he was forced to answer questions about keeping control, in what is being painted as a lawless white house. if the failing new york times has an anonymous editorial — can you believe it? anonymous, meaning gutless, a gutless editorial. we're doing a greatjob. the poll numbers are through the roof, our poll numbers are great, and guess what. nobody is going to come close to beating me in 2020, because of what we've done. but fear, a new book written by bob woodward, one of the journalists who exposed the watergate scandal, is making similar allegations — that many are working to protect america from its president. the new york times said it was proud to publish the piece, which it insisted gave the public a real insight into the workings of the trump administration,
7:07 am
from someone in a position to know. a new cap on energy prices is expected to be announced soon. the energy regulator, 0fgem, says it is to protect customers who don't shop around, but remain on their supplier's standard variable tariff, and end up paying more than they should. the cap will come into effect in december, and will be reviewed and updated every six months. 0fgem says the move will benefit 11 million customers in england, scotland and wales. ben is at a windfarm in cumbria this morning. what more do we know? yes, pretty timely to be here talking about wearout energy comes from, but clearly the price we pay for it is what affects all of us as consumers. i have just for it is what affects all of us as consumers. i havejust had for it is what affects all of us as consumers. i have just had those numbers through, and this is coming from 0fgem, the energy regulator. it
7:08 am
said it is going to impose a cap, a maximum amount of money that these energy firms can charge us, if you are on a standard variable tariff, because as you mentioned, inevitably thatis because as you mentioned, inevitably that is the one that is always the most costly. i have had the numbers through. they tell us that that b £1136 a year. energy firms will not be able to charge any more than that, and that applies if you are a dualfuel that, and that applies if you are a dual fuel customer paying by direct debit. so by the calculation is that of issue that would save an average customer about £75 a year. if you are on the most expensive tariffs, that currently are being offered, it will save you about £120 a year. and the idea of all of this is to stop the idea of all of this is to stop the energy firms charging us excessive prices. now, for their pa rt excessive prices. now, for their part the energy firms say they are worried about this cap because that would limit their ability to make money. the government has responded and said if you are a well—run energy firm and you are doing things right, you shouldn't struggle to make a profit. what we are trying to do is protect consumers who are
7:09 am
paying the highest tariffs. and as you touched on, 60% of households still on the so—called standard variable tariff, that is the most expensive. and so it is expected that this news this morning could save money for about 11 million people, saving, as i said, about £75 a year because of this new energy cap that has been brought in, and that will apply from december. thank you for that update. we will look more at those figures shortly. later we will be speaking to 0fgem's chief executive. that is at 8:10am. britain and france have agreed the principles of a deal that would end a dispute over scallop fishing in the english channel. boats from both countries collided with each other during confrontations last week, when french fishermen accused british boats of fishing unfairly. here is our environment correspondent claire marshall. heading out from brixham, a very different boat to the huge dredgers that left from this same harbour last week, and clashed with french fishermen. we were taken to a secret location with divers that gather scallops by hand. they showed us their technique. there is no large
7:10 am
machinery involved. they select the right ones, and leave the rest. there is another way to get scallops that leaves the sea bed intact, and the growing success of businesses like this shows that more and more people are caring about how their scallops are fished. if you don't leave sort of enough breeding stock to breed, then you can't keep fishing. and this so—called scallop war is about dredging, industrial boats that catch huge amounts. the british were fishing legally, but french fishermen say they will leave them with no catch in the bay de seine this year. this blue boat is a 200—ton british trawler, crashing into a french boat. british fishermen say these smaller vessels deliberately got in their way. it took four hours of negotiations, but a deal of sorts was done. i'm very pleased that we've negotiated a deal that satisfies the honour of both sides, that our fishermen will be fishing where they want to fish, the larger vessels and the smaller vessels, and from 1 october.
7:11 am
this is brixham harbour. locally caught scallops are being sorted. there is scepticism about the plan. the level of compensation wasn't decided. that is down to a summit in paris on friday. all british scallop boats have been asked to voluntarily stay away from the contested area until a formal deal is signed. so, at the moment, it is up to the skippers whether or not to comply. claire marshall, bbc news, brixham. a strong earthquake injapan's northern island of hokkaido has caused a landslide, engulfing several houses. nearly 50 people have been injured and at least 32 are missing. 3 million buildings are without power. japan's prime minister, shinzo abe, says his government has set up a sea rch—and—rescue taskforce. it was the year of the woman at last night's gq men of the year awards. the actress rose mcgowan became the first woman in the history of the men's magazine awards
7:12 am
to receive the inspiration prize. she spearheaded the #metoo movement to get justice for victims of sexual abuse, after going public with her claims that she was raped by harvey weinstein. let's go back to our top story this morning. theresa may is trying to build pressure on russia after saying two men suspected of carrying out the novichok poisonings in salisbury were russian military intelligence officers. uk and russian officials will meet to discuss the case today. let's speak to human rights lawyer elena tsirlina, who represented the family of former russian spy alexander litvinenko. lovely to talk to you this morning. thank you very much for spending some time with us. what do you make of this meeting? what would you expect to come out of this meeting at the un security council?m expect to come out of this meeting at the un security council? it is difficult to say at this stage, because it depends entirely on how much appetite there is to impose any
7:13 am
further sanctions or any other measures against russia at this stage. because we all heard what jeremy hunt said during his visit to america last month, and it depends entirely on what the un security council intends to do, at this stage, and what measures it wants to ta ke stage, and what measures it wants to take against russia. there is certainly very... you know, it is very difficult to say whether the people are going to be prosecuted in the uk. there is a very unrealistic prospect at this stage. so we will have to wait and see the outcome of the day's meeting. you dealt very closely with alexander litvinenko's case. you were a lawyer for his wife, and there are obviously similarities that we are seeing, the poisoning of a russian on british soil. what do you think the impact of this is, though? even if there isn't really an appetite for sanctions among the un security council or among the members of the
7:14 am
un, what does this do in terms of russia's image? russia's image is in tatters, i think, russia's image? russia's image is in tatters, ithink, because it russia's image? russia's image is in tatters, i think, because it has been embroiled in so many crises over the past few years, from crimea, ukraine, to litvinenko and the latest incident in salisbury. it is very difficult to say why russia chooses to embark on these missions abroad, leaving very telling calling cards, and engaging in very esoteric crimes abroad. but, you know, if anything else, they do that to send anything else, they do that to send a message to those who they conceive to be traitors. the pictures of the two man accused of the poisoning of the skripals has been released. what happens next, in terms of a warrant for their arrest or moves across the
7:15 am
world to try to capture these two people or bring them to prosecution? well, we know that the european arrest warrant has been issued, and interpol red notices will be issued shortly. it really means that, if the two will travel outside of russia and in the member states, in the eu member states, they will be arrested and brought to the uk. the eu member states, they will be arrested and brought to the ukw is not likely, though, is it? it is very, very unlikely. and of course, we understand that russia doesn't extradite its own national ‘s 2—faced trial abroad, so it almost seems as if it is a stalemate. but it is also understood that the uk chose not to send an extradition request as it is understood that under article 61 of the russian constitution these two individuals are very constitution these two individuals are very unlikely to be extradited to the uk to stand trial. how likely, just in your experience of
7:16 am
tracking people down, how likely is it that we will ever know more about these two men? it is very likely that the names we have at the moment are aliases. it is likely that the names that they use aliases, even though they use authentic russian passports. it depends on the type of intelligence we are going to continue to gather. thank you very much for talking to us this morning. just after eight o'clock we will speak to the government securities minister, ben wallace, to decide what the authorities do now in the aftermath of those specific allegations of. the time outjust after quarter past seven. —— allegations. time to talk to matt. blue skies at there. he knows where all of the wind is blowing all across the uk. fountain of knowledge axe mac very good morning to you, the view you will see today and get out of bed and private eye both horns of. while
7:17 am
we have sunshine on the rising to the east, up to the west there are clouds on the horizon. satellite imagery, clumps of cloud pushing into the north—west. this area cloud bringing rain across ireland, clipping the south of northern ireland, pushing into northwest england at the moment, will slide its way across other parts of wales, the midlands and into southern counties of england into this afternoon. showers into scotland develop later, a bit of sunshine in between, not as much sunshine this afternoon compared with yesterday afternoon. plenty of cloud. staying dry the longest across east anglia but that rain band, fairly fragmented, rain will come and go. across north wales, northern england, scotland and northern ireland, brighter skies into the afternoon but showers will spoil the view every so often, politically or then england and scotland. highs of 21 today in and around the far south—east, only looking at around 13 or 14 across much of scotland.
7:18 am
chilly day, some rain across the south—east corner, showers into the evening will fade almost overnight but will rain into the east later on and the green on how to bridge a chart is an indication of cool temperatures. temperatures into single figures across the sun —— across the countryside. a cool start to your friday morning, and of the working week and for some of you and other day to grab the brolly. area of low pressure to the north—east, bringing persistent rain, eventually in northern scotland and sliding into the north—east of england. a breeze coming tomorrow and that will feed one or two showers into their but what the series will stay dry. the breeze is at it this —— is at its strongest further north you are to be temperatures mostly below 20 degrees, feeling particularly cool where you have the wind and rain across the north—east parts of england and eastern scotland. into
7:19 am
the weekend that low pressure might pull away but we have another weather system working its way in over the atlantic. a bit of a mixed weekend if you have any plans, for england and wales, saturday is your cloudy day, outbreaks of rain pushing eastwards, maybe the far north of england and southern counties of. across scotland and northern ireland, reap —— a reasonably warm day, mostly dry. showers most likely, central areas, dry and bright day on sunday. all in all, a little on the cool side. if you could dress up as a superhero, who would it be, orjust any movie hero? now you have put me on the spot. it has got to be superman. no, iwant on the spot. it has got to be superman. no, i want to be spiderman. i see that more, actually. there are suits for sale from famous films, yes. any child sizes? laughter. that
7:20 am
doesn't work if you don't know that mac is diminutive. —— matt. from the hoverboard in back to the future to indiana jones' whip, a whole host of props from the silver screen will be going under the hammer at the end of the month in the uk's largest auction of film and tv memorabilia. before that though, you can see them for free at an exhibition in central london. mark, matt wants a spiderman suit. edward scissorhands is a cool one. what are you after? there are all sorts but i fancy the terminator. these are the actual suits which we re these are the actual suits which were used in those films. we have got a real aladdins cave here in waterloo. the auction will be going
7:21 am
on september 20, you can have a look if you are a movie buff. stephen lane is the ceo of this prop store running this auction. talk us through what we have got. what we haveis through what we have got. what we have is a storm trooper helmet from star wars, have is a storm trooper helmet from starwars, a light —— sabre. this is marty mcfly's hover board from back to the future at two. great detail on it, that has an estimate of 30 to £50,000. every auction has a star attraction. i know what this is. this is undoubtedly the star. this is han solo's jacket. this is undoubtedly the star. this is han solo'sjacket. we have been able to match this up specifically toa numberof able to match this up specifically to a number of key scenes in the film. when he is confronted, this is
7:22 am
the jacket that harrison ford is wearing. how much will this affect? sitting comfortably, a pricetag estimate of 500,000 to £1 million of. this is a movie lovers dream and who better to talk about this then helen o'hara from empire magazine. these are often as popular as the stars of the film. they are a way of getting close to the film, a way of meeting your favourite star, it is also a way of getting closer to the character and closer to the film you love. what do movie buffs do with them? do they put them in a vault or wear them around the house? they tend to put them on display, i know some who are set up museums and displays in their own homes. have it on display and show you how —— you own a piece of film history. you have to have deep pockets. £1 million of. if i had it i would be
7:23 am
tempted, but i will have to hold off, i really don't. this runs until september 20 and until then you can get down to the bmi in waterloo and look at all of this stuff for free yourself. £1 million for a jacket, just an average shopping trip. you look $1 million, don't you worry. average shopping trip. you look $1 million, don't you worrylj average shopping trip. you look $1 million, don't you worry. i would devalue it significantly. you wouldn't have needed a jacket much of this summer. as we know it's been a record breaking summer, the joint hottest on record in fact, and although we've been enjoying the increased temperatures, they've raised a few questions. how much of the good weather can be attributed to climate change? and is this year's heatwave a sign of things to come? graham satchell has been to the met office to get some answers. now we officially know it has been the joint—hottest summer on record, what does this years heatwave tell us about the future? this is where they crunched
7:24 am
the numbers, the met office in exeter. it wasn't just a hot summer, but a sign of things to come. we are seeing a change in climate and our climate in the uk has warmed byjust under a degree over the last 50 years or so. with a warming climate, we do expect the number of hot days and heatwave incidences to increase going into the future. those sorts of conditions may become more normal for the 2040s. if what we saw in the climate this summer becomes more normal, the impacts will be felt everywhere. food, for example, is already expected to be 5% more expensive this year. building regulations may have to change to protect vulnerable people with heart and lung problems. hospitals will have to plan for summary emergencies. and there are other impacts. it is generally meant that we have seen higher numbers ofjellyfish, bluefin tuna.
7:25 am
we have certainly seen, recorded more minke whales, particularly west approaches to the channel. and we have recorded hundreds of common dolphins. these pictures were taken off the dorset coast this summer. and this remarkable shot is a thrasher shark in the english channel, it's more commonly found in the warmer waters of the mid—atla ntic. the explosion in the number of jellyfish, like these near newquay, means we have seen more unusual visitors to our coast. this is a sunfish. but a warmer sea is not good for everything, the white beaked dolphin, for example, has suffered. they are a coldwater species, their stronghold being in the north sea, so we have to start thinking about this lower edge of this populations range and what impact higher sea surface tempertaures will have on those.
7:26 am
we need to think about the other threats that could be potentially be impacting these species and trying to limit those as best as possible, so we are not imposing too much pressure and threats onto these species. so are we ready for more frequent heatwaves? a report this summer by a group of mps says that from the environment to transport, hosuing to health, not enough is being done. graham satchell, bbc news. something we should talk about a lot. we'll be continuing our look at climate on tomorrow's programme, when we'll be finding out what could be done to reduce the number of heatwave related deaths. we have seen those across the world, haven't we? in japan, we have seen those across the world, haven't we? injapan, australia, europe. lots more to talk about, particularly up on the programme as well. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. see you in a minute. good morning from bbc london news, i'm charlotte franks.
7:27 am
a woman has died and two other people have been taken to hospital overnight following london's third fatal house fire in a week. up to 60 firefighters tackled the blaze in centurion square in woolwich, which prompted more than 20 emergency calls. it broke outjust before 1.30 this morning, and ripped through three floors of the property. the cause of the fire is not yet known. a 27—year—old man has been charged with murder after a 22—year—old was stabbed to death in deptford almost two weeks ago. shevaun sorrell died from a stab wound to the chest after reports of a altercation in creek road in deptford. dana powell, will appear before magistrates later today. it's foiled some of the most high profile armed robberies in history and today the met‘s flying squad is celebrating its one hundredth birthday. it's officers intercepted an attempt to steal a £200 million diamond from the millennium dome in 2000, and they ambushed thieves trying to seize gold bullion from a warehouse at heathrow.
7:28 am
the man in charge of that operation says he proud of the squad's rich history. it is a unique unit. it is a specialist unit. it takes a certain quality of officers to serve on it, it always has done since day one, when frederick wensley, the dc! of the day at the end of the first world war, got together 12 proven thief—takers. let's have a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tube this morning. onto the roads, in wanstead the green man tunnel is closed eastbound at the green man roundabout, following a collision overnight. in plumstead, wickham lane is closed at king's highway following a collision, with delays between the local cemetery and plumstead high street. northbound traffic on the blackwall tunnel southern approach is slow from the woolwich road flyover. and in the city, fenchurch st is closed between aldgate high st and fenchurch street station for various gas works. lets have a check on the weather now with lucy martin.
7:29 am
hello. good morning. the best of the dry, bright weather through this morning, but it doesn't look set to last, the cloud will increase as we move through the day, some patchy outbreaks of rain later. so this morning there could be a few patches of mist around, some early cloud, that will clear fairly quickly and we will see plenty of sunshine for a time. cloudy skies will work in however, from the east as we move to the afternoon and we will start to see some showery at rates of rain with that as well. temperatures generally in the high teens, low 20s, a maximum of around c1 celsius with a north—westerly breeze. through this morning and rush—hour, you could need your umbrella for a time, but then we will see the skies clearing through the overnight, clear spells and temperatures falling to an overnight low of 7—11 degress celsius. tomorrow we are looking at a fresh but bright start to the day, we will tend to see cloud bubble up for a time, temperatures at a maximum of around 20 celsius. as we move into the weekend, it looks like we could see some showery outbreaks for a time on saturday and sunny spells
7:30 am
and showers for sunday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with naga munchetty and jon kay. here is a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news: british and russian officials will come face—to—face as the un security council discusses the novichok attack, after theresa may said moscow agents were behind the attack. police and prosecutors announced they have enough evidence to charge the men. the prime minister told mps it was sanctioned at a senior level by vladimir putin's regime. a new cap on energy prices is being announced by the regulator, 0fgem. it is to protect customers who don't shop around, and end up paying more than they should. ben is at a windfarm in cumbria this morning. what more do we know?
7:31 am
yes, you are right. an important announcement this morning. we finally had a figure put on that price cap and it is a figure of £1136. that is the maximum that people will pay if they are on what is known as a standard variable tariff. it means energy firms cannot charge you any more than that. and essentially this is a cap for, forgive me, for lazy people. people who do not shop around. you can still save money if you put yourself ona still save money if you put yourself on a fixed rate tariff but this is for the 60 million households who do not shop around and are often on the most expensive tariff available. the government have said those firms need to limit how much they charge, stop overcharging customers and therefore impose this limit. for their part, a lot of energy firms say they do not like this idea. it could limit their ability to make a
7:32 am
profit. but the government has said if you are a well—run business and you are doing things right, you will still be able to make money by charging bears. on average it will save a typical user about £75 a year. if you are on the most expensive tariff you will save about £120 a year. what we should stress that if you want a cheaper deal you should swap around, you should switch, and often the cheaper, better deals are those if you get a longer—term deal by shopping around another supplier. and we will speak to the chief executive of 0fgem about that new price cap in half an hour's time. britain and france have agreed on the principles of a deal that would end a dispute over scallop fishing in the english channel. video footage recorded last week showed boats from both countries colliding. the new agreement will not allow british vessels to take scallops from the bay of seine between may and october, when the french are not allowed to harvest. a senior white house official has claimed that members of the trump
7:33 am
administration deliberately hinder some of the president's actions in an effort to curtail his impulsive behaviour. writing anonymously in the new york times, the source is highly critical of mr trump, and portrays a sense of chaos in the white house. the president has dismissed the opinion piece as gutless, calling the newspaper phony. a strong earthquake injapan's northern island of hokkaido has caused a landslide, engulfing several houses. nearly 50 people have been injured and at least 32 are missing. 3 million buildings are without power. japan's prime minister, shinzo abe, says his government has set up a sea rch—and—rescue taskforce. and after an ambulance was forced to block a driveway, this is what the crew returned to. £10 and an unsigned note,
7:34 am
which read: "you're blocking our drive. no worries. buy a coffee when you can." one of the crew, gary turley, said it had made their day‘ after a busy and emotional shift. coming up on the programme, matt will have the weather for you. let's ta ke let's take the temperature in front of the ryder cup. it is one of those events which if you are a non— golf fan, you can't help but get excited about the ryder cup. it is the one time, and you alluded to this earlier, sometimes golf can be perceived as boring to watch. but when you watch the ryder cup, the crowds go crazy, and there is loads of bolshie but nice bolshie behaviour and reading. the players
7:35 am
feed off it. big personalities. patrick reed with rory mcilroy, we will see a bit more of that. you are selling it very well. and whether you love him or hate him, tiger woods is back. as is ian poulter. because thomas bjorn had four wildcard picks, he had eight of the 12 players on the team, and who were the additionalfour? and ian poulter, mr ryder cup himself, is one of those. thomas bjorn has also picked ian poulter, paul casey and henrik stenson. thomas bjorn said sergio garcia was the heartbeat of the team, even though he has failed to make the cut in all four majors this season. we talk about european team rooms, we talk about what they are, and it's really difficult to pinpoint, but for some reason he's right at the centre every time. he just has this ability to make other people better. novak djokovic was up
7:36 am
againstjohn millman in the quarter—finals of the us open tennis, the man who knocked out roger federer, but he came through in straight sets. the scoreline didn't tell the full story, though, with the match lasting almost three hours. djokovic faces kei nishikori next. nishikori came through a five—setter against marin cilic, who beat him in the final at flushing meadows four years ago. and it was an historic day forjapan, who have a man and a woman in the semi—finals of the same grand slam, for the first time, thanks to naomi osaka's victory over lesia tsurenko. she will take on madison keys next. and it was a mixed day forjamie murray. he and bruno soares are out of the men's doubles, but he is through to the mixed doubles final with bethanie mattek—sands. the nations league kicks off tonight. meaningless international friendlies will be a thing of the past, with european nations competing in a new—look tournament, with four places at euro
7:37 am
2020 up for grabs. the top—ranked countries will compete in league a. wales begin their campaign against the republic of ireland in league b. the two teams meet in cardiff tonight, in what will be ryan giggs's first competitive match in charge of wales. we know what we're up against. we know we're up against a team who's going to work hard, who's going to make it difficult for us. so a proud moment for me, can't wait. just like as a player, you know, the build—up to it, you've got to do it, but really you can't wait for the game to come. england rugby union head coach eddie jones says fly—half danny cipriani will be judged on his performances on the pitch and not his recent trouble with the law. cipriani admitted common assault and avoiding arrest after an incident injersey last month. he has been disciplined by his club and the rugby football union, but he could play for england this autumn. we feel it's been dealt with. it was a situation you wouldn't like to have, you wouldn't like to have it again.
7:38 am
danny understands that, and now we'rejustjudging him by his rugby. you've got to find out what really happened. you see so many things in the paper these days that aren't necessarily true, so you've just got to find out the facts. britain's simon yates still leads the tour of spain, but only just. he is one second ahead of the spanish rider alejandro valverde, after he finished two minutes off the pace on stage 11, which was won by alessandro de marchi. the people of leamington spa were out in force to witness a sprint finish at the end of stage four of the tour of britain. andre greipel won it, but patrick bevin extended his overall lead by picking up four bonus seconds. today's stage is a team time trial from cockermouth to whinlatter pass in the lake district. david beckham has revealed the name of his new major league soccer team, after he was awarded an mls franchise in january. and he has gone for club internacional de futbol miami, or inter miami for short. intermiamii
7:39 am
intermiami i think inter miami i think has more of a kick to it. their crest is designed to celebrate miami's diverse, inclusive and ambitious spirit. it definitely does that. and herons, not flamingos, it is worth pointing out. the club are due to make their league debut in 2020. we are a new team, but we're a city with a lot of history, and i think that that's what we wanted to create with this crest. but also the authenticity, the south american flavour that we wanted in there. we also wanted that modern twist in there, as well, because it's what miami is all about. who thought a crest could say so much? there is plenty of work still to be done, but they have the fine
7:40 am
details in place, the club crest. matt will update us with the weather a little later. family, friends and colleagues have been paying tribute to bbc presenter rachael bland, who passed away yesterday. she was 40 and had breast cancer. rachael spoke candidly about living with the disease on the podcast you, me and the big c, which became a huge hit. her fellow podcasters deborah and lauren, who also have experience with cancer, will join us in a moment. but first, let's take a look at why the show was so popular. we're three friends, we're also bloggers. we all have one thing in common. we all have, or we have had, cancer. rachael, who was 40, joined the bbc in 2001, and she soon became part of the on—air team here at 5 live.
7:41 am
we thought we would come back you with a bang and talk about death and dying. and mainly, ithink, we really want to talk about this subject because people don't talk about it. no, they don't. it wasn't about her. she didn't want any personal fame. it was a crusade to help other people get through cancer. i'm now your "it could be worse" person. we've all got one. i like to provide a service, i like to help people out. i love a good deathjoke, because you've got to find your humour in everything. the call came through and said, you know, i'm really sorry. it's the cancer. it's back. ijust couldn't believe it, and little freddie was just playing innocently away in the barn. and i wasjust like, poor, poor little fred. and all the way home i was just saying to freddie, i'm so sorry, i'm so sorry. unfortunately, for rachael's cancer, her journey has ended.
7:42 am
but what she has shown is she has lived, and she has lived an absolutely worthwhile, purposeful, amazing life, that has had an impact on so many people. rachael's fellow podcasters deborahjames and lauren mahon join us now. thank you so much forjoining us this morning. i know how close you will work, and we are so sorry for your loss. other guest talking about her and talking about what she wa nted her and talking about what she wanted to talk about is part of this for you, even today. absolutely, thatis for you, even today. absolutely, that is why we need to continue what we are doing. the last thing she wa nted we are doing. the last thing she wanted people to do is to stop talking, and that is why we created the pod cast. that is the whole reason why we created it. we just wanted to open up a conversation. rachael is a phenomenal woman and
7:43 am
all she wanted is for no one to feel alone in a cancerjourney, as we all did. from the outpourings of the la st 24 did. from the outpourings of the last 24 hours, i think that she smashed it. we are so proud of her and it is so painful to have to stand here and go through this, but seeing the impact and seeing the response, and knowing how we have made a difference, it is overwhelming. so yes, we have smiles to celebrate what she has actually achieved. i think we should have this chat on rachael's terms, and she was very specific about the ways we should talk about cancer, but also the way we should talk about death from cancer. how would she wa nt death from cancer. how would she want us to have this conversation? no one say loss, because we didn't lose her in the supermarket, she didn't pass on anywhere, she would say died. in doing so, we find comfort in death. i know that
7:44 am
rachael in the last few weeks found so much comfort in katherine mannix's words, and she talks very openly about the process. we tackled the to—do on you, me and the big c. i find massive comfort about the way that rachel spoke to us about her wishes, in terms of the way that she articulated exactly what she wanted, it allows her to be there today, in a way. i know that by sending here to continue having those conversations is exactly what rachael would have wanted. it makes us feel like we are doing the right thing by her. and there is nothing more to ask of her. she died in the way that she lived, and i think we need to celebrate her life, and she did it her way. you know, in the words of... in her beautiful hair and her nails painted. reverse dalai lama, she called it. absolutely, but herfamily are lama, she called it. absolutely, but her family are feeling incredibly proud of her, and i woke up this
7:45 am
morning not to be real, but then i also work up with an immense sense of pride in terms ofjust what i have been part of, what we have been pa rt have been part of, what we have been part of. and honoured to be part of that. we wanted to continue being pa rt that. we wanted to continue being part of that conversation. i was go to ask you that, the podcast without rachel seems impossible because she was such a big part of it, but i feel her conversation must continue. big part of it, but i feel her conversation must continuem big part of it, but i feel her conversation must continue. it will go on, she was determined that we continue it, this was her wish to us and the bbc. we will uphold the end of that bargain for rachel, we were told unless it isjennifer aniston, no one will sit in her chair. she wanted this and so we will do this for her as wanted this and so we will do this for herasa wanted this and so we will do this for her as a friend and a colleague stopped stopped —— colleague. for her as a friend and a colleague stopped stopped —— colleaguelj for her as a friend and a colleague stopped stopped -- colleague. i felt even more riled up to make an impact. this goes to show that we are not there yet in terms of
7:46 am
cancer, we still have to have those conversations and this unfortunately is the tragic way that we have to demonstrate how important it is for us to continue. i have neverfelt such a great sense of purpose in terms of what we need to do.|j such a great sense of purpose in terms of what we need to do. i was listening to 5 live yesterday, such a big part of the station, the thousands of messages coming in from listeners talking about how rachel and herjourney listeners talking about how rachel and her journey and listeners talking about how rachel and herjourney and all of you have helped inspire those listeners. how did rachel inspire and affect youtubein did rachel inspire and affect youtube in your own personal experiences of cancer? —— you two.|j have stage for bowel cancer and it returned recently and she was the first person that i called because i knew that rachel knew exactly how i felt. to be honest with you, she has held my hand, she is the person i taxed at 3am in the morning alongside lauren and she is the
7:47 am
person who comes back with death jokes at the darkest of time. listening to the clips you are playing out reminds us of how much laughter we had in the darkest of times, that was her amazing ability to flip the most horrible situations into something that i can look back on incredibly fondly. i hope, as i continue with my cancer treatment, that i can take a little bit of that energy and humour from that i can take a little bit of that energy and humourfrom rachel, moving forward. i said it quite publicly yesterday that a woman changed my life for the better. we found each other online route social media —— online through social media, i was diagnosed just after her. such compassion, warmth and laughter and we bonded immediately and through the podcast she showed me what it means to be courageous, professional, to have class through it all and professional, to have class through it allandl professional, to have class through it all and i am so proud and honoured to have just been in her
7:48 am
life and yeah, she is in my heart forever and we will do her proud. thank you for sharing her memories and continuing your crusade in her name. iam and continuing your crusade in her name. i am sure she will be massively proud of you standing up and saying what you said this morning. we wish you both well, thank you so much. you can listen to ‘you, me and the big c‘ on the bbc radio 5 live website. it is coming up to ten minutes to eight. we promised we would give you an update with the weather. we have got not a bad start to your thursday, the weekend forecast coming up to two. blue skies overhead, for many it is a cool start and things are about to change because the shower clouds pushing in across scotland. the cloud here will push across england and wales
7:49 am
through today. already bringing rain to north wales, past of north—west england, extending across the midlands towards east anglia and the south—east. will see sunshine across that, but we will see showers widely across northern england into the afternoon. will take closer look at the details because not everybody will see rain today are not much of southern counties of england will stay dry. the rain band fairly fragmented as it stretches across the midlands, lincolnshire towards wales. rain will come and go rather than being a thoroughly wet day. at times in northern england, northern ireland and scotland, as you have seen, a good scattering of showers as well to take that sunshine away. showers in scotland on a heavy side, ruling out that rumble of thunder, but a cool day. in the south—east we may see some rain the evening, same across east anglia. they will fade inland for me overnight and with that green colours on the map quite widely, it will be a cool start to
7:50 am
friday morning. temperatures always from city centres into single figures of. —— single figures of. a cool start to the new day on friday but it will be a dry day for many. most persistent across these counties of. elsewhere, more of a breeze tomorrow but some sunny spells and a bright day through the midlands, southern england and wales, one or two showers, many places spending the bulk of the day dry, but averages for the vast majority well below the 20 —— the 20 degree mark. a bit of a split on the weekend, expecting dry and sunny weather but also a little bit of rain at times. on saturday, this next would assist in pushing in, eyeing wales, outbreaks of rain coming and going, most persistent in the west but there will be some that
7:51 am
avoid it. scotland and northern ireland will be dry and bright, here on sunday we are most likely to see heavy showers further south, dry and writer compared with saturday. that is how it is looking. —— brighter. we should be looking out the window forecast more closely. the world's largest off—shore wind farm officially opens off the coast of cumbria today. we've sent ben over to have a look. tell us more about it. morning to you. i promise to show you around. we have moved inland little bit because this big offshore windfarm, the biggest in the world, opening off the coast of cumbria here. absolutely vast, it is about 20 kilometres offshore. take a look at these things because these are some of the blades that go on the wind turbines, about half the size, about 50 metres long. you can fit a double—decker bus inside some of the
7:52 am
blaze. so how does it all work and how do those numbers add up? take a look at this. growing investment in recent years has made the uk a world leader in wind technology. last year, wind provided 15% of britain's electricity, more than from coal. the walney extension wind farm covers 145 square kilometres. it took engineers nearly three years to build it and it's already generating enough power for half a million homes. in total, there are 87 turbines, the biggest is 194 metres tall. that is taller than the blackpool tower, or 98 times higher than me. yeah. that is quite a height. lets talk more about all of this. matthew, i want to start with you
7:53 am
because you are from the firm that puts these things out there. why here? the two things you need for a great offshore windfarm are shallow water depth and high wind speed and here in the irish sea and the north sea we have some of the best conditions in the entire world for offshore wind. tell me about the logistics of getting these things out there, the fact it is offshore, you get better wind but it is a lot more difficult to put them there in the first place. a little bit more difficult but we have gotten pretty good at the installation. once the foundation is in place we can put one of these things up in a day. the power, the cell and the blades. —— hours. the next day we can switch it on. emma, you are from renewables uk, where does this fit in where we are getting our energy from? right now renewables are doing a third of our energy today and by 2030 we are talking about the majority coming from renewables copy offshore wind
7:54 am
is about 15% of that. when we talk about those numbers, clearly there isa about those numbers, clearly there is a push to get more that. how easy is a push to get more that. how easy is it to do that? matthew makes it sound simple, put them out to sea, but it is not that simple stop it we are getting really good at building them but in terms of policy what is easier is that it is the cheapest form of generation we have. a cost about £57 50 per mega hours. onshore wind is even cheaper. i want to bring in lenny. the issue is meeting those targets, we know the government has strict targets from how much should come from alternative sources, will we meet those targets? sure. in order to meet the 80% c02 reduction by 2040, we have to look at the energy mix. absolutely, today's announcement is a great investment opportunity to boost the supply chain in the uk and also in increasing the renewable energy mix, especially offshore wind
7:55 am
in the uk. but if we look at the longer term, we need to consider energy storage, we need to consider pv, nuclear and other mixes to make sure that we have a stable baseload and energy storage capability to meet its long—term target. absolutely. nice to see you. thank you very much. there you have it. clearly a lot of issues to content with in terms of moving us away from traditional sources of energy and moving towards renewables. when you see the scale of this stuff of what is going out to sea, clearly a big investment and for this, a really big day, the world ‘s biggest offshore windfarm opening today, creaking power for 600,000 homes. offshore windfarm opening today, creaking powerfor 600,000 homes. we will talk more about that little later. lets get the news, travel and weather wherever you are watching this morning. see you soon. good morning from bbc london news.
7:56 am
i'm charlotee franks. a woman has died and two other people have been taken to hospital overnight following london's third fatal house fire in a week. up to 60 firefighters tackled the blaze in centurion square in woolwich, which prompted more than 20 emergency calls. it broke outjust before 1.30 this morning, and ripped through three floors of the property. the cause of the fire is not yet known. a 27—year—old man has been charged with murder after a 22—year—old was stabbed to death in deptford almost two weeks ago. shevaun sorrell died from a stab wound to the chest after reports of a altercation in creek road in deptford. dana powell, will appear before magistrates later today. it's foiled some of the most high profile armed robberies in history and today the met‘s flying squad is celebrating its one hundredth birthday. it's officers intercepted an attempt to steal a £200 million diamond from the millennium dome in 2000, and they ambushed thieves trying to seize gold bullion from a warehouse at heathrow. the man in charge of that operation says he proud of the squad's rich history.
7:57 am
it is a unique unit. it is a specialist unit. it takes a certain quality of officers to serve on it, it always has done since day one, when frederick wensley, the dc! of the day at the end of the first world war, got together 12 proven thief—takers. let's have a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tube this morning. onto the roads, in wanstead the green man tunnel is closed eastbound at the green man roundabout following a collision overnight. in plumstead, wickham lane is closed at king's highway following a collision, with delays between the local cemetery and plumstead high street. northbound traffic on the blackwall tunnel southern approach is slow from the woolwich road flyover. and in the city, fenchurch st is closed between aldgate high st and fenchurch street station for various gas works. lets have a check on the weather now with lucy martin.
7:58 am
hello. good morning. the best of the dry, bright weather through this morning, but it doesn't look set to last, the cloud will increase as we move through the day, some patchy outbreaks of rain later. so this morning there could be a few patches of mist around, some early cloud, that will clear fairly quickly and we will see plenty of sunshine for a time. cloudy skies will work in however, from the east as we move to the afternoon and we will start to see some showery at rates of rain with that as well. temperatures generally in the high teens, low 20s, a maximum of around c1 celsius with a north—westerly breeze. through this morning and rush—hour, you could need your umbrella for a time, but then we will see the skies clearing through the overnight, clear spells and temperatures falling to an overnight low of 7—11 degress celsius. tomorrow we are looking at a fresh but bright start to the day, we will tend to see cloud bubble up for a time, temperatures at a maximum of around 20 celsius. as we move into the weekend, it looks like we could see some showery outbreaks for a time on saturday and sunny spells and showers for sunday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom
7:59 am
in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. good morning. welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and jon kay. our headlines today: the men accused of the salisbury novichok attack. the uk aims to turn up the heat on russia at the un security council. the pair are believed to be members of russia's military intelligence agency. we'll be live in moscow with reaction. in the past hour a new energy price cap has been announced. the regulator says it will save 11 million customers around £75 a year. a truce in the scallop wars. but some british fishermen say it's a victory for the french. good morning. the world's largest offshore wind form opens off the coast of cumbria today. it is enough to power 600,000 homes and it is an
8:00 am
area that covers the island of jersey. it will generate enough energy for 600,000 homes. just thinking about it gives him goosebumps. ian poulter makes europe's ryder cup team, as one of the captain's wild cards. a bright start for most but rain clouds on the horizon. i will have the full details on the forecast in 15 minutes. see you then. it's thursday 6th september. our top story: british and russian officials will come face—to—face as the un security council discusses the novichok attack after theresa may said moscow agents were behind the poisoning. police and prosecutors announced they have enough evidence to charge the men over the poisoning in salisbury in march. lucinda adam has more. we now know the faces of the two russian men accused of the novichok poisonings. it is understood british police may know their true identities, but cctv shows them arriving in the uk under the names alexander
8:01 am
petrov and ruslan boshirov. they are seen travelling to salisbury, where it is believed they used this fake perfume bottle to deploy the novichok nerve agent, which would later kill dawn sturgess and contaminate her partner, charlie rowley. theresa may said months of investigation showed this was not a rogue operation. the men are officers of russia's military intelligence service, the gru. the actions of the gru are a threat to all our allies and to all our citizens. and on the basis of what we have learnt in the salisbury investigation, and what we know about this organisation more broadly, we must now step up our collective efforts, specifically against the gru. moscow said the two suspects mean nothing to them, and accused britain of manipulating information. this the response on the facebook page of their foreign ministry. the woman on the right, maria zakharova, is their head of communications.
8:02 am
to reveal so much detail of the investigation so publicly is designed to increase diplomatic pressure on russia. the uk wants more european sanctions, but may struggle to convince its eu allies. lucinda adam, bbc news. we can speak now to our moscow correspondent steve rosenberg. good to see you. i wonder how much notice rush is taking of this discovery by the uk and the naming of the two men. —— russia. discovery by the uk and the naming of the two men. -- russia. they are noticing and they are reacting. i was rereading the programme and russian newspapers this morning and it seems clear that the russian authorities are trying to discredit the evidence that was presented in the evidence that was presented in the uk yesterday to try and find inconsistencies in it and to sow doubt and to present the whole thing as some kind of anti—russian western
8:03 am
blot. one of the country's most popular tabloids today declared there is no proof at all that russia is guilty. it quoted a former russian intelligence officer as saying that what happened to the skrpals as presented by london looks more like the work of a cheap soap opera rather than an intelligence agency. i suppose it is about confidence, and vladimir putin's confident on the world stage, and there is very little appetite for more sanctions to be placed on russia, which is perhaps one route that could be taken by the un. you are right. there are some european countries which have called for less, not more, fewer sanctions. countries that want to improve relations with russia. one of the problems here, russia's default position over the last few years, when accused of a crime, has been to deny it. never to admit it. and that
8:04 am
goes for accusations of hacking ahead of the us elections, accusations of russian military intervention in ukraine, and accusations that the russian state was behind the salisbury poisoning. the knee jerk position of russia is to say we have nothing to do with this. and that continues till this day, i think. thank you for going through all of that with us. steve rosenberg, our moscow correspondent. a new cap on energy prices is being announced by the regulator 0fgem. it's to protect customers who don't shop around and end up paying more than they should. ben's at a windfarm in cumbria this morning. he can tell us about the price cap. what would it mean for customers? quite simply it means that there would be a limit on how much we as customers pay every year for energy. this is particularly applicable to customers on what is known as the standard variable tariff. that is
8:05 am
about 60 million households in the uk. essentially it is for people who don't switch. they tend to be on these, the most expensive tariffs. it might be the vulnerable and the elderly but also lazy people who don't shop around to get a cheaper deal. what the government has said is they are being penalised, they are paying too much, and they have therefore set a limit on how much energy firms can charge. that limit is £1136 per year. it will essentially save an average consumer about £75 a year. if you are on the most expensive tariff you stand to save £120 a year. for their part, the energy firms don't really like this idea because it could limit their ability to make a profit. the government says, look, if you are well run business selling energy around the country, you should still be able to make a profit. this goes some way to addressing the concerns about sky—high energy prices which seemed to rise every year. it could
8:06 am
save customers some money but the advice as always is if you don't like what you are paying, shop around because there are cheaper deals out there. if you are on the standard variable tariff of your energy supplier, the chances are that it energy supplier, the chances are thatitis energy supplier, the chances are that it is pretty expensive. thank you for explaining that. then in cumbria. —— ben in cumbria. in a few minutes we'll be speaking to 0fgem's chief executive. we'll find out how it works for customers. a senior white house official has claimed that members of the trump administration deliberately hinder some of the president's actions, in an effort to curtail his impulsive behaviour. writing anonymously in the new york times, the source is highly critical of mr trump, and portrays a sense of chaos in the white house. the president has dismissed the opinion piece as gutless, calling the newspaper phony. the failing new york times has an anonymous editorial, can you believe it? anonymous. meaning that list, thatis it? anonymous. meaning that list, that is editorial. we are doing a
8:07 am
greatjob. the that is editorial. we are doing a great job. the poll that is editorial. we are doing a greatjob. the poll numbers through the roof. the poll numbers are great. and guess what? nobody is going to come close to beating me in 2020 because of what we have done. britain and france have agreed the principles of a deal that would end a dispute over scallop fishing in the english channel. boats from both countries collided with each other during confrontations last week when french fishermen accused british boats of fishing unfairly. here's our environment correspondent, claire marshall. heading out from brixham, a very different boat to the huge dredgers that left from this same harbour last week and clashed with french fishermen. we were taken to a secret location with divers that gather scallops by hand. they showed us their technique. there is no large machinery involved. they select the right ones, and leave the rest. there is another way to get scallops that leaves the sea bed intact, and the growing success of businesses like this shows that more and more people are caring about how their scallops are fished. if you don't leave enough
8:08 am
breeding stock to breed, then you can't keep fishing. and this so—called scallop war is about dredging, industrial boats that catch huge amounts. the british were fishing legally, but french fishermen say they will leave them with no catch in the bay de seine this year. this blue boat is a 200—tonne british trawler crashing into a french boat. british fishermen say these smaller vessels deliberately got in their way. it took four hours of negotiations, but a deal of sorts was done. i'm very pleased that we've negotiated a deal that satisfies the honour of both sides, that our fishermen will be fishing where they want to fish, the larger vessels and the smaller vessels, and from 1st october. this is brixham harbour. locally caught scallops are being sorted. there is scepticism about the plan. the level of compensation wasn't decided. that's down to a summit in paris on friday. all british scallop boats have been asked to voluntarily stay away from the contested area until a formal deal is signed.
8:09 am
so, at the moment, it is up to the skippers whether or not to comply. claire marshall, bbc news, brixham. a strong earthquake injapan's northern island of hokkaido has caused a landslide, engulfing several houses. nearly 50 people have been injured and at least 32 are missing. 3 million buildings are without power. japan's prime minister, shinzo abe, says his government has set up a search and rescue task force. after stories over the summer about people getting annoyed and frustrated by the emergency services parking incorrectly and popping them in, some good news for you this morning. after an ambulance was forced to block a driveway while on call in faversham, this is what the crew returned to. you can imagine, can't you? they see a note on the windscreen and they think they have upset someone else. that is not what happened. a £10 note under the windscreen wiper and the note says: "you're blocking
8:10 am
our drive. no worries. buy a coffee when you can." one of the crew, gary turley, said it had made their day after a busy and emotional shift. i bet they are having that copyright now. good for them. a nice message to receive. it is 8:11am. as we have been hearing from ben, if you don't shop around for your energy, the chances are that you are paying more than people who do. this morning, the industry regulator, 0fgem, has introduced a price cap it says will make things fairer. the £1136 upper limit will apparently save 11 million customers on default tariffs around £75 a year. we're joined now from westminster by 0fgem's chief executive, dermot nolan. westminster by 0fgem's chief thank westminster by 0fgem's chief you for talking to us morning. thank you for talking to us this morning. what do you hope to achieve
8:11 am
with a cap? we hope to achieve the fermentation of the will of parliament to protect people on poor value deals by ensuring them that from now on they will always be paying a fair price for their energy. you have had the power before to cap prepayment, vulnerable households, those on tariffs, and you haven't done that before. why do you haven't done that before. why do you think it is needed now? actually we have put cats in place for prepayment meters. this is a major intervention into the market. parliament has given us the powers and we are moving as quickly as we possibly can to make sure that the 11 million people are protected. what we have done is we have looked very carefully at all the data, we have said what would an efficient market supplier charge? and as a result, prices will go down for these customers and they will be assured from now on that they are paying a reasonable price for their energy. how will you assure them? a number of times on this programme
8:12 am
and in many other media outlets, it has been reported that wholesale energy prices are going down but the bills go up. can you now promise that if wholesale prices go down, we will immediately see that? those people with capped tariffs, they will see their prices go down?|j can't promise that. we can't control wholesale prices because they are determined by fossilfuel wholesale prices because they are determined by fossil fuel prices. what we can promise is to update the cap every six months so that as wholesale prices change, the cap will change very to reflect that. so if wholesale prices fall, say by 5%, will there be a direct correlation in the next six—month gap when you change the cap of 5%? wholesale prices are about half the energy bill, so there would be a change probably of around 2.5%. the details will be transparent and clear. i hope that wholesale prices fall and i can't guarantee that. we can
8:13 am
guarantee that wholesale price changes will be fairly reflected when the cap is updated. and quickly incremented as well? this is the problem. people see the numbers and you can't guarantee wholesale prices and i'm not asking you to do that, but i am asking you to guarantee that when they move, and when they move lower, it will be fair for people on the capped tariffs. we believe the cap will deliver that and we are aiming to have it in by the of this year. one of the points of this tariff is to protect people who haven't moved, who haven't switched. and now you are saying that they will be charged a fair price. is that a fair thing to say? i think it is a fair thing to say. so then if people believe they are onafair so then if people believe they are on a fair price, where is the incentive to switch? i would always advise people to shop around and switch. there are 70 survivors now in the residential energy market. some are offering innovative new tariffs, particular kinds of deals that will suit people. there will still be incentives to switch to
8:14 am
these kinds of suppliers and i would a lwa ys these kinds of suppliers and i would always encourage someone to do that. but i would also say that if in fact you really prefer not to engage, you find it more difficult to engage, you can still be guaranteed that you will be paying a fair price for your energy. so taken together i think this is a good overall mix for energy customers. i think british gas no longer uses the standard variable rate, the standard variable tariff. and if there is this issue where people are reluctant to switch, even though it is in their best interests, why do we have it at all? why isn't there an automatic system that can kick in? the technology is out there so why hasn't it been implemented to make it easier and more economical for people who don't have any choice and have got to use energy?” people who don't have any choice and have got to use energy? i think all the big energy supplies including british gas still have this, but when it comes to switching, i agree. there are systems out there and many people are already signed up to them
8:15 am
that which you automatically. this price gap is a temporary idea and it is therefore a number of years to protect people but the technologies you refer to, like automatic switching, collective switches, they are developing and they will be put in place, and they will help to make the market more effective and efficient. dermot nolan, chief executive of 0fgem, thank you for talking to us this morning. it is that time of year when temperatures are dropping and we are starting to think about eating going on. my heating has gone on, for several days. big duvet. i hope you are on the right tariff! yes, i think! let's see if it will get any colder. matt has got the weather. as soon as the temperature drops below 28 degrees in neck and ‘s house, she puts the heating on! —— in naga's house. i am so cold-blooded and
8:16 am
cold—hearted! beautiful blue skies are clear in aberdeenshire. for many it is a day of change. on a satellite radar you can see spices of blue and showers in western scotland and cloud and outbreaks of rain. cloud sliding into north and west rails and further south. —— west wales. some areas towards the south—east which will seem rain but many will stay dry. some sunshine to be had across southern counties, with temperatures getting above 20. but further north much cooler and cloudier than yesterday. the rain band is fragmented and it will come and go with heavy bursts and dry weather as well. in northern england, northern ireland and scotland, sunshine throughout the day but this afternoon a good scattering of showers in scotland and the far north of england. you will be hard pressed to avoid them and they will
8:17 am
be on the heavy and thundery side. the breeze makes it feel around 14. cooler nights tonight with evening splashes of rain across east anglia and the south—east. they will fade for many inland overnight. the green is an indication of another cool night uk wide away from city centres. mostly into single figures if not below a single figures. you will have noticed that in eastern scotland, there is rain in the morning, linked to this low pressure which will hover around the north east today. feeding in more persistent rain along the north—eastern coast and into north—eastern coast and into north—eastern england as well and rain in other parts of northern scotland. with the north—westerly breeze, some showers will drift down from eastern and northern ireland into parts of england and wales but for many a drier day compared to today. on friday, coolerfeel with the winds, especially when the
8:18 am
sunshine goes behind the cloud and it is raining, it is in the east of scotla nd it is raining, it is in the east of scotland and england in particular. into the weekend, the low pressure fades away from eastern scotland, good news. but another system works its way in. on saturday, mixed weekend. saturday across england and wales, the cloudier day, but not raining all the time. that rain band might shift further south. northern ireland having a bright day on saturday with sunshine but it is on sunday that we are most likely to see the showers and a stiff breeze. brighterfurther see the showers and a stiff breeze. brighter further north compared to saturday. temperatures not looking great but what they should be for this time of year. back to you. thank you. that doesn't look too bad. that hot summer feels like a long time ago. that record—breaking summer. increased temperatures, we talked about that, the joint hottest on record. but it has raised
8:19 am
questions about the climate and the future of the planet. and is it a sign of things to come? graham satchel went to the met office and asked quite a few questions and got quite a few answers. now we officially know it has been the joint—hottest summer on record, what does this years heatwave tell us about the future? this is where they crunched the numbers, the met office in exeter. it wasn't just a hot summer, but a sign of things to come. we are seeing a change in climate and our climate in the uk has warmed byjust under a degree over the last 50 years or so. with a warming climate, we do expect the number of hot days and heatwave incidences to increase going into the future. those sorts of conditions may become more normal for the 2040s.
8:20 am
if what we saw in the climate this summer becomes more normal, the impacts will be felt everywhere. food, for example, is already expected to be 5% more expensive this year. building regulations may have to change to protect vulnerable people with heart and lung problems. hospitals will have to plan for summary emergencies. and there are other impacts. it's generally meant that we have seen higher numbers ofjellyfish, bluefin tuna. we have certainly recorded more minke whales, particularly in western approaches to the channel. and we have recorded hundreds of common dolphins. these pictures were taken off the dorset coast this summer. and this remarkable shot is a thrasher shark in the english channel. it's more commonly found in the warmer waters of the mid—atla ntic. the explosion in the number of jellyfish, like these near newquay, means we have seen more unusual visitors to our coast.
8:21 am
look! this is a sunfish. but a warmer sea is not good news for everything. the white beaked dolphin, for example, has suffered. they are a coldwater species, their stronghold being in the north sea, so we have to start thinking about this lower edge of this population's range and what impact higher sea surface tempertaures will have on those. we need to think about the other threats that could potentially be impacting these species and trying to limit those as best as possible, so we are not imposing too much pressure and threats onto these species. so are we ready for more frequent heatwaves? a report this summer by a group of mps says from the environment to transport, housing to health, not enough is being done. graham satchell, bbc news. we'll be continuing our look at climate on tomorrow's programme, when we'll be finding out what could be done to reduce the number of heatwave related deaths. we heard that there were a lot in
8:22 am
europe and injapan as well. we will be talking about that. and designing homes and if it can be a way of avoiding some of those in the future. it is 8:23am and we need some popcorn because we are going to the movies. notjust to watch the movies. we can potentially own a bit of the movies. from the hoverboard in back to the future to indiana jones' whip — a whole host of props from the silver screen will be going under the hammer at the end of the month in the uk's largest auction of film and tv memorabilia. before that though, you can see them for free at an exhibition in central london. marc ashdown has been given a sneak peek at what's on offer. it really is like a big kid' toyshop. good morning. good morning. i have costumes to the left of me and costumes to the right. but if you follow me here, there is an aladdin's cave of props and
8:23 am
memorabilia from movie history and all of this is going under the hammer later in the month. steve elaine is here, the ceo of the company running the auction. no prizes for guessing what this is. i think this hat needs no introduction. indiana jones, mr harrison ford's fedora from raiders of the lost ark. how much do i have to spend on that? up to £300,000, key to several sequences in the movie. and this needs no introduction, from a key sequence in back to the future two. yes, in several sequences in episodes two and three. this was the hover board that they used for the shots when they were running around. an iconic think that movie fans will love. add a genuine artefact here, i will he
8:24 am
—— wonkabar. and from star wars as well we have a stormtrooper head peace. all of the profits are going to charity. just talk through the star of the show. this is harrison ford's jacket from the empire strikes back. base is what he wears when he arrives and when he is confronted by darth vader for the first time. £1 million is expensive. yes, but it should end up in a museum because it is a truly iconic piece of film artefact. good luck with the auction. there is loads of stuff here. lord of the rings, star wars, aliens for the adults. the movie lover's dream and who better to talk to us about that than helena from empire magazine. it is a movie
8:25 am
buff‘s seventh heaven. from empire magazine. it is a movie buff's seventh heaven.” from empire magazine. it is a movie buff's seventh heaven. i am freaking out about being here. catwoman's mask behind me, tyler's road to my right and it is magic! do people dress up in them and put them in the loft or do you just brag about them? essentially bragging rights. you have a glass case like these and you keep them somewhere prominent so people can see the cool piece of movie history that you own. you have got to dig deep. possibly £1 million for that jacket. it is amazing. even smaller items, if they are from a film that people adore, you are talking about tens of thousands. the props can bejust you are talking about tens of thousands. the props can be just as famous as the stars of the shows. exactly, something like indiana jones's whip, you instantly know what it is from and where it has come from and what it has done. it is magic. the auction is on the 20th of september but until then you can
8:26 am
come down here, wherever you are from. and on that note i will hand you to the news, travel and weather wherever you are. good morning. a decidedly autumnal feel to our weather today. pretty krul out there and there will be some rain at times but not all the time. some sunshine in the forecast. thickening up across wales, south—west england, some outbreaks of rain spreading across the midlands, east anglia and the south—east as the day wears on. for northern ireland, northern england and scotland, here it turns into a day of sunny spells and showers. some of the showers, especially in scotland, heavy and thundery. temperatures, 14 in glasgow, maybe sneaking up to 21 in london. this evening and tonight, a fair amount of cloud and damp weather in south wales in southern england. clear
8:27 am
spells behind. most of the showers fading but the rain that feeding into northern scotland and north east england. a chilly night, temperatures down to four to — six. tomorrow, an area of low pressure developing to the north—east of the british isles. that will feed in rain in north—east scotland and england. some of that rain quite heavy. elsewhere, not many showers. some spells of sunshine. but it will be breezy, particularly towards the north and north—east, and another called day —— cool day. that first area of low pressure will spin away towards scandinavia as they get into the start of the weekend but it looks like we will see another frontal system pushing on from the west this time. some heavy rain in parts of south—west england, wales and the midlands as they go through saturday. the south—east may stay dry, uncertainty about that. brighter skies for northern ireland and scotland, just a few showers,
8:28 am
17-20d. and scotland, just a few showers, 17—20d. sunday, another breezy dates with a mixture of sunshine and showers. this is business live from bbc news with maryam moshiri and victoria fritz. a crucial day in the trade war between the united states and china. will president trump follow through on his threat of another $200 billion worth of tariffs on beijing? live from london, that's our top story on thursday 6th september. decision time looms as american
8:29 am
businesses have until the end of the day to express their views. we'll have more on this in a moment. also in the programme... the world's largest working offshore wind farm open's off the coast of north—west england today. it's the size of 20,000 football pitches and we'll have a special report from near the site.
8:30 am

54 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on