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tv   Victoria Derbyshire  BBC News  September 6, 2018 9:00am-11:01am BST

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hello. it's thursday. it's 9 o'clock. i'm victoria derbyshire. welcome to the programme. good news — your energy bills are to be capped if you're on a standard tariff. the regulator says 11 million of you will save around £75 a year. ofgem's boss tells us energy firms wont be able to get round it. we will be enforcing this in the strictest fashion possible. right. you will tell them to? we have the power to require them not to. by telling them something stronger?m legally requiring them. they will not be legally allowed to charge above the price cap. so how will energy companies be forced to comply? we will speak to energy uk who represents them. the united nations security council will hear the british government outline its case against two russian nationals it has accused of carrying out the novichok poisoning in salisbury. the government has concluded that the two individuals named by the police and cps are officers
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from the russian military intelligence service, also known as the gru. but why has the government closed its investigation into m other suspicious deaths in britain that have been linked to russia? we will have the latest. is the fear of a migraine as bad as the migraine itself? two—thirds of migraine sufferers say it is, according to new research. we'll be hearing from those affected. and we speak to a british woman who has spent 25 years trying to unite orphaned children in war zones with their families. her latest mission is in iraq, where she's helping victims of islamic state. i'm trying to find all of the children that were taken, all of the youngsters. but particularly sabir because i believe we can find him. i can't promise you but i will do my very best. hello.
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welcome to the programme. we're live until 11 this morning. as we are each weekday. we want to talk about your gas and atrocity bills today. how much do you pay each year and how much do you think you will benefit from the cap on your bills? will it encourage you to switch or stay where you are? because the regulator is doing the job for you bringing down the bills. when was the last time you switched and do you even know how? get in touch. and that's our top story today. a new cap on energy prices has been announced this morning by the regulator ofgem. they say it's to protect customers who don't shop around, and remain on their supplier's standard variable tariff and end up paying more. the cap will vary according to usage but for the average user it has been set at £1,136 a year. that is based on a typical dual fuel customer paying by direct debit.
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ofgem say the move will mean 11 million households will save around £75 on average a year. the cap will come into effect in december and will be reviewed and updated every six months. our business correspondent theo leggett is with me. why is it needed? because most of us don't bother to shop around. 11 million households, almost half of all households, are still on standard variable tariffs, which they are put on because dealers have expired or they have never tried to change supplier. another 5 million consumers are already protected because they are considered to be vulnerable. very few people actually bother to shop around and to make savings that way. is there a downside to the cap? you suggested then that the government might mean that people are letting the government do it for them, that is the obvious risk. this is designed to save the average household £75
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per year. if you switch supplier and get onto the cheaper tariffs, you could be saving hundreds. that is what people will be looking at today as one of the potential risks of the strategy. thank you. we will hear from the ofgem boss in about ten minutes. now here is annita with the rest of the news. good morning, everyone. a senior white house official has claimed that members of the trump administration deliberately hinder some of the president's actions, in an effort to curtail his impulsive behaviour. writing anonymously in the new york times, the source portrays a sense of chaos in the white house. the president has dismissed the opinion piece as gutless, calling the newspaper phony, as chris buckler reports. each day seems to bring new claims about what is happening behind the doors of this white house, and the unconventional president in charge here. the new york times says it was a senior official in donald trump's own administration who wrote its damning opinion piece, although the author insisted on remaining anonymous.
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they claim the president's leadership style is impetuous, adversarial, petty and ineffective, that many are working diligently from within to frustrate parts of his own agenda and his worst inclinations, and that the root of the problem is the president's amorality. god bless you and thank you, mr president. mr trump was meeting a group of sheriffs when he was forced to answer questions about keeping control in what is being painted as a lawless white house. if the failing new york times has an anonymous editorial... can you believe it? anonymous, meaning gutless, a gutless editorial. we're doing a greatjob. the poll numbers are through the roof, our poll numbers are great, and guess what? nobody is going to come close to beating me in 2020 because of what we've done. but fear, a new book written by bob woodward, one of the journalists who exposed the watergate scandal, is making similar allegations — that many are working to protect
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america from its president. the new york times said it was proud to have published the piece, which it insisted gave the public a real insight into the workings of the trump administration, from someone in a position to know. chris buckler, bbc news, washington. the security minister ben wallace says that the russian president vladimir putin bears ultimate responsibility for the novichok attack in salisbury. his comments come as the uk prepares to brief the un security council on the arrest warrants it's issued for two russian men suspected of having carried out the nerve agent attack in march. moscow has denied any involvement. lucinda adam has more. we now know the faces of the two russian men accused of the novichok poisonings. it is understood british police may know their true identities, but cctv shows them arriving in the uk under the names alexander petrov and ruslan boshirov. they are seen travelling
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to salisbury, where it is believed they used this fake perfume bottle to deploy the novichok nerve agent, which would later kill dawn sturgess and contaminate her partner, charlie rowley. theresa may said months of investigation showed this was not a rogue operation. the men are officers of russia's military intelligence service, the gru. the actions of the gru are a threat to all our allies and to all our citizens. and on the basis of what we have learnt in the salisbury investigation, and what we know about this organisation more broadly, we must now step up our collective efforts specifically against the gru. moscow said the two suspects mean nothing to them, and accused britain of manipulating information. this the response on the facebook page of their foreign ministry. the woman on the right, maria zakharova, is their head of communications. to reveal so much detail of the investigation so publicly
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is designed to increase diplomatic pressure on russia. the uk wants more european sanctions, but may struggle to convince its eu allies. lucinda adam, bbc news. britain and france have agreed on the principles of a deal that would end a dispute over scallop fishing in the english channel. video footage, recorded last week, showed boats from both countries colliding. the new agreement will not allow british vessels to take scallops from the bay of seine between may and october when the french are not allowed to harvest. an indian—registered ship that's been impounded in an english port for more than two years is finally on the verge of being sold. the malaviya 20 has been stuck in great yarmouth in norfolk sincejune 2016 after its owners fell into liquidation, leading to legal disputes. bids for the ship will open on tuesday. proceeds will go towards paying the crew's wages and port fees. the luxury british goods maker burberry says it
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will end its practice of burning unsold goods. a report injuly showed that it destroyed products worth £28 million last year to protect its brand. it's also announced an end to using realfur. english heritage is asking for the public‘s help in identifying world war one nurses who served at england's first wartime country house hospital. no formal records exist for many of the women who worked at wrest park in bedfordshire, but it's hoped they'll be recognised by relatives in photographs which have been transformed into colour. that's a summary of the latest bbc news. more at 9.30. thank you. this text on energy bills from dodder penelope. i object to being called lazy by not switching my energy provider. i did it once and ended up with a poor service and eventually higher costs. i am not willing to do that again. i am not lazy, just frightened. and on facebook: many of the most
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vulnerable, without access to the internet like my disabled daughter, are penalised. they cannot search the internet. those in sheltered accommodation don't have access to computer and star's time is taken up by basic needs. i manage my daughter's energy bills but she is the exception. i know nobody else in receipt of the payment, which must be the greatest kept secret. and this one: now the government has introduced a price cap on energy, i now have got to find an extra £34 a month for my benefit that i haven't got because the government cap on benefits puts me below the poverty line. thank you. please keep them coming in. we will talk more about this in the next few minutes. when was the last time you switched? does the cap on your bill encourage you to switch or decide to stay where you offer longer? now sport. the ryder cup is a few weeks away and we know the full europeteam and they
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have gone for experience over use. thomas bjorn, the europe captain, named his four wildcards and he's plumped for players that have no fewer than 20 ryder cup appearances between them. paul casey and former 0pen champion henrik stenson were expected, as was ian poulter. the name perhaps causing most consternation is actually the most experienced of the lot — sergio garcia. he is the world number 30. he's been in pretty wretched form this year. missed the cut in all of the majors. failed to qualify for the end of year playoffs in america for the first time. you'll remember back at easter he had a meltdown at the masters defending his title. he went into the water five times on a single hole. but with 5 rookies automatically qualifying, captain thomas bjorn said without sergio, it would be like a football team playing without their skipper. it meant the likes of in—form matt wallace and rafa cabrera—bello missed out. bjorn said he felt sick having to tell them. it was not an easy decision because
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so it was not an easy decision because so many guys have played well and tried hard and put effort into them. they deserved that we sit down and consider them and take everything into account. but in the end, this was the decision that was reached. and yes, making those phone calls to those four was easy but it was tough to make the phone calls to the ones that missed out. a poll on the bbc sport website had ian poulter as their overwhelming choice for a wildcard. he seems to embody everything the ryder cup is about. we remember the miracle at medinah a couple of years ago. he's got a great record — never lost a singles match. and a remarkable comeback from the englishman too. two years ago he wasn't playing when europe got thrashed at hazeltine. he'd dropped to below 200 in the world. he said his main motivation over the last couple of years was getting back into the team and he's managed it. the competition starts on friday 28th septemberjust outside paris. the usa are favourites to retain the trophy,
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although they've not won in europe since 1993. and tell us why the world surfing league is leading the way in us sports? they've become the first us based global sport to give equal prize money to men and women. the changes will come into effect from next year with both male and female surfers praising the move as much for the money as the message that it sends out to youngsters and other sports around the globe. the sport and the world surf league is one of the fastest growing around the world and will be included in the olympics for the first time in a couple of years. injune the wsl came under fire after a junior competition awarded the male winner double the prize money of the female winner. it's now commited to a number of inititives promoting women's surfing and the 11—time men's world champion kelly slater has fully endorsed the move. i was actually astounded that it hasn't happened. we are setting a
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precedent in our sport by having equal pay for men and women. i think it is great. 0bviously equal pay for men and women. i think it is great. obviously it makes me think back to my own mother who raised three boys mostly by herself from the time that we were quite young, on a paycheque. you think about inequalities with women highlighted in the news over the last few years. it is warranted. slater also said he hopes this move can now challenge others to do the same thing and hopes this becomes the norm. that's all for now. thank you. more from ben throughout the morning. let's talk more about your energy bills being capped if you're on a standard variable tariff. 0fgem say that 11 million customers will benefit from the proposed cap which is being set at £1,136 for a typical dual fuel user. that means an average household on a standard variable tariff saving £75 a year.
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the cap was a promise from the prime minister. 0fgem's chief executive dermot nolan told us energy firms won't be able to get round it. we are setting the cap for 11 million customers on poor deals and we hope to bring it in by the end of the and at that point we expect people to save on average £75 a year. so where are you actually setting the cap, at what figure? year. so where are you actually setting the cap, at what figure7m will vary by customer usage but for the typical user who pays by direct debit, that will be £1136 a year for and and gas combined. why isn't the cap lower than that? it is as low as we possibly can set it. we have gone through it with incredible phone is that we have looked at what an efficient supplier would do and we have added a minor marketing to it. ican have added a minor marketing to it. i can reassure people that we have
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set this for the energy companies and they will have to take dramatically and be more efficient to meet this. are they? i believe they are. how? if they can't beat they are. how? if they can't beat the cap, they will not be able to operate effectively in the market. we have seen a lot of entry into the mark davis last few years and newer companies coming in. we now have 60 01’ companies coming in. we now have 60 or 70 players in the energy market. this will be a real challenge to the bigger players. if they want to work effectively in the market, they will have to be more efficient and improve customer service, and compete with the new entrants. improve customer service, and compete with the new entrantslj wonder compete with the new entrants.” wonder how much of a challenge it is for some of the big six. let's just ta ke for some of the big six. let's just take one, npower, who released a 70% rise in profits this year compared to last year and just a couple of months ago it put up its standard tariff gas price by 4.4%, and its electricity by 6.2%. they were prepared. the underlying cost of
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energy, the wholesale cost of energy, the wholesale cost of energy, producing it, which mainly comes from fossilfuels, energy, producing it, which mainly comes from fossil fuels, has increased over the last year. so prices have risen. what i can assure anyone watching is that the price cap will now make sure that any changes in underlying costs are fairly reflected. so if wholesale costs go down, then the price cap will react as well. 0verall costs go down, then the price cap will react as well. overall this will react as well. overall this will be a fair and transparent cap which will work for all users. do you think it will encourage people to switch, which is the real problem, isn't it? people are coaxed into discounted deals, and then the energy companies quietly put them on a much higher standard deal.” energy companies quietly put them on a much higher standard deal. i would a lwa ys a much higher standard deal. i would always encourage people to switch and to shop around. sure but does this cap incentivise people to switch? there will still be incentives for people to switch but it will protect those that don't.
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the way in which people use energy will change a lot in the next few yea rs. we will change a lot in the next few years. we will see smart meters and faster switching and things called auto switches, which are already there, to change you automatically. it will be easier to switch as the energy sector will change a lot in the next few years, but in the meantime we will protect people.” understand the protecting argument, i hear it. what are the incentives with a price cap to switch? customers will say they don't need to because the regulator is doing it for them. the regulator is giving a level of protection and charging a fair price, however there will still be new firms, innovative firms, potentially very efficient firms, and still an incentive to switch. i think the key is how these things coexist, and i think they will coexist. it will protect those who
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are not engaged and offer them a fair price was still making it easier to switch and there will be incentives to do so. why should customers have to switch all the time? people who don't switch will be guaranteed to pay a fair price. but competition in the long run will probably make things more efficient and effective and as technology changes the energy sector... who have already said there are 60 or 70 companies in the market. that is incredible competition and still millions of people don't switch. incredible competition and still millions of people don't switchm will be easierfor them millions of people don't switchm will be easier for them to switch. if they choose not too there is still strong protection given to them. this is what parliament has asked us to do, to protect those who are not engaged and make it easier for them to engage in future. that is what we are trying to do because we think overall it is best for consumers and it will deliver a fair dealfor them in the consumers and it will deliver a fair deal for them in the energy sector. how will you enforce this cap? by making sure absolute monitoring, making sure absolute monitoring, making sure absolute monitoring, making sure nobody charges above it and taking incredibly strong action if they don't. what is that? forcing them to reduce their price to the
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cap. we will be enforcing this in the strictest fashion possible. you will tell them to? we have the power to require them not to. by telling them? something stronger? by legally requiring them. they will not be legally allowed to charge above the price cap. joining us now in the studio is guy anker from moneysavingexpert.com and lawrence slade from energy uk which represents over 100 energy firms. welcome to both of you. why don't your members do the decent thing now and cut the cost of standard variable tariffs so there will be no need for the cap? basically prices are driven by external factors like wholesale costs. we have just seen turn dermot nolan talking about that. not all of them. most of the costs are outside the control of suppliers, and we know that wholesale prices have gone up drastically. and larger profits. the largest companies have only had a
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4.4% margin over last year, so we are seeing that coming through already. that if millions if not billions of pounds. some of them are barely breaking even though. we want eve ryo ne barely breaking even though. we want everyone to get access to a fair deal and we are investing and making it easy to change and we are investing in new services and try to make target work as well as it can for people. quite a few of the energy companies put up their standard variable tariffs on average by about 8% recently. they got in first circuit will not affect them. it is not to do with getting in first. as ofgem has said, the cap is that regardless of the actions of suppliers. wholesale prices this year have risen by something like 1596. year have risen by something like 15%. that is what those increases are about. 32 energy companies have increased their standard variable rates this year. this is a market responding to market conditions. the other thing i would really like out of this is more transparency in the
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market and to help people understand what drives the costs. ultimately, the best way you can save money is to switch, be on the best tariff, but make sure your house is as efficient as it can be. how will your members cope with this cap? efficient as it can be. how will your members cope with this cap7m will be challenging. we will have to become more efficient. we will have to look at how we can use technology. you should have been doing that already surely? this is what competition is doing, victoria. this is why we have 70 companies in the market. this is the challenge coming through. 5.5 million people changed supplier last year, which is growing byi million households every year. a lot of effort is going in here. the cap is here but we have still got to make the market work for everyone. this is not the cap in stock, it is more work to do to make sure everyone in the market can benefit. do you have sympathy for the energy companies facing this challenging time? my concern is more for people out there and how much they are paying on their bills. some will see reduced bills clearly. it is important not
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to rest on your laurels because there are much bigger savings to be had by switching supplier. it might be switching tariff within your own supplier. looking last night, the cheaper tariff on the market based on average use was £859 per year. the average big six tariff right now is about £1200 a year and this cap will bring that down. assuming that cheapest tariffs still exists, there will be a big differential between the cap and the cheapest deals, so i would encourage people to look around. not everyone can switch. i havejust people to look around. not everyone can switch. i have just read a message from a mother who manages her door disabled daughter's utility bills. and a woman who switched and then got higher costs and is writing to switch again. not everyone has access to the internet. this person signed the tenancy deal and can only get her energy from one supplier which means she can't shop around.
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it is tricky for some and the cap will benefit people who can't switch. the viewer comment who was too frightened to switch, it will benefit them. i would say that for those who can, for those online, you can easily check. once you switch, you have got to keep switching because after the discount deal runs out, then your members put everybody back on the much more expensive standard variable tariffs. all of the companies in the market will make every effort they possibly can to make sure that you are warned that your fixed deal is coming to an end, in the same way as happens in the savings and mortgage market. we wa nt the savings and mortgage market. we want people to be engaged, and we don't want this engaged customers because the market is changing. all services are coming in. what about people who don't have access to the internet and can't switch?” people who don't have access to the internet and can't switch? i do acce pt internet and can't switch? i do accept that. the simplest thing to do is to telephone your supplier. if you are worried about the bill, picked up the phone to the supplier. how much will that cost them to hang
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around on the phone for? it shouldn't because you should be able to make an immediate saving. the warm home discount, make sure you are getting the benefits available to you. suppliers have specialised teams to deal with vulnerable customers and they are there to help customers. it is really important that if you are worried about your bill that you get on the phone to your supplier because they will help you. i don't want people to be afraid to turn the heating up and not turn the lights on. the help is there and you need to contact your supplier if you are worried. why don't your members scrap the standard variable tariffs? somehow. and why? you would have to ask the individual companies. —— some have scrapped it. what i am prepared to do is to push the market to make sure that we are doing everything possible for our consumers. does the cap that is on average £75 cheaper,
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does that incentivise people to switch or make them rest on their laurels? it is a good question and we will have to wait and see. i hope it doesn't make people rest on their laurels. for those worried about switching, that those who can, it is the same gas and electricity at the same pipes. it takes around five minutes to go on a comparison site if you are online to plug in your details and find out your cheapest supplier. it is not onerous and you will have to give a few weeks later. in most cases, that is it. it is not a difficult thing. to answer your question, i hope people don't rest on your laurels. that is why i come on your laurels. that is why i come on programmes like this to explain how easy it can be. nikolai facebook says what about prepayment meters? there was already a cap for prepayment meters in place. they tend to be more expensive anyway. it is cheaper to get on a build meter andl is cheaper to get on a build meter and i would encourage people to do that. another text. i can't get a better electricity tariff because i don't have the you have suggested they just bring up. don't have the you have suggested theyjust bring up. tom says the price cap is nonsense because it doesn't encourage people to might
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benefit from the cap but i don't because i am below it. unit price cap would be the way. if the cap was on the unit price it would make sense. people who are profligate with energy use might benefit from the cap but i don't because i am below it. unit price cap would be the way to and this one: 0fgem suggest that 20 million households should eat spent one hour three times a year shopping around through dozens and dozens of sale. this is bad because it is time wasting. another text: i have lpg, as my electricity is hydroelectric, and my guess is £92 a month and my electricity £65 a month. just for a two bed bungalow. apart from the fa ct two bed bungalow. apart from the fact that we will have to wait and see if this incentivise his people to switch, are there any other downsides? to switching? to the cap. if the wholesale prices go up and it is reviewed every six months, bills could go up. that is true and they could go up. that is true and they could go up. that is true and they could go down. we have been critical in the past of suppliers putting prices up when wholesale prices have gone up but not as quick when they gone up but not as quick when they go down. i hope the devil might be in the detail. we haven't fully analysed it yet. i hope the cap
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gives sufficient scope for prices to go down when wholesale prices do go down. those on low incomes will not benefit from this cap. the cap will give the average person on an average standard variable tariffs are saving of £75. but you have got to spend over £1000 a year to get that. which is a cost of energy. there are cheaper tariffs available. speak to your supplier if you're concerned about your bill. the point i would like to come back on is one of those comments. actually the way to make a really big saving is to make your house as efficient as possible. i would also recommend that you check with your supplier. are there any services that they can give you? there are energy efficient programmes available free of charge to people in particularly vulnerable circumstances. make sure you have got that. it is the old saying that it is true that the cheapest energy that you don't use. please get in
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contact and make sure you are on the best tariff, make sure you're getting the warm home discount, your houseis getting the warm home discount, your house is insulated and you are using the cheapest light bulbs because there are real things that all of us can do. are all of your members going to comply with this cap? they have no choice. it is there. guy said it, the cap is there. we need to see how it comes in and it affects the market. as we are bringing in exciting things to the market, we need to engage customers, exciting things like electric vehicles. i suspect they will close the cap as quickly as possible. we have seen that with prepayment meters. you need to have variability in the price. that is the risk. thank you. do keep your views coming in. still to come:
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a constant headache... new figures out today suggest around two out of three people with migraines live in fear of when their next attack might be. and a budget blackhole. why westminster will hear calls later today for more support for children in need as they turn 18. time for the latest news — here's annita. the headlines now on bbc news: a new cap on energy prices has been announced this morning by the regulator 0fgem. they say it's to protect customers who don't shop around, and remain on their supplier's standard variable tariff and end up paying more. the cap will vary according to usage but for the average user it has been set at £1,136 a year, based on a typical dual fuel customer paying by direct debit. 0fgem say the move will mean 11 million households will save around £75 on average. the cap will come into effect in december and will be reviewed every six months. a senior white house official has claimed that members
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of the trump administration deliberately hinder some of the president's actions, in an effort to curtail his ‘impulsive behaviour‘. writing anonymously in the new york times, the source is highly critical of mr trump, and portrays a sense of chaos in the white house. the president has dismissed the opinion piece as gutless, calling the newspaper phony. the security minister, ben wallace, has said the russian president, vladimir putin, bears ultimate responsibility for the salisbury novichok attack. the crown prosecution service said yesterday that two russian men, identified as serving officers with the gru military intelligence service, were suspected of carrying out the poisoning which left one person dead. britain will brief the un security council on the issue later today. india's supreme court has ruled that gay sex between consenting adults is legal. the ruling overturns a law which has been in place since colonial times and was punishable with up to ten years in jail. campaigners outside the court cheered and some broke into tears as the announcement was made.
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britain and france have agreed on the principles of a deal that would end a dispute over scallop fishing in the english channel. video footage, recorded last week, showed boats from both countries colliding. the new agreement will not allow british vessels to take scallops from the bay of seine between may and october, when the french are not allowed to harvest. that's a summary of the latest bbc news. thank you very much. here's some sport now with ben croucher. novak djokovic has reached the semifinals for the 11th consecutive time at the us open. he beatjohn millman, who beat roger federer. djokovic will play kei nishikori in the semifinals. a good day for japan. the first timejapan have had representation in the men's and women's semifinals at the same grand
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slam. europe's ryder cup captain has defended his decision to pick sergio garcia as one of his wild cards that this month's contests against the usa, saying he is the heartbeat of the team. ryan giggs takes charge of his first competitive match as wales manager tonight. they play the republic of ireland in the nation ‘s league. ryan giggs says he wants his tea m league. ryan giggs says he wants his team to be hard to beat and play attractive football. that is all the sport for now. thank you. migraines affect1 in 7 people across the world and they can cause agonising symptoms, including headaches, vomiting, dizziness and even loss of vision. it's estimated 190,000 people get migraine attacks every day in the uk — with women more susceptible than men. new figures out today suggest around 2 out of 3 people with migraines live in fear of when their next attack might be — and for many the anxiety can be just as bad as the physical symptoms of the actual attack. a social media campaign #foma — or ‘fear of migraine attack‘ has been launched to try and get people talking about the condition. let‘s talk to drjessica briscoe —
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she‘s a headache specialist doctor and has regular migraines herself. yasmin coutinho has around our migraine attacks a month and nichola west — who has migraines where she loses her vision, and is blogging on instagram this month to raise awareness about the condition each describe what it feels like to have a migrainejessica, i get igeta i get a migraine with aura. a visual aura, flashing lights, blockages in my vision, which is how it starts. i get that around 20—30 minutes before my headache actually starts. i also get difficulties with speech, slurring speech, not being able to get the right words out. sometimes word confusion as well. then i will start to feel quite cautious. sometimes i do vomit as well. then i get the headache, which tends to be on the bright side. for me, the
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headache isn‘t the worst part of it. it‘s the fa ct i isn‘t the worst part of it. it‘s the fact i can‘t concentrate, i can‘t speak properly, i get very light—sensitive and i cannot see. then it makes it difficult for me to work or do anything i would want to do in life. how long does it last? what i called a migraine attack lasts for a few hours... probably half a day, maybe a full day sometimes, and then i feel unwell for about two days after. and yourself? i think i get migraines without aura, but for me the worst pain is the head pain. i kind of explains that is being shot on the head but for a long period of time, for about a day. i also get some annoying side symptoms, but nor sure, ivomit annoying side symptoms, but nor sure, i vomit a lot when i get a migraine. iget sure, i vomit a lot when i get a migraine. i get access of yawning, so migraine. i get access of yawning, sol migraine. i get access of yawning, so i can't stop yawning, i get
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fluids coming out of my nose. really annoying symptoms. for me, it is that constant throbbing head pain on the left— hand that constant throbbing head pain on the left—hand side which is unbearable, inca pacitating. the left—hand side which is unbearable, incapacitating. nichola west, how would you describe your migraine attacks? i get migraines with aura, lose my vision for 20—40 minutes and then the headache which comes afterwards. for me, the worst bit is losing my vision and just being afraid of when that is going to happen, because then it starts, i need to get myself somewhere quickly, because i can't see that that length of time. it's quite a scary experience. sorry to ask a stupid question, when you say you lose your vision, you can‘t see anything, or does what‘s in front of you become blurry? it starts off, it's almost as if someone has poured water into your eyes. it's like a very blurred vision. from there, i really need to close my eyes to be 0k, really need to close my eyes to be ok, because it's so difficult to see. i've been out before at places where i have had to cover an eye and
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try to squint to see things. it's a very limited vision. what about all of you, in terms of the fear of a migraine attack? that is the research out today, two out of three people say it can be as bad as the migraine. absolutely. particularly if i have something important to do or if i know i have something big on at work, i get the fear. that itself can sometimes drive a fear. that itself can sometimes drivea migraine, fear. that itself can sometimes drive a migraine, so it can be difficult. you wonder, am i worried because the migraine is starting? it's because the migraine is starting? it‘s a self—perpetuating cycle. because the migraine is starting? it's a self—perpetuating cycle.” agree. stress or excitement is a trigger for a migraine. agree. stress or excitement is a triggerfora migraine. if agree. stress or excitement is a trigger for a migraine. if i agree. stress or excitement is a triggerfora migraine. if i have something very important coming up like a presentation or a wedding, or something really fun, that is when i might get one. so it's kind of a vicious cycle, really. some of the happiest moments of my life have actually been tainted with migraine pain. it'sjust actually been tainted with migraine pain. it's just unfortunate, actually been tainted with migraine pain. it'sjust unfortunate, but i guess we try and manage that anxiety
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as best as possible, knowing thereon methods, there is medication that can help with the anxiety. nichola west, how do you manage a migraine? 0ne west, how do you manage a migraine? one thing west, how do you manage a migraine? 0ne thingl west, how do you manage a migraine? one thing i have had to do is talk to my children. i have had three children and i have to talk to them about what happens if i have a migraine attack. i have been out before in a supermarket with my three children, who were quite young at the time, nine and under, i think it was probably the fear of one happening again. i can relate to that. i sort of had this moment of thinking and it was quite strong overhead lights, so my son in the end that nine years old had to pay for the shopping and get me outside toa for the shopping and get me outside to a bench, where i could sit down for a while and just hope my vision returned quickly. in some ways, it's about telling people around me so they are aware when it happens, i need to leave quickly and get to somewhere that is quite safe. do any of you find that people are not
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sympathetic? absolutely, people think it isjust sympathetic? absolutely, people think it is just a headache and there is a big difference between a tension headache and a migraine. a tension headache and a migraine. a tension headache and a migraine. a tension headache is bothersome, it is there that will go away with painkillers. people say, it‘s a migraine, have you tried paracetamol orido migraine, have you tried paracetamol or i do prevent? i think, i‘ve never heard that before! you have tried everything, that is the point. do you find people don‘t take it seriously? 10096. the worst case where that happens is when you are ina where that happens is when you are in a situation where it is hard to ask for help. i have been in immigration queues or on the tube andl immigration queues or on the tube and i am like, can i sit down, i have a migraine? people are like, that's not being disabled enough or that's not being disabled enough or thatis that's not being disabled enough or that is not a fair reason for you to sit down. when you are near to vomiting and you cannot see, you just want some relief. i think the word doesn't carry as much gravity as it probably should. because people who haven‘t had a migraine have no idea how horrific it can
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feel? absolutely. nichola, what do you think, a lot of people don‘t really understand ? you think, a lot of people don‘t really understand? definitely. people think of it as being a bad headache. i had my first migraine seven years ago, when i headache. i had my first migraine seven years ago, when | was headache. i had my first migraine seven years ago, when i was pregnant with my youngest. up until that point, idid with my youngest. up until that point, i did get headaches, bad headaches, which i would describe as migraines. i would say to people, i have a migraine today. i thought that's what it was, the really bad headache. it was only after getting migraines and all of the physical symptoms that come with it, actually the headache is a small part of it, it was only then i realised migraines are really different to just headaches. at shirley says she is to bomb out with 12 hours with headache, tiredness and vicious retching. she realised sugar was the trigger and she went cold turkey, cutting out all sugar including natural chagrined fruit and hasn‘t had another attack. you said it is stress and excitement, what triggers it for you, jessica? changes in
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sleep pattern, stress is definitely changes in blood sugar level. if i skip meals, which can happen when you are busy at work, i definitely get a you are busy at work, i definitely geta migraine. you are busy at work, i definitely get a migraine. for me it was red wine. that has stopped, obviously, because it is not whether. leon says, i suffer badly from ike‘s tree migraines and the fear of getting a migraines and the fear of getting a migraine is bad. stress makes me worse. when i get a migraine, and out of action for three days with vomiting and extreme head pain. sadly, when i went for an assessment for benefits, they referred to them as bad headaches, which is not the case. the benefit assessor was so out of touch. i now have two appeal ata out of touch. i now have two appeal at a tribunal yet again. people need to know stress and anxiety make it worse. i am always petrified of getting an attack whilst out and about. briefly, nichola, you‘ve talked about how you manage things. give people some hope, especially do ata give people some hope, especially do at a specialist head doctor, what advice would you give?” at a specialist head doctor, what advice would you give? i think the first thing to do is a diary, so you
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can figure out exactly when you are getting on, is there a pattern? look about 12—24 hours before your migraine starts because that is how long it takes for a migraine to develop. think about things like keeping a good routine. it can be quite boring whilst you establish that routine, getting regular sleep, eating regularly, drinking plenty of water. and actually, go and see a doctor. a lot of gps do have more knowledge than they are given credit for about knowledge than they are given credit forabout migraine, knowledge than they are given credit for about migraine, but also their headache centres and specialists who can help if you‘re getting frequent migraines, you stott preventative treatment necessary. for me, it's the same. thank you all of you. thank you, nichola. appreciate your time. thank you. thank you to you for your many m essa g es thank you to you for your many messages about your electricity and gas bills. news today that the regulator 0fgem is capping energy bills. that will come in at the end
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of the year. roy says, i have my energy supply and a fixed tariff which began in august. when i checked my bank, the payment they took was almost 50% more than i had agreed to pay. i phoned an power and told it was due to a projection on the energy i might use. i was told it is government policy, to stop people getting into debt. how can this be right? 0n people getting into debt. how can this be right? on a fixed more than i need for energy they think i could use? john says competition in the energy industry is a farce. your choices are industry is a farce. your choices a re often industry is a farce. your choices are often from very expensive, crazily expensive or stupidly expensive, we need to bring back energy providers and that government control. energy is as necessary to live as water and air and energy companies shouldn‘t be allowed to pay so much buried essential utility for stop lance says i‘m on a fixed price tariff is my power company, recently switched as their parents yearly bill is expected to be well
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over the mooted cap of £1136. ican over the mooted cap of £1136. i can then presumably use power in the same is now on my bill will come down and be capped at £1136. result! more of those to come through the programme. keep them coming in. coming up... british and russian officials will meet face to face today at the un security council — where the nerve agent poisoning in salisbury will domimate proceedings. a muslim law student has became the first woman to wear a traditional headscarf on the catwalk of the miss england final in nottinghamshire. sara iftekhar, from huddersfield, didn‘t win on tuesday night but said she had achieved a lot just by entering. ahead of the final, the 20—year—old, said: "i did not expect to be making history. i do feel proud." here‘s her story. sara iftekhar. moving from being a teenager to adulthood is a difficult time for anyone. but some face challenges most people will never deal with. there are almost 60,000 "children in need", aged 16 or 17. these are young people who aren t
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in care but who have to deal with things like domestic violence, mental health issues, substance abuse and neglect. all this while making the tricky transition to adulthood. campaigners say the support for this group isn‘t good enough and point to a £2 billion black hole in children‘s services budgets. westminster will hear calls later today for more help for these children in need as they turn 18. let‘s speak now to the politician who‘s hosting that debate in westminster. steve mccabe is a labour mp and chairman of a cross—party group for looked after children and children in care. also here — peter grigg from the children‘s society. and speaking to us from plymouth is conor tate, he‘s 20 years old — he‘s been in and out of foster care since he was six. welcome to all of you. steve mccabe, explain to our audience the issue here. the issue is twofold. there are 60,000 youngsters, as you say, having some sort of contact with
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local authorities, but probably about a quarter of a million in total, so much bigger number, being altogether. those who are getting help, the minute they turn 18, there‘s no obligation for that help to continue orfor there‘s no obligation for that help to continue or for any kind there‘s no obligation for that help to continue orfor any kind of transition. we wouldn‘t do that with our own children. it kind of absurd situation to do it to some of the most vulnerable young people. conor, you are 20 years old and you are in foster ca re now you are 20 years old and you are in foster care now as i understand it. explain what that means for you and where‘d you would be without that support. i am in plymouth and i foster placement. i have been there for four years now. i am part of the staying put arrangement, which means ican staying put arrangement, which means i can stay with a foster carer up to the age of 25. it's one of the best things i've been offered. i don't know where i would be without it. i did get pushed at the age of 17 to go did get pushed at the age of 17 to go into supported living, which, in
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my eyes, is not where i would want to be. at 18 you are pushed out, as the other guy said. tell people what supported living is because not eve ryo ne supported living is because not everyone will know. it's where you basically live on your own with a supervisor person keeping an eye on you, but mainly you do the whole thing by yourself. so it's pretty much like living on your own. why couldn‘t you do that at 18, explained that as well?” couldn‘t you do that at 18, explained that as well? i wasn't ready for it emotionally. moving out at 18 isn't the sort of thing you would do with your own children, i would do with your own children, i would stop. i was not ready at 18 to move out. i wasn't in a stable enough place. where i am now, with this family, and more stable than i would be living on my own. peter, can you tell us what the difference is between the sort of support conor has had on what is out there for teenagers who do not quite meet the threshold for local authority care? at the children's society we work
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with lots of young people in that category. anita has been identified and is there but they are not getting the support. if the support is there, it looks like a personal adviser, it looks like support to help through different systems. it might be planning post—18 for jobs, and everything else. if the support is not there, often young people i left to get on with things themselves. why, go wrong? we know full we ll themselves. why, go wrong? we know full well the outcomes for those children will be poor, in terms of their mental health in the future, their mental health in the future, their ability to get jobs and housing in the future. if you talk to adults experiencing those problems right now, they will point to times in their adolescence where
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if the right support was there, it would have helped them so dramatically. conor's experiences of feeling pushed out what three as he is reaching 18 i once we have very readily at the children's society. what three, could and should the government do now to help these kind of children, young people? ithink one, we need to have a bigger i think one, we need to have a bigger homelessness. it‘s a much and the government needs to understand they would say they would say, reduction act. they have no figures on how many 17—18 —year—olds are homeless in this predicament. we need to know introduced the homeless reduction act. they have no figures on how many 17—18 —year—olds are homeless in this predicament. we need to know we need to have a proper transition for anyone turning 18, don‘t find themselves with the door suddenly they don‘t find themselves with the door suddenly closed on assessment for everyone who comes to the door. 30% don‘t get assessed. if you went toa and 30% don‘t get assessed. if you went to a and three, we need to have a much more focused assessment for eve ryo ne much more focused assessment for everyone who comes to the door. 30% don‘t get assessed. if you went to doesn‘t everyone get assessed? and the third of you didn‘t get to see a gp, no one would be happy about that. it is the same problem. why doesn‘t everyone get assessed? there
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is not enough money and resources to do the assessment but it means a third of people are being written off without any consideration of the needs they. what happens to those people? up having mental health problems that go for three the cracks, end up sleeping rough, end up cracks, end up sleeping rough, end up having mental health problems that go they end up sometimes being picked up by criminal elements and being they end up on a much poorer thanit being they end up on a much poorer than it need be, when we have known and much earlier stage that they needed help and support. is all about money? the department for education say they have made £200 billion available to councils up to 220 -- 2020 for billion available to councils up to 220 —— 2020 for local services, which includes those for children and young people. they also say they have invested a further £270 million to improve the lives of vulnerable children. it is not all about money. it's children. it is not all about money. it‘s about how welljoined up services are and how much focus is on the real issues. but it is all
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very well to quote general figures for total local government expenditure. the reality is there about to point taken out of children‘s services and about another billion gap in disabled children services. do you agree, from the children‘s society, there isa from the children‘s society, there is a shortfall in terms of the cash, despite what the department for education say? romagna yes, and as the numbers go up, in terms of the size and scale of the problem, the support services are going down. often where there are support services available, it said the crisis and, when things have gone very badly wrong. we know from our own experience, that's the hardest time to pick things up. if we could shift some of the resources, support and services to earlier on when there are signs of problems, for example the child is going missing from home, if there are issues in the family, if mental health issues are being signalled, that is the time we should be getting in on providing that support. if we know these young people have been identified, we know full well when
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they reach 18 they will need extra support. it is then we should be helping them. you said when you turned 18 you were not ready to go out on your own, as it were. the children‘s society say there are 58,00016 and 17—year—old in need. what was going on in your life when you were that age? i wasn't sure what i wanted to do or what was actually going to happen, but at the age of 17 to deduct social services we re age of 17 to deduct social services were trying to push me out to go into supported living. luckily enough, the fast the service i was with tried to give me help. in the end, the council agreed to it. from 18, i've been staying with this staying put arrangement. children in action pushed it more, because they
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are all for this. what you think would have happened to you if you had ended up in the supported living arrangement? i wouldn't really want to think about that. i have had friends who have gone through it and they have ended up in really bad places, involved with drugs, alcohol, mixing with the wrong people and that is not the sort of place i would want to be. ok. one needs to change now?” place i would want to be. ok. one needs to change now? i hope this afternoon, the government minister is going to give the issue a fair hearing and i hope he will agree to expand the existing review of education for children, to encompass some of these other factors, so we can have a deliberate plan and a transition strategy for those turning 18. ok, we will see what happens, thank you all very much for coming on the programme. thank you for your messages about migraines. wendy says i suffered
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horrendous migraines for many years until i heard an item on the radio many years ago. advising sufferers to have amalgam fillings removed. i had mine removed which i pay privately for, after a couple months, my migraines became less often and eventually stopped altogether. my life is so different because of this. i have had a couple of migraines over the years but the intensity was so much yes. it changed my life completely. another said, i suffered dreadfully until my son was born and then they never returned. maria says, suffered the migraines 26 years, horrific loss of vision, vomiting and pain. people just do not understand. liz says she has had acupuncture not had a migraine symptoms used have two a week. for her, acupuncture definitely work. patricia says, used to watch my model bang her head on the living room wall when her
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migraines started. thank you for those. news and sport on the way but before that, the weather. thank you. a lovely sunny start in many parts of the uk. this was the scene in hastings a couple of hours ago. those blue skies giving way to something different west. a similar coastal scene, not similarskies. grey different west. a similar coastal scene, not similar skies. grey skies overhead, link to an area of rain pushing on at the moment. the rain has been working across ireland through the night and is now sliding into wales, closed parts in south—west england, but north west midlands as well turning distinctly wet. at the same time, a scattering of showers in north and west of scotland. some sunshine in between charles, further south, any blue skies this morning will give way to cloudy ones as they go through the morning and afternoon. the rain erratic in nature, so there will be gaps. the odd heavy about working through the midlands and towards east anglia and lincolnshire by the end of the afternoon. 21 and possibly on the sabbath, a greater chance of sunshine tour north wales. but as you can see here, scattered showers. some in scotland could be
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heavy enough for the chance of a rumble of thunder. even though the breeze is not especially strong, it is quite a cold one. into tonight, there will be some rainfora into tonight, there will be some rain for a town in east anglia and the south—east. that will clear away the south—east. that will clear away the showers inland fading for many. they will continue into north wales in north—west england. notice those green colours, are widely cool night, temperatures in rural areas down into low single figures just about anywhere. in cities, 10—12, london and plymouth, but for most a cool start for friday. dried right one for many. but north and east scotla nd one for many. but north and east scotland and north east england most prone to seeing outbreaks of rain on friday, some of which can be heavy and system. quite a breeze blowing as well, that will add to the cooler feel. 12—15 in these areas most other parts having a brighter day,
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brighter in southern areas compared to today. temperatures and part, tempered about by the strength of the breeze. the weekend, if you are eyeing up activities to do outside, it could be a case of mixed fortunes. saturday, the weather system pushing its way which works like it is targeting england and wales, could change but outbreaks of rain pushing from west to east, a brisk wind. but more than half of the country tending to be a bit brighter and dry with just one or two shows. by sunday, reversing fortu nes two shows. by sunday, reversing fortunes of it about. some showers at timesjust fortunes of it about. some showers at times just about anywhere but mainly in the north, a brighter day in the south and not feeling quite as chilly. hello. it‘s thursday. it‘s ten o‘clock. i‘m victoria derbyshire. our top story today: there‘s good news for billpayers if you‘re on a standard tariff for your gas and electricity. your bill will be capped if you‘re on a standard tariff. the regulator says 11 million people will save around £75 a year.
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ofgem‘s chief exec tells us energy firms wont be able to get round it, and the body that represents energy firms says they are trying to improve the market for consumers. we are investing in making it easier to change supplier, we are investing in new services, and we are trying to make the market work as well as possibly can for people. my concern is for people out there and how much are paying on their bills. clearly some will see reduced bills but it is important not to rest on your laurels because they're bigger savings to be made by changing your supplier. britain is going to brief the united nations security council about two russians suspected of carrying out the salisbury nerve agent attack. the uk security minister says president putin bears ultimate responsibility. he is the president of the russian federation. he is in charge, just like our prime minister is accountable for her intelligence services. he is accountable for them. the gr u is a major sickness belonging to the military, who a nswe rs belonging to the military, who a nswers to belonging to the military, who answers to the defence minister, who
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a nswe rs answers to the defence minister, who a nswers to answers to the defence minister, who answers to president putin. —— is a major organisation belonging to the military. what should be the uk‘s next move? we‘ll speak to marina litnvinenko‘s lawyer, whose husband alexander was poisoned in britain by the russian security services in 2006. and we‘ll ask why 14 other suspicious deaths in the uk that have been linked to russia are no longer being investigated. and changing the conversation around cancer. we look at the legacy of the bbc 5live newsreader rachael bland who died yesterday and whose podcast you, me and the big c offered a funny and frank take on terminal illness. today, as i mentioned at the start, we thought at the start, we thought we would come back with a bang and talk about death and dying. and mainly i think we really wanted to talk about this subject because people don‘t talk about it. they don't. the reason we are all terrified of our cancer coming back and getting worse and going down that road is because ultimately we‘re worried it will kill us.
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deborahjames, one of the co—hosts of that podcast, willjoin usjust after 10.30, along with the actor greg wise who appeared on one of the podcasts and wrote a blog with his sister annita mcveigh is in the bbc newsroom with a summary of the day‘s news. a new cap on energy prices has been announced this morning by the regulator ofgem. they say it‘s to protect customers who don‘t shop around, and remain on their supplier‘s standard variable tariff and end up paying more. the cap will vary according to usage but for the average user it has been set at £1,136 a year, based on a typical dual fuel customer paying by direct debit. the energy watchdog say the move will mean 11 million households will save around £75 on average. the cap will come into effect in december and will be reviewed every six months. ofgem‘s chief executive said the cap would be fair and transparent for all users. the underlying cost of energy, the wholesale cost of energy,
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of producing it, which mainly comes from fossil fuels, has increased over the last year, so prices have risen. what i can assure anyone watching is that the price cap will now make sure that any changes in underlying cost are fairly reflected. if wholesale costs go down, then the price cap will react to it as well. overall this will be a fair and transparent cap which will work for all users. a senior white house official has claimed that members of the trump administration deliberately hinder some of the president‘s actions, in an effort to curtail his impulsive behaviour. writing anonymously in the new york times, the source is highly critical of mr trump, and portrays a sense of chaos in the white house. the president has dismissed the opinion piece as gutless, calling the newspaper phony. the security minister ben wallace has said the russian president, vladimir putin, bears ultimate responsibility for the salisbury novichok attack. the crown prosecution service said yesterday
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that two russian men, identified as serving officers with the gru military intelligence service, were suspected of carrying out the poisoning which left one person dead. britain will brief the un security council on the issue later today. india‘s supreme court has ruled that gay sex among consenting adults is lawful. it‘s overturned a controversial law dating from colonial times which the judges described as irrational and arbitrary. the bbc‘s divya arya has been following the case from delhi. here are outside the supreme court has been excitement and anticipation since this morning. a large sum of people on the lgbt community, activists and lawyers, have been gathering here and there is a huge presence of media, with everyone waiting for the final judgment. presence of media, with everyone waiting for the finaljudgment. when it came there were loud cheers. the court has now clearly said that any aduu court has now clearly said that any adult can engage in sexual activity
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in private and if it is with consent it doesn‘t matter what the sexual preference or gender is. it has taken months to come to this day and the colonial practice happened in 1994. initially all of the challenges were led by ngos, groups of people and not individuals, because the lgbt community was silenced. in recent years and personalities have come out, claimed their sexual orientation, maybe challenges and gone to the supreme court and now they have the final verdict. two consenting adults have sex of any kind in private and there is consent and it is in private, it will not be an offence. 377 is unconstitutional. section 377 had a ten yearjail term for violations but activists said it was used to harass them and push them into the
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closet. reality they hope will change now. an indian—registered ship that‘s been impounded in an english port for more than two years is finally on the verge of being sold. the malaviya twenty has been stuck in great yarmouth in norfolk sincejune 2016 after its owners fell into liquidation, leading to legal disputes. bids for the ship will open on tuesday and proceeds will go towards paying the crew‘s wages and port fees. the luxury british goods maker burberry says it will end its practice of burning unsold goods. a report injuly showed that it destroyed products worth more than £28 million pounds last year to protect its brand. it‘s also announced an end to using realfur. english heritage is asking for the public‘s help in identifying world war one nurses who served at england‘s first wartime country house hospital. no formal records exist for many of the women who worked at wrest park in bedfordshire, but it‘s hoped they‘ll be recognised by relatives in photographs which have been transformed into colour. that‘s a summary of the latest bbc news. more at 10.30.
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let‘s get some sport now with ben. novak djokovic has maintained his impressive record at the us open, reaching his 11th straight semi final with a straight sets win overjohn millman. millman was the man who beat roger federer in the last 16 but the scoreline doesn‘t tell the full story. it lasted almost three hours with the heat and humidity a factor again. djokovic faces kei nishikori next. he came through a five—setter against marin cilic, who beat him in the final at flushing meadows four years ago. 6—4 in the final set. and it was an historic day forjapan, who have a man and a woman in the semi—finals of the same grand slam for the first time, thanks to naomi osaka‘s victory over lesia tsurenko. she‘ll take on last year‘s beaten finallist madison keys next. and it was a bittersweet day forjamie murray. he and bruno soares are out of the men‘s doubles but he‘s through to the mixed doubles final
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with bethany mattek—sands. europe‘s ryder cup captain thomas bjorn has defended his decision to pick sergio garcia as one of his wildcards for this month‘s contest. garcia has been in pretty poor form of late, failing to make the cut in all four majors this season, but bjorn said he was the heartbeat of the team. rafa cabrera—bello will probably be feeling the most aggrieved and bjorn conceded that it was horrible having to tell him — and others — that they hadn‘t made it. it was not an easy decision because so many guys have played well and tried hard and put every effort into it. they deserved that we sit down and consider them and take everything into account. but in the end, this was the decision that was reached. and yes, making those phone calls to those four was easy but it was tough to make the phone calls to the ones that missed out.
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the nations league kicks off tonight. it‘s uefa‘s attempt to do away with meaningless international friendlies. 55 european nations will compete with four places at euro 2020 available. there are four leagues and wales begin theircampaign against the republic of ireland in league b. it will be ryan giggs‘ first competitive match in charge of wales. we know what we‘re up against. we‘re up against a team who is going to work hard, make it difficult for us. so proud moment for me. can‘t wait. just like as a player, the build—up to it. yeah, you‘ve got to do it, but really you can‘t wait for the game to come. it‘s been confirmed that the fa have put forward the only bid to host the women‘s european championship in 2021. the deadline was extended to last friday but no other nations came forward. the fa will still need to meet all the requirements and uefa‘s executive committee will meet on 3rd december to announce the hosts. you are up—to—date. more a little
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later. security minister ben wallace says the russian president vladimir putin bears ultimate responsibility for the salisbury novichok attack because it is his government that controls, funds and directs the gru intelligence service blamed for the nerve agent poisoning. british and russia officials will come face to face today at the un security council where the attempted murder of sergei skripal and his daughter in salisbury is top of the agenda. it comes after british police released details of those two men they want to question in relation to the attempted poisoning in march. but there are questions about the government‘s decision to close its investigation into 14 other suspicious deaths on uk soil, which have been linked to the russian state. ? our reporter jim reed is here. bring us the latest on this, jim. ? as you said, we expect british officials at the united nations in new york today to be pressing other countries to extend sanctions on
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russia and the russian state, financial sanctions. it comes after this cctv was released yesterday. the pictures behind a fear of these two men, who british police want to question in relation to the attack in salisbury. the prime minister yesterday afternoon spoke to the house of commons and said it is thought these men were members of the elite unit, the gru military intelligence units, and they have now left the country. it is thought that prosecutors of the cps in the uk have enough evidence that if these men were arrested they could be charged with this attack in salisbury, for using a banned chemical weapon. what has the response been in russia? as those person for the kremlin was asked about this yesterday and he said he had no idea about the men involved and he didn‘t know their names, didn‘t recognise their names. then yesterday evening the russian foreign ministry in moscow seem to be very unhappy that british authorities were not releasing enough information about the case. they wanted more data on things like fingerprints. when that wasn‘t
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a p pa re ntly fingerprints. when that wasn‘t apparently provided, russian state television seems to use that to suggest the british were being secretive, hiding something in some way. you can see the former russian response is likely to take. what about other suspected attacks on british soil? this suspected attack here was not the first. in 2006 there was the death of alexander litvinenko, the man killed by polonium poisoning in the uk. since then there have been other suspected deaths as well. back in march last year, the government said it would launch a review into 14 other cases. these 14 were all investigated by the website buzzfeed and we will speak to some of them in a second. they had us intelligence sources saying they thought the 14 were linked in some way to the russian state, and they could have meant russian state involvement. that included gareth williams, the former m16 included gareth williams, the former mi6 spy whose body was found in a
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bag in an apartment near mi6 headquarters. he died in 2010. and another man. you might be seeing a picture of him here. alexander, russian financier, who collapsed while jogging russian financier, who collapsed whilejogging outside his mansion in surrey in 2012, and around that time he was preparing to give evidence in a contentious fraud trial linked to russian organised crime. this week we spoke to a man called bill browder, an american financier living in the uk, and it was his company that was the victim of this alleged fraud. i believe that he was murdered in november of 2012. based on the fact that he was cooperating witness against russian organised crime, that he was on a hit list, that he felt that risk, that he went out and took out an enormous life instrument believes that insurance policy and katie was killed, and that he dropped dead at the of 44 with no prior help prop them —— he
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was with no prior help prop them —— he was killed and he dropped dead at the age of 44 with no prior health problem. we were led to believe this would take a matter of weeks and it had taken six months. the prime minister was asked directly about the review of commons yesterday and this is what she said. there has beena numberof this is what she said. there has been a number of cases, and the numberof 13 or14 been a number of cases, and the number of 13 or 14 comes into mike head and they have been reconsidered by the police and they have looked at all the evidence in relation to those matters. i understand a letter will shortly be going to the chair of the home affairs select committee setting out the outcome of that. but i understand that there is no cause for further consideration of those cases. if you didn't catch it, the key phrase was the last one. no cause for further consideration of these cases. it looks like the police are going to drop any investigation into the other 14. yesterday we had a letter that went
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out after that from the home secretary, published letter, confirming that would be the case. we don‘t know why they have made that decision. he said no further details would be given. we understand, we think it is to do with national security reasons that we don‘t know any more. with national security reasons that we don't know any more. thank you. let‘s talk about that at the evidence presented by the police about this two suspects. we can speak now to elena tsirlina, a lawyer for marina litnvinenko, whose husband alexander was poisoned in britain by the russian security services in 2006, tom warren from the news website buzzfeed, whose reporting on those 14 suspicious russian—linked deaths led to the announcement of a government review into each of the cases ? a review which has now been closed as you‘ve just heard, chris phillips, former head of the national counter terrorism security office and andrey kiyashko, deputy head of news at the russian state broadcaster rt. thank you for coming on the
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programme. how do you respond to the details were released of the two russian suspects in the skripal case yesterday? i think we are having deja vu because it is very familiar. it is very similar to what happened in 2007. when the names of the suspects in the alexander litvinenko murder were released, and subsequently an extradition request was sent out, and it was denied and instead russia proposed to try the suspects in russia. and that provoked a further reaction from gordon brown at the time, and then a further extradition request was sent out for the second man, and that was also refused and russia claimed that the russian constitution prevents russian nationals being extradited. so what will happen? it is clear
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that the uk has learnt its lesson. we have not sent out extradition requests. instead the uk has issued european arrest warrants for their arrest. and also interpol red notices. will that make any difference? will that make any difference? will that make any difference? not really. our position is very precarious with brexit coming so we are not sure if we will still be party to the european arrest warrant framework by march 2000 and 19. -- by march 2019. when is russia going to accept responsibility for what happened in salisbury? this thing is that, if you have noticed, in the police report there is no mention of blaming the russian government. the russian assistant commissioner of counterterrorism policing said no. is that there are certain lines of
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inquiry in there. there is a clear distinction between what the police are saying and what the politicians are saying and what the politicians are saying. theresa may said something like it is almost certainly approved by the highest levels of russian government. you notice the correlation between highly likely and high levels of confidence. are you saying that there are road russian operatives?” am not saying anything. i am just saying that we are putting this story and there are to markers things. there is the police report which is very interesting and we all wa nt which is very interesting and we all want to know who these people are. and then there are the politicians trying to build something at which is not in the political court. chris phillips, the head of the counterterrorism security office, some were saying the operation by these two russian suspects was quite
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crude and they failed to kill the intended victim and chucked the perfume bottle away, which doesn‘t sound like highly trained russian military intelligence officers. we must not put these people on too much of a pedestal, as we have seen with alexander litvinenko and also this case. yes, they are professional assassins, almost certainly employed by the gru, and the russian government, and what we have seen is that people are not necessarily very good at theirjob and their tradecraft was not good in this instance. so we mustn't put too much weight on the fact that they we re much weight on the fact that they were not very good at theirjob. the fa ct were not very good at theirjob. the fact is that they tried to do it and they have been responsible for killing people in the uk. it is important that we just look back at the facts. we saw people coming from russia, coming over to the uk, the facts. we saw people coming from russia, coming overto the uk, and using novichok. that is quite incredible. and we have got to celebrate the police and the security services were doing their
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job so well. and how do you respond? yes, the police report was very interesting. but he said it was crude and it is indeed. theresa may said that gru is a highly disciplined organisation. and two people, travelling under aliases, posing for security cameras, doing everything to be noticed, then we see them in the police report, i certainly want to know who those people. i will leave you for a moment because it is quite difficult to hear you because of technicals. as the lawyer for marine and it can yank, whose husband was poisoned in britain over a decade ago, i wonder if you agree that russian citizens can kill people in britain without worrying about being held to account
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for it. —— the lawyer for marina, the wife of alexander litvinenko. for it. —— the lawyer for marina, the wife of alexander litvinenkom seems they can do it with impunity. if russia can conduct extraterritorial killings and state—sponsored terrorism on british soil, we need to make russia understand that it shouldn‘t happen and it will not happen again. and measures should be put in place to prevent such killings taking place ever again. so further sanctions? we need to think very carefully about further steps because sanctions have been placed on russia before. have they worked? have they been effective? there are questions to be asked. but effectively what we want to see is perhaps a public inquiry happening in the uk because there is furtherforensic happening in the uk because there is further forensic evidence to consider in this case and further questions to be asked about the identity of this man, how they came to the uk, how the immigration system allowed them to come here. we we re system allowed them to come here. we were talking earlier about the fact
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they may have been using aliases, but real russian passports. there is a whole background story yet to be unravelled. one of the best forums for that would be a public inquiry. tom, thank you for coming on the programme. the government has closed the review into the 14 cases that you uncovered as being allegedly suspicious. that is it. case closed. i think there may be a touch more to it than that. our reporting has revealed that in each of these 14 cases, intelligence had been passed from the us intelligence community to the british intelligence community. we also spoke to 17 former and serving intelligence officials across the uk and the us, who said that russia could kill with impunity. when we look at the detail of this letter, we note that select mps have had briefings on the review under privy council rules. which means what? in essence, they were
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allowed to be told secret intelligence material and we don't know what it is they have been told. we had alexander litvinenko in 2006 and more recently the skripal case. our position is that the public has a right to know and maybe it is time for the government to discuss the secret intelligence that holds because the public deserves a degree of reassurance. but if they can't release information, is there anything that can be done? in that case it is difficult. i imagine further reports... in one of the cases, the inquest hasn‘t even finished yet. there is a case where there seems to be a collision between the judicial inquiry and the decision of the government and the police to investigate no further. the main contention in that case is in fact that the victim was working with the intelligence services and the court was granted a ministerial certificate so that no secret material could be discussed in public. the suspicion is that he was
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killed. and it is yet another case where the public are not receiving the answers, the understanding, that they really seek for reassurance after the skripal case. chris, how do you respond to the other 14 cases now being closed ? do you respond to the other 14 cases now being closed? first of all, i think buzzfeed did a brilliantjob of this investigation, bringing it into the open when know that he was talking about it. i think almost certainly some of them if not all of them are involved in russian state activity in some way, but of course you have got to have evidence and all of this is in the past now, way into the past, and very difficult to actually gain any evidence that will stand up in court. they were assassins perhaps, they did a better job than the two that tried to attack who we are talking about. what is the evidence that some of these were murdered? on buzzfeed we
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follow two strands. we spoke to people in intelligence community to heartheir people in intelligence community to hear their views. some of them were quite forthright, especially in this case where there was a high degree of possibility that it was the state killing. then we reconstructed the cases, and we had drs financial data and we spoke to people link to the people to see what the motives could be and who they were involved with. we did that in terms of lifestyles. who were they and what role do they play? it might have been political or financial in laundering money into the mainstream western banking system. we want to understand what potential reasons could there be for them to be killed? and what evidence that the police have used at the time of their deaths? go ahead, chris? buzzfeed did a betterjob than the british police. sorry, that was andrei, thank you. how do you
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respond? even though the home secretary and the prime minister decided there was no cause for further investigation, there is still one active murder investigation under way. that is into the death of nikolai ustinov, killed a week after the salisbury incident. —— glushkov. thank you. still to come: we remember the bbc 5live newsreader, podcast host, wife and mum of a two—year—old boy, rachael bland, who died yesterday from breast cancer. and after over a thousand children from iraq‘s yazidi community went missing after fleeing the islamic state, we speak to the british aid worker who has made it her mission to help find as many of them as she can. imgaine being stranded on a ship in a foreign country for months
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without being allowed to get off. that‘s what‘s happened to an indian crew who‘ve been stranded on their boat in norfolk for 18 months. captain nikesh rastogi and his three crew members arrived in great yarmouth to work on the cargo ship called the malaviya 20 in february 2017. they thought they‘d be home within weeks. but a legal battle between the port and the ship‘s owners has meant they‘ve been stranded here ever since and technically they‘re not even allowed to set foot on british soil. they say they haven‘t been paid since last october, but now the court that governs maritime issues has allowed the ship to be sold in auction next week, which would mean the men can finally go back to india. we can speak to captain nikesh rastogi now. thank you very much for talking to us. good morning. tell us what it has been like staying on the ship for over a year. a couple of
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corrections in your introduction. thank you for the introduction. but it is not that we are not allowed to set foot on british soil. sorry, i know. i said technically. border officials have been very kind to you, i know. they have been very nice. it has not been very pleasant. it has been a surprise because there are few things that you take for granted a seafarer. for instance that in case of any such eventuality, it is a standard principle that your salary will be paid. there is something known as the provider of funds. it is a claim made by the court. this claim supersedes the claim of the seafarers. this is very difficult to explain to a seafarer. anybody we spoke to back home, it is a
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principle, and be think we should just get the wages but it is different here. what about the prospect of finally being able to go home? very happy but i think it will only think in once we get out of this environment. —— sink in. when we lose sight of the vessel, then we will be really happy! either. you haven‘t had a wage since last october. you have not been surviving —— how have you been surviving for food and everything else? friends have been very helpful, withdrawing from my account back home for food. the seafaring centre here, they have been very nice. they have been
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supported by the mission for seafarers. we continue to operate. how hopeful are you that you will get the tens of thousands of pounds in wages that you are road? —— owed? we are hopeful. it is being handled by the court. there is a reasonable hope when we approach the courts. and the person who spearheaded the whole thing. it must be mentioned that you really don‘t know what is on the other side of it. good luck and thank you very much
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for speaking to us. captain nikesh rastogi, who hopefully in the next couple months, will be on his way back home to india. next, bbc 5 live newsreader, podcast host, wife and mum of a two—year—old boy, rachael bland who died yesterday from breast cancer, has been widely praised for changing the conversation around cancer. she was diagnosed towards the end of 2016 and learned this year, it was incurable. in her podcast, you, me and the big c, she, along with two other women who have or have had cancer talked frankly and funnily about the disease. we‘ll talk to deborah james, one of the co—hosts in a moment, along with greg wise, who appeared on one of the podcasts and who wrote a blog with his sister clare as she was dying of cancer last year. first here‘s a couple of clips from the you me and the big c podcast. a call came through and he said, you know, iam really sorry, it‘s the cancer, it‘s back and it is all in the skin
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around the chest, so... what was your immediate thought? i can‘t swear, but if i would swear next to a microphone, it would be the word that you are thinking that i would‘ve said, and ijust couldn‘t believe it. and little freddie was just playing innocently away in this little tyre in the barn, and i was just like, my poor, poor fred. were you on your own with him? no, i was with friends so, you know, they were sort of looking at me a bit like, oh, you‘vejust had some bad news. did you go numb or did you just cry? i used to do this at school, if i hurt myself at school, i‘d just hold it in, wait until you get home and i literally just flung myself on my friend, hugged her and the other girls just looked at me like a bit, oh no, what‘s going on? i got freddie together, got in the car and it is literally two minutes down the road from my house. luckily, steve was working from home that day so i just dashed home as quickly as i could and all the way home i was saying to freddie, i‘m so sorry, i‘m so sorry. 0h, rach...
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you‘re going to make me... it‘s the only thing that made me cry in the whole 12 episodes of my pod cast. it‘s finally broken me. you've not done anything wrong. you've not done anything so you have nothing to apologise for. no, but that‘s, yeah... ijust find it really difficult for him, like he is my main worry, him and steve. and so, you know... i bet he was oblivious, he didn‘t know anything. absolutely oblivious, just sat there staring out the window, smiling, chatting away. did that help? absolutely, yeah. it would be so much harder if he reacted to a lot of these things or i thought that he understood more. once you switch on the tears, you‘re not going to switch them off again. i should have brought tissues with me today. i should have brought my poo costume. normally i just cry when i‘m dressed as a poo. i think next week we‘re going to talk about dating and stuff. we'll come back to it. we‘ll delve deeper into that then. today, as i mentioned at the start, we thought we‘d come back
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with a bang and talk about death and dying and mainly i think we really wanted to talk about this subject because people don‘t talk about it. no, they don't. and the reason that we are all terrified of our cancer coming back and getting worse and going down that road is because ultimately we are worried that it is going to kill us. and it is that fear of death. and i think very much in this country at the moment we don‘t talk about death and i find, particularly in my situation, knowing that i‘m going to die, and probably going to die quite soon, i can‘t discuss that with anyone because people, the looks on their faces if i bring it up or if i say, oh, i might not be at that thing, if i‘m still around. theyjust glaze over. yourjokes are bombing. myjokes are not doing well. i love a good deathjoke. you‘ve got to find a humour in everything and so to me, at the moment, ithink, ha—ha, how funny, i made a wittyjoke. and yet the people around me, you know, my husband and mum included, are just like horrified.
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and we don‘t use the words for death, do we? no, we don't, we don't say someone died, we say, oh, they slipped away or they passed or i lost someone. it's like, you didn't lose them in primark, do you know what i mean? go back and have a look if you‘ve lost them. you know what i mean? they're gone. let‘s talk now to deborahjames, who co—hosted the you, me and the big c podcast with rachael, and actor greg wise who lost his sister to cancer and who has written a book titled not that kind of love. hello to both of you. many members of our audience will know rachael, but for those who want to know more, and we saw some amazing clips, tell them. it reminded me what a strength of character she has. i think her legacy is someone who lived right up until the very last moment. i saw her ten days ago, when we recorded
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our last pod cast. the images on the clips you will see from that last pod cast, it isn‘t out yet, actually, she looks very well and she had that grit and determination. what you don‘t see on camera is that behind closed doors, she was having to use oxygen, just to be there. we knew what was happening, but i think she is a woman who when someone says, what can one person do? it‘s the power of talking about her story and sharing her story and the impact that had on so many people. and, as we saw, for those of us who have listened to the pod casts, as we can here, you have a really good laugh. you have stage for bowel cancer. which you have reported on for this programme before. despite rachel being told her cancer with terminal, you continue to heart deliberate laugh. you have to have black humour. yes. i got in the position when i was in remission, when i
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recorded with craig and spoke about how amazing that was. a week later, my cancer returned on the first person i called was rachael. i spoke to load of people, and what rachael did, she sent me some death jokes, as rachael would and then she said wipe your tears and get on with living and a glass of wine. she very much kind of... yes, it was horrible, but i‘m learning from her that even when faced, and it‘s quite scary for me sitting here now, knowing that i have cancer, knowing i have stage four cancer, to watch on my best friends going through this knowing i could be next. but what i take comfort from is the fact she lived every single moment she had here and she made worthwhile. greg, do you think it is a good idea to talk about dying? laughter we absolutely have to. we have two daysin we absolutely have to. we have two days in our lives under 24 hours,
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the day we are born on the day we die. we spend inordinate amounts of time talking about the first day and we try and ignore the second. and in many ways, the second day is more important, because it is the culmination of all the experiences, all the joys, all the pain, everything is of hopefully a long life, or possibly a short life. it is important to try and die as well as the camp. what was glorious about the talk we had when i came along and did the pod cast with debra and rachael and lauren, it and did the pod cast with debra and rachaeland lauren, it was and did the pod cast with debra and rachael and lauren, it was open talk, as if we were talking having a cup of tea with each other, having did, having a chat. because we have to take it away from being some sort of realm of professionals talking about it. no, everyone is on the journey, everyone is facing it, let's talk openly, kindly and lovingly about it, when we are well as one well as when we are facing a
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life limiting disease. but it is hard. i don‘t know what conversation you had with your partner or children, rachael talked about it, she couldn‘t talk about it with her husband or her mother because they are in denial. you can‘t accept the person you love is going to die at 40. it is outrageous. it's awful, and that‘s why we need to continue talking about it. when you are facing the life limiting illness, people don‘t want to acknowledge that conversation, because they are scared. but the thing i really like about what rachael did, i listen back to that pod cast that we recorded together. i know that even sitting here now and continuing that conversation, talking left, right and centre and continuing, ensuring that we do her proud, if you want to say that, and educate and take things to the next level is what she wanted. how do i know that? because
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she told me. i think when somebody dies, a lot of relatives around them, friends, family are always asking the question, always saying, ami asking the question, always saying, am i doing right by that person, doing proud? how do i know this is what they would have wanted? but with rachael, because she articulated it so well, we know what to do. she‘s left us check list expat yes, absolutely. with your sister, greg, you wrote the blog and took it over in the end. you have since written a book. how much did you talk to her about the kind of death that she wanted? you see, my sister was dying properly, she wasn't doing it right, she hadn't read the books i had read. i got very frustrated with her, and then i realised it her show and what very ferres people die how they lived. my sister generally lived in denial,
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therefore she died in denial. rachael had lists, she sorted stuff out, she gave people rows, she's wrapped presents for freddie until he is 21. she is an organised woman. she died in an organised way. my sister was in denial until her last breath and the thing that kept thumping me between the eyes all the time was, i cannot bring what i did .my sheet music to someone else '5 recital. it's her gig. how have you adjusted to life without your sister? i carry a hole around on me. i was 18 months younger than her, i never knew a life without her. we we re very never knew a life without her. we were very close and spent most christmas is on holidays together. the hole is gently changing its nature but will always be there. but my relationship with my sister is still very powerful, even though she
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is not here any more. we are all formed by loss as much as love, by pain as much as happiness and that's what makes us the shape we are. it is very important to honour the pain as much as the love. the broadcast you have talked about, the last minute recorded with rachael and lauren, when we hear it? all of that episode that out now to download, you, me and the big c, from any provider. we have a couple more to put out. one will go out today and last one will go out next week. so they are out on thursday. it will be a tough honest, i‘ll be honest. we recorded it knowing it would be our final one, so the one that‘s out today, i hope myself and lauren will dojustice to today, i hope myself and lauren will do justice to what we have already got down. and then we will move it forward. it‘s not going to be easy to do that. we can‘t pretend for one
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second that we can just pick up the same model and carry on the way things are going but i think we can ta ke things are going but i think we can take her with us. there is lots more to be done. whilst we have to remember, notjust to be done. whilst we have to remember, not just in to be done. whilst we have to remember, notjust in terms of cancer, more people will live for ten yea rs cancer, more people will live for ten years and you know this after being diagnosed with cancer, then die with it and that is amazing and thatis die with it and that is amazing and that is because of research and because of people talking about it. but we‘re not quite there yet. by continuing to raise awareness of early diagnosis, people knowing their bodies, knowing what‘s right and what‘s not right, we can make sure things like this don‘t happen. thank you, thank you very much debra and greg coming on the programme. as debra said, you can download the pod cast. i would go to the five live website. thank you very much. next we‘re going to talk about
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heart—rending images that quad bike yea rs heart—rending images that quad bike years ago went around the world from ain years ago went around the world from a in north iraq. tens of thousands of people from iraq‘s yazidi community were on the run, fleeing from fighters of the extremist islamic state group. the west, including britain, sent in helicopters to airdrop food and rescue some. the brutal onslaught against this ancient community which is one of the world1s oldest religions, is regarded by the un as a genocide. 10,000 yazidis were killed or kidnapped, and thousands of women were taken as sex slaves. four years on, thousands of yazidis, including more than a thousand children are still missing. one british aid worker sally becker with her charity road to peace has made it her mission to help find the children. it‘s the kind of humanitarian work she‘s been known for, for the past 25 years. we‘ll be talking to her in a moment. but first, let‘s see her on the start of her mission in iraq, where she was joined by the bbc‘s chief international correspondent lyse doucet. this camp on a hillside
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in northern iraq is home to thousands of yazidi families. all of them survived the brutal onslaught of islamic state. now they are in limbo. every family here has lost almost everything and don‘t know if their missing loved ones are still alive. a couple of little details which i didn‘t know... i have come here with british aid worker sally becker to meet one family, all captured by is four years ago. the oldest girls taken a sex slaves. this little girl almost lost her kidney to organ traffickers. eight of their relatives are still missing, including a little boy. i‘m trying to find all of the children that were taken, all of the youngsters. but particularly sabir, because i believe we can find him. i can‘t promise you, but i will do my very best. translation: we were held together
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in captivity for around nine months and then isis took all the children away from their parents. they took sabir and our little nieces. sabir was just nine month's old and was still being breast—fed when they took him from his mother. i know that you‘re looking for other family members and ijust wonder, do you think you will ever see them again? translation: it is really difficult because isis split us up and our family is scattered everywhere. we have no idea where they are or even if they are still alive. we miss them, a life without them is hard. but we can't do this alone and we will need help if we are ever going to see them again. sally becker‘s search for sabir takes her to the highest offices of the yazidi faith. this person is also looking for the missing and he shows us some of his files.
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a few of the people who have been found. translation: there are still around 3000 missing. more than half of them are children under the age of 18. most of them are still being held by is. some of them are in the displacement camps. apparently the name that was given him by isis was rasul and i... you know him? rasul? rasul mohammed, i have a video from this child. where did you get this video? translation: i was given this video by the police. do you think it is him? definitely. really? no question. amazing. one woman‘s mission to rescue war zone refugees. this is how sally becker has always worked. in the 1980s in bosnia, some called her the angel of mostar. crossing lines to rescue injured children and circumventing bureaucracy.
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now she‘s trying to do the same in a country like iraq. this is a video that i‘ve got and i don‘t know for sure that it is him, but if you would look at it and just tell me whether you recognise any of these children. do you think it might be him? translation: i helped take care of him in captivity. iwould recognise him, i know his face, his eyes. the photos we've seen show a boy of four and that the age sabir would be now. finding a child in iraq, confirming an identity, is sensitive and complicated. despite sally becker‘s efforts, the family may never find that little boy. the same for thousands of other yazidis still searching for loved ones. but it is a rare bit of hope in a bleak life. let‘s talk now to sally becker, the charity worker
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who you saw there in lyse‘s film. good morning. iwonder what good morning. i wonder what you do next for sabir. well, it's very difficult. we have the un child protection agency in baghdad helping us now, and they are partnered with the icrc, who are helping to locate sabir, but it is notjust him. there are over 1000 children like sabir still missing. some are ending up in turkey, but like a little girl who found herself in hospital and they we re found herself in hospital and they were about to take her kidney, and then others are in camps, living with isis families and they don‘t know their names are where they came from. i‘m trying to push the un on the other agencies to appoint a
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team, a specific team, who could go to these camps and orphanages and check the children and those children who don‘t look as though they belong, those children who seem uncomfortable with those families or have had their identity changed within the last year, they‘ve been issued new id, then they should be suspicious and they should do a dna test and hope that it matches up to the list of blood... people gave blood to the abductees office. all those families have given blood. so they need to match it up and find these kids before it is too late. they need to match it up and find these kids before it is too latem sounds a bit like having to be a detective, i suppose. sounds a bit like having to be a detective, isuppose. is sounds a bit like having to be a detective, i suppose. is that a fair description? well, the thing is all you can do is find what‘s been posted, what people have been told. a lot of it is rumour. i found another video after the one you had
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just shown, in which he is clearly there, sabir, and they call him rasul. he had a bandaged head. that would have been when he was first discovered by an iraqi soldier in hospital. but yes, i suppose it is a bit. i'm hospital. but yes, i suppose it is a bit. i‘m hoping the big organisations will get to work and help to find these children because i can‘t do it on my own. help to find these children because i can't do it on my own. of course not. what do you think the chances are offinding not. what do you think the chances are of finding sabir and the others? well, we hope we are getting closer. now that we have the support of the un child protection agency, i really think there is a chance they will find him. it depends if he is still in iraq. if he is still there in one of the orphanages, hopefully there will be a record of him. but he has been moved four time so far since he was discovered. i‘m just frightened he may have already been moved to turkey. if that has happened, then who knows. thank you very much for
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talking to us. we wish you all the best. we thank you for your time. sally becker, trying to do her utmost to reunite yazidi families. this programme has covered the controversy over mesh implants for many months. there is now a temporary ban on the use of vaginal mesh after thousands of women reported appalling side effects. and now, a woman who underwent controversial mesh implant surgery is believed to be the first in scotland to have the procedure listed as an underlying cause of her death. eileen baxter died last month at the age of 75, after being admitted to hospital the previous week. multiple organ failure is listed as the direct cause of death, but her mesh repair — an implant to fix a pelvic organ prolapse — is listed as an underlying cause. we can now speak to eileen‘s son mark and the scottish labour msp neil findlay, who has campaigned vigorously on behalf of the scottish mesh
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survivors group. thank you forjoining us. mark, i am so sorry for your loss. i know you are devastated. i guess you might also be angry? very angry, very angry. just for what mum went through. basically, not getting the a nswe rs. through. basically, not getting the answers. mum had said she would love to do something about this, if this mesh implant. the problems. but mum was so ill and we were more interested in her getting better. sadly it didn‘t turn out that way. neil findlay, thank you for talking to us. apart from the devastating loss to mark and his family, there‘s a real significance to the fact this
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mesh implant is cited as an underlying cause of mrs baxter‘s death. can i first of all offer my condolences to mark and his family, devastating for them, particularly when they see on the death certificate that this product, mesh, has been a contributory factor into their mum's death. i have been campaigning on this issue for six years. still in a position where women in scotland and indeed across the world are being implanted... inaudible causes problems with mobility, organs, relationship break—ups, lose their careers organs, relationship break—ups, lose theircareers in organs, relationship break—ups, lose their careers in homes and ultimately lose their lives and i think it's an absolute... inaudible what kind of questions do you have the medical professionals now? loads of questions. i know this is going
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live. i would love to ask them, did they know exactly what this was going to do to mum? i know they were thinking this was going to be ok, but the implications are massive. mum is not here. i would love to ask why, why this happened? could they have put a stop to this? i don‘t know... my head is totally... i‘m trying to be thinking straight, but we arejust so trying to be thinking straight, but we are just so devastated this has happened. mum was life and soul of the party, but after this mesh implant, it was just a slow decline in her health. notjust with a perforated bowel, which she went into hospital, but her bladder... me
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and my sister were even doing our own diagnosis when we were looking on google because we weren‘t getting any of the answers. they didn‘t seem to care, basically. my mum went into hospital last month, just really poorly, got taken by ambulance. she got basically sent home that day after two or three hours. and just going to go back to neil findlay for a moment because we‘re coming to the end of the programme. neil findlay, you want an investigation, i understand, into the death of eileen baxter? yes, because this is a very significant thing mark and his family have done. they are the first people to bring to the attention of the public the fact that... the death certificate... an underlying concern and a cause of death. that is hugely significant. i think this could be a real... inaudible
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so there are very serious questions to be asked. doctors take an oath not to cause harm. now we know this product causes death, question whether any doctor can continue to implant this product. before we sign off, can i say a couple briefly. six years it's been going on, initially nobody wanted to know. i would like to the scottish survivors, journalists and your programme, because it is only through combined works that this has become recognised as a national and national medical scandal. please keep at it. thank you both for coming on the programme. neil findlay and mark, thank you for coming on the programme and talking to us. we wish you the best in your search for answers about the death
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of your mother. thank you very much for watching our programme today for getting in touch. we are back tomorrow at 9am. abc news bbc newsroom live is coming up next. good morning. a pretty autumnal feel to the weather over the next few days. quite cool out there. there is some sunshine, but a little rain around as well. a beautiful scene here for as well. a beautiful scene here for a weather watcher in cornwall earlier. the cloud thickening up across a good part of england and wales are to go through the afternoon. outbreaks of rain moving across the midlands, eventually towards east anglia and the south—east but taking a while to get there. northern england, northern ireland and scotland, a day of
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sunshine and showers. 13—14d here, may be struggling up to 21 across the far south—east. this cloud and rain in the south will continue to move its way through as we had three this evening. clear skies following behind. still a few showers for parts of north—west england, maybe the west midlands and rain pushing into the far north—east later. a chilly night, temperatures are many spots down into single digits. tomorrow, north—eastern areas will see some rain. other places dry but cool see some rain. other places dry but cool. pretty unsettled and changeable for the week ahead. this is bbc news. these are the top stories
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developing at 11am. the energy regulator announces a new price cap which it says will benefit 11 million customers in england, wales and scotland — saving the average customer 75 pounds a year. donald trump reacts with fury after an unnamed white house official claims members of his staff deliberately hinder some of the president‘s actions, in an effort to curtail his impulsive behaviour. britain will brief the un security council today on the arrest warrants it‘s issued for two russians accused of carrying out the novichok nerve agent attack in salisbury in march. also in the next hour — legalising gay sex in india. campaigners welcome the ruling
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