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tv   The Papers  BBC News  September 13, 2018 11:30pm-12:00am BST

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‘to see rain on sunday, areas likely to see rain on sunday, probably northern england and wales, and further south it could be, or it could be further north, some uncertainty about the positioning. at the moment the south of england look strike, quite warm at 22, and a touch cooler with sunshine and showers in the north—west. further ahead to the working week this warm front ahead to the working week this warm fro nt m oves ahead to the working week this warm front moves in on monday and that is an indication of some slightly warmerairon an indication of some slightly warmer air on the way. certainly on monday and tuesday as well. south—westerly wind starting to build on monday. still some rain gci’oss build on monday. still some rain across parts of northern ireland and scotland. particularly late in the day. england and wales has a fine looking day. in the sunshine temperatures up to around 20 or 22 degrees or so. then things start to get more interesting on monday night and tuesday. looking at all of the isobars around the storm system, ex— hurricane helen moving into western parts of the uk. computer models
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don't work well with parts of the uk. computer models don‘t work well with ex— parts of the uk. computer models don't work well with ex— hurricanes so don't work well with ex— hurricanes so there is uncertainty about positioning of the wind and rain associated with this ex—hurricane bertha quite a brisk when developing means temperatures could be on the rise with 26 or 27 degrees across south—eastern parts of england. keep in part with the forecast as we look to next week. later next week, this jetstrea m to next week. later next week, this jetstream will drive low pressure. it will move away. as the kink moves to the north and east, a region in the jet stream builds to the north and east, a region in thejet stream builds behind it, which could bring cooler conditions, and northerly breeze, and high pressure will develop, so quite a big area in charge of the weather as we look to the end of next week, which means at some dry and settled whether potentially on the way for the end of the month. so things are turning warmerfor all of the end of the month. so things are turning warmer for all of us after a wet and windy midweek. it should be dry and bright later on next week. hello.
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this is bbc news. we'll be taking a look at tomorrow mornings papers in a moment — first the headlines. two russian men have gone on state tv to deny carrying out a nerve agent attack in salisbury, claiming they were tourists who happened to be there at the time the government has published the latest batch of contingency measures being prepared in case there's no brexit deal. and an exclusive bbc report reveals howi in 5 young people consider themselves to be a young carer whose families depend on them for everyday living. the eastern seabord of the united states readies itself for hurricane florence — forecasters say high rainfall and storm surge could trigger life—threatening floods. and russia performs its
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biggest military drills since the fall of the soviet union — president putin says it's an answer to ‘aggressive and unfriendly attitudes‘ towards his country. hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are former trade minister, lord digbyjones and the broadcaster, henry bonsu (pres) many of tomorrow's front pages are already in. the telegraph leads on the salisbury poisonings — in an interview today the two russian agents accused of the novichok attack claimed they were just tourists, leading to theresa may accusing moscow of "insulting the public‘s intelligence". the metro carries the same story, with the headline "for your spires only", after the two russians claimed they were visiting
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salisbury cathedral. brexit is the other big story of the day: the financial times reports that bank of england governor mark carney has warned of a property crash if britain leaves the eu without a deal. the governor also makes the front page of the guardian, who said that a no—deal brexit could be as disasterous as the financial crash. meanwhile the i says that britain could have more genetically—engineered food after brexit, as the government considers lifting eu restrictions. "cup in arms" is the headline in the sun, which leads on a proposed plastics tax on soft drinks cups. the government spent £306,000 pounds of taxpayers‘ money on works of art in one year, according to the front page of tomorrow‘s express. and the mirror dedicates its front page to north korea, where they spent eight days in the secretive country. let‘s have a look at some of those.
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digby, kick us off. as a boy about the archbishop of canterbury who spoke at the tuc, talking about zero—hours contracts and the times as saying, hang on a moment? hoist by one's own petard comes to mind. i am one of those people who think ministers of religion, any religion, don't have to have politically neutral views expressed. i do think they are parts of society, human beings, and two said they had to be neutral? jesus christ wasn't neutral. he wasn't, but earlier in the week, he got a slap from people saying you shouldn't criticise. i think he's got a few to express. the problem is, he has to wear his brand carefully because come the next general election campaign, if what i was on the labour side, even the
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archbishop of canterbury said... and he was inflammatory. he said zero—hours contracts are simply the reincarnation of an ancient evil. that is pretty strong stuff. i'm not saying it is right, wrong or indifferent, he is entitled to it at it will not be pleasant to have that thrown at him. what you then do is you through the church into a different type of environment. that is where he got to until the times, of course, and i wouldn't for a minute suggest they were motivated to do this by anybody but nevertheless, they have done a bit of digging and found that the church of digging and found that the church of england, the church of england users zero—hours contracts, invests in amazon, who are one of the companies being flagged, and how dare he be so hypocritical as to criticise the very thing that the
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organisation, the boss of which is doing. and what i think is rather ironic is the minister, who is a united reform church minister, argues the archbishop of canterbury is not the boss of the uniting church but he is called ray anglesea, which is lovely. but what i find even worse is serious this church, stop this, they say, but we do it. church of england spokesman said the guidance to parishes on the website no longer reflects the church's policy. take it off then! i imagine that they had no clue they we re imagine that they had no clue they were operating this way, bubbly way below pay grade. the buck should stop with him, especially when he is making very heavy biblical statements. should he resign? 0f
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course not. his job statements. should he resign? 0f course not. hisjob is far broader and far greater. not at all. you can‘t presume to speak to me on everything, just half the things i say. in the case of welby, we forget that the church of england is a business, it is in the business of making money, it‘s a landowner and it needs to practise what it preaches. if the boss says something like this, do we need to do due diligence before he steps in front of the audience and says something like this. a lot of people think, he‘s got no business speaking like this. it‘s about buying people together and the leader of all churches should be involved. do you think he should apologise? you should say something. what of the wider issue of zero—hours contracts. that will be an issue of the forthcoming election. that will be an issue of the
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forthcoming electionlj that will be an issue of the forthcoming election. i am convinced in my indecision because i can give you a lot of examples where the very employees for want of a better word, i hate the word worker, because of other people who work in trade unions, but these people, a lot of them like the flexibility, lots of them like the flexibility, lots of them enjoy the ability that they can pick it up and put it down and therefore i wouldn't want to deny therefore i wouldn't want to deny the choice of that. because the other problem is, it is open to abuse. you get exploitation and abuse. you get exploitation and abuse from people who have no way of fighting back. it's not a zero—sum game. 0n fighting back. it's not a zero—sum game. on one time, you bet they do, there are a lot of people who like there are a lot of people who like the flexibility. there is the case with uber, it works for them. henry is wrong, but don't worry.|j with uber, it works for them. henry is wrong, but don't worry. i suspect there might be a hint of
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disagreement as you move to the guardian. no deal breaks it could be as disastrous as the financial crash. digby, hold your breath. the governor of the bank of england went in there. when did you show up theresa may‘s position with the cabinet by painting a nightmarish picture of unemployment reaching double figures. house prices falling between 25% and 35%. though they are falling by some measure, in parts of london, 10% over the last couple of yea rs. london, 10% over the last couple of years. he compared the outcome of no deal breaks it to the crash that happened ten years ago this week. cabinet ministers have been briefing the guardian. 0ne cabinet ministers have been briefing the guardian. one of them said, the government would just stand by. the labour government didn‘t and we wouldn‘t hear but interestingly,
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after this meeting, the government released a batch of technical notices, they call them here, and a lot would be not happy to hear that uk driving licences won‘t be valid in the eu. travellers with uk passports, close to expiry, with less tha n passports, close to expiry, with less than six months to go, may be denied entry. it‘s highly unlikely this happens. roaming charges as well but i suspect the two sides will come closer together. that's where i wanted to go because the words, highly unlikely is important. can you see over there, there are some pigs flying. what on earth? where is the balance in this article? cabinet sources said. this isa article? cabinet sources said. this is a plant and its planted to a newspaper that is a remain newspaper. it doesn't mean it didn't happen. he painted a bleak picture of unemployment reaching double figures, house prices falling 35%,
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transport links stalling, the death of the firstborn by friday. that is not in there. transport links stalling. no one ever went to europe before 1973, did they? if there was i'io before 1973, did they? if there was no deal, people would still travel to europe. but it might not be as easy. i welcomed your balance at the end about highly unlikely. easy. i welcomed your balance at the end about highly unlikelylj easy. i welcomed your balance at the end about highly unlikely. i was balanced all the way through. but you are agreed on highly unlikely, yes? it's got nothing to do with britain, it is not in germany's interest, germany runs europe, bosses europe, and no deal breaks it means lots of unemployment in germany and they are not standing for that. he is actually looking into the camera. that is absolutely true. there will be a deal, not because we are obsessing about it, suddenly europe will wake up to the fa ct. suddenly europe will wake up to the fact. i suppose the point i would
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make here, it‘s interesting conversation we are having, it would be strange, would it not, for the bank of england governor —— governor not to go at it to a meeting and outlined various permutations? not only are you write but i do a ploy that carney and i am glad he was around. —— i do applaud carney. you are not saying that an hour ago. you didn't give me a chance. you were so biased. stay with that, that is interesting. i've said that many times because i'm more balance to the new but what i do object to is before the referendum, he and his like were saying, immediately after the referendum, there will be an emergency budget, we are at the point where the experts are at it again and we are all going to hell ina hand
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again and we are all going to hell in a hand basket. that bit of this, i don't applaud him. if he was going to do it, it should be done in seriously strictest confidence. 0ne thing that happened, if you got a house price reduction of 30%, and a lot of people who benefit from that. a final port? a lot of people who accuse carney of getting its forecasts wrong should remember there are a lot of people on the brexit side to get their forecasts wrong, leaving the european union would be a walk in the park. david davies said it would be so easy and lookout fiendishly difficult it is. even among the european research group, they can‘t agree among themselves. i totally agree, group, they can‘t agree among themselves. itotally agree, it's group, they can‘t agree among themselves. i totally agree, it's a statement of the obvious. on that note of unexpected harmony are going to ta ke
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note of unexpected harmony are going to take us to the telegraph. digby, plastic layer in the earth‘s crossed. the telegraph put it on the front page on its own which signifies importance. in all of what is going on in allies we should remember this is is going on in allies we should rememberthis is an is going on in allies we should remember this is an enormous problem —— our lives we should remember this is an enormous problem with plastic in the world. when we talk about it in the world. when we talk about it in the eu or in america, 90% of the plastics come down about nine rivers from asia and africa. we have to get to the cause of this which isn't beating up a stonier about plastic. it is going to asia and africa and sorting it in the rivers —— estonia. what the article says is in 1945 there started with the first atom bomb forming enough particles to spread a layer, plastic has proliferated, then the plastic ended
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up proliferated, then the plastic ended up on the seabed, and when that happens you create a layer in the earth's crust. so in thousands of years we will have a layer of plastic which has mineralised. and the sea, as we know, is two thirds or more of the earth's surface, so i applaud the telegraph for putting this on the front page. we need to find out how to stop this. one way is to lead from the front and take the moral high ground. then let's get into the educative process in africa and asia and stop them putting it in the rivers in the first place. people are aware of this in africa and asia. some countries are banning plastic bags. in other countries people don‘t necessarily drink from a bottle, they drink from a plastic bag which is biodegradable. i think it is going to happen in the cardiff marathon in a few weeks. look at the
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names for the era, the holocene era which began at the ice age 12,000 yea rs which began at the ice age 12,000 years ago, we are in the anthropocene era, which is human, but this one that we are creating, we don‘t know what it will be called, should i call it the plasticine — era ? called, should i call it the plasticine - era? i think there is one, are plasticine — era. 5 million years ago. you have destroyed my joke! it wasn‘t very good anyway. no, it was ok. i have no idea whether you are right or not.|j no, it was ok. i have no idea whether you are right or not. i seem to remember that. ok. the metro. henry, this is... talking about the two russians. straight out of the kremlin casting roles for the james bond skyfall the. —— skyfall move.
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and then they said that they should come forward. we see them in the papers today. they claim they want to see the dreaming spire of salisbury cathedral. friends of theirs had told them for years, you must come down and see this. so they flew 2000 miles, four hours on a plane to come to london and then go over to salisbury. no pictures of them are merged inside the cathedral or around the cathedral apart from the cul—de—sac where the skripal‘s live and that was seen as insulting from theresa may. i am not sure what the russians think of it. that is one of the puzzles. in terms of newspaper review, the metro way to treat this, remember this paper has picked up on an awful lot of stations on the way to work. picked up on an awful lot of stations on the way to workm picked up on an awful lot of stations on the way to work. it is free. i thought, "for
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stations on the way to work. it is free. ithought, "for your stations on the way to work. it is free. i thought, "for your spires only" it gets a smile from a serious subject. it touches on many ironic things. the thrust of this, do we find it insulting? 0f things. the thrust of this, do we find it insulting? of course we do. doi find it insulting? of course we do. do i think the russians are clever enough to know that? yes, they do. 0n enough to know that? yes, they do. on one side, what do we do other than this? on the other side i see mr putin tonight on the tv exercising two thirds of the russian army? in vostock. there are a lot of people in the world who don't want to go to war. they would look to leadership in the world. there is a dearth of leadership in the world. it would be very good to see people taking this seriously enough to get
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together rather than giving cause to the metro to have this sort of headline and having as henry rightly says this reaction of disbelief. the other thing is people ridicule what happens today and the danger is we forget that quite apart from what happened to the skripals, a woman died. and a police officer was ill and the woman‘s partner was also ill and the woman‘s partner was also ill and it could have been so much worse. it would appear that the spray bottle was just left, when the men had done their work, thrown into a skip. the thing about he sees the world through the eyes of mother russia, under attack and he says, don‘t you, g7, it used to be g8, don‘t you, g7, it used to be g8, don‘t laugh at us, and they are mocking britain and that is how it is. just over a minute to contemplate the daily express exclusive. is miles when we went
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through this outside. —— i did smile. classic story, taxpayer forks out for the art which ministers can put on the walls in the officers. £360,000 to buy, they say, modern art, and isn't itjunk? there are referenda and opinion polls, you get answers according to the questions and they asked if money would be better spent on the nhs. well, of course it would! the reason our smile is when i was a minister they came in on my first day and said what art would you like from the collection? they offered me a lot of modern art. what is that? and what i wanted, andi modern art. what is that? and what i wanted, and i got it, was the famous picture of wellington beating napoleon at waterloo so that the next on the french came in the room they would realise who won. the only reason they have this story is
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because £60,000 was spent on a picture called in the back from wolfgang tillmans, and this brexiteers can always be relied upon to bring this up in the express. everyone is entitled to choice. that is it for the papers. don‘t forget, you can see the front pages of the papers online on the bbc news website. it‘s all there for you, seven days a week at bbc.co.uk/papers and if you miss the programme any evening you can watch it later on bbc iplayer. thank you henry bonsu and lord digbyjones. goodbye. good evening. we start with cricket. after a 16 year wait, sorry other
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cou nty after a 16 year wait, sorry other county champions once again. the three wicket win gave them the unassailable lead of 61 points —— surrey. the celebrations begun when they passed the victory target of 271. it was one of their outstanding players of the season, south african bowler mornay morkel who struck the winning runs with another key player rikki clarke with him in the middle. surrey. were last champions in 2002. we are absolutely delighted. it is what everyone wants to win. and to do it, we are delighted. more nerve racking than you wanted today when you're six or seven down? definitely, i could have done with being there at the end and it would have made it easier. i was watching my phone most of the time and trying to drink coffee and distract myself. staying with cricket and former
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england one—day captain paul collingwood will retire at the end of the season more than two decades after making his first—class debut. he played in 68 tests and was part of three ashes winning teams, leading england to victory also at the t20 eight years ago. his final game will be at home to middlesex. britain‘s simon yates has maintained his 25 second overall lead at the vuelta a espa na. his 25 second overall lead at the vuelta a espana. he marked his nearest challenger and now only two stages remain ahead of sunday‘s procession finish in madrid. the women‘s british open winner georgia bohl made a strong start to the final major of the summer at the evian championship in southern france. she finished three under, three shots off the lead. the tottenham goalkeeper will carry
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on as the club captain despite his recent drink—driving conviction. hugo lloris will play no part in saturday‘s opening premier league game. the spurs keeper is injured. totte n ha m game. the spurs keeper is injured. tottenham face leaders liverpool in the big game without their choice keeper, or dele alli, who is also injured. it is one of the best teams in europe, not only england. a very good player, great manager, and of course it will be a really tough opponent. and of course it is going to demand a lot of energy for us, to have a very good performance if we wa nt to have a very good performance if we want to be able to win. manchester city women were tonight a superb first leg win after late equaliser for atleti co first leg win after late equaliser for atletico madrid in the last 32 champions league tie. gemma bonar opened the scoring for city in the first half but atletico madrid
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cranked up the pressure, levelling in the final minute of normal time. castleford boosted hopes of a home semi—final in the super league play—offs with a 44— four win over huddersfield. they brought in eight tries and castleford have two games left in the super 8s, which would meana left in the super 8s, which would mean a home advantage in the last format. huddersfield remain in fifth. —— in the last format. that is all your sport. have a lovely evening. good evening. before we get to the forecast for the uk just an update on hurricane florence battering the east coast of the us. as i speak, we are hours away still before the storm makes landfall. this is the satellite loop from the last couple of days. the worst weather at at sea still. we have talked hours before the iron crosses the coastline. the
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animation is quite fast. it is actually a slow—moving storm. that means it will be raining. we will have destructive winds for a considerable time, something like 24 hours of destructive weather. 0n the other side of the world, we have a typhoon, more powerful than florence, this tremendous eye heading for the philippines, and it could be catastrophic when the storm makes landfall in the next few days. anyway, the weather in the next few days and 24 hours, this is the image you can see, cloud across the north of the uk, clear in the south, that is how we start friday morning. clear whether in the south at 6am on friday. temperatures around 10 degrees. rain in the north—west. quite a lot of rain here. through the morning into the afternoon, look at the clock, the rain falls apart,
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so we arejust at the clock, the rain falls apart, so we are just talking about bits and pieces of rain showers are cross central parts of the uk. either side of that it will be dry and bright. the south and the south—east will get away with quite a nice day with just a few passing clouds. friday night into saturday and high pressure is close to southern britain. that means many southern and central areas of the uk have a nice day on saturday. the wind blowing out of the south, south—west. it is cooler and you will notice the rain and the weather funded in through later on saturday. so we need the brolly saturday night in belfast. and on sunday the weather front parks itself across central areas of the uk. lancashire, yorkshire, maybe northern wales. either side of that, the weather looking better, 22 in london, fresh
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in glasgow at around 15 degrees. then early next week potentially looking very unsettled with remnants of ex—tropical storm is heading our way as well. welcome to newsday in the bbc. i‘m sharanjit leyl in singapore. the headlines: tens of thousands of people in the philippines have begun evacuating from coastal areas as super typhoon mankhut heads towards the island of luzon. and in the united states, there‘s more extreme weather as hurricane florence looms. forecasters expect life threatening flooding as a result of a storm surge. i‘m kasia madera in london. also in the programme: we‘ll be talking to malaysia‘s first daughter about human rights and why she is not one to shy away from the spotlight. and bye bye beetle: german car manufacturer volkswagen announces it‘s stopping production of the iconic car next year.
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