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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  September 14, 2018 6:00am-8:31am BST

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good morning, welcome to breakfast, withjon kay and mega munchetty. our headlines today: hurricane florence hits the us, with officials warning of catastrophic flooding and say many lives could be lost. stay on guard. this is a powerful storm that can kill. today the threat becomes a reality. britain accuses russia of "lies and blatant fabrications" as the prime suspects in the salisbury nerve agent attack claim they were just tourists. house prices could fall by more than a third if there's no deal on brexit. that's the latest warning from the governor of the bank of england who briefed mps on the worst—case scenario. a winner in italy, a winner in france and britain could have another, in the tour of spain. simon yates leads, but there's a brutal climb ahead today. a wet day for those of you in the
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north and the west. we have the details and your full forecast here on breakfast. good morning. it's friday, the 14th of september. our top story: the south—east coast of america has begun feeling the brunt of hurricane florence, with its outer bands already lashing the land. more than a million people have been ordered to evacuate their homes, with winds of up to 90 miles per hour expected later. our north america correspondent laura trevelyan has this report. dramatic scenes as the leading edge of hurricane florence breaches the north carolina coast. rain and wind pummel the barrier islands exposed to the atlantic. this huge slow—moving storm is now so wide it is threatening the south—eastern coast of the us from the carolinas to georgia. it is the rain from the hurricane that could pose the greatest threat. forecasters warn that if we get prolonged rainfall over a couple
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of days there could be catastrophic flooding, as the water levels rise and inundate people's homes. there are fears that millions could be without power across the coast south—east of the us as the triple hazard of hurricane force winds, storm surge and flooding become a reality. many have fled their home, seeking shelter in evacuation centres inland. from the vulnerable elderly to the very young. while most people in mandatory evacuation zones, they have left, some are determined to see out the storms. my family and everyone has evacuated except my wife and i but we are setting up crews now to deal with the aftermath which could take weeks. the track of hurricane florence once it makes landfall is uncertain. what is certain is this damaging assault on the coastline from wind
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and water is intensifying. our reporter paul blake is in morehead city, in north carolina. he described the scene there to us earlier. as the wind and rain begins to lash the area, morehead city and much of the area, morehead city and much of the region looks like a ghost town as people have either moved into shelters or they are hunkering at home. people in the low—lying region have been watching the forecast for days, stockpiling supplies and deciding on whether to evacuate from what many people fear is a storm of a lifetime. officials are concerned many people have decided to stay at home and have not heeded evacuation orders. there was a powerful bull —— couples is of relief when it was downgraded from major hurricane status. there is the anxiety over whether it could stall out, bringing major flooding and a destructive storm surge to the area. we'll be taking a closer look at the impact of hurricane florence as it moves closer inland with matt later.
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the most powerful typhoon this year is roaring towards the main island of the philippines, with wind gusts of 160 miles an hour. super—typhoon mangkhut has gathered strength since monday, tearing down trees and power lines and leaving thousands of people homeless, but millions more live in the areas most at risk. our philippines correspondent howard johnson reports from cagayan, one of the provinces expected to be hardest hit by the storm. i'm outside the provincial government headquarters here in cagayan, where theyjust held an emergency briefing. the governor has a plan where he wants people to help their neighbours. if you live in a shack or a flimsy house, move to a more robust house. help a neighbour by letting them stay with you or go to a church or to a school. he is also saying there is a liquor ban or alcohol ban in place, to stop people drinking through this period and get exposed to the weather. i asked him if there were any faults
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in his plan and he said potentially telecommunications could go down on roads were impassable. earlier today we saw them stockpiling food here, bread was being loaded into baskets, ready to being loaded into baskets, ready to be taken around the province. he is also appealing for air support from the national government to be able to spread that food around the province. last time the storm hit here, 2016, there were four casualties in this province. this time around, he's hoping for zero casualties and that seems somewhat optimistic given the magnitude of this super typhoon. downing street has condemned a russian television interview of the suspects in the salisbury poisoning attack as "deeply offensive to the victims." alexander petrov and ruslan boshirov told russia's state—run news channel "russia today" that they had travelled to the city simply as tourists. an official spokesperson for theresa may described the broadcast as an "insult to the public‘s intelligence." jon donnison has the latest. assassins or tourists? the
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government named alexander petrov and ruslan boshirov as russian agents sent to salisbury to kill sergei skripal, but popping up on russian state—run tv they said otherwise. translation: what were you doing? our friends had been suggesting for a long time that we visit this wonderful town. salisbury, wonderful town? visit this wonderful town. salisbury, wonderfultown? yes. a tourist town. downing street described the interview as lies, blatant fabrications and an insult to the public intelligence. the bbc has spoken to the journalist who carried out the interview. has spoken to the journalist who carried out the interviewlj has spoken to the journalist who carried out the interview. i don't have any reasons to believe them, i don't know them, they are not my friends, but i have normal reasons to believe the conservatives who had
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been lying previously. some see the interview after putin suggested the men should speak publicly as provocative. whether there are will ever be challenged in a british court seems unlikely. the church of england has said it will keep its shares in the online retailer, amazon, a day after the archbishop of canterbury said the firm was "leeching off the taxpayer". the church times has revealed amazon was among the 20 biggest global investments by the church last year. a statement from the cofe said it considered the most effective way to seek change was to be "in the room with these companies" as a shareholder. the leader of one of the uk's biggest unions has suggested that accusations of anti—semitism in the labour party may have been started by israel to divert attention from what he called "its atrocities." mark serwotka of the public and commercial services union was speaking at a fringe meeting of the tuc conference. in a statement, the union said he also made the point that anti—semitism should be opposed. there's been a fresh warning about house prices in the event
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of a no—deal brexit. ben's been looking into this one. it isa it is a stark warning from the governor of the bank of england mark carney talking about what could potentially happen, a range of scenarios of a messy no—deal brexit from the eu and he said in the worse case scenario prices could fall as much as 35% and he blamed it on two things, the pound would fall and then to strengthen the pound the bank would raise interest rates and that would mean the cost of mortgages would go up, house prices would probably fall and a lot of homeowners could be left in negative equity. one of the real concerns is the messy no deal planning. many will accuse the governor of the bank of england as being part of that project fear and something he has been accused of before. he was grilled by mps yesterday, some of them critical of his assessment. all of this has come out of information
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that the government has put together about the different scenarios that would affect us and they have spoken about things like passports. what would happen to the passports. do we need a new one, how much would be left on them and we try to travel to the eu? driving, whether you have to swa p the eu? driving, whether you have to swap your licence for the international driving permanent. they would not potentially be recognised. and things like roaming for the mobile phone, with a battleground that you can do that in eu countries. and to rome for free using the data package. now, brexiteers say this is part of project fear and it is a worst—case scenario that they don't think will happen. they are confident that a deal will be done. nonetheless the bank of england pointing out there are real worry for the economy and it would be a shock to the financial syste m it would be a shock to the financial system if we left without a deal and in that scenario prices for homes would fall. thank you. a series of gas explosions have set fire to dozens of homes in the us state of massachusetts. the blasts in three separate towns north of boston are thought to have
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been caused by the rupture of an overpressurised gas line. olivia crellin reports. onfire. flattened. and up in smoke. these are homes from three communities north of the us city of boston, massachusetts. destroyed in the wake of an apparent natural pipe line rupture. a total of 75 fires, explosions or investigations of gas were reported. hundreds were evacuated and some 50 fire departments rushed to the scene. the cause of the blast is still unclear and the massachusetts governor charlie baker says that safety and shelter were the first priority. there will be plenty of time later tonight and tomorrow morning and into the next day to do some of the workaround determining exactly what has happened and why and what needs to be done to deal with that. the focus in the short term
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is to make sure we do everything we can to provide shelter for people who need shelter. investigators suspect over pressurisation of a gas main lead to the series of blasts and fires. say the colombia gas company who supply gas to the area it is investigating what happened. residents supplied by the companies are unable to return to their homes and many are in the dark about the state of their property, it may take days to work out what has happened and weeks for those affected to come home. paul oakenfold has become the first dj to play a set at the ancient stonehenge monument. his performance at the world heritage site was a closely guarded secret, with only 50 people allowed to attend the event, which happened as the sun went down. oakenfold has previously played at venues including the great wall of china and base camp at mount everest. i'm very lucky to get asked to
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perform and do a live show to sunset. it's an honour as an englishman to play at one of the most iconic sites notjust in britain, in the world. if you were driving down the a303 last night you would be wondering what was going on. and only 50 people. i suppose if you have crowds around somewhere like that you don't wa nt to around somewhere like that you don't want to do any damage. around somewhere like that you don't want to do any damagelj around somewhere like that you don't want to do any damage. i think they would have wanted a crowd. you don't need a big crowd to have an atmosphere. you would have enjoyed it. i would have loved it. britain, it is raining in spain at the moment. i don't want to remind him what happened earlier this year in the giro d'italia when he blew
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his lead. he is leading in the spanish equivalent. he is doing so well in the grand tours at the moment. if he can do it, i don't wa nt to moment. if he can do it, i don't want tojinx moment. if he can do it, i don't want to jinx it. moment. if he can do it, i don't want tojinx it. it is moment. if he can do it, i don't want to jinx it. it is a climbing day today. it is a huge day up into andora. and the legs are going to be burning today. it's the penultimate meaningful stage of la vuelta today, and yates goes into it with a 25 second lead. it's going to be hard to hang on to the leader's red jersey today, with a massive climb into andorra awaiting the riders. yates would be britain's third winner of a grand tour this year. surrey are the county cricket champions for the first time in 16 years. they beat worcestershire by three wickets to seal the title, and there could be an england call—up coming for their captain rory burns, who finished the season as the top run—scorer. england's georgia hall is looking to add to her british open win. she's three shots off the lead going into the second round of the last major of the season, the evian championship. and what a finish for britain's james cooke.
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he came from third place to win gold at world modern pentathlon championships in mexico city, taking it by 300ths of a second. in the papers in a moment, why fans should take toiletries to birmingham. pardon? why the fans should take a long spare toiletries. i will explain why. throwing toilet paper like in the olden days? none of that. there is a good reason behind it. we are intrigued. thank you. let's take a look at today's front pages. the daily telegraph leads with the story of the two russian men alleged to have carried out the salisbury nerve agent attack, and theresa may's reaction to their television interview yesterday. she calls their denial an insult to our intelligence. the guardian also features the salisbury story and a warning
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from mark carney, the bank of england governor, that a no—deal brexit could be as disastrous as the financial crash of 2008. the daily mail picks up the story of the church of england holding shares in amazon, despite the archbishop of canterbury accusing the online giant of corporate greed in a speech earlier this week. the headline says "that's rich, archbishop." and the daily mirror has something completely different. they've spent eight days in north korea. his name is even on the paper. the reporter has written about an account of that with pictures of a0 found inside a factory with a family
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inside kim's career. what life is really like. what is everyone catching up with online? people are reading about the end of the road for the volkswagen beetle. i never had one but i always wanted one. koby goes bananas was my favourite film as a kid. —— herbie goes bananas. then, i can't imagine you ever had a beetle, you wouldn't fit. our business producer kate drives a boxlike and beetle. we came back in one. it was a little folded up. 21 million of them, they've made, since it first rolled off the production line. they are going to end production. they want to concentrate on electric cars and driverless vehicles. they are sort of focusing their attention elsewhere. 21
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million that they have made and are going to release a special final addition when it spends —— when it ends in 2019. i would have thought an electric beetle would be a good seller. this is a story talk to about yesterday. john lewis, profits fell by 99% in the first half of the year. if you look into a bit of detail, it's because of that promise, and we talked about it yesterday, to match prices from its competitors. that cost of £40 million. but better news from morrisons. morrisons, its best sales figures were a decade to compete with the likes of tesco and asda. 6.3%. with the likes of tesco and asda.
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6.396. football is doing good to the community. birmingham play west brom in the championship tonight. one of the form of players, jeff hawkes field, is now a builder and he renovates houses for the homeless. asking fans to bring on any spare deodorant and shampoos. has he come back to his days as a brickie to paper over the cracks? this is a conundrum that affected many foot ball conundrum that affected many football fans, the bbc has sold its own little glitch. there was this delay during the world cup matches. i was watching a football club upstairs andl i was watching a football club upstairs and i went to the toilet. i was having a bit of a wee... you said you are going to get some toiletries, i thought. said you are going to get some toiletries, ithought. get to said you are going to get some toiletries, i thought. get to the point. he went what, what, and
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rushed away to go downstairs. he hadn't seen the goal. there is a 22nd of eight. now that technology has been fixed. i know it's only a few seconds but on a big sporting event, if your neighbours are watching, a twitter alert. that is a problem for many people in the summer. like this from cornwall. they decided that the shortcrust pastry is a bit unhealthy survey are suggesting that the low pastry. i love that idea. can you imagine how that will go down in cornwall? people become very passionate about pasties. but what of the reasons i don't eat cornish pasties, but i love the feeling, i don't eat meat,
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but the pastry is so thick. the thick crust. you can't have cornish pasties made of the low pastry. but you can have tasty pasties with a filling and have it with a nice feeling. it's like a bowl of salad. it's nice having you here. are you a big thick pastry person? pastry keeps me going the whole week, never the billing. so you would have one made of filo pastry? no, sorry. got some rain around across many northern and western areas in for a time this morning, it could be a bit on the heavy side. let's take a look at the way it's raining. showers
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across the north and west of england. we'll continue to see them come and go. heading across scotland and into northern england. it does mean the northern half of the country brightens up and particularly the south and east, there is a chance of one or two showers passing by as we look at the closer detail here but the most of the time, it will be dry. that will keep temperatures at 1718 degrees. there is the zone of cloudy or wetter weather. still in northern ireland, not a great day. we'll see more sunshine through the afternoon. a cool breeze, temperatures in stornoway around 11 celsius. into tonight, who was in a zone of cloudy weather. the top and tail of the
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country, some clearer skies around. it's going to be a chilly night. could be a touch of frost in eastern scotland. a lovely bright start. still fairly cloudy, a few showers around. and to get in the end of the afternoon. the breeze coming in from the south—west, temperatures are belittled it on saturday. a wet night to take as their across scotland. the rain heads its way southwards. more likely to see outbreaks of brain. quite a blustery wind here. some sunshine at times, and temperatures around 22— 2a degrees. we can see the remnants of an ex— hurricane heading our way
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which will mix the weather up a little bit. uncertainty as to whether it brings is wet and windy weather or warm weather. we are grateful because we don't have florence. back to our main story this morning, and millions of people living on the east coast of america, are bracing themselves for the arrival of hurricane florence. this is the latest image of the storm as it fast—approaches land. it's expected to make landfall at 8am local time, which is around 12 noon here in the uk. florence has been downgraded to a category one storm with winds of up to 90mph. officials are warning it has the potential to kill "a lot of people". preparations are under way as people stock up on supplies and board up their homes. nearly 1.7 million people have been ordered to evacuate the coastlines. but not everyone has decided to go. mike riddle lives on north myrtle beach in south carolina. the alternative was to evacuate and
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not know what was going on with my house and to me, that is more stressful tha n house and to me, that is more stressful than sitting here and at least being able, although i know it is risky, at least being able to deal with anything that happens to the house. let's hear more about what the situation has been like on the ground. our north america editor chris buckler sent us this report from wilmington earlier. iam in i am in wilmington and this is an area that has seen hurricanes in the past. locals will tell you they have experienced storms and will give you a rollcall of some of their names like hugo, hazel and now florence. the real worry here is the storm surge, the amount of flooding that can be caused on land and beyond that, there is a likelihood that florence is going to hang around for some time. the higher the storm is
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expected to reach the carolinas later on today that it is not expected to move quickly when it reaches land. it will hang about the some time, potentially causing 2a hours or more of destructive weather. matt is here to tell us more. it strikes me, this is a huge area. matt is here to tell us more. it strikes me, this is a huge aream is, and we can to be focusing on whether it is category one, two, three, four. the wind is not the main feature. but the biggest issue is going to be the storm now stalling. its 50 miles offshore and it's a question of how long it lingers around the coast over the next couple of days. does windspeed define category? yes. that is the problem. it's the storm surge which
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goes on for a great length of time. just the relentlessness of the rain. you can see a mac graphic, it is raining quite heavily. we could get up raining quite heavily. we could get up to raining quite heavily. we could get uptoa raining quite heavily. we could get up to a metre worth of rain. that is like manchester's yearly rainfall in three days. when you say it lingers off the coast, what is the impact? it brings up the moisture. hurricane speed off the warmth and moisture, then they start to decay if you take that away. it starts to lose that, and eventually it will start to weather. it sounds counterintuitive. you wanted to come in as soon as possible. that's interesting, what you said about the downgrading because we heard from a british man living there who said, they've downgraded it. that's only half the story.
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we will keep you updated. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. still to come this morning, the singerjamelia will be here to urge more women to celebrate their natural afro hair, after her daugher asked her, "how come nobody on tv has hairlike me?" it'll be interesting to see what her hair is like. she slept it natural for three years. good morning from bbc london news. shops in london are selling knives alcohol and tobacco to children as young as 13. that's according to london trading standards which says the items were sold to child volunteers 285 times
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during test purchases over an 18 month period. the met police has called it unacceptable. there's more disruption ahead for passengers at waterloo using south western railway this weekend. (00v) another strike is due to take place from midnight tonight. —— another strike is due to take place from midnight tonight. it's the eighth day of action by the rmt union since the start of august. around half the normal number of services are expected to run. no further strikes have been announced. a ban on cars, lorries and taxis at one of the capital's most notorious junctions will be made permanent. since may last year, only buses and cyclists have been allowed at bankjunction in the city of london from 7am to 7pm on weekdays to try to make it safer and greener. it followed dozens of accidents — and a fatality there. surrey‘s mental health trust has been awarded an extra 1 million pounds of nhs funding for it's pioneering way to alleviate some symptoms of dementia. it's installed smart technology in the homes of sufferers
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to monitor them to try to reduce depression, agitation, anxiety and irritability. the trust says it enables people to stay in their own homes longer. the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tubes this morning. let's have a check on the weather now with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. it is not quite asjulia hello, good morning. it is not quite as julia was hello, good morning. it is not quite asjulia was misty hello, good morning. it is not quite as julia was misty as hello, good morning. it is not quite asjulia was misty as it hello, good morning. it is not quite as julia was misty as it was hello, good morning. it is not quite asjulia was misty as it was this time yesterday. we are into double
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figures in most of the towns. sadly, not as much sunshine as we have yesterday, quite a bit of a way of cloud, it's breezy, but we should stay mostly dry, small chance of one or two showers. there will be some good spells of brightness and sunshine around but quite a bit of cloud at times as well. still some sunny spells into the afternoon but in northern home counties, the small chance of one or two isolated showers that mostly dry, a noticeable south—westerly breeze. possibly 19 celsius in central london. through this evening and overnight, the threat of the showers will die away really. lots of clear spells around, temperatures could dip back into single figures away from the towns, otherwise holding at around 1011dc. on saturday, again, mostly dry, the small chance of a shower, temperatures will tend to go up shower, temperatures will tend to go up as we shower, temperatures will tend to go up as we go shower, temperatures will tend to go up as we go through the weekend, dragging in more humid air, and maybe 27 degrees by tuesday. i'm back with the latest
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from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. hello, this is breakfast, withjon kay and naga munchetty. it's 6:30am. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment. but also on breakfast this morning: we're talking about the children who put their families first, as it emerges the number of school—age carers is much higher than originally thought. we'll find out how olympian kelly sotherton feels to be finally holding her bronze medal a decade after being robbed of it by drug cheats. and peter andre will be here to talk family, fame and his iconic new cameo on stage. guess which musical he is in. good morning. here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news. millions of people on the east coast
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of america are bracing themselves for hurricane florence. more than a million people have been ordered to evacuate their homes, with winds of up to 90 miles per hour expected later. more than 100,000 homes without power as conditions begin to worsen and officials have warned it has the potential to kill a lot of people they say the risks of catastrophic flooding. the most powerful typhoon this year is roaring towards the main island of the philippines, with wind gusts of 160 miles an hour. super—typhoon mangkhut has gathered strength since monday, tearing down trees and power lines and leaving thousands of people homeless, but millions more live in the areas most at risk. our philippines correspondent howard johnson reports from one of the provinces expected to be hardest hit by the storm. downing street has condemned a russian television interview of the suspects in the salisbury poisoning attack as "deeply offensive to the victims." sergei skripal and his daughter suffered from a nerve agent in march and dawn stu rgess
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suffered from a nerve agent in march and dawn sturgess died after being exposed to the same substance. alexander petrov and ruslan boshirov told russia's state—run news channel "russia today" that they had travelled to the city simply as tourists. on the recommendation of friends. translation: our friends had been suggesting for a long time that we visit this wonderful town. it isa it is a tourist city, they have a famous cathedral, salisbury cathedral, famous throughout europe and in fact throughout the world, i think, famous for its 123 metre spire, famous for its clock, the oldest working clock in the world. the church of england has said it will keep its shares in the online retailer amazon a day after the archbishop of canterbury accused the firm of "leeching off the taxpayer". the church times has revealed amazon was among the 20 biggest global investments by the church last year. a statement from the cofe said it considered the most effective way to seek change was to be "in the room with these companies" as a shareholder. house prices could fall by more
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than a third if there's no deal on brexit. that's the latest warning from the governor of the bank of england who briefed mps on the worst—case scenario. firefighters have been battling 60 fires in three separate towns in massachusetts following dozens of gas explosions. it is thought they might have been caused by a rupture in an over pressurised gas line that was then forced into these towns and domestic areas. the towns have been told it will be sometime before those evacuated can return home. vw says it will stop production of third beetle next year, closing the
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door on one of the most iconic designs. the company said output would end at the plant in mexico in july. don't despair if you are a beetle fan, vw has stopped production several times before, i think that all is right, and then they revived it, and they say that they revived it, and they say that the car could be resurrected again in the future. i think they are. two thoughts on the russian story with the guys who said they were tourists. david has sent an e—mail. he said if the russians were tourists, where are their photos? they always take photos. that is a point. and i have learnt something else. i didn't know it was the old est else. i didn't know it was the oldest working clock in the world. it was around in the 1ath century. the oldest working clock in the world. in the cathedral. yes, because that is what one of the guys said. salisbury is worth a visit, it's true. good morning.
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what a summer it has been for the brits. victory in italy, they had a dance in france after thomas won and now on the verge of winning in spain with simon yates heading up to andorra today. he could clinch victory and make up for what happened to himself in italy when he was leading and then finished second. you can draw from that. this isa second. you can draw from that. this is a crucial day for him. the ultimate stage and hopefully he is 0k ultimate stage and hopefully he is ok and set for the procession into madrid on sunday. yes. historic back—to—back british wins at la vuelta a espana remain on course this morning, after simon yates maintained his lead. yates, looking to follow in the tyre tracks of chris froome on this tour, remains in red after stage 18. he's still 25 seconds ahead of his nearest challenger alejandro valverde. there are now only two stages before sunday's processional finish in madrid. today's stage 19 takes the riders into andorra and the pyranees.
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at the end, they go up and up to over 2000 metres with leg burning climb of over 12 miles. it's a chance for a last attack from yates' rivals. he will be trying to forget what happened in the giro d'italia earlier this summer, when he lost his lead at this point to evential winner chris frome. after nearly two decades, surrey are the county cricket champions once again. they won at worcestershire yesterday to give themselves an unbeatable lead. the celebrations could begin when they went past the victory target of 271. surrey have been led brilliantly by the man with his back to us, captain rory burns. a player many think should now be opening the batting for england. england's georgia hall says "three behind is nothing really" after a good opening round at the final women's major of the season, the evian championship in south—east france. she's already won the british open
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this year and she picked up three birdies and no bogeys, "a special thing" on that course, she said. there was an incredible finish at the world modern pentathlon championships in mexico city, with britain's james cooke taking gold. in a sprint finish, he came from third place to win it byjust 300ths of a second. it's a bronze medal for britain's kelly sotherton a decade on from the beijing olympics. she was clearly quite emotional to be receiving her medal ten years on at a team gb ball last night. she finished fifth in the heptathlon but moved up two places after two athletes were disqualified for doping. this is the second time sotherton has received a medal retrospectively after collecting a relay bronze last year. i started to think back at the moment, how i would feel, so i started to cry, started to shake, the same feeling i would have had
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ten yea rs the same feeling i would have had ten years ago, so very emotional. i had to do a lot of fluttering. it was such a great ovation and i'm really pleased to share it with so many people who would feel and understand what it would be to go through this. he feels very special. in the recent us open, alfie hewett won two titles in as many days, claiming both the wheelchair singles and doubles. he's now won seven grand slam titles in all and is still only —— he's now won seven grand slam titles in all and is still only 20. he's now back from the open and joins us now. have you touched the ground, have you been to norwich?” have you touched the ground, have you been to norwich? i have come back for 2a hours and had two hours sleep. sorry about that. thank you for having me on. how did that go? i was playing the international tennis federation rules, we had a
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challenge, lots of people... lots of good rallies. yes, but you thrashed me. you have had lots of doubles titles but the singles, to get this, what does it mean? it means a lot. i haven't won since the french open last year. it felt like it was a long time. it was awesome to get the win at wimbledon for us and to retain the doubles title in the us last year, and to go to the us and make the double was something that meant a lot. you were delayed, weren't you? i am really interested in the mental strength that you have. any champion has. what happened, first of all, and how did you deal with it? happened, first of all, and how did you dealwith it? it happened, first of all, and how did you deal with it? it was partly my fault. i didn't have to stop over in chicago. i was taking my brother a
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long. meeting my family atjfk. meeting in chicago. when we got there there was a lot of rain delays and weather storm, something like that. it meant that my flight was cancelled, then another flight was delayed and cancelled, which led to me sleeping in the airport for the night, i had one hours sleep and then i got up the following morning to leave and it means i missed everything on tuesday. so how do you start mentally readjusting, and then what do you do? i was quite stressed. i am quite particular around preparation. even on the wednesday i felt quite rushed in everything i was doing. i spoke to my team around me. it was one of those situations where it wasn't in my control. trying to put it behind me and focusing on what i could do in that present moment. it affected how i was feeling and my mentality. resilience is something that i have
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come to grow in the last couple of yea rs come to grow in the last couple of years so thankfully it happened through that tournament. do you feel when you overcome that that you learn something about yourself and how you move forward? yes, someone commented last year about digging deep to win the masters and it is like when you go to everest you can go there again. it fell similar when everything was against me and i was tired. i hadn't slept. my body was feeling it from sleeping on the airport floor. this was something that i really wanted quite badly. i was going to the depth and not using it as an excuse. and once you go to chicago you don't have to go there again. yes, exactly. we have some shots of you winning the doubles with gordon reid. i saw when you beat me 10—0 how much ground you cover, how fast and physical it is, singles compare to doubles, what we are seeing here. the doubles on the
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grass is staffed because of the surface, it adds a bit of friction, so it's a shame because wimbledon is the biggest event and we get a lot of coverage and i would say the tennis maybe isn't as high as it could be compared to the hardcourt, but movement is 70% of the game, it is so important to get around the court and get to the ball, it is such a big skill and it takes years learn. congratulations. you have a break now. yes, a bit of a break. it will give me the extra motivation. i knew that i was going to take the rest of the year off. it was meant to be the masters at the end of the year. i want to skip it in the short term, into the moment, celebrate. it is important to do that. and let your body recover as well. we have tokyo 2020 coming up and qualifying begins in 2019. maybe you need to have a rematch. maybe you need to,
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see if you can get some points.” have a rematch. maybe you need to, see if you can get some points. i am so see if you can get some points. i am so bad at tennis. sort something out. thank you so much. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the headlines: america battens down the hatches as hurricane florence menaces the east coast. downing street rejects offensive claims that the two salisbury poisoning suspects were innocent tourists. here's matt with a look at this morning's weather. good morning to as well. a bit of a mixed weekend throughout the dry and warm through the south and east of the country. today, you'll need to grab the umbrella that we had out, particularly the north and west. ba rely particularly the north and west. barely showery at the moment but it is already starting to turn a little ofa is already starting to turn a little of a persistent. the rain becoming a
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bit more lengthy maturation across western scotland and northern ireland. across other parts of western england and wales, a few scattered showers around. across northern scotland, things will brighten up. it's not meant to rain all day long. most likely to see some wet weather at times. a bit of a westerly breeze. barely few and far between. temperatures generally in the mid—to high teens. but outbreaks of rain, some heavy bursts at times. just a few showers into the afternoon. temperatures around 11- 13 the afternoon. temperatures around 11— 13 degrees. cloud an occasional rain. got some lengthy clearer
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skies. rural areas have dropped down into single figures. a lovely bright start here. still, that cloud an occasional showers. rain turns persistent to the west of northern ireland. with wins in the south—west, it will start to feel a bit milder. a bit of a wet night, saturday night. working its way southwards. not throughout the day, across parts of northern england, particularly the western side of the pennines. sunshine and showers and blustery showers. dry weather, sunny spells, it may turn a bit hazy through the david temperatures into the low 20s. we will see
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temperatures climb a little bit further. next week, the chance of some wet and windy weather. hurricane helene. gordon has gone. i zac is not bothering us, and joyce isn't either. what lovely hurricane names.” what lovely hurricane names. i love the names of hurricanes. black women are ditching chemical relaxers and straighteners in favour of embracing their naturally afro—textured hair. leigh—anne from little mix has been encouraging others to love their afro, and rochelle humes and jamelia both stopped straightening their hair after their daughters said they didn't see princesses or people on tv with curls. ahead of world afro day tomorrow, our reporter elaine dunkley has been to meet its founder. it's a celebration of super curls,
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textures a nd it's a celebration of super curls, textures and twists. world afro day is about embracing natural beauty. and it's much more than that. it's about heritage, history, identity and being proud of your roots.- six this morning, we are into an extremely special treat because we are learning a little bit about world afro day. at this primary school in south london, an important lesson about inclusion and acceptance. world afro day was really inspired by my daughter who is really positive in celebrating her house. she was singing one day andi her house. she was singing one day and i thought, i really want every little black girl child with afro hairto little black girl child with afro hair to feel great and the other reason was, the negative dialogue the world. you always have to believe in yourself to know your hair is unique. not all schools are as encouraging as this one. black
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children have been sent home to having their hair in locks, twists and afro. these conversations about awareness. it's just special for the black people who are not accepted for who they are, expression lee when they have braids. every hair should be noticed because it's all unique. you look ugly, don't listen to them if they say that. the politics of black hair is deeply rooted in history. from signifying status and african tribes to struggles against slavery and social injustice. there have been people kicked out of school, not being able to get certainjobs. kicked out of school, not being able to get certain jobs. the relationship without herra 's black woman is incredibly complex because one, we've been taught that we don't entirely belong to our own selves that means that people often approach us with the intention to inspect us and often that intention is laced in compliments like, oh, it's so big, it's a puppy, can i
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touched it? most times, it is not asked. would come a long way, the advancement of social media has had advancement of social media has had a huge impact because once upon a time, you would not see people on tv he looked like you and videos and magazines in which created the space online or you are seeing people in your circle who look like you with their hairout, the your circle who look like you with their hair out, the rapper out, but you are seeing people across the world celebrating their natural hair. there is how positive in imagery, a subject that rapper getz is tackling. i've never had anybody tell me they have played my music to their children. daddy, how come there are no girls who look like me in the shop? the standard of beauty sta rts in the shop? the standard of beauty starts from that age. there is no representation from them and she grows up representation from them and she grows up feeling like she wants to be something that she is not. as the first man that she is going to love,
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i have two empower her. world afro day was a growing movement, challenging and changing mainstream perceptions of beauty, embracing your natural hair and empowering minds. don't let the world ruin you, no matter what they say, you are beautiful, but he is in the eye of the beholder. we'll be talking to the pop star and presenter jamelia in the next hour. she let her natural hair grow out 3.5 years ago, and wants other women to do the same. debenhams and john lewis both making headlines — for all the wrong reasons. ben's looking at why our department stores are struggling. ben? shares in debenhams fell another 9% yesterday after house of fraser said it wouldnt launch a takeover bid.
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over atjohn lewis, it reported a surprise slump in profits. so what's going wrong with our department stores? john lewis — reported a near 99% fall in its profits for the first half of the year. it said its promise to match rival‘s prices had cost it £a0 million. just last month, house of fraser was saved from collapse by sports direct — in a deal worth £90m. (ani 3) yesterday, debenhams shares fell again after sports direct said it wouldnt make a takeover bid. remember it already owns 30% of debenhams, but said it wouldn't buy more. the debenham's boss has denied that it's in trouble, but has said stores will close. let's speak to retail expert fiona davis. it's so interesting, when we hear
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all these different anecdotal headlines about what's happening here and there, what is going on with our department stores?m here and there, what is going on with our department stores? it does sound a bit like doom and gloom but i don't believe that to be the case. we are in a period of probably biggest change that i've ever seen in retail. as customers, we know more than we've ever known about what we want and what on offer. there is more choice available and it's a competitive environment from retailers. is it very gusty brain the internet to this? not at all. 20% of sales are online and to me, it's quite wrong. 80% of sales are still going through spaces. the reason that we choose to stop can assure versus online is typically for the experience. there is a
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reason to go. we want something that isn't purely available online. the majority of sales, they start looking online. they may not go by ina looking online. they may not go by in a physical space or they may go and buy online so it's not right to look at online versus physical space, purely in terms of whether sales are coming from, it is much messier than that, if you live. in john lewis's case, they say the decision to match rival prices cost than £a0 million. some are calling for them to scrap that. what you make of that? the proposition that underpins whatjohn lewis is about is trust. it doesn't matter if you are millennial or you've shopped there three years. john lewis's proposition is understood, having talked to a lot of people in the
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last few weeks, about retail department store sector so to withdraw that would be a withdrawal of that trust on that promise. what they are saying is, we will match any competitor's prices. if they are selling at more cheaply, we will match that price. but those other retailers may not be investing. training staff, having that knowledge, big stores on the high streets, they can't compete. widowed shop purely on the basis of price. that's where the investment that john lewis is making another zoo are succeeding, in offering a very differentiated experience, creating a reason to shop. honestly, if i look at house of fraser and debenhams, i would look at house of fraser and debenhams, iwould have look at house of fraser and debenhams, i would have to say i'm not entirely sure. what should these
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firms be looking at and making sure they can do right now? those businesses have a big change to go through. to make them fit for the future. but we have a look on the other hand, businesses like selfridge's, they stand for something. liberty stands the something. liberty stands the something entirely different, it special and unique. we all need a reason to go to a particular environment to buy something or to simply experience it. we are social human beings and we want to be in a place were other people are as well as having the convenience of shopping online. i am very optimistic about the future of retail. it's good to hear some optimism. thank you to that. so some reason to be excited about our high street rather than the doom and gloom we have heard. still to come, an exciting idea
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because the sky at night presenter is going to be here to talk about her latest fashion project energy sapping to one day to take her daughter all the way there. can you |magine? daughter all the way there. can you imagine? that would be a mum and daughter trip. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm victoria hollins. shops in london are selling knives, alcohol and tobacco to children as young as 13. that's according to london trading standards — which says the items were sold to child volunteers 285 times during test purchases over an 18 month period. the met police has called it unacceptable. there's more disruption ahead for passengers at waterloo using south western railway this weekend. another strike is due to take place from midnight tonight. it's the eighth day of action by the rmt union since
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the start of august. around half the normal number of services are expected to run. no further strikes have been announced. a ban on cars, lorries and taxis at one of the capital's most notorious junctions will be made permanent. since may last year, only buses and cyclists have been allowed at bankjunction in the city of london from 7am to 7pm on weekdays to try to make it safer and greener. it followed dozens of accidents and a fatality there. surrey‘s mental health trust has been awarded an extra 1 million pounds of nhs funding for it's pioneering way to alleviate some symptoms of dementia. it's installed smart technology in the homes of sufferers to monitor them to try to reduce depression, agitation, anxiety and irritability. the trust says it enables people to stay in their own homes longer. let's have a look at the travel situation now. thameslink services
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are subject to delays between london blackfriars and st pancras international due to a fault with the signalling system. let's check the weather. hello, good morning. it is not quite as chilly or as misty as it was this time yesterday. we have hung onto double figures in most of the towns. sadly, not as much sunshine as we have yesterday, quite a bit more in the way of cloud, it's breezy, but we should stay mostly dry, small chance of one or two showers.
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this is how we start off this morning. there will be some good spells of brightness and sunshine around but quite a bit of cloud at times as well. still some sunny spells into the afternoon but in northern home counties, in particular, the small chance of one or two isolated showers but mostly dry, a noticeable south—westerly breeze. top temperatures of 18, possibly 19 degrees celsius in central london. through this evening and overnight, the threat of the showers will die away really. lots of clear spells around, temperatures could dip back into single figures away from the towns, otherwise holding at around 10 or 11 degrees celsius. on saturday, again, mostly dry, the small chance of a shower, temperatures will tend to go up as we head through the weekend, we're dragging in some warm and humid air, and maybe 27 degrees by tuesday. good morning, welcome to breakfast, withjon kay and naga munchetty. our headlines today: hurricane florence hits the us — officials warn of catastrophic flooding and say many lives could be lost.
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stay on guard. this is a powerful storm that can kill. today the threat becomes a reality. britain accuses russia of "lies and blatant fabrications" as the prime suspects in the salisbury nerve agent attack claim they were just tourists. house prices could fall by more than a third if there's no deal on brexit. that's the latest warning from the governor of the bank of england who briefed mps on the worst—case scenario. a winner in italy, a winner in france and britain could have another, in the tour of spain — simon yates leads, but there's a brutal climb ahead today. it isa it is a wet day in the north and west of the uk. details on that and can forecast right here on brea kfast. good morning, it's friday, the 1ath of september. our top story: the south—east coast
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of america has begun feeling the brunt of hurricane florence, as it starts to hit land. more than a million people have been ordered to evacuate their homes, with winds of up to 90 miles per hour expected later. our north america correspondent laura trevelyan has this report. dramatic scenes as the leading edge of hurricane florence breaches the north carolina coast. rain and wind pummel the barrier islands exposed to the atlantic. this huge slow—moving storm is now so wide it is threatening the south—eastern coast of the us from the carolinas to georgia. it is the rain from the hurricane that could pose the greatest threat. forecasters warn that if we get prolonged rainfall over a couple of days there could be catastrophic flooding, as the water levels rise and inundate people's homes. there are fears that millions could be without power
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across the coast south—east of the us as the triple hazard of hurricane force winds, storm surge and flooding become a reality. many have fled their home, seeking shelter in evacuation centres inland. from the vulnerable elderly to the very young. while most people in mandatory evacuation zones have left, some are determined to see out the storms. my family and everyone has evacuated except my wife and i but we are setting up crews now to deal with the aftermath which could take weeks. the track of hurricane florence once it makes landfall is uncertain. but a sustained and damaging assault to the coastline from wind and water is intensifying. our reporter paul blake is in morehead city, in north carolina, which is being lashed by hurricane—force winds. it is the middle of the night. you
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are feeling the effects of this hurricane. yes, wejust are feeling the effects of this hurricane. yes, we just have the latest advisory from the centre here in the us. the storm is moving at six miles an hour. it is a category one storm. the winds are at the lowest level that they can be for a hurricane. important to add the caveat. officials say it is important not to focus on the category level. the storm is moving so slowly it can dump rain over the regent over several days if it hovers and lingers over the carolinas. that is a storm surge, as water is pushed into the rivers, the low—lying regions were so many people live. that can cause destructive flooding and damage to property and even loss of life. destructive flooding and damage to property and even loss of lifem is just not moving, six property and even loss of lifem isjust not moving, six miles an hour, it will hang around for so long it could potentially be even more catastrophic? exactly. that is
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what they are saying. don't focus on the category level. the wind is still going at 90 mph and destructive wind all around, where i stand right now, there is power out, windows are covered in leaves, tree limbs are down, ankle and knee deep water, which will hang around so long as it keeps raining and the ground is saturated and it can't drain anywhere. as seawater is pushed further into the rivers, officials have said that the flow has been reversed, so water is being pushed inland into regions that are not used to dealing with flooding, highways and seawater rushing into the community. 0k, thank you for that. we saw some really dramatic pictures of what you're talking about. safe. thank you. matt, tell us about. safe. thank you. matt, tell us about where this storm is, because it is coming in, is it on land yet? it is still offshore. less
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than 50 miles away. it is hanging around offshore and the longer it is offshore the more it picks up energy and more moisture it picks up. it will throw the moisture into the carolinas not just will throw the moisture into the carolinas notjust today but will throw the moisture into the carolinas not just today but through into the weekend. if you can see the rainfall graphics, the bright intense colours, the heaviest rain, it will keep on falling and we are talking about ten inches of rain since the alto band of the storm made landfall last night. —— alto band. we could see as much as a metre of rain in places. and you have to focus not just metre of rain in places. and you have to focus notjust on the wind but the rain and a storm surge and it is some of the worst inland, where it could be four metres high in the river areas, rivers trying to flow out, the sea flowing in, they meet each other and the shots at the levels and that is likely why we
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will see flooding not just at the moment but over the next few days. you will keep us up—to—date, and another typhoon you have an eye on as well, which you can bring us up to date on later as well, thank you. it is another extreme weather event. the most powerful typhoon this year is roaring towards the main island of the philippines, with wind gusts of 160 miles an hour. super—typhoon mangkhut has gathered strength since monday, tearing down trees and power lines and leaving thousands of people homeless, but millions more live in the areas most at risk. our philippines correspondent howard johnson reports from one of the provinces expected to be hardest hit by the storm. i'm outside the provincial government headquarters here in cagayan, where they've just held an emergency briefing. the governor has a plan where he wants people to help their neighbours. if you live in a shack or a flimsy house, move to a more robust house. help a neighbour by letting them stay with you or go to a church or to a school. he is also saying there is a liquor ban, or alcohol ban,
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in place, to stop people drinking through this period and get exposed to the weather. i asked him if there were any faults in his plan or any worries and he said potentially telecommunications could go down on roads could become impassable. earlier today we saw them stockpiling food here, bread was being loaded into baskets, ready to be taken around the province. he is also appealing for air support from the national government to be able to spread that food around the province. last time the storm hit here, 2016, there were four casualties in this province. this time around, he's hoping for zero casualties and that seems somewhat optimistic given the magnitude of this super typhoon. downing street has condemned a russian television interview of the suspects in the salisbury poisoning attack as "deeply offensive to the victims." alexander petrov and rooshlan boshirov told russia's state—run news channel "russia today" that they had travelled to the city simply as tourists. an official spokesperson for theresa may described the broadcast as an "insult to the public‘s intelligence." jon donnison has the latest.
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assassins or tourists? the government named alexander petrov and ruslan boshirov as russian agents sent to salisbury to kill sergei skripal, but popping up on russian state—run tv they said otherwise. translation: what were you doing? translation: our friends had been suggesting for a long time that we visit this wonderful town. translation: salisbury, wonderful town? translation: yes. translation: a tourist town. downing street described the interview as lies, blatant fabrications and an insult to the public intelligence. the bbc has spoken to the journalist who carried out the interview. i don't have any reasons to believe them, i don't know them, i haven't spent life with them, they are not my friends,
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but i have normal reasons to believe the secret services, who have been lying previously. some see the interview after putin suggested the men should speak publicly as provocative. whether their accounts will ever be challenged in a british court seems unlikely. there's been a fresh warning about house prices in the event of a no—deal brexit. ben's been looking into this one. it feels, i am not the only one, that every day we hear the warning about brexit. from this man, the governor of the bank of england. he is worried about house prices, among other things. he was giving evidence yesterday to mps about what could happen in the case of a no—deal brexit. it was a whole lot of things that they were discussing yesterday it but the one he picked out on was house prices, suggesting they could fall by as much as 35% over three
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yea rs, fall by as much as 35% over three years, and that is because he suggested that if we left the eu without a deal, it could force a slump in the pound, and then they would raise interest rates to try to compensate, which could force up the cost of mortgages and it could leave some owners in negative equity, so it isa some owners in negative equity, so it is a perfect storm of trying to deal with a weaker pound, which could affect the mortgage market. so suggesting that prices could fall as much as 35%. already criticism as some suggest he is part of project fear that brexiteers have also said that frankly there are good things to be had out of this and this is a worse case scenario as far as mark carney is concerned. nonetheless he has raised some concerns. brexiteers said that these figures have been wrong before, so how can we trust the figures? and given that we heard about the no—deal brexit papers on all of the things that could happen, mobile roaming, suggesting that is an eu agreement, that we can use the
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phones in eu countries without paying extra, they said that could change, we may need a new driving licence, we could have to have a permit, all sorts of things, but house prices is one of them given how closely linked house prices are to the wider economy, they suggest it could be a big economic issue. 0k, it could be a big economic issue. ok, thank you for now. firefighters have been battling at least 60 fires in three separate towns in the american state of massachusetts, following dozens of gas explosions. it's thought the blasts could have been caused by the rupture of an over—pressurised gas line. the towns have been told it will be some time before those evacuated will be able to return to their homes. a little bit of motoring history could be happening again, again! volkswagen says it will stop production of its famous beetle next year, closing the door on one of the world's most iconic car designs. the german company said output would end at its plant in mexico nextjuly. but don't despair if you're a beetle fan. volkswagon has stopped production of the car several times over the decades and then revived it,
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and the company says the model could be resurrected again in future. so the end, for now. is not nigh. may be. more than one in five children in england are helping to look after a sick or disabled member of their family, according to research carried out by the bbc and the university of nottingham. that figure of 22% is much higher than previously thought. caring for a family member can involve doing anything from housework to helping someone get out of bed and dressed. it can also mean giving them their medication and getting up in the middle of the night to help them. so who are these children looking after? the most frequent answer was their mothers, followed by their siblings. physical and long—term illnesses were the two most common reasons they provided care. ricky boleto has been to blackpool to meet the brothers and sisters caring for their dad. at the top, we got mum and dad. then
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look at and, she the oldest. the second oldest. helen shares a room with me. the fourth oldest is owen and he has got his own room. and then i am the youngest. poppy is nine years old. she is a young carer, along with her brothers and sisters, they look after their dad. ican sisters, they look after their dad. i can put his slippers on when he needs them or i can take his killshot and help them organise them. what's it like looking after dad? sometimes it can be a bit upsetting because he can be sick sometimes. andrew is unable to walk, awaiting surgery on his back and suffers from extreme anxiety which has left him bedbound. his partner tino gave up work to look after him but she says she can't do it alone. if it was just me and andrew,
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probably really hard. because there doi probably really hard. because there do i don't have anybody i can rely on to help me, really. 14 and the whole family, some days are really tough. before and after school, the children cook and clean. there is little time for anything else. add to help the kids with a home work. sometimes, it is hard. sometimes it is hard to the youngest member of the family. is it hard at school because some friends don't know what you do. what do you tell them? i don't really tell you —— tell them anything. once a week, the family does get a break, here at the blackpool carers centre, a charity working in partnership with blackpool council. in the past five yea rs new
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blackpool council. in the past five years new legislation was brought in wringing more rights to people in england. people are legally entitled to help their local council. an assessment on the impact that a relative has on the young person but the level of support is different depending on where you live. actually, rather than support children. it feels very uncomfortable and to me, it doesn't a lwa ys uncomfortable and to me, it doesn't always make sense. in some areas, you got children who will have support in school and to those children, they say it makes all the difference. charities are now calling to that same level of support are all young carers to help those children who need it the most. ricky is he in the studio. there are assessments that you can have done assessments that you can have done asafamily assessments that you can have done as a family to have that helped. but
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everybody has taken up. like you say, not many people are going through these assessments. lots of families are worried about these assessments. they think that if they ta ke assessments. they think that if they take part in these assessments, social services might get involved. some people don't need to have these assessments because in their particular area, they have the releva nt particular area, they have the relevant provisions from charities who are supporting them. they don't feel like they need to go through those means of going through the local authorities but still, the aim is to have this assessment and you will be told, as a child, but yes, you need that support, you can be helped out at school a little bit more so they are really there to help. it seems lots of kids are doing it. then think that they are a young carer. they think what they are doing is normal. it's all they've ever known. i've spoken to
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six—year—old ‘s, eight —year—olds, they do a lot, but they wouldn't say they do a lot, but they wouldn't say they are a young carer, but they are. in their minds, they are just being family. some young carers love doing what they do.” being family. some young carers love doing what they do. i was really surprised by these numbers, one in five young people i carers. what are authorities saying? they told brea kfast authorities saying? they told breakfast they worked really hard to make sure people get what they need. children's services are facing at £3 billion funding gap by 2025 and some of the services to be cut first by local authorities will be the ones that affect young carers. we know some local authorities give up funding to young carers is a lot of charities are having to pick up the slack. and a lot of kids wonder, if i go through that assessment, then i can't carry on, who is go to look after my parent or grandparent and sibling? it is a real burden on many
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children but we know the lots of schools are doing really good things, they are able to identify young carers better than ever and give them the provisions they need, give them the provisions they need, give them the provisions they need, give them access to a council of a small things, like letting them have their mobile phone in the classroom, so they can get in touch with a loved one. they could explain in that. america battens down the hatches as hurricane florence hits the east coast. downing street rejects "offensive" claims that the two salisbury poisoning suspects were innocent tourists. we can be grateful that hurricane florence is nowhere near us. good morning, matt. there is a mixed picture ahead. a bit of a mixed one
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this weekend. the best of the driest weather in the south—east. that is the case today as well. particularly across northern and western areas, set to be a weekday at times. especially through this morning into the early afternoon. if we show you where the rain is falling at present, we have heavy and more persistent rain across northern ireland and western scotland and the far south—west. south of that, a few showers around across parts of the midlands and western england and wales but many southern and eastern areas, dry and bright. it does brighten up across northern scotland. the rain band sits across southern scotland, northern ireland and the far north of england. sunshine, a little hazy ‘s side but brea ks sunshine, a little hazy ‘s side but breaks throughout the day, the further south you are. the odd heavy one, shall as quite frequent. more
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persistent rain across cumbria and northumberland. it stays a bit wetter times. better chance of some afternoon sunshine. showers a little bit on the heavy side. temperatures much like they were yesterday, in the teens. indigenous, we stick with the teens. indigenous, we stick with the zone of cloudy weather weather would further outbreaks of rain. either side of it, some clear skies and quitea either side of it, some clear skies and quite a chilly night. county boss levels for 12 the countryside. these are going to be bright spots. that increases across scotland. still showers, parts of northern england, into northern ireland. almost to the south and east where we continue with some sunny spells. temperatures back above the 20 degrees mark. sandwiched with
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another weather front. not as cold. brightening up here through the day. another day of rain coming and going. the further south and east you are, hazy sunshine and temperatures on the climb again. up to around 22, 20 four degrees possible. there is a lesser charge that we could see something stormy by the time we get towards tuesday and wednesday. great britain's kelly sotherton described finally receiving her bronze medal from the 2008 beijing olympic games last night as a bittersweet moment. she originally finished fifth in the heptathlon — but since then two rivals have been disqualified for doping. we'll speak to her in just a minute but first let's have a look at that moment a decade ago when she missed out on her medal. kelly suburbs, she gave it
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everything, we expected that, but she came here believing she could win gold. she will leave this stadium with tainted memories that she could have done better. good morning kelly sotherton, you rightly haveit morning kelly sotherton, you rightly have it around your neck. it's been a long time coming. that must feel like a very special thing to have in your hand. definitely. as you heard of the commentary, i left beijing really disappointed. i remember having an interview, i was so mortified, i looked awful, i was moody, i was disappointed. so now, ten yea rs moody, i was disappointed. so now, ten years later, to get to olympic medals, it would have been a whole different experience, thought processes leaving that game. i could
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be angry and bitter, but i really emotional and happy and looking forward to the future. it must be great to have it. those are not kept up great to have it. those are not kept up with the details, bring us up to date, what has happened, what's changed, how come you have got the middle. in the habitat and in beijing, ifinished middle. in the habitat and in beijing, i finished fifth. middle. in the habitat and in beijing, ifinished fifth. the ukrainian athlete who had finished failed a drugs test. she was kicked out of the village. in that time, subsequently, the russian athlete had failed a drugs ban. that was in the time wherejessica ennis was second at the world championships. she got reinstated in 2011. i thought, if she's failed the test in 2009, she was definitely doing it in
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2008. back in 2017, in april, via twitter i found she had failed and expected drug test that had gone back to the 2008 test and this was just a waiting game. she appealed, went to the court of arbitration for sport so i had to wait their decision and her reasons why it wasn't a negative, positive test. in august, finally, vla received a medal and i got to choose where i have it. i couldn't wait any longer. as an athlete, the ioc allow you to choose where you want it so i could have waited to the next anniversary games but i thought it would be better if over and done with. keep receiving olympic medals. it's not yourfault receiving olympic medals. it's not your fault that it's taken ten years to get to this point. of course i am. idon't
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to get to this point. of course i am. i don't want this to happen to anybody else. i'd be nice to think it won't. hopefully, one of my missions now would be, there's got to be bigger consequences the countries and people who actually cheat and that is on the table and we have to do something about it. the letter was sent by the uk anti— doping yesterday to wada, how we feel as british athletes, unless they tick every box and show remorse. there should be bigger penalties and consequences. it's not nice but this is notjust me who misses out. my performance director in 2008 got the sack. the 18 medals and we only at that time came back with four. it is notjust me who loses out. my family, my friends, the sport, the funding. we don't wa nt the sport, the funding. we don't want that continually to happen.” can see those double—decker buses on the street down below. you've earned yourself an open top bus all on your
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own. go on higher one and you have your moment in full. most definitely. i will see they can stretch their budget to that. thanks so much adjoining is. don't lose it. well done, brilliant, well—deserved. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm victoria hollins. shops in london are selling knives, alcohol and tobacco to children as young as 13. that's according to london trading standards, which says the items were sold to child volunteers 285 times during test purchases over an 18 month period. the met police has called it "unacceptable". there's more disruption ahead for passengers at waterloo using south—western railway this weekend. another strike is due to take place from midnight tonight.
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it's the eighth day of action by the rmt union since the start of august. around half the normal number of services are expected to run. no further strikes have been announced. the mother of a six boy stabbed to death as she has been left without any hope of prosecution. he was stabbed to death on an estate in cannington. no one has been prosecuted in relation to his death despite police offering a £20,000 reward for his information. great in the capital has increased by around 20% since 2010. the mayor of london wants to reduce the number of london wants to reduce the number of lorries and bands entering central london by 10% by 2026. let's have a look at
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the travel situation now. on the tubes there is a good service running on all lines. thameslink services are subject to delays between london blackfriars and st pancras international due to a fault with the signalling system. a1 highbury corner has a lane closed in both directions at highbury & islington station due to emergency gas mains work. let's have a check on the weather now with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. it is not quite as chilly or as misty as it was this time yesterday. we have hung onto double figures in most of the towns. sadly, not as much sunshine as we had yesterday, quite a bit more in the way of cloud, it's breezier, but we should stay mostly dry, small chance of one or two showers.
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this is how we are starting off this morning. there will be some good spells of brightness and sunshine around but quite a bit of cloud at times too. still some sunny spells into the afternoon but in northern home counties, in particular, the small chance of one or two isolated showers but mostly dry, and a noticeable south—westerly breeze. top temperatures of 18, possibly 19 degrees celsius in central london. through this evening and overnight, the threat of the showers will die away really. lots of clear spells around, again, temperatures could dip back into single figures away from the towns, otherwise holding at around 10 or 11 degrees celsius. on saturday, again, it's mostly dry, the small chance of a shower, temperatures will tend to go up as we head through the weekend, we're dragging in some warm and humid airfrom the near continent, maybe 27 degrees by tuesday. how nice! i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, withjon kay and naga munchetty. here's a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news. millions of people living on the east coast of america
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are bracing themselves for the arrival of hurricane florence, which is nowjust 50 miles off the mainland. officials have warned of life—threatening storm surges in both north and south carolina as the hurricane moves towards land with maximum wind speeds of 90 miles per hour. more than 100,000 homes are already without power as weather conditions begin to worsen. officials have warned the storm has the potential to kill "a lot of people" amid risks of "catastrophic" flooding. the world's most powerful typhoon this year is roaring towards the main island of the philippines, with wind gusts of 160 miles an hour. super—typhoon mangkhut has gathered strength since monday, tearing down trees and power lines and leaving thousands of people homeless, but millions more live in the areas most at risk. number ten has branded an interview with the suspects in the salisbury poisoning attack as "deeply offensive to the victims" and "an insult to the public‘s intelligence". sergei skripal and his daughter
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yulia suffered nerve agent poisoning in salisbury in march, and dawn sturgess died injuly after being exposed to the same substance. alexander petrov and rooshlan boshirov told russia's state—run rt channel they had travelled to salisbury as tourists on the recommendation of friends. translation: our friends have been suggesting for quite a long time that we visit this wonderful city. it is a tourist city, they have a famous cathedral, salisbury cathedral, famous throughout europe and in fact throughout the world, i think, famous for its 123 metre spire, famous for its clock, the oldest working clock in the world. the church of england has said it will keep its shares in the online retailer amazon a day after the archbishop of canterbury accused the firm of "leeching off the taxpayer". the church times has revealed amazon
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was among the 20 biggest global investments by the church last year. a statement from the cofe said it considered the most effective way to seek change was to be "in the room with these companies" as a shareholder. house prices could plunge by more than a third in the event of a no—deal brexit, according to the governor of the bank of england. mark carney briefed senior ministers thursday to discuss the potential risks of leaving the eu without a deal. according to sources, the governor said a slump in the pound and a rise in interest rates could mean house prices would fall by as much as 35%. firefighters have been battling at least 60 fires in three separate towns in the american state of massachusetts, following dozens of gas explosions. it's thought the blasts could have been caused by the rupture of an over—pressurised gas line. the towns have been told it will be some time before those evacuated will be able to return to their homes. volkswagen says it will stop production of its famous beetle next
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year, closing the door on one of the world's most iconic car designs. the german company said output would end at its plant in mexico nextjuly. but don't despair if you're a beetle fan. volkswagon has stopped production of the car several times over the decades and then revived it, and the company says the model could be resurrected again in future. they are stopping but they are not stopping and they might not stop and there might be more in future but they are stopping. it is 7:34am. coming up on the programme, matt will have the weather. he is keeping an eye on the situation in the us and explaining the storm surge. it seems it is a bigger issue than the hurricane. 160 mile an hourwinds bigger issue than the hurricane. 160 mile an hour winds in the
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philippines, and that is a super typhoon. good morning. i don't think the weather will be terrible for the cyclists, it is the kleins. it is a huge day going up into andorra, over 200 metres, yes, it is more in few can cope with the climbing and the lactic acid building up, but they are smashing it when it comes to the grand tours, winning the giro d'italia, the tour de france and would it be simon yates victorious in spain? of course it could. he lost the lead in 2003. simon yates is still wearing the leader's red jersey at the vuelta, which chris froome won last year. after 18 stages, yates is 25 seconds ahead of his nearest challenger, alejandro valverde. there are now only two stages to go, before sunday's processional finish in madrid. today, the riders are in the pyranees and they go up to over
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2000 metres, with a leg—burning climb of over 12 miles into andorra. it's a chance for a last attack from yates's rivals. after nearly two decades, surrey are the county cricket champions once again. they won at worcestershire yesterday to give themselves an unbeatable lead. the celebrations could begin, when they went past the victory target of 271. surrey have been led brilliantly by the man with his back to us, captain rory burns. a player many think should now be opening the batting for england. 100%, it shouldn't be a discussion, i know it is with james taylor to pick the team, but rory burns should be inked into the squad straightaway now, he has done it forfour years and this year he is even a better
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player and i trust the selectors to make the right decision. you can never fill alistair cook's shoes but with time and the opportunity i really believe he can open the batting for england. a late strike denied manchester city women a great away win against atletico madrid in the champions league. defender gemma bonner had given city a first—half lead in their last 32 tie, but the hosts equalised with just a minute remaining! the second leg is in manchester next wednesday. tottenham's son heung min has spent a lengthy stint on international duty with south korea, but he's back for their premier league match against liverpool tomorrow. and the trip really paid off. he helped his country win gold at the asian games, which means he avoids two years of mandatory military service. and his manager wants some of the credit! i told him today, what is my present? i think i want a watch,
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something. no, some korean food. because when we saw in the past different clubs didn't allow to go and play different tournaments, who took the risks? i did. and the people need to congratulate me and say thank you. i wonder if he got his gift. england's georgia hall says "three behind is nothing really" after a good opening round at the final women's major of the season, the evian championship in south—east france. she's already won the british open this year and she picked up three birdies and no bogeys, "a special thing" on that course, she said. there was an incredible finish at the world modern pentathlon championships in mexico city, with britain's james cooke taking gold. in a sprint finish, he came from third place to win it byjust 300ths of a second. great britain won bronze at the
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equestrian championships, and dujardin says this new horse reminds her of the great allegro. this venue is only 250 miles from where the stormy sitting, so keep an eye on that. you might have seen this on brea kfast a that. you might have seen this on breakfast a short while ago. britain's kelly sotherton said the could had lifted after she eventually received her bronze medal from the beijing olympics ten years on. she was clearly quite emotional at the presentation ceremony, at a team gb ball last night. she was promoted from fifth to third in the heptathlon when two athletes were disqualified for doping. i left beijing really disappointed.
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i went to beijing on the front of the plane, came back on the back of the plane, came back on the back of the plane. i remember having an interview, i was so mortified, so upset. i looked awful, i was moody. i was so disappointed. so now, ten yea rs i was so disappointed. so now, ten years later, to have two olympic medals from the games, it would have been a whole different experience and the thought process leaving the games with two medals, and i could be angry and bitter, but i am really emotional and happy and looking forward to the future. that is worth watching back again, the whole interview, the whole story is incredible, it is bittersweet. the contrast of the picture on the track after she thought she lost it and she looks serious and disappointed and then the pictures of her smile now ten years later. absolutely. and this final story is great, for any usher, keep your eyes peeled. and, finally, to baseball, because the best defensive play between the boston red sox and the toronto bluejays didn't come from the players.
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instead, it was an usher on the upper deck. take a look. such a brilliant, yet nonchalant catch. casual as you like. he one handedly catches the ball and goes one better by giving it to a young boy in the crowd. the coolest dude in the stadium. he isn't even looking at that, natural. that is a cool guy, isn't it? meanwhile the guys on the field have askedif meanwhile the guys on the field have asked if they can have the ball back. can he play for us? exactly! black women are ditching chemical relaxers and straighteners in favour of embracing their naturally afro—textured hair. leigh—anne from little mix has been encouraging others to love their afro, and rochelle humes and jamelia both stopped straightening their hair after their daughters said they didn't see princesses or people on tv with curls. we'll be speaking to jamelia in just a minute, but first our reporter elaine dunkley has been to meet the founder of world afro day. at this primary school in south
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london, it is an important lesson about inclusion and acceptance. world afro day was about my daughter who was positive in celebrating her hair, she was singing one day and i thought i want a child with afro have to feel so great, and the other reason was because of the negative dialogue all around the world. you always have to believe in yourself to know that your hair is unique. not all schools are as encouraging as this one when it comes to appearance. black children have been sent home for having their hair in twists and afro, and these conversations are about awareness. it is special for black people who are not accepted for who they are. especially when they have dreadlocks, braved. every hair has to be noticed because it is unique. if people say they don't like your head, you look ugly, don't listen to
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them. the singerjamelia is one of the many black women embracing their natural hair, and shejoins us now. good morning. it is a lovely piece, hearing those voices and those explanations. what was your story? i remember you had straight hair. what has changed ? remember you had straight hair. what has changed? i had my hair straightened from the age of ten yea rs straightened from the age of ten years old. at that time it was very normal. what changed was having daughters question their own identity and particularly one moment was my eldest daughter challenging me and saying i don't see anyone on tv with hair like me. i would consistently tell my daughter is that their hair is beautiful. that is my youngest. i have three daughters. and i would consistently tell them that their hair is beautiful. it is notjust about telling them, it is about showing them and that is what i found, representation is also validation and it is important to show young
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black girls examples of themselves and that conversation with my daughter highlighted that she doesn't see herself enough, so i decided that i need to become the change that she needs to see. when you say it straight in your head, what do you mean? i was doing what is called a relaxer, a chemical process , is called a relaxer, a chemical process, it is... even describing it is basically burning your hair straight and it is a chemical composition, i don't know if it is like emotion. is it like a perm, so if you have straight—a you make it curly? exactly but it is incredibly damaging and there is a fantastic documentary from chris rock called" good hair" and he puts a coke came in the solution and it burns through the coke can and disintegrates it and that was also a moment for me where i was like, and you put this on your hair, are you crazy? tell me
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about your views when it comes to schools, because lots of conversations and examples where they have said to one young boy, who went to the courts, that he was told to shave off his dreadlocks because, i don't know the reason behind it, but to shake them off because they didn't conform to the uniform. there is also the issue that when i went to school i have naturally really curly hairand to school i have naturally really curly hair and when it is longer it is really curly so if i went to school and it wasn't tied it would look messy. how do teachers and pa rents look messy. how do teachers and parents combat looking smart when hair grows out and my hair was really big and messy?” hair grows out and my hair was really big and messy? i think it is that, changing the narrative, you know, why is it seen as messy, why is... naturally textured hair, naturally afro textured hair is unique to black people and people of
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colour, so what you're saying is you have to erase that part of yourself to assimilate with the eurocentric standard. that is unfair. whenever i see these stories about people in school being vilified and also... you are risking their education. there are career opportunities that are there are career opportunities that a re lost there are career opportunities that are lost because hair is not seen as professional. we have to change the narrative. that is the importance of normalising hair and understanding that hair should not be a threat, it should not be seen as unprofessional. this is how it grows out. you have your hair tied, don't you? but i want to. i had the opportunity to have a doubt. we have to stop policing blackbody is because i feel that happens so often and being told, i tied that happens so often and being told, itied my that happens so often and being told, i tied my hair up because it's my choice and that's what's
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important. we all need to be able to express important. we all need to be able to ex press ourselves important. we all need to be able to express ourselves in whatever way we choose. in the 70s, our crows were very popular and guess people chose them to start straightening their hair. it wasn't a case of policing back to you —— blackbody is, was it? what was connected was people start connecting froze with the black panther party. even a couple of yea rs panther party. even a couple of years ago, piers morgan said that beyond say‘s performance contained people with political apparatus. what is a political afro? and afro is how it grows out of your head? that is an act of policing and it's not fair. how ignorant you think people are who don't have afro hair? there are incidents or occasions where someone goes up to a person with afro hair and says, can i touch it? because the texture is so
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different to european hair.” it? because the texture is so different to european hair. i don't think it's a case of being ignorant, it's just not having these conversations. people are afraid to make other people feel uncomfortable. if we don't have these conversations, progress is never made. it's important we have these conversations that when somebody touches your hair, you have to say to them, please don't do that, i am to say to them, please don't do that, iam not to say to them, please don't do that, i am not an animal. people don't touch without asking? they do, they do. i have sat down next to someone and they literally done that to my hair. the thing is, in that scenario, i didn't say anything its and it's because i didn't want to make them feel uncomfortable. people watching you, thinking, this is a style thing, this is a fashion thing. what do you say? i say, i woke up like this. matt, lots going on in the weather
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away from the uk. very calm here, and that is the view in london. while we have got some sunshine to the south and east of the moment, just breaking through the moment, just breaking through the cloud, we do have some rain to the cloud, we do have some rain to the north and the west. let me show you where that weather is. it's become more persistent as well. it's a wet few northern ——a wet few hours in northern ireland. the wettest conditions in the morning. that rain will start to ease off a little bit and breakup. turning more showery as we go into the afternoon. to the south and east, a few showers will come and go in the breeze. not a desperately cold one but it is a notable breeze. most of the time, across the south, you will stay dry. a few will see no showers at all. adding further north, after some wet
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weather this morning, the rain turning showery. still some wet weather at times. to the north of the central belt, here is we have the central belt, here is we have the afternoon sunshine. still here, we could see a few heavy showers through the afternoon. taking into tonight, the central zone where we see the cloud. showers become less frequent in the south and the north and with clearer skies, the south—east and east anglia, temperatures away from towns and cities will be well down into single figures. we could see temperatures low enough for a touch of frost that these areas, where recidivist of the sunshine, lots of cloud through the central zone with brighter spells but always catering to a few showers. the rain turns heavier into northern ireland. many will get away with it, a drier and buy today. temperatures in the south—west breeze, starting to climb up the 20 degrees. those southwest winds will be pushing towards us into sunday,
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just ahead of weather front which on saturday night, scotland and northern ireland, a lot of heavy rain, spreading into northern england. as we go into sunday. still some wet weather to come here. writer and breezy. temperatures in the high teens. not much in the way of wet weather. as i said, it will start to turn a little bit warmer. still a bit of rain here and there. you don't want to see ben when he is angry. that is here to talk about evictions this morning. britain's biggest pub chain — jd wetherspoon — hasjust reported its latest set of results. profits are up 16.5% to £89 million,
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sales up by 5%. in all of these things, that's what's happened in the year. with her from the boss this morning talking about all sorts of things. costs could drop this year. keeping the business afloat. we are going to talk about that with the boss. the founder and chairman ofjd wetherspoon, tim martin, joins me from the london stock exchange now. we are only five or six weeks into our financial we are only five or six weeks into ourfinancial year, sued we are only five or six weeks into our financial year, sued if we are only five or six weeks into ourfinancial year, sued if you are dealing with the stock market, you have to have an element of caution, especially if you've had two or three good years in a row. we said we'd need about three or a%, like—for—like sales growth, to
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retain our record profits. we've had 596 in retain our record profits. we've had 5% in the first six weeks so it's doing ok but you don't want to three or have to be added this early. that's talk about what you've also details. you've used it as a good opportunity to let everybody know what you think about brexit. in it, you are backing a no deal brexit. that's better than what theresa may is proposing. that's right. it is sort of pejoratively called no deal. no deal really means free trade. the eu isa no deal really means free trade. the eu is a protectionist body with thousands of tariffs which keep the prices in the shops and pubs higher for uk consumers said if we adopt free trade like singapore, new zealand, australia and other countries, prices in the shops will fall, we will regain control of our fishing grounds which is good the economy and we will also avoid the £39 billion payment to the eu as a
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sort of divorce gift. all in all, if we adopt free trade rather than protectionist policies of the eu, we will do better. there is a big debate about that. let me just pick you up on that. it takes a long time to negotiate these free trade deals. you talk about just adopting them but on average, 3.5 years, the trade deal the eu has got with canada took seven yea rs. deal the eu has got with canada took seven years. it is not a simple thing. that is a common myth. if you wa nt to thing. that is a common myth. if you want to adopt free trade, it starts on the 29th of march and you stop all the tariffs, the protective ta riffs all the tariffs, the protective tariffs at the eu imposes. then you reduce the prices in the shops. you don't need a deal with anyone to do that. that's assuming the other side agrees to adopt it unilaterally. it's no good if they slapped tariffs
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on the stuff we sell to them. well, that's what switzerland would done —— has done. that's what israel and hong kong have done. australia and new zealand have slashed tariffs. we slashed than 200 years ago when we got rid of the corn laws and prices forgrain got rid of the corn laws and prices for grain went down. if you believe in free trade, you are not afraid of other people imposing tariffs on them. this came up 200 years ago and them. this came up 200 years ago and the prime minister at the time said, we in the uk or britain are going to buy a cheap, even if other people lined. if people impose tariffs on what we sell, we are a big enough country to be able to deal with that ona country to be able to deal with that on a case—by—case basis. country to be able to deal with that on a case-by-case basis. lots of detail emerging yesterday on what would happen in the event of a no deal and it affects all sorts of things. you touched on some of them yourself that you said we might need new passports, new driving licences may not be able to use mobile
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roaming when we go abroad and the governor of the bank of england says, in the worst—case scenario, house prices could fall by 35%. it not all is rosy as you paint out, is it? life is never completely rosy. cheap imports come into the country, control of our fishing, and free trade. he was afraid of free trade? i don't think the british people laugh. there are a lot of people putting scare stories about a mostly connected political campaign for remains when you stand back and look, free trade is a plus. tim martin, always good to talk to you. we'll talk again and see whether some of those predictions come true. so many ifs, buts, maybes in this case will that case. it's so fiendishly complicated. it's pretty optimistic about no deal. tons of
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m essa g es optimistic about no deal. tons of messages from you in the last him is it dashed in the last few minutes about jamelia's comments on afro hair. see you in a sack. good morning from bbc london news, i'm victoria hollins. shops in london are selling knives — alcohol and tobacco to children as young as 13. that's according to london trading standards — which says the items were sold to child volunteers 285 times during test purchases over an 18 month period. the met police has called it unacceptable. there's more disruption ahead for passengers at waterloo using south western railway this weekend. another strike is due to take place from midnight tonight. it's the eighth day of action by the rmt union since the start of august. around half the normal number of services are expected to run. no further strikes have been announced. the mother of a 16—year—old boy stabbed to death three years ago today says she's been left without any hope of a prosecution. mohamed dura—ray was killed
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on the 1ath of september 2015 on an estate in kennington. no—one's ever been prosecuted in connection with his death, despite the met police offering a 20,000 pound reward for information. businesses are being given funding by transport for london to make deliveries greener and more efficient. the plan is to reduce congestion and pollution. freight in the capital has increased by around 20 per cent since 2010. the mayor of london wants to reduce the number of lorries and vans entering central london in the morning rush hour by 10% by 2026. let's have a look at the travel situation now. on the tubes there is a good service running on all lines. thameslink services are subject to delays between london blackfriars and st pancras international due to a fault with the signalling system. a1 highbury corner has a lane closed in both directions at highbury and islington station due to emergency gas mains work. trafalgar square: aa cockspur street is partially blocked in both
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directions between trafalgar square and haymarket due to emergency gas main repairs. let's have a check on the weather now with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. it is not quite as chilly or as misty as it was this time yesterday. we have hung onto double figures in most of the towns. sadly, not as much sunshine as we had yesterday, quite a bit more in the way of cloud, it's breezier, but we should stay mostly dry, small chance of one or two showers. this is how we are starting off this morning. there will be some good spells of brightness and sunshine around but quite a bit of cloud at times too. still some sunny spells into the afternoon but in northern home counties, in particular, the small chance of one or two isolated showers but mostly dry, and a noticeable south—westerly breeze this time too. top temperatures of 18, possibly 19 degrees celsius in central london. this evening and overnight, the threat of the showers will die away, really. lots of clear spells around, temperatures could dip back into single figures away from the towns, otherwise holding
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at around 10—11 degrees. on saturday, again, it's mostly dry, the small chance of a shower, temperatures will tend to go up as we head through the weekend, dragging in some warm and humid airfrom the near continent, maybe 27 degrees by tuesday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. good morning, welcome to breakfast withjon kay and naga munchetty. our headlines today. hurricane florence hits the us — officials warn of catastrophic flooding and say many lives could be lost. stay on guard. this is a powerful storm that can kill. today, the threat becomes a reality. britain accuses russia of "lies
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and blatant fabrications" as the prime suspects in the salisbury nerve agent attack claim they were just tourists. house prices could fall by more than a third — if there's no deal on brexit. that's the latest warning from the governor of the bank of england who briefed mps on the worst—case scenario. a winner in italy, a winner in france and britain could have another, in the tour of spain. simon yates leads, but there's a brutal climb ahead today. and while the sun is out for one of you for many a cloudy an wetter day, particularly in the west. i will have the forecast for today and of course the weekend right here on good morning, it's friday the 1ath of september.
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our top story. the south east coast of america has begun feeling the brunt of hurricane florence, as it starts to hit land. more than a million people have been ordered to evacuate their homes, with winds of up to 90 miles per hour expected later. our north america correspondent, laura trevelyan has this report. laura trevelyan, has this report. dramatic scenes as the leading edge of hurricane florence breaches the north carolina coast. rain and wind pummel the barrier islands exposed to the atlantic. this huge slow—moving storm is now so wide it is threatening the south—eastern coast of the us from the carolinas to georgia. it is the rain from the hurricane that could pose the greatest threat. forecasters warn that if we get prolonged rainfall over a couple of days there could be catastrophic flooding, as the water levels rise and inundate people's homes. there are fears that millions could be without power across the coast south—east of the us as the triple hazard of hurricane force winds, storm surge and flooding
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become a reality. many have fled their home, seeking shelter in evacuation centres inland. from the vulnerable elderly to the very young. while most people in mandatory evacuation zones have left, some are determined to see out the storms. my family and everyone has evacuated except my wife and i but we are setting up crews now to deal with the aftermath which could take weeks. the track of hurricane florence once it makes landfall is uncertain. but a sustained and damaging assault to the coastline from wind and water is intensifying. our reporter, paul blake is in morehead city, in north carolina. he described the scene there to us earlier. as the wind and rain begins to lash the area, morehead city and much of the region looks like a ghost town as people have either moved into shelters
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or they are hunkering at home. people in the low—lying region have been watching the forecast for days, stockpiling supplies and deciding on whether to evacuate from what many people fear is a storm of a lifetime. officials are concerned many people have decided to stay at home and have not heeded evacuation orders. there was a palpable sense of relief when it was downgraded from major hurricane status. there is the anxiety over whether it could stall out, bringing majorflooding and a destructive storm surge to the area. downing street has condemned a russian television interview of the suspects in the salisbury poisoning attack as "deeply offensive to the victims." alexander petrov and rooshlan boshirov told russia's state—run news channel "russia today" that they had travelled to the city simply as ‘tourists'. an official spokesperson for theresa may described the broadcast as an "insult to the public‘s intelligence." jon donnison has the latest. assassins or tourists?
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the government named alexander petrov and ruslan boshirov as russian agents sent to salisbury to kill sergei skripal, but popping up on russian state—run tv they said otherwise. translation: what were you doing? translation: ourfriends had been suggesting for a long time that we visit this wonderful town. translation: salisbury, wonderful town? translation: yes. translation: a tourist town. downing street described the interview as lies, blatant fabrications and an insult to the public intelligence. the bbc has spoken to the journalist who carried out the interview. i don't have any reasons to believe them, i don't know them, i haven't spent life with them, they are not my friends, but i have normal reasons to believe the secret services, who have been lying previously. some see the interview after putin
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suggested the men should speak publicly as provocative. whether their accounts will ever be challenged in a british court seems unlikely. it's been revealed that the church of england has shares in the online retailer amazon — a day after the archbishop of canterbury accused the firm of "leeching off the taxpayer". the church times claimed amazon was among the 20 biggest global investments last year. but a statement from the church of england said it considered the most effective way of seeking change was to be "in the room with these companies" as a shareholder. formerjls member oritse williams has been charged with rape over an alleged attack on a fan in a hotel room after a concert in wolverhampton in 2016. the 31—year—old singer from croydon was arrested alongside another man. both men are due to appear before magistrates next month. there's been a fresh warning about house prices in the event
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of a no—deal brexit. ben's been looking into this one. ben? this is from the man at the top. he is looking worried there. yesterday he gave evidence about what he thinks could happen to the economy in the event of a no—deal brexit. one of the things he looked at were house price, and how close they are linked to the state of the economy. he said in the worst case as far as owe prices could fall by up to 35% over three year, this is related to the value of the pound. he suggested if there was a no deal the value of the pound would fall and bank would be forced to raise interest rates to pf°p up be forced to raise interest rates to prop up the pound, and that could mean that mortgage costs go up, that makes it much more expensive for people paying it back and some people paying it back and some people could find themselves in negative equity, where their house is worth less than they owe on it. so, this all part of that evidence that he was giving. he said that was
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the worse case scenario but it is pa rt the worse case scenario but it is part of the concerns about the economy. he said it would be a shock to the economy. we have heard from some of the brexit paperer the no deal papers about things like driving licenses, would we need to getan driving licenses, would we need to get an international driving permit, easy to do but there might be a backlog. whether we would get mobile roa m backlog. whether we would get mobile roam roaming for free. backlog. whether we would get mobile roam roaming forfree. a lot backlog. whether we would get mobile roam roaming for free. a lot of the big firms say yes, but no promises. and all sorts of other things that might change. mark carney is saying a shock to the economy and one he would wan to avoid. he has being questioned in return, some of his critics are saying you are overstating it, overstating the dangers. this always happens with the if, the buts and the maybes that go with them, we are talking about hypothetical scenario, we don't know what the deal would be, so they are looking at a best case and worse case. as you said a lot of critics say you are part of of this project
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fear, you are making it sound terrible with a view to staying in, he isa terrible with a view to staying in, he is a prominent remainor, that is a concern about what actually happens to the economy, is the economy strong enough to withstand any shock, yes that worse case scenario but we don't know what is one person has died and several others have been injured in a series of gas explosions in three towns outside the us city of boston. it's thought an over—pressurised gas line ruptured, causing dozens of homes to explode or burst into flames. the towns have been told it will be some time before those evacuated will be able to return to their homes. olivia crellin reports. onfire. flattened. and up in smoke. these are homes from three communities north of the us city of boston, massachusetts. destroyed in the wake of an apparent natural pipe line rupture. a total of 75 fires, explosions or investigations of gas were reported.
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hundreds were evacuated and some 50 fire departments rushed to the scene. the cause of the blast is still unclear and the massachusetts governor charlie baker says that safety and shelter were the first priority. there will be plenty of time later tonight and tomorrow morning and into the next day to do some of the workaround determining exactly what has happened and why and what needs to be done to deal with that. the focus in the short term is to make sure we do everything we can to provide shelter for people who need shelter. investigators suspect over pressurisation of a gas main lead to the series of blasts and fires. the colombia gas company who supply gas to the area say it is investigating what happened. residents supplied by the companies are unable to return to their homes and many are in the dark about the state of their property,
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it may take days to work out what has happened and weeks for those affected to come home. volkswagen says it will stop production of its famous beetle next year, closing the door on one of the world's most iconic car designs. the german company said output would end at its plant in mexico nextjuly. but don't despair if you're a beetle fan. volkswagon has stopped production of the car several times over the decades and then revived it, and the company says the model could be resurrected again in future. critics often compain of childish behaviour in the house of commons but at least this visitor to parliament had a good excuse... he's less than three months old. lib—dem deputy leaderjo swinson brought her son gabriel
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to the chamber for the closing remarks of a discussion about voting. it's thought to be the first time a baby has been present on the floor of the house while mps are sitting. back to our main story this morning. millions of people living on the east coast of america are bracing themselves for the arrival of hurricane florence. this is the latest image of the storm as it fast—approaches land. it's expected to make landfall at 8am local time, which is around 12 noon here in the uk. florence has been downgraded to a category one storm with winds of up to 90—miles—per—hour. however, officials are warning that it has the potential to kill "a lot of people". heavy rain and winds from hurricane florence have hit the southeast coast of the united states. the storm is expected to cause
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widespread devastation, with more than 100,000 homes already without power. our correspondent nada tawfik has been in the eye of the storm over the atlantic, on board a us air force plane. fear, you are making we are flying through hurricane florence, you can see there is zero visibility. in fact the ride can be bumpy because we are hitting up against winds of over 100mph, now we are here on a cargo plane that has been outfitted with the latesteth weather equipment. it is kind of a laboratory with wings. we are here with these pilots and scientists who have been flying around—the—clock since monday. really trying to get the information that has been so
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vital to determining the storm's next move. not only is the plane outfitted with sensors but they drop sensors during flight. this is needed because satellite imagery just doesn't give an accurate picture of the storm. 36 we can hear more about the situation on the ground, or correspondent chris buckler sent this report. i'm in wilmington and this area has seen hurricanes in the past fsm you talk to local residents they will tell you they have experienced storms an give you a roll call of some of the names, and now they are prayering for florence. the worry is the storm surge, the amount of flooding that could be caused on land. beyond that there is a likely that florence is going to hang round for oisin tymon. the eye of the storm is expected to reach the carolinas later today but
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it is not expected to move quickly. it will hang about for some time, potentially causing 2a it will hang about for some time, potentially causing 24 hours or no of destructive weather. we have live pictures. look at that, that is wilmington where chris was reporting from. the camera just about holding up from. the camera just about holding up there. the winds strengthening and you can see the strength of the rainfall there, no cars on the road, are there. it looks like special effects. doesn't look real. lashing through. matt? matt is here, we have been talking about this as a hurricane, we think that is about the wind, but you are saying that is not really the main concern any more. not in this situation, we have seen winds gust up to 100mph this morning on the coast, but that is easing away, the winds are only part of story. this is one where the flooding from rainfall and from storm surge are the greatest threats it. is a massive storm. you saw wilmington, they are the wind blowing offshore. the biggest
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constoner the forth of that storm, where the winds are coming on shore so it is piling in that massive storm surge, this is the latest radar. you can see the centre, the circle in the middle. that is the core. when that reaches land it is officially making landfall. it is where the strongest of the wind are, and to the north of it. the top it, this is where they are piling in the rain, could see as much as a metre's worth of rain. already had 25 centimetres since yesterday evening but a metre's worth of rain. that is roughly to what we see in manchester ina roughly to what we see in manchester in a whole year, you can understand some of the flooding impact that will have. and, the amount of rainfall they will get, i mean, how, are they prepared for this do you see? this is the thing, we seem to co nsta ntly see? this is the thing, we seem to constantly be reporting about the hurricanes and this extreme weather coming in, and in this region, they have had experience before. the problem is they have had wet weather in the lead up to this. it will try to get into the river, the rivers
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are trying to push the water out but it is fighting water trying to come in as well. we are likely to see flooding in areas that don't formally so it, inland and etcries —— estuaries and we could sigh a four metre rise in water levels. imagine that, that is is a double decker bus in some areas. this is hurricane season though isn't it? we are round the peak, and that helps to fuel things but at the moment it is phenomenal, we have had four named storms in the atlantic basin all at once. meanwhile on the other side of the world in the philippines you have this supertyphoon. exactly. what makes it a supertyphoon?m you have this supertyphoon. exactly. what makes it a supertyphoon? it is the same as a major hurricane but it is equivalent to category five. it will come in across the eastern parts, but then flooding, destruction inland before it heads to south—west china, so this could
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have different impacts from the wind and rainfall. you spoke about how they get their energy from the sea, and the warmth as well, how long will it, how long will it take for this to not be a supertyphoon? as soon as it moves inland. it starts to decay. it could restrengthen a bit as it heads to southern china. matt, thank you. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the headlines. america battens down the hatches as hurricane florence menaces the east coast. downing street rejects "offensive" claims that the two salisbury poisoning suspects were innocent tourists. here's matt with a look at this morning's weather. so, look, we have had lots on the
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other weather but for us it is much more settled. it is. a bit of sunshine, a bit more warmth as well in the south and east and that is the story today. out there lots of cloud around. this grey shot in sussex where you have some of the drier conditions to come. further north and west it is a soaker of a friday morning. the radar where the rain is falling, in northern and western scotland, northern ireland, and increasingly in scotland and northern england. heavy bursts within that. it is on the move. things will improve in northern ireland from here on from the west. really turning showery and the rain across southern scotland northern england will turn showery. it means northern scotland brightens up. sunshine but shower, blustery. first south, if you look at the finer detail on the model you can see a few splashes of blue. they will push through on the westibly breeze. enough to push the rein on quickly, if it is with you, a lot of dry weather to come. some sunshine, some will stay dry in eastern england but
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further north more likely to stick with cloud. further outbreaks of rain and while we have the sunshine returning across northern scotland with one or two heavy thundery shower, the breeze here keeps it on the cool side. let us take you into tonight, we have still got that couldier zone through the central swathe, clear skies top and tail. excuse me. and with clearer skies east anglia and the south—east it will be chilly. temperatures down into single figures. parts of north east scotla nd figures. parts of north east scotland could see a frost into tomorrow morning. saturday, start of the weekend, most start the day dry. best of the sunshine scotland. south—east england having a fine day. elsewhere, turning cloudier through the day, one two showers but it will be northern ireland where we see the weather to end the day. temperatures rising on the south—west breeze, will be with us into sunday but wet weather through the night in northern ireland and scotland, which, like today, comes
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toa grinding scotland, which, like today, comes to a grinding halt across some parts of northern england and and south—east scotland. affecting north and west wales on sunday so a cloudier zone here, outbreaks of rain. some sunshine, a few showers in northern scotland, strong winds keeping the temperature from rising too much but higher than recent days with hazy sunshine, we will get that bit warmer still. temperatures up to let's take a look at today's front pages. the daily telegraph leads with the story of the two russian men alleged to have carried out the salisbury nerve agent attack — and theresa may's reaction to their television interview yesterday. she calls their denial an insult to our intelligence. the guardian also features the salisbury story and a warning from mark carney, the bank of england governor, that a no—deal brexit could be as disastrous as the financial crash of 2008.
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the daily mail picks up the story of the church of england holding shares in amazon, despite the archbishop of canterbury accusing the online giant of corporate greed in a speech earlier this week. the headline says "that's rich, archbishop". and the daily mirror has something completely different. they've spent eight days in north korea. it spent time with tam members, at a factory, taking a look at the regime and how it works but it said it was, the team was constantly shadowed by the team was constantly shadowed by the security agents. and online, people are reading
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about the end of the road for the volkswagen beetle. this is one of the most read stories on the bbc news website. the german company said output would end at its plant in mexico nextjuly after production of celebration models. we have the yo—yo that is matt. you have got to give us your, your assessment of how well the weather is done. without looking at the papers. let's take a look at today's inside pages now. the firm said it will concentrate on d riverless the firm said it will concentrate on driverless electric cars so it will
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discontinue, not before two special versions of it next year. remember of course they launched this revamped version. production ending and we have been talking today about retail because we had that awful oat of figures from john lewis yesterday. it is on the front of the business page of the telegraph. profits down by 99%. they have been talking about their promised matched prices, they say it has cost them £ao prices, they say it has cost them £40 million and that has had a big effect on their number, so we have been talking about that. what have you got? what do premier league footballers retire? go into management? swan off into the distance on aality? not geoff horsefield. he has gone back to being a bricky, he has gone
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renovating houses for the homeless. he used to play for west brom. there isa he used to play for west brom. there is a nice article about how he is renovating the homes for the homeless, to provide shelterfor the homeless. 30 bedrooms he is providing and he is asking fans, because he needs to put some stuff in the bathroom. he wans spare toiletries, bring it along. to the match? yes. can you imagine if every fan brought one piece. amazing, you would have shampoo of choice. what would have shampoo of choice. what would be your toy triof choice? if you afan, would be your toy triof choice? if you a fan, you have to take one. would be your toy triof choice? if you a fan, you have to take onem you a fan, you have to take onem you had to won one... shower gel. that goes in the bathroom, you can wash your hair with it. toothpaste for me. yeah... favourite bathroom thing! we invite matt on to the sofa for the first final and the first thing we ask is what is his favourite bathroom thing. the other young is how many of us, you are
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watching live on tv or the internet and there is a 20 second difference. i was watching the sweden game in hampshire, england scored, went to the toilet, a chap was there doing what you do... i love this detail. what was his favourite toil tri? he said to to me do you think there will be a goal and i said there already has been. the bbc has got a bit of technology that can fix this glitch and soon they will be in perfect synchronisation. this is like, we had a deal, that we would never appear at the same place and same time. we are breaking this deal. like you could be twins. on that camera shot you couldn't get more varied height, could you. that is better. that is a first! what was
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that film, twins with arnold schwarzenegger and danny devito. thank you very much. we need to create more room because we have more peoplejoining us. join the bbc news teams round the uk, for the news, travel and weather are you are. good morning. a rather wet start to the day. northern areas, staying quite showery with a little bit of rain, the best of the brightness in the south, scotland and northern ireland, rainy this morning, ageing south and east. still showery across northern ireland, brighter skies coming through in northern scotland, in the south—east of england fairly bright today, waxman temperatures
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16-19d in bright today, waxman temperatures 16—19d in england and wales, or chilly in scotland and northern ireland, 1a—15d. —— maximum temperatures. and clear skies tonight, temperatures reaching single figures across the north—east of scotland, for degrees in aberdeen, in the countryside much lower. for the weekend, aberdeen, in the countryside much lower. forthe weekend, saturday, aberdeen, in the countryside much lower. for the weekend, saturday, a ridge of high pressure keeping things settled, dry and bright start, some showers perhaps northern areas of england, on the whole staying driver most, cloud increasing in northern ireland and with that outbreaks of rain slowly moving by the end of the day, maximum temperatures 1a—15d, 21 in the cells. sunday, this weather system, the next batch of rain moving north and east into scotland, edging its way further south also.
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during sunday, some wet weather for a time across northern england, wales, that will continue for much of the day. to the north and south of the day. to the north and south of that largely dry and bright with sunshine. again, temperatures roundabout mid—teens in the north, getting into the 20s in the south. goodbye. this is business live from bbc news with maryam moshiri and victoria fritz. g20 ministers gather in argentina to talk global trade — as currency crises deepen — and the threat of tit—for—tat trade sanctions and tariffs run high live from london, that's our top story on friday 1ath september. as top trade officials from the world's largest economies meet in argentina — tensions over trade are at their highest in decades, as president trump seeks to shake up america's business relationships
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all around the world. plus — ten years on from the collapse of lehman brothers — how the rise of china saved asia from the worst of the crisis.

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