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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  September 14, 2018 2:00pm-5:01pm BST

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hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm martine croxall. today at 2pm. hurricane florence makes landfall on the east coast of the united states, with high winds and torrential rain — a state governor urges people to remain calm. surviving this storm will be a test of endurance, teamwork, common—sense and patience. meanwhile, 5 million people are in the direct path of typhoon mangkhut, due to make landfall in the philippines. prison officers end protest action across england and wales — officers walked out this morning after a report described a dangerous lack of control at bedford jail. "distressing" and "vivid" footage of the moment pc keith palmer was stabbed outside parliament during last year's westminster attack has been shown at an inquest into the victims‘ deaths. an exclusive bbc report reveals how one in five young people consider themselves to be a carer whose families depend on them for everyday living.
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coming up on afternoon live — all the sport with hugh and jose mourinho defending himself again. yes, he has been entertaining as a lwa ys yes, he has been entertaining as always with a press conference earlier today defending himself against claims the england star marcus rashford is underused and he came on with plenty of facts. more on his passionate rebuttal in about 30 minutes... thank you very much. and ben has all the weather? all other conditions at home and abroad? yes, the latest on hurricane florence and typhoon mangkhut. both making landfall within hours of each other. we will talk about the uk weather, the weekend bringing wind and rain at times but further south and rain at times but further south and east you will not see much rain, some sunshine and warmth into next week but all of those details coming up... that you...
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also coming up — the ig—nobel prize ceremony at harvard has been celebrating some of academia's most bizarre research and discoveries — we'll be joined by one of this year's winners. hello — this is afternoon live. hurricane florence may drench north carolina on the us east coast with ten trillion gallons of rain over the next week — that's the prediction of one american meteorologist. the storm's destructive winds have already left more than 100,000 homes in the state without power, and a storm surge has reached nearly 10 feet in some places. the hurricane's eye has just made landfall in the last hour near wilmington — on the north carolina coast, and laura trevelyan is there for us. dramatic scenes as the leading edge of hurricane florence reaches
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the north carolina coast. rain and wind pummel the barrier islands exposed to the atlantic, then move on. this huge slow—moving storm is now so wide, that it's threatening the south—east coast of the us, from the carolinas to georgia. north carolina's governor is warning that conditions are only going to deteriorate. people inland could be threatened too. the first bands of the storm are upon us. but we have days more to go. wind and waves are driving sea water through some coastal streets, like rivers. surviving this storm will be a test of endurance, team work, common—sense and patience. there are fears that millions could be without power across the coastal south—east of the us, as the triple hazard
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of hurricane force winds, storm surge and flooding become a reality. many have fled their homes, seeking shelter inland, from the vulnerable elderly, to the very young. while most people in mandatory evacuation zones have left, some are determined to see out the storm. my family and everyone has evacuated pretty much, except for my wife and i, but we are setting up crews now to deal with the aftermath which may take weeks. the track of hurricane florence once it makes landfall is uncertain. but a sustained and damaging assault on the coastline from wind and water is intensifying. there's a major storm on the other side of the world as well. hundreds of thousands of people are having to leave their homes on luzon in the philippines, as typhoon mangkhut approaches with winds of more
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than 160 miles an hour. the typhoon is due to make landfall on the north of the main island over the weekend. more than 5 million people are directly in the storm's path. alexandra mckenzie has the latest. several million people are in the direct path of this potentially deadly storm. typhoon mangkhut is due to make landfall on the northern tip of the main island of luzon by tomorrow. thousands of people have moved inland from the vulnerable coastal areas, and are doing whatever they can to protect their belongings and their livelihood. this woman said they are terrified. she said they fear for their homes, as this typhoon is much stronger than the last one. the philippines endures about 20 typhoons and storms each year. forecasters say mangkhut is the strongest so far in 2018.
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it is more than 500 miles in diameter, with sustained winds of 160mph. transport has been disrupted, schools shut, and the army is on stand by. preparation is already under way for a vital relief effort. officials say this typhoon may cause floods and landslides, with extensive damage expected to infrastructure and crops. and people are seeking refuge where ever they can. some families have come to this makeshift evacuation centre. they hope they have found a place of safety, away from the worst of what's been described as a supertyphoon. alexandra mckenzie, bbc news. that was alexandra mackenzie. you
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can see what was happening on the other side of the world. more on that in a moment. ben rich is joining us from the weather centre to talk about these weather systems. laura trevelyan is in wilmington in north carolina. you can already see the impact of this storm but it is not as bad as it is going to bejust this storm but it is not as bad as it is going to be just yet? the hurricane has just made landfall and this is what category one looks like. bringing winds of over 90 mph, torrential rain, the trees are bending and in the wind there is debris everywhere. already there is massive flooding. 320,000 people in north carolina are without power. there are 150 people a little bit
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north of me who live at the end of a river inland and they are waiting to be rescued because their homes have flooded up to the second story, if you can imagine. even though the scene looks dramatic, it is not the wind or the storm surge that poses the greatest risk although they are incredibly dangerous, it is a fact this storm is due to hang around off the coast of the carolinas, lingering and then jump the coast of the carolinas, lingering and thenjump rain like this for another two days at least and that could lead to what officials say will be catastrophic flooding. so there are 10 million people in the part of this storm and we are braced for what it may bring. lawro, thank you very much. —— laura trevelya n. with me is our weather presenter, ben rich. that was just category one? anyone watching yesterday will have heard us watching yesterday will have heard us talking about the herrick and being downgraded and that means the wind is a little lighter and a
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sustained winds in the centre of the storm is the steady wind and not the gusts. around about 85 mph at the moment, a short time ago there were gusts of 99 mph. and those wins are over a big area, hurricane force winds over an area 80 miles away from the centre of the storm. this isa from the centre of the storm. this is a huge swathe of strong winds. the downgrade has not mean a lot. this is still a dangerous beast. when we talk about gusts of wind it can sound benign until you think of the conditions come with it, the storm surge and the amount of rainfall? and we think of hurricanes asi rainfall? and we think of hurricanes as i wind weather feature but actually they are not just about that, we have a set of hazards and the real problem is this one has slowed down so we can look at some graphics of how this storm has been behaving. this is a satellite picture of how the storm has moved over recent days in the last 2a
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hours. look at this word of cloud moving slowly, about six miles per hour, that is a slowjogging pace, thatis hour, that is a slowjogging pace, that is how fast this storm is moving towards the coast and it did make landfall about 12:15pm in our time but that is continuing to move very slowly and it just sits there, spinning and picking up more moisture from the ocean and driving that into the shoreline as outbreaks of heavy rain. that is why some places will get one metre of rain and the storm surge, the combination of low pressure lifting the sea and the strong wind blowing that onto the strong wind blowing that onto the shoreline so there is catastrophic coastal flooding and huge amounts of inland flooding from those rains, one metre of rain, even though this is just category one this will continue to huge —— cause huge problems. sitting across the ocean? be normally come inland and the land breaks up and weakens them but if you leave them with a
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connection to the ocean, with a connection to the ocean, with a connection to the field sources, like leaving something plugged in, it will keep drawing energy and moisture and that will continue to pile into the coastline. we also need to think about the philippines? 5 million people are in line of typhoon mangkhut? how different and experience will that we? in many ways similar. there are differences, this storm is stronger, it has winds around about 130 mph, that is the steady wind and the gusts are stronger so stronger but moving through more quickly and probably will not bring quite so much rain, 400 - 500 will not bring quite so much rain, 400 — 500 centimetres of rain, half a metre, and because the philippines is not a huge land mass, we talk about the land we giving up the storms but there is not a lot of land to passover so it will begin a bit but as it passes towards the
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south of china over the coming days it still will have a lot of strength. this storm will continue to make headlines, faster moving but will still bring huge amounts of wind and rain. thank you very much. a protest by the prison staff has been called off. members would demonstrate outside prisons in england and wales. the government threatened to seek an injunction to end the action of the protest has been stopped following an agreement with the prisons minister, rory stewart. 0ur correspondent, lisa hampele, is at wormwood scrubs prison in west london. and the prisons minister had been outspoken about what he thought of this action? absolutely. the protest has been going on since seven o'clock this morning abandon the country across in this —— england and wales but there were protesters this morning and there are none of
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them, they have gone back in because it has been called off, there has been a meaningful engagement, they say, with the prisons minister and there has been a plan of action to address the concerns that the prison officers association has been talking about and they say that they have called at the processed but —— called off the protest but the devil is in the detail and they have been concerned for a very long time, we have been hearing about violent assaults in prison and drugs and yesterday the chief inspector of prisons talked about bedford prison and how they had been —— there had been a breakdown of order and discipline and this protest today follow that and was an are not allowed to go on strike so they have got round that by having protest about health and safety because they say their health and safety and human rights has been copper wires
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and that is why they have been protesting. up to 25 officers assaulted every day in our prisons. the prisons minister says he wants to make drugs and violence his priority and in the light of this protest, what is going to happen in terms of his approach? what will he give to the prisons to do with this? we have heard him saying that he will resign if things do not get better and he is promising things will get better and a lot of this has to deal with the partner, it is about sprays they want to use to repel people inside the prison when they get violent and about a sequence they get violent and about a sequence of events that are supposed to be put into effect and has not been yet done so and they want this to be rolled out quickly across jails in prison and wales and prison officer say they are being smashed in the face and have their bones
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broken every day, being assaulted with drugs and they don't have enough staff and they are asking for things to be put into effect more quickly and they say that at the moment the government is just paying lip service and they want to see action. they are waiting to see... they obviously have decided the protests will try to get the government to do more and notjust as they say pay lip service and they are hoping that this will actually mean that a plan will come forward and that is what we are being told by the prisons minister, that he is going to make sure that happens and that the prison service does meet with the prison officers association. thank you. let's speak now to the labour mp and shadowjustice secretary, richard burgon. he's in our leeds newsroom. welcome. what is your view of the prison officers taking action in this way when they are not meant to? ? prison officers are not expecting
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to be kicked, punched and spat out 01’ to be kicked, punched and spat out or having excrement and lee ryan thrown at them and they say it is only a matter of time, such is the dettori ocean of prison safety that prison a prison officer is killed on duty so i think this is a wake—up call for the government. i have called earlier for rory stewart to film the association and speak to them. and he played tough this morning and he has eventually agreed to have further discussions and so far as officers that retreated last week in parliament when referred to be government ministers as heroes, the government tried to portray them as villains and they are not the villains in this. what actually he was trying to keep prisons safe in the absence of prison officers, his
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view is they are putting their collea g u es view is they are putting their colleagues at risk and other inmates who are not violent? both inmates and prison officers are at risk unnecessarily every day, largely because the conservative government decided to cut the number of prison officers by 7000 so this is an emergency situation. the prison officers felt they were left with no choice other than to take this protest action rather than condemning them people should be thanking them for the job they do to keep society safe every day at a very difficult and demanding job which is very difficult and demanding but should not necessarily dangerous. they deserve the resources and colleagues and staff and protective equipment and the restraining equipment that they require and they are demanding and we support them in those very reasonable demands. you are criticising rory stewart when you have —— he has said he is giving
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millions of pounds more to the prison governors to get on top of these problems, particularly drugs and violence which could fuel these problems in prisons. he has said that he will resign if he cannot bring the offending rates down. in the next 18 months. is it not best to get him a chance? that was a good gimmick to say he will resign, better see if he can turn it round and if he resigns. but the additional resources the government by giving and the extra prison officers they are recruiting are only going some way to making up for the huge cuts they unnecessarily made in the first place and i do not think he should be congratulated for recruiting a few thousand more inexperienced prison officers when they are the ones cut 7000 unnecessarily in the first place. we need emergency action to end this emergency in prisons and we need the treasury to actually provide extra resources to end overcrowding in prisons and end understaffing and
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return to the prison officer dashed prisoner ratio and we need protective equipment for the prison officers that they have been demanding and we do not need the government running off to court as quickly as it can every time you try to drag prison officers through the courts rather than speaking to them ina courts rather than speaking to them in a sensible and respectful and collegiate way. it have a government that works with prison officers to end this. thank you very much for joining us. thank you. you're watching afternoon live — these are our headlines. hurricane florence makes landfall on east coast of the united states, with high winds and torrential rain. in the philippines... 5 million people are in the direct path of typhoon mangkhut, due to make landfall in the philippines. prison officers end protest action across england and wales — officers walked out this morning after a report described a dangerous lack of control at bedford jail. and in the sport, rugby league clubs
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have voted by a two thirds majority to scrap the super rates and return to scrap the super rates and return toa to scrap the super rates and return to a normal promotion system from 2019. the premier league investigates whether rules were broken during everton's recruitment of the manager, marco silva, following claims by watford that they made an illegal approach for him. and horns getting locked in the ring once again this weekend, one former champion tells us this is a fight that will bring boxing back to before. wuornos story is coming up... thank you. —— more on those stories. let's get cross to washington — where the fe emergency group is making a statement... the hurricane is
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currently category one. with 90 mph winds. moving slowly, six miles per hour out of the west. currently there is a tornado watch in effect, it will likely continue into tonight. the storm surge along the carolina coast will continue into saturday. and in some areas sunday night and into monday morning. expect higher levels of higher tides during the high tide cycle and the next high tide cycle along the carolina coast is around noon today easter in time. i do want to emphasise that this is only the beginning... florence is very slow—moving and will continue to track along the south, to north carolina and the south carolina coast lines for the next 24—36 hours and it will not get to colombia, south carolina until sunday at midnight morning. we have already
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seen one foot of rain just north of wilmington and we are still expecting rainfall amounts of 20—30 inchesin expecting rainfall amounts of 20—30 inches in some isolated spots of 40 inches in some isolated spots of 40 inches and some of you may remember that this is in comparison to september of 1999. the first half of that month of that year we had hurricane dennis and hurricane floyd. they produced the same amount of rainfall we anticipate with florence. the only difference is back then it was within 14 days. and we are looking at the same amount of rainfall. in three days. some of the river levels will be forecast to exceed the historic levels and some of those wondering floyd. we must
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emphasise for your own safety to do not drive weather watcher covers roadways, especially at night, a lot of the flooding will start in the river stem levels tonight near the coastline and increase sunday into mourning further inland. always remember to turn around and don't drown. that is the main thing we a lwa ys drown. that is the main thing we always say. concern beyond that continues as it moves into the appellations sunday into mourning —— into monday morning and into the middle act region next week. due to the recent rainfall over the last couple of weeks it will not take much rainfall for additionalflash flooding to occur in these areas. 1-3 flooding to occur in these areas. 1—3 inches and a couple of hours will lead to flash flooding. not as much as the main rivers as we
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anticipate over the main carolinas. and the national hurricane centre's next update —— update is at 11 o'clock in the morning. thank you. good morning. billjacobs. in addition to the forecast and decision support from the weather service, we deploy assets to support recovery. no's response team is staging reopening ports as soon as possible and a national survey has aircraft on standby to support overflights for affected areas. no's office of responsibility is on standby to assist the coastguard in any chemical or oil spill. the source at system is providing distress and specific location information to the coastguard. noah is working with local emergency managers in industry to amplify the hmmfi managers in industry to amplify the forecast message... ... we
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managers in industry to amplify the forecast message... we have an update regarding the situation on the east coast of the united states as hurricane florence makes landfall and as we heard from ben rich, underwood has been downgraded to category one, but should not give anybody much comfort because of the conditions that come with it, the wind speeds are very high and the gusts might be slightly lower than previously but as we heard from fema and the kennoway, conditions will meana and the kennoway, conditions will mean a lot of water around around flooding and people need to be very careful. when out and about. do not drive through that water. the inquest into the deaths of five people killed in the westminster terror attack last year is continuing at the old bailey. today focuses on the death of pc keith palmer. 0ur correspondent helena lee is outside the court. we have this in court distressing ordeal recordings of those who tried
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to help pc palmer as he was lying and dying on the ground after he was attacked by khalid masood and in those recordings person can be heard saying that he was described as having him a weak pulse and losing blood. another can be heard urging pc palmer to fight for his life. the court was shown this photograph of pc keith palmer at the start of the inquest this morning. taken by an american tourist, outside the palace of westminster, it was to be the last photograph of him. he was killed not long after. this is the aftermath of the attack. pc palmer had been on duty and unarmed when khalid masood approached him. there was a struggle, masood then stabbed him. witnesses today have been describing what they saw. 0ne eyewitness whose statement
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was read to court said as soon as the knives went up, it went from car accident to attack. antonia kerridge, a parliamentary assistant, was in a building opposite the palace. sshe told the court "the policeman had collapsed. the attacker ran over to him, and just leaned down towards him and raised the knife quite high. and hejust stabbed him. two or three or four times. i was looking away, it was more than once. he raised the knife up. masood was then shot dead by officers." emergency services tried to treat pc keith palmer at the scene but he died from his injuries. an officer dedicated to hisjob, a father of a young daughter, and a husband. and a man who the inquest heard was a public face of parliament, the hearing here continues this afternoon. thank you very much.
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helena lee at the old bailey... the funeral has been held for four children who were murdered in a firebomb attack on their home in greater manchester. demi, brandon, lacie and lia pearson, who lived in walkden near salford, were aged between three and 15. their mother is still being treated for her injuries and wasnt able to attend the service. two men who targeted their home with petrol bombs last december have been jailed for life. time for a look at the weather. thank you... reports of wind gusts of 105 mph thank you... reports of wind gusts of105 mph in thank you... reports of wind gusts of 105 mph in wilmington, north carolina so hurricane florence continues to cause huge problems and back home and weekend is much quieter. still some wind and rain in the forecast and wet and breezy weather at times and the driest weather at times and the driest weather to be found towards the south—east. pass the south—east may not see any rain at all. this is the latest radar and satellite picture,
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bands of cloud and rain sinking south eastwards and heavy rain pushing across the north of northern ireland and south—western parts of scotla nd ireland and south—western parts of scotland and through the afternoon we will continue to push these areas of rain and a few showers further south and east and the south—east of england staying largely dry, 19 and a mixture of sunshine and blustery showers for northern scotland and a decidedly cool feeling. today, most areas of rain will fade away so we are left with largely dry conditions and showers coming through in the west but with clear skies overhead, especially for the north—east of scotland, it turns into a chilly night in the centre of aberdeen with those of 4 degrees and in the countryside it could be cold enough grass frost. bottas code further south but many places getting a fine start on saturday morning and the north—east of scotland and south—east of england keeping the sunshine for longest but things from the west should start a cloud over through the day and for northern ireland and western scotland, they replied bringing rain later with blustery winds as well. 14—21d, the
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temperatures nudging upwards across the south—east. into sunday, high—pressure close by south eastern areas but these frontal systems bringing systems from the north—west and still uncertainty over how far south the rain will get but it looks like it will move out of southern scotla nd like it will move out of southern scotland and northern ireland into northern england and wales and to the south—east we keep hold of sunshine, set in stone areas driest of all and 23 degrees in london and 14 in stornoway with a of sunshine and showers. for the start of next week, this is the remnants of what was hurricane heading. not a hurricane any more but it will bring low— pressure hurricane any more but it will bring low—pressure towards the west of the uk during monday night and tuesday. uncertain timings but there is a potential for wet and windy weather but it was a hurricane and there is warm tropical air mixed in and we will feel the effects of that across eastern and south—eastern areas so towards the south—east we could be looking at middle 20s by the time
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get into tuesday but further north and west, spells of wind and rain at times and all the latest on the uk weather plus weather around the world on the bbc website. this is bbc news — our latest headlines. hurricane florence has made landfall with high winds and heavy rain lashing the east coast of the united states. meanwhile thousands of people have begun evacuating from coastal areas of the philippines as a super typhoon brings powerful winds and torrential rain. prison officers have taken part in widespread protests over safety concerns due to inmate violence. the prison officers association warns of "unprecedented levels of violence" in jails. the church of england has said it will keep its shares in amazon, two days after the archbishop of canterbury said the firm was "leeching off the taxpayer". "distressing" and "vivid" footage of the moment pc keith palmer was stabbed outside parliament during last year's westminster attack has
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been shown at an inquest into the victims' deaths. sport now on afternoon live with hugh. and jose mourinho has had a rough time of it of late. yes, but he has come out fighting. jose mourinho, the man utd boss was asked about the amount of playing time he's given rashford. well he gave an impassioned defence in his press conference earlier... armed with a number of facts he outlined rashford had played nearing 6,000 minutes in 105 games in all competitions. and he's right — figures
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from football statisticians 0pta show no player currently aged under 21 has played more competitive minutes for a premier league team than rashford since his debut in february 2016. the man that's keeping marcus rashford out of the starting line—up is romeul lukaku... he supports his manager's strong character — speaking to bbc1‘s football focus programme, lukaku sastose is "a family man who makes the players laugh, who fights for them, and deserves respect. have a listen. what i like about him is he doesn't fa ke what i like about him is he doesn't fake his emotions. when he is sad, he is sad, and when he is happy, he is happy. he is a family guy and he fights for his players but he is real so people need to appreciate that at least there are people who are real in this world like him. well united travel to watford tomorrow and mourinhojoked he'd still be criticised for not playing rashford despite the fact he's suspended. if you are a boxing fan there is a
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treat in store in las vegas? absolutely. one reason they aren't is probably the names themselves! gennady golovkin of kazakhstan will be taking on the mexican, sowl ‘canelo' alvarez for the wba, wbc and ibo world middleweight titles in las vegas tomorrow night. and particularly when it comes to golovkin, it's a wonder he isn't more well known... 40 fights, zero defeats, only 1 draw. that was when the pair last met — a fight many thought golovkin deserved to win. since then alvarez has failed a drugs test and golovkin says it means he has now lost ‘respect for his opponent'. it's all goes into the melting pot for what should be a blockbuster with two of the most talented fighters in the sport. it's a view shared by the promoter. it's a lot of pressure for canelo
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having a whole country behind him, defending his pride, defending his people. he must stay focused obviously, he must stay in charge of his destiny. his destiny is to win, to knock out his opponent. if you lose focus, things can go very wrong inside the ring. fighting on mexican independence day of course. it's a fight you can hear on radio 5live — live from las vegas on 5 live from 4 o'clock on sunday morning. what‘s been described as a ‘civil war‘ in rugby league appears to be over. the majority of clubs have voted to scrap the super 8s from next season and go back to a conventional promotion and relegation system. 0ur rugby league correspondent dave woods explained the changes to me. the super league clubs were against
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it, the majority, because they said it, the majority, because they said it was too volatile. essentially they have a regular season and at they have a regular season and at the end of that they split into a top eight for the play—offs for the grand finaland top eight for the play—offs for the grand final and the bottom four lay the top fourfor grand final and the bottom four lay the top four for an extended relegation and promotion play—off and that is the volatility the super lea ks and that is the volatility the super leaks didn‘t like, and that is the volatility the super lea ks didn‘t like, that and that is the volatility the super leaks didn‘t like, that so many teams could be relegated. and a change to something more familiar? it isa change to something more familiar? it is a format the game has had before but now there will only be the bottom team relegated and the top team from the championship promoted, and it will be a top five lay—offs for the grand final instead of the top eight which favours the teams that finished first and second in terms of reaching the old trafford finale, the showpiece in 0ctober. and sebastian vettel hit a wall in second practice ahead of this weekend‘s singapore grand prix. you can follow second practice on
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the bbc sport website. thank you. we will see you later. let‘s bring you some breaking news around paul manafort. we were hearing a few hours ago that he was likely to be pleading guilty as some kind of plea deal regarding the mueller investigation but now they have failed superseding criminal investigation against paul manafort. there are two criminal charges, one conspiracy against the united states, and one count of conspiracy to o bstru ct states, and one count of conspiracy to obstruct justice. states, and one count of conspiracy to obstructjustice. paul states, and one count of conspiracy to obstruct justice. paul manafort had held out for quite some time
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before doing a deal, hence those previous charges of fraud that he faced, but now we are hearing he has agreed a deal with special counsel. again, putting more pressure on the trunk campaign. two counts of criminal charges, one of conspiracy against the united states and one of conspiracy to obstruct justice. against the united states and one of conspiracy to obstructjustice. we will no doubt return to that very soon with the help of all —— all correspondences in the united states. two days after the archbishop of canterbury accused amazon "leeching off the taxpayer" it‘s been revealed that the church of england has shares in the online retailer. the church times claimed amazon was among the church‘s 20 biggest global investments last year. but a statement from the church of england said it considered the most effective way of seeking change was to be "in the room with these companies" as a shareholder. charles walker is the mp
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for broxbourne, hejoins me now. what do you make of this apparent contradiction between what the archbishop of canterbury believes and what the church of england is investigating. the archbishop of canterbury should have got his facts straight before he gave his speech. i think the archbishop was more interested in getting a standing ovation when giving a fact —based speech, particularly about the gig economy and the church‘s role in it. but isn‘t he within his rights to express his own personal view, and actually potentially even if that means being at odds with the investment is the church is making? he called the gig economy evil. there are certainly difficulties with the gig economy. matthew taylor has done a report on that around six —— sick pay, but what he ignored was
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the fact hundreds of thousands of stu d e nts the fact hundreds of thousands of students every year, sixth form and university students, work in the gig economy, and that economy provides them with jobs they can wrap around their studies and holidays. he ignored that and called all evil. it was a disgraceful and lightweight speech and the fallout from the speech and the fallout from the speech has been made worse by the church‘s holding in amazon. speech has been made worse by the church's holding in amazon. should the church of england give up the amazon shares in light of what the archbishop thinks? no, i don't think amazon in itself is evil, ijust think the archbishop could think more before he speaks. he shouldn‘t go around chasing standing ovations at the tuc conference. i'm sure he would argue that‘s not what he was chasing. he might argue that he wasn‘t but that‘s exactly what he wanted, otherwise he would have mentioned the gig economy revives
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thousands of opportunities for young people and the church has a shareholding in amazon. he was trying to also raise the concern that companies like amazon pay very little tax. amazon would pay —— say they pay the right amount of tax but they pay the right amount of tax but the archbishop isn‘t alone in thinking that a company that makes such a big profit should pay more tax. but he called amazon a leech. he was pretty negligent if he didn‘t know that they did have a shareholding in that company because he chairs the body that oversees the shareholdings of the church of england. why isn't he right to object to companies, notjust amazon, companies paying wages that are so low people cannot live on them, then the taxpayer has to subsidise them? he is right but he
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didn‘t makea subsidise them? he is right but he didn‘t make a balanced intervention as you would expect from the leader of this nation‘s church. he called the gig economy evil, he called amazon leeches, it wasn‘t really the speech you would expect from a seniorfigure in speech you would expect from a senior figure in public life. speech you would expect from a seniorfigure in public life. it really wasn‘t. seniorfigure in public life. it really wasn't. charles walker, mp for broxbourne, thanks for coming if you‘re suffering with kidney stones, taking a ride on a roller—coaster might be the medicine you need — that‘s the conclusion of research that has won this year‘s ig nobel prize for medicine. these are spoof prizes published in the annals of improbable research but perhaps being shaken about in order to dislodge a kidney stone isn‘t as daft as it might sound. 0ur science correspondent pallab ghosh has been looking at the evidence. thrills, spills and medical treatment. what more could you want from a fairground attraction? a ride on big thunder mountain at walt disney world is an effective
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treatment for dislodging kidney stones. not so effective are scarier rides involving prolonged plunges. needed, as well as the ups and downs, are lots of side to side movements to rattle the stones out. though it sounds like mickey mouse science, it has been scientifically proved and could form the basis of a new treatment. and it was a recipient of the ig nobel prize for medicine at an awards ceremony last night. the real credit goes to one of my patients. my patient went on spring break with his family to the walt disney world resort and rode on a roller—coaster called the big thunder mountain railroad roller—coaster. he rode the ride, got off, and about two minutes later passed a kidney stone. the nobel prize ceremony celebrates excellence in research and the arts.
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the ig nobels are a parody and celebrate the quirky. put into the collar... some people rudely suggest that scientists can be up their own backsides. in this case, this research are really is for his do—it—yourself colonoscopy kit. if the winners speak for too long, a girl gives them a gentle reminder to wrap it up. please stop. thank you very much. joining me now from boston is drjames cole, principal lecturer in archaeology at the university of brighton who won the nutrition ig nobel prize for calculating that there is nothing overly nutritious about a human being and that eating a traditional diet is superior to cannibalism. congratulations on your prize. what
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does it mean to you to be the prize winner? thank you, it is an honour to be awarded one of these because it‘s a great way to engage people in science that they perhaps might not have thought about or even wanted to think about in their normal lives. tell us about your research because it‘s easy to send it up but you did have a purpose and you have been spending while on it. yes, i was really trying to focus on trying to understand the complexity of cannibalism behaviour in the human a ncestors cannibalism behaviour in the human ancestors because in our species there is a range of reasons people might engage in these parts. while —— warfare, spiritual, ritual, but the father you go back it‘s harder to access the motivation behind
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these acts. we have fossil remains with teeth marks on them and dating where possible, so trying to look at the nutritional value and stacking it up against other animals that we know were successfully hunted like horse and mammoth, i was trying to see if you could get a feel for whether we are cannibalising for these reasons. how nutritious is a human being? haps unsurprisingly we come out we would expect for an animal of our size so our muscle mass gives something between 36,000 calories but horse will give a couple of hundred thousand calories soa couple of hundred thousand calories so a single individual of a large game animal that we would successfully hunt in the past gives you a much greater return than we do, but that is just about size and
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volume i think. i imagine there was quite a bit of competition for the nutrition prize. what was it that swung it in your favour, nutrition prize. what was it that swung it in yourfavour, do nutrition prize. what was it that swung it in your favour, do you think? i wish i knew! there's something like 9000 nominations for these awards and they give ten so maybe it was just the title. i did try and make people also think in the paper about our ancestors have a much more complex behavioural repertoire than we think. we know a lot more about neanderthals is now commonly produced art and have language, they buried their dead so these are complex humans who we also mated with when we encountered them so there‘s a combination of a catchy, slightly disturbing title, i don‘t know, and some thoughtful presents about how we should think about others and ourselves. presents about how we should think about others and ourselvesm certainly caught our eye and congratulations to you. doctorjames
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cole, it sounds like a few people have caught you on the television and they are messaging you to tell you! we will let you deal with those m essa g es you! we will let you deal with those messages now. thank you for having me. it's an education! jamie is here with the business news, we will find out the headlines in a moment after our headlines on afternoon live. hurricane florence makes landfall on east coast of the united states, with high winds and torrential rain. five million people are in the direct path of typhoon mangkhut, due to make landfall in the philippines. prison officers end protest action across england and wales — officers walked out this morning after a report described a dangerous lack of control at bedford jail. here‘s your business headlines on afternoon live. sports direct boss mike ashley has accused shareholders of stabbing him and the company
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in the back. he said they had failed to support him and chairman keith hellawell, who resigned on wednesday. the bank of england governor mark carney says it‘s his job "not to hope for the best but to prepare for the worst" after brexit. in a speech in ireland he said he had tested the country‘s banks for a no—deal brexit scenario with mortgage rates spiralling, a plunging pound, and house prices crashing 35%. british steel has announced that it will cut 400 managerial, professional and administrative roles across its uk, ireland, france and netherlands operations as part of the company‘s ongoing transformation. so volkswagen‘s iconic car has come to the end of the road? we will talk about that in a second but first i want to talk about the kim in the state. did you used to
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have one? no, did you? yes, it was lovely. hurricanes, the point is it is expensive and this is going to be very expensive. i will give you some of the figures we have been looking at some of the past ones. 125 billion, hurricane harvey, and katrina about 160 billion so obviously it hit infrastructure, people, oil companies and that‘s one of the reasons the oil price is going up around $80 per barrel. in terms of human life of course. the worst of —— hurricane killed 12,000 people. let‘s go to gym in the state where she is not in the eye of the storm closer than we are. in terms of financial, economic impact, do we
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have any idea about what will happen the over next couple of days?m predicting the path of a hurricane is difficult, predicting the economic impact seems to be even more challenging because i have seen estimates saying that hurricane florence could cost anything from $700 million in terms of lost revenue, people going out to retail stores and businesses in the area, all the way up to the hundreds of billions of dollars so so far it seems far too soon to tell but there are some clues. 0ne seems far too soon to tell but there are some clues. one of them is there are some clues. one of them is there are fewer cars in the area than there were surrounding the houston area during hurricane harvey and that suggests in terms of reimbursement costs for car damage, they might be lower. the same thing goes for the number of people in the area. it is after labor day in the united states. unfortunately we have had to go back to work so there are
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fewer tourists in the area meaning the number of people who have been evacuated in terms of lost revenue might be slightly lower. when you put all of this together, economists say they are not significantly worried this will be a huge hit to economic growth in the united states but certainly in the area it will be something that will be felt by the businesses at least for the weeks to come. just a word on what that area of the united states is like because obviously the big comparison is when it hit new orleans and industrial and economic hub. it‘s not quite like that, is it, where this hurricane is heading for? now, it is less densely populated, there are fewer oil and gas pipelines and refineries in the area but not nearly as many in the new orleans area which is why we haven‘t seen as significant impact of the oil price
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the lead up to those hurricanes. which isn‘t to say people in the area won‘t be feeling the impact. we have already seen a significant people have had loss of power the area, but the potential economic damage from this storm, in many ways there are less economic drivers in there are less economic drivers in the path of this particular hurricane. jim, thank you for that. now can we talk about the volkswagen beetle? yes, we can, they are ending production. i thought they already had. they redesigned it. what colour was yours? mine was green, i drove around the state in it. they relaunched it and made it more sleek and modern. yes, they modelled them ona and modern. yes, they modelled them on a volkswagen golf. it did feel quite small in a sense and that‘s
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one of the reasons they lost popularity. they were reintroduced in the states about ten years ago and did very well. we all know about the vw emissions problem so they lost popularity for that and increasingly people have moved towards suvs and they feel small in that context. you recognise that? towards suvs and they feel small in that context. you recognise that7m is heavy. you remember the movie? we are both showing our age.|j is heavy. you remember the movie? we are both showing our age. i do, one of the older styles but they are immensely collectable. the original concept came out of the idea of the people‘s car, adolf hitler called it... and the vw after the
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wall was built around the idea of a people‘s car which could be cheap, effective and efficient. which it was, all of those things for the new germany as it emerged from the ruins. here are the markets, or looking incredibly strong. the pound is looking strong. and the ftse... just generally optimistic end to the week. i will see when an hour and i will try to stick to the order of the questions! time to look at the weather forecast. seems like the one behind me here are part of our weekend weather story. there will be wet and breezy weather at times but very little of the rain is expected to reach the south—east. some parts of england will stage i. you can see bands of rain that had been sinking south—eastwards but the
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south—eastern corner holding onto some sunshine. we have also had brightness across northern scotland with a scattering of heavy showers. in the evening most of that will clear away, and notice these green and blue colours on the chart, temperatures in the centre of aberdeen getting down to around four degrees. in the countryside temperatures dipped lower than that. not especially cold further south. we start tomorrow on a final note for most, keeping some sunshine across north—eastern scotland and also for central and eastern parts of scotland, although cloud will be streaming in from the west through the day. for northern ireland and central scotland the cloud will begin to bring rain and a strengthening breeze, up to 21 degrees in london. as we get into the second half of the weekend, frontal systems will try to push in from the north—west bringing breezy
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weather but there is aboutjust how far south and east these weather front will get. it looks like we will bring some rain in across northern parts of england and the midlands. in east anglia and the south—east it‘s expected to stage i. some bright skies too across scotla nd some bright skies too across scotland and northern ireland. beginning to warm up across the south—east corner. looking ahead to the start of next week, this is the re m na nts of the start of next week, this is the remnants of what was hurricane helene and it looks like it‘s heading our way. uncertainty about exactly where and when it will arrive but it looks like western parts of the uk could see potentially wet and windy weather. remember it used to be a hurricane, there is warm tropical air within it and we will start to see that. further north and west, wind and rain at times. hello, you‘re watching afternoon live —
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i‘m martine croxall. today at 3pm. hurricane florence makes landfall on the east coast of the united states, with high winds and torrential rain — a state governor urges people to remain calm. surviving this storm will be a test of endurance, teamwork, common—sense and patience. meanwhile, 5 million people are in the direct path of typhoon mangkhut, due to make landfall in the philippines. "distressing" and "vivid" footage of the moment pc keith palmer was stabbed outside parliament during last year‘s westminster attack has been shown at an inquest into the victims‘ deaths. the church of england defends having shares in amazon after the archbishop of canterbury criticised the retail giant for ‘paying almost nothing‘ in taxes. coming up on afternoon live — all the sport. jose mourinho defending himself?
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there are no plans intended, jose mourinho is on the defensive today, he has brought his stats with him so don‘t play that marcus rashford does not play enough! more on that and the boxing fight of the year at half—past. thanks, and we‘ll bejoining you for a full update just after half—past. ben has all the weather. generally speaking the uk weather is quiet this weekend with cloudy, wet conditions at times but parts of the south—east should stay dry all weekend long. more weather details later in the programme... also coming up — rhe performers in the musical "42nd street" who have made west end history by becoming the first to take on a role in the west end as a job—share. hello.
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this is afternoon live. hurricane florence may drench north carolina on the us east coast with around ten trillion gallons of rain over the next week — that‘s the prediction of one american meteorologist. the storm‘s destructive winds have already left more than 100,000 homes in the state without power, and a storm surge has reached nearly 10 feet in some places. the hurricane‘s eye has made landfall in the last few hours near wilmington — on the north carolina coast, from where laura trevelyan reports for us. dramatic scenes as the leading edge of hurricane florence reaches the north carolina coast. rain and wind pummel the barrier islands exposed to the atlantic, then move on. this huge slow—moving storm is now so wide, that it‘s threatening the south—east coast of the us, from the carolinas to georgia. north carolina‘s governor is warning
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that conditions are only going to deteriorate. people inland could be threatened, too. the first bands of the storm are upon us. but we have days more to go. wind and waves are driving sea water through some coastal streets like rivers. surviving this storm will be a test of endurance, team work, common—sense and patience. there are fears that millions could be without power across the coastal south—east of the us, as the triple hazard of hurricane force winds, storm surge and flooding become a reality. many have fled their homes, seeking shelter inland, from the vulnerable elderly, to the very young. while most people in mandatory evacuation zones have left, some are determined to see out the storm. my family and everyone has
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evacuated pretty much, except for my wife and i, but we are setting up crews now to deal with the aftermath which may take weeks. the track of hurricane florence once it makes landfall is uncertain. but a sustained and damaging assault on the coastline from wind and water is intensifying. in a moment we‘ll be speaking to our correspondent, laura trevelyan, in north carolina. meanwhile, there‘s a major storm on the other side of the world as well. hundreds of thousands of people are having to leave their homes on luzon in the philippines, as typhoon mangkhut approaches with winds of more than 160 miles an hour. the typhoon is due to make landfall on the north of the main island over the weekend. more than 5 million people are directly in the storm‘s path. alexandra mckenzie has the latest. several million people are in the direct path of this potentially deadly storm.
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typhoon mangkhut is due to make landfall on the northern tip of the main island of luzon by tomorrow. thousands of people have moved inland from the vulnerable coastal areas, and are doing whatever they can to protect their belongings and their livelihood. this woman said they are terrified. she said they fear for their homes, as this typhoon is much stronger than the last one. the philippines endures about 20 typhoons and storms each year. forecasters say mangkhut is the strongest so far in 2018. it is more than 500 miles in diameter, with sustained winds of 160mph. transport has been disrupted, schools shut, and the army is on stand by.
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preparation is already underway for a vital relief effort. officials say this typhoon may cause floods and landslides, with extensive damage expected to infrastructure and crops. and people are seeking refuge whereever they can. some families have come to this makeshift evacuation centre. they hope they have found a place of safety, away from the worst of what‘s been described as a supertyphoon. alexandra mckenzie, bbc news. for more, let‘s cross to the met‘s tropical storms expert — julian heming in exeter. a very busy time for you with lots of systems to be watching out for. in particular the reporting on one
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hurricane and one typhoon. what are the fundamental differences? they are actually the same thing, hurricane is a name given to a severe tropical cyclone over the atla ntic severe tropical cyclone over the atlantic and in the eastern pacific on the other side of the world the same thing is cold a typhoon. we keep saying that hurricane florence has been downgraded to category one storm and that sounds quite mild and benign? it is not? the category system is based on wind speed so category one has wind speeds of around about 90 mph and gusts of a 100 mph which are damaging but you can get stronger wind speeds but the main concern with hurricane florence is the amount of rainfall it will produce over the next three or four days and we could be looking widely at 500 millimetres but in some places 1000 millilitres. of shocking amount of rain to have to cope with.
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it gets the power from the ocean and the speed at which the path over that ocean which sustains it is the thing, isn‘t it? that ocean which sustains it is the thing, isn't it? a tropical cyclone typically stores up huge amounts of moisture coming from the ocean surface and as it makes landfall it dumps that over the land and with hurricane florence because it will be such a slow—moving storm we expect to rain for maybe three or four days in that region around the carolinas. let us look first of all at what is happening in north america and north and south carolina. what are the particular features that you would point us to when trying to think about what it is like to have to live through this? i think what we have seen from the new stories over the last two daysis the new stories over the last two days is they are very well prepared in that part of the world for hurricanes and have been a lot of
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evacuations and preparations, boarding up buildings. but you still have to come back to the aftermath and what we do expect is to see extensive flooding even well inland from this hurricane over the next few days. in comparison, how well prepared by the philippines? they are also used to this time of storm. 5 million people in the path of this one? some say that typhoon mangkhut isa one? some say that typhoon mangkhut is a different kind of beast, the wind strengths are much stronger, they could be over 160 mph. the damage from the wind will be more extensive from typhoon mangkhut banned from hurricane florence but they will also receive huge amounts of rain and a storm surge in that pa rt of rain and a storm surge in that part of the world and we expect la ndfall to part of the world and we expect landfall to be some time during this evening uk time. you study these things every day of your working life, what more do you want to know about these systems?” life, what more do you want to know about these systems? i think there
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was always things we can do better, the computer models are improving all the time and we need extra data to feed into those and so a lot of the work we do at the met office and other meteorological institutes and research institutes around the world is to try to improve the models and the observations we feed into them to be able to predict the storms well in advance. we are extremely grateful to you for sharing that information with us, that knowledge. thank you very much forjoining us. back to hurricane florence now and we can speak to our correspondent — laura trevelyan is in wilmington in north carolina. joining me to talk about the impact on wilmington, north carolina, is the mayor. thank you forjoining us. tell us what impact this weather is having on wilmington. major impact,
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we have a rain event and a wind event and we have got a lot of low—lying areas flooded and a lot of downed power lines, trees. we will be without power for possibly ten days, we will have a lot of people especially in the inland areas that will need additional help to get out of their homes. and the unusual thing about this storm is it has been hovering over last and will do that for over two days. tell us about the geography of wilmington. we are on the coast but we also have all these rivers inland? we have the risk of flooding because we're sandwiched between the river and the ocean so we are in sandwiched between the river and the ocean so we are in this open in sailor. we have several beaches, north carolina beach and kerry beach and they will be covered in water as the storm surge comes over, anywhere from seven to 11 feet. in downtown
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wilmington along the river we expect it to crest at 25 feet on tuesday so this is going to be with us through tuesday of next week. it is a significant event for our community and we will have to deal with that for the next couple of days. you have lived here all your life, have you ever seen anything like this? not this size, the stormers 400 miles wide and moving it filed mph so miles wide and moving it filed mph so you could literally walk with it and that is why it took so long get through and it does not only impact wilmington but the state of south carolina and also city '5100 miles from us. they have a lot of rescues where people stay in their homes. they are being rescued because their river has come into the city, people are experiencing that in the city. we seem to be experiencing increasingly slow—moving hurricanes. is this to do with the changing climate? i am not a scientist or a
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meteorologist but i believe something is going on in the atmosphere. i have never seen storms like this, that seemed to stack up during the hurricane season like they do today and then the massive size of the storms and the amount of rain they are carrying and the amount of energy and there are very slow—moving. a amount of energy and there are very slow— moving. a lot amount of energy and there are very slow—moving. a lot of times people say, it isjust category one. the amount of rainfall that falls with it is incredible. that is something we do not deal with and it ends up killing more people afterwards, after the storm leaves and causes the flooding situation. can you tell our viewers what it is that we are experiencing right now, what stage of the hurricane as it makes progress? were getting through the eye of the hurricane so we have got through one half of it and we have to do with the other half of it, tropical storm winds of around 55—75 mph for the next several hours so we
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will be pounded by the scene for a couple more hours until it gets passed. then we will assess the overall damage as to what it matters for the community, we will be without flooding and power, let us clean up the roads for those folks that might be living in this area, in london or in england and coming back here, it will be maybe a couple of days before you can get back. do you have all the resources you need to fight this? i believe we have all the resources, they are ready to come, i got a call yesterday from the president and the governor and local representations in congress and they are ready to go so everybody is waiting for the storm to pass through and then determining where the assets will be best deployed. we will need all of it on the north and south coast. thank you so much for taking the time to join us on so much for taking the time to join us on the bbc news channel. thank you very much. that was the mayor of this community, which is being
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absolutely battered by hurricane florence. and it is a rainfall that isa florence. and it is a rainfall that is a big worry. you heard the mayor saying that the river that were next to, the cape fear river, it is expected to crest at 25 feet on tuesday. then the worst flooding will occur so this is only the beginning. thank you very much. laura trevelyan. in the hurricane, in wilmington. the inquest into the deaths of five people killed in the westminster terror attack last year is continuing at the old bailey. today focuses on the death of pc keith palmer. 0ur correspondent helen lee has been at that inquest — she described what happened this morning. they heard the issues concerning the attack on pc palmer on the day he was attacked. we heard in court distressing ordeal recordings of those who tried to help pc palmer as he was lying and dying on the ground after he was attacked by khalid masood and in those recordings
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a person can be heard saying that he was described as having him a weak pulse and losing blood. another can be heard urging pc palmer to fight for his life. this was to be the last photograph of him. he was killed not long after. this is the aftermath of the attack. pc palmer had been on duty and unarmed when khalid masood approached him. there was a struggle and khalid masood stabbed him. witnesses today have been describing what they saw. 0ne eyewitness who statement was read to court said as soon as the lights went up, it went from car accident to attack. antonia
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kerridge, a parliamentary assistant, was ina kerridge, a parliamentary assistant, was in a building opposite the palace. the police might collapse, the attacker went over to him and leaned down towards him and raised in life quite high. and she stabbed him two or three orfour times. i was looking away. it was more than once. he raised the knife up. khalid masood was then shot dead by officers. emergency services try to treat pc keith palmer at the scene. but he died from his injuries. an officer dedicated to his job, but he died from his injuries. an officer dedicated to hisjob, a father of a young daughter and husband. and a mild who the inquest heard was the public face of parliament. the hearing here continues this afternoon. you‘re watching afternoon live, these are our headlines. hurricane florence makes landfall on east coast of the united states, with high winds and torrential rain.
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5 million people are in the direct path of typhoon mangkhut, due to make landfall in the philippines. distressing and vivid footage of the moment pc keith palmer was stabbed outside parliament during last westminster attack. it has been shown at an inquest to the victims‘ deaths. in the sport, in the last few minutes kimi raikkonnen has clocked the fastest time in the second practice session ahead of the singapore grand prix. john bishop leader lewis hamilton was second fastest. britain‘s davis cup tie against uzbekistan is under way in glasgow, dan evans taking the first set in the tie—break against denis istomin. gb must wind to be seeded in the new davis cup format next year but are with out andy murray and kyle edmund. rugby league clubs have voted by a two thirds majority to scrap the super rates and returned to a conventional promotion
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and relegation system from 29. i will be back with more on the stories just after half past. —— from 2019. president trump‘s former campaign manager paul manafort is to plead guilty to charges of conspiracy against the united states and obstruction of justice. let‘s speak to gary 0‘donoghue. the two charges he agreed to plead guilty to are conspiring against united states, which is to do with not registering his work and not letting the authorities know that he was working on behalf of a foreign government here. in this case, an organisation in ukraine. the other charge relates to obstruction of justice and this is because while he was being investigated it turned out that he was attempting, according to authorities, to interfere with witnesses and he went to jail. his bail was cancelled and he went to
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jail injune and has been injail since. this is the second trial he has faced, he has already been dry in virginia and been found guilty on a number of counts relating to tax evasion, bank fraud and is already facing sentencing for that. this was a second trial he was facing in a district of columbia. the key question here is what we do not know about this big deal, which has to be agreed to by a judge, and that should be agreed to in the next 40 minutes, what we don‘t know is weather or not he has agreed to cooperate in a wider sense with authorities in order to have a number of the other charges dropped against him. that is a thing we hope to find out soon. the fraud charges, and after that was dealt with, president trump two twitter praising paul manafort. yes and this is a sort of underlying story to all of this. paul manafort was donald trump‘s campaign chairman during the
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2016 general election —— presidential election. these cases not against him are not to do with the investigation into collusion, alleged collusion between the trump campaign and russia. this around other issues that turned up during the special counsel‘s investigation. what some people believe is that paul manafort is helping but at some point the president will pardon him. from these convictions. convictions in virginia and these guilty pleas. and that will effectively meet he does not serve time in prison. that isa does not serve time in prison. that is a very big if and the president has not said he will do that. it is certainly something he thinks was in the realm of possibility. if he sta rts the realm of possibility. if he starts cooperating with the special counsel in terms of the investigation relating to the trump campaign, theni investigation relating to the trump campaign, then i suspect that would become less likely, the pardon. we will see what happens. there are a
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lot of unknowns at this stage but we know this trial was due to start, thejury know this trial was due to start, the jury selection was due to start on monday and the trial following monday. that seems as if it will be. how much pressure does this put on the wider trump team? it will create a certain amount of uncertainty, for sure! they will not know exactly what paul manafort is planning to say to the special counsel, if anything. 0ne say to the special counsel, if anything. one thing it will do use it will remove the prospect of a trial over the coming weeks in the run—up to the mid—term elections, which could have been pretty damaging for the republican party in general, the stuff being raked over everyday. even though the charges we re everyday. even though the charges were not directly related to the trump campaign, you have the prospect of a campaign chairman standing in the dock and listening to all of this testimony. that‘ll be a blessing in some senses or donald trump and the wider republican party. but the downside is what
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potential damage might be down the road if, and it is a big if, if he decides to cooperate more widely with robert mueller, the special counsel. gary, thank you. a protest by prison staff has been called off. members of their union, the poa, were demonstrating outside jails across england and wales in response to what they call "unprecedented" violence in prisons. the government had threatened to seek an injunction to end the action. but the protest has now been stopped following an agreement with the prisons minister rory stewart. the funeral has been held for four children who were murdered in a firebomb attack on their home in greater manchester. demi, brandon, lacie and lia pearson, who lived in walkden near salford, were aged between three and 15. their mother is still being treated for her injuries and wasnt able to attend the service. two men who targeted their home with petrol bombs last december have been jailed for life. a teenager, who murdered his stepmother with an axe and a samurai
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sword and tried to upload pictures of her body to the internet, has been sentenced to a minimum of 15 years in prison. 17—year—old reuben brathwaite pleaded guilty to murdering fiona scourfield, in what the judge called a "savage attack against a defenceless woman." after the attack braithwaite called the police confessing to her murder. in a victim impact statement ms scourfield‘s mum described her as the ‘apple of my eye‘ and preferred to see the good in everyone. two days after the archbishop of canterbury accused amazon "leeching off the taxpayer", it‘s been revealed that the church of england has shares in the online retailer. the church times claimed amazon was among the church‘s 20 biggest global investments last yea r. but a statement from the church of england said it considered the most effective way of seeking change was to be "in the room with these companies" as a shareholder. i‘m nowjoined by lily tomson, investor networks manager
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at shareaction, a charity that promotes responsible investment. welcome. how much credibility is there in the argument put forward by there in the argument put forward by the church of england that they are better off influencing as a shareholder within the company?” would say it is absolutely the best way forward for them, particularly on this issue. share action believes that if you want to engage companies effectively to change their practices on key issues, such as hacks, which the public are very concerned about, the best thing to do is to be in the room with them. instead of selling the shares when in reality another investor would buy the shares and probably be less concerned about the issue and not make any further changes. what evidence is there that the church of england intends to do it that way? they have a very impressive track record on engagement. relatively
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recently, share action, their pension board and a range of other investors coal—fi red pension board and a range of other investors coal—fired resolution against rio tinto, a major global mining company, looking at the continued support that rio tinto has given to large—scale trade bodies, lobbying associations, but often a bstra ct lobbying associations, but often abstract work around climate change. and by co—filing this resolution, which went to the agm, there is a huge amount of support their which has really put the pressure on them to change. that i‘m quite a number of other stories, on x mobil, at glen caught, they have previously engage companies to great effect. the other issue the archvillain raised —— archbishop raised by zero—hours contracts. some people we re very zero—hours contracts. some people were very happy working in the gig economy and don‘t necessarily want
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that sort of contract but of the church of england is trying to tackle that in a company like amazon, what pressure is at under to put its own house in order? there are cathedrals, church of england cathedrals, which advertise zero—hours contracts? cathedrals, which advertise zero-hours contracts? it is very encouraging that after this has come out in the press, there has been a very strong response by the church of england to change its strategy on this issue and addresses contracts. i cannot speak for the church of england there. but share action does a lot of work around workforce issues on the living wage. it is very promising to see that they are concerned about that issue. putting their house in order before the engage with amazon on it. how often is it financially in a shareholder‘s interest to push a company into paying more tax? away from zero—hours contracts? if that is what the shareholder feels is required? taxes -- tax is a
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reputational and an ethical issue and it is important that investors might be church of england should be carrying ethical issues at the forefront of their concerns and they are starting to make progress on tax issues. what we could be seeing his work such as filing resolutions, asking questions of the company agms and also speaking with the company directly. and what i hoped to see is a sensible time based escalation of that work so from initial conversations with amazon, work at the agm ‘s and suchlike towards escalating as needed, as the church of england have promised to around fossil fuels and the companies they hold. daley thompson, thank you for coming in. —— lily thompson. the journalist who interviewed the two russian men suspected of the salisbury novichok attack hung up on bbc newsnight, after being challenged about the manner of the interview. in their appearance on the state—run
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rt channel, the pair said they visited salisbury on the recommendation of friends. when asked by kirsty wark whether rt was a propaganda tool, margarita simonyan said: "your question to me seems like typical western propaganda" — and shortly afterwards, hung up. jon donnison reports. assassins or tourists? the government has named alexander petrov and ruslan boshirov as russian agents sent to salisbury to kill sergei skripal. but popping up on russian state—run television, they said otherwise. translation: what were you doing there? translation: our friends had been suggesting for a long time that visit this wonderful town. that we visit this wonderful town. salisbury? a wonderful town? yes. a tourist town. downing street has described the interview as "lies", "blatant fabrications" and an "insult to the public‘s intelligence".
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the bbc has spoken to the journalist who carried out the interview. i don‘t have any reasons to believe them, i don‘t know them, i haven‘t spent life with them, they are not my friends, but i have no more reasons to believe secret services who have been lying previously. you did watch the interview, didn‘t you? oh, i watched the interview. did you see my face? did you see the tone? you probably don‘t speak russian. i don't speak russian, but i also looked at the transcript. yeah. and the questions were quite obviously hard for them and made them nervous and, at some point, they even said something like, "we came here, we thought you would support us and you behave like we were having an investigation in the court," and i said, "i‘m not here to support you, "i‘m not your advocate, i‘m a journalist." some will see the interview, coming just a day after president putin suggested the men should speak publicly, as provocative. whether their accounts will ever be challenged in a british court seems unlikely.
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jon donnison, bbc news. there will be spells of wind and rain at times but also some dry weather. we have had some rain moving across north—western areas today but as we head through into the evening, that will fizzle away. most areas will be left dry with clear spells. not especially cold across southern areas, but parts of north—east scotland could get cold enough for a touch of frost. here tomorrow morning we will see spells of sunshine, actually across many central and eastern parts of the uk. it will cloud over from the west as the day wears on and we will see outbreaks of rain into northern ireland and perhaps western scotland with a strengthening breeze.
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temperatures ranging from 15 to 21. further north and west we will see wet and windy weather at times. this is bbc news — our latest headlines. hurricane florence has made landfall with high winds and heavy rain lashing the east coast of the united states. meanwhile thousands of people have begun evacuating from coastal areas of the philippines as a super typhoon brings powerful winds and torrential rain. prison officers took part in widespread protests over safety concerns due to inmate violence earlier today. the prison officers association warned of "unprecedented levels of violence" in jails. the church of england has said it will keep its shares in amazon, two days after the archbishop of canterbury said the firm was "leeching off the taxpayer". "distressing" and "vivid" footage of the moment pc keith palmer
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was stabbed outside parliament during last year‘s westminster attack has been shown at an inquest into the victims‘ deaths. sport now on afternoon live with hugh... jose mourinho has been fighting his corner once ain? yes, marcus rushford scored in two games over the break and jose mourinho was asked why some players are not playing as much as they could. he brought with him some statistics and it turns out no player over the age of 21 has played more competitive minute since marcus rushford since 2016. the man that‘s keeping
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marcus rashford out of the starting line—up is romelu lukaku. he supports his manager‘s strong character — speaking to bbc 0ne‘s football focus programme... lukaku saysjose deserves respect. people no side of who he is, a winner. what i like about him is he doesn't fake his emotions. when he is sad, he is sad, and when he is happy, he is happy. my relationship with him is cool. he is a family guy and he fights for his players but he is real so people need to appreciate that at least there are people who are real in this world like him. well united travel to watford tomorrow and mourinhojoked he‘d still be criticised for not playing rashford despite the fact he‘s suspended. and if you are a boxing fan there‘s a huge fight to forward to? yes, and i am.
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gennady golovkin of kazakhstan will be taking on the mexican, sowl ‘canelo‘ alvarez for the wba, wbc and ibo world middleweight titles in las vegas tomorrow night and particularly when it comes to golovkin it‘s a wonder he isn‘t more well known. 40 fights, zero defeats, only one draw. that was when the pair last met. it should be the highlight of the sporting weekend. this fight on saturday night will demonstrate once again how big boxing is and how important boxing is to the world in general. we strongly feel that canelo and triple g will deliver hopefully one of the best fights in recent years. boxing needs a knockout, whether it is canelo or golovkin, we need an
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exciting fight back and forth. punches and bunches, combinations, exciting every single round. if we get that fight on saturday night, boxing is back. it‘s a fight you can hear on radio 5live — live from las vegas from four o‘clock on sunday morning. kimi raikkonen has clocked the fastest time in second practice at the singapore grand prix. ferrari‘s raikkonen led lewis hamilton‘s mercedes byjust 0.011 seconds. hamilton‘s title rival sebastian vettel was ninth after hitting the wall and damaging his car‘s right rear corner. britain‘s davis cup tie against uzbekistan is under way in glasgow. dan evans took the first set in a tie—break against denis istomin. gb must win to be seeded in next year‘s new davis cup format. gb are without both andy murray and kyle edmund. what‘s been described as a ‘civil war‘ in rugby league appears to be over.
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the majority of clubs have voted to scrap the super 8s from next season and go back to a conventional promotion and relegation system. 0ur rugby league correspondent dave woods explained the changes to me. the super league clubs were against it, the majority — 11 of the 12, because they said it was too volatile. essentially they have a regular season and at the end of that they split into a top eight for the play—off for the grand final and the bottom four play the top four for an extended relegation and promotion play—off and that is the volatility the super leagues didn‘t like, that four teams per year could be relegated. and a change to something more familiar? it is a format the game has had before, but now there will only be the bottom team relegated and the top team from the championship promoted, and it will be a top five play—off for the grand final instead of the top eight, which favours the teams that finished first and second in terms of reaching
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the old trafford finale, that showpiece in october. that‘s all the sport for now. we will have more for you in the next hour. a performer in the musical "42nd street" has made west end history by becoming the first to take on a role in the west end as a job—share. charlene ford gave birth to her son six months ago, and this week she returned to the production on a job share withjenny legg, the performer who had covered her maternity leave. let‘s speak now to charlene and jenny, who are here with me in the studio. you have just done your shows, how was it getting back on stage? you have just done your shows, how was it getting back on stage7m you have just done your shows, how was it getting back on stage? it was a big shock to the body. my first show was monday evening, then tuesday evening and two shows on wednesday so waking up on thursday morning was quite a shock. jenny, where did this idea come from?m has sort of been put into the pot by
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equity, our union, and lots of people have been talking about it for so long and trying to make it work because it could be huge with what we do. i find it's staggering that in the west end this has never been tried before. 0ther theatrical productions have done something similar. yes, matthew bourne has done this with his company, a ballet company, a dance company, for touring productions and long seasons in london so he has already put this to play which is amazing. alongside 42nd st doing this, wicked are on board with this job share as well, so hopefully we are starting to get movement of it and it is possible. more productions will begin to start it. jenny, how difficult was it to convince the powers that the that
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this was a sensible workable idea? luckily, charlene and i were in contact with each other before we put it to them so we discovered that we had four sets of costumes, hats and gloves we would share, we knew the show and there was nothing really that would have been in the way of them saying let's do it. but it is always going to be a difficult question to ask produces. especially when it hasn‘t been done before. yes, it's always going to be difficult to put that to them but luckily we managed to make that happen. what will it mean to your family, the fact you can work in this way? i feel lucky it has been agreed because after having a baby nothing can prepare you for how life changes and i am loving being a
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mother and i also love myjob and what i do, and i have been doing it professionally for 14 years so the idea of finishing performing just because i have had a baby were something i didn‘t want to accept. with the job something i didn‘t want to accept. with thejob share something i didn‘t want to accept. with the job share i get the best of both worlds. what was in it for you, jenny? you were covering for charlene while she was on maternity leave. i am at an age where hopefully in a few years i will be thinking of having a family as well so thinking of having a family as well sol thinking of having a family as well so i think on this occasion it has maybe helped i am the age i am and i understand the importance of it. it also gives me a couple of days off in the week to do the other things i do, to establish myself better as a teacher or to go and do something completely different. it is the best of both worlds, and eight shows on 42nd st is hard. physically it is
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demanding anyway, and this is a physical show so that‘s why i pushed to get thejob physical show so that‘s why i pushed to get the job share because i thought looking after a newborn baby alongside doing the eight shows a week, coming back late at night, sleepless nights with the newborn baby, i didn‘t think it would be possible sale i have the confidence to try and push for what i believed could happen. that was the agreement we had anyway because i have always been charlene's maternity cover so had she come back full time i was expecting to have left the show. it is nice i don't have too because it is nice i don't have too because it is such a wonderful show to be part of and it's a wonderful thing that's happening now to be part of well. and jenny being so supportive and on—board from the get go, the first conversation we had had we hadn‘t
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worked together, jenny doesn‘t owe me anything so you have been amazing and supportive from the beginning. ifjenny wasn‘t on board with it, it might not have happened. you do find that people who have these part—time arrangements will work really hard to make it work because it is in your interests so what would your advice be to other people who would like to do what you are doing? first of all have the confidence to ask in the first place to push and believe it‘s possible. the first place to push and believe it's possible. if you don't ask you don't get in what we do for a living and actually nine times out of ten if you ask it works in your favour. there is an organisation called pa rents there is an organisation called parents in performing arts and they are encouraging and talking to more theatres to get on board with flexible working and job share is so hopefully this is the first of many. you won‘t necessarily have spotted
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while we were talking but we just saw a picture ofjensen, your baby, onstage, and we saw him when he was still a bump second ago. already on tv, not bad for a six—month—old! thank you and good luck with it. thank you and good luck with it. thank you. more than one in five children in england are helping to look after an ill or disabled member of their family, according to research carried out by the bbc and the university of nottingham — a far higher number than previously thought. caring for a family member can involve anything from housework to helping someone get into and out of bed, or providing them with their medication. ricky boleto has been to meet one family in blackpool. at the top we‘ve got our mum and dad. then we‘ve got anna. she‘s the oldest and helps cook sometimes with abi, which is the second oldest. third oldest is ellen, which shares a room with me. the fourth oldest is 0wen, and he‘s got his own room
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and then i‘m the youngest. poppy is nine years old. she‘s a young carer. along with her brother and sisters, they look after their dad. i can put his slippers on when he needs them, or i can take his pills up and help mum organise them. and what‘s it like looking after dad ? sometimes, it can be a bit upsetting, because he can be sick sometimes. andrew is unable to walk. he is awaiting surgery on his back and now suffers from extreme anxiety, which has left him bedbound. his partner, tina, gave up work to look after him but she says she can‘t do it alone. if it wasjust me and andrew, probably be really hard, because then i don't have anybody that i can rely on to help me, really. before and after school, the children cook and clean. there is little time for anything else. i have to help the kids with their homework and read books and make their dinner, because i‘m just used to doing it now.
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but sometimes it is, like, a bit hard. it‘s also hard for the youngest member of the family. is it sometimes difficult at school, because maybe some of your friends don‘t know what you do at home, i suppose? yeah. what do you tell them? i don‘t really tell them anything about what i do at home now. really knead it. once a week, the family does get a break, here at the blackpool carers‘ centre, a charity working in partnership with blackpool council. in the last five years, new legislation was brought in, giving more rights to young carers in england. all over the uk, children are now legally entitled to help from their local council. an assessment measures the impact caring on a relative has on a young person, but the level of support is different depending on where you live. in some areas, very, very little support, and actually, the duty is to assess need rather than actually support children, which feels very uncomfortable and, for me, doesn‘t always make sense.
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whereas in some areas, you‘ve got children who will have support in school and for those children, they say it makes all the difference. charities are now calling for that same level of support for all young carers, to help those children who need it the most. ricky boleto, bbc news. all this week, we‘ve been reporting on the tenth anniversary of the collapse of lehman brothers bank in new york, which unleashed the global financial crisis. spain was particularly badly hit — a building boom funded by reckless borrowing rapidly gave way to a bust that cut growth and costjobs. 0ur europe correspondent kevin connolly went back to madrid to look for signs of recovery. not far from bustling madrid, a ghostly spanish road to nowhere. a stretch of highway left unfinished at a time when businesses were losing their money and bankers were losing their nerve. there are ghost towns of empty houses, too, nearby,
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but in some of these, signs of change. in once deserted valdeluz, the mayor says public money spent on schools and sports facilities is bringing people in. valdeluz was empty. valdeluz, six years ago, was a ghost city. but now it is a star city. we changed the perception of the outside people. but spain‘s recovery is patchy. this community group in madrid campaigns against banks that repossess homes when families can‘t pay their mortgages. they say the poor are being punished for mistakes made by bankers and politicians. i‘m sure things have not been fixed at all. people are losing their houses and are fighting for their rights. the depression of the 1930s still haunts spain, too.
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its new leftist government wants to remove from this memorial site the remains of franco, the dictator who ruled as fascism prospered. there will be nothing like this to mark the fallout of the first financial crisis of the 21st century. the consequences were less violent, less profound. but there were changes on the left and the right in european politics, and it‘s possible that the final consequences are stilljust working their way through the system. high streets have ticked over as public money has propped up the banking system and borrowing has been cheap. but some economists warn that policies meant to fix the last crisis could yet trigger the next one. there is an old spanish saying that goes... he speaks spanish. a pessimist is a
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well—informed optimist. you say "when" we have the crisis, not if. that‘s right, when, not if, because i‘m sadly sure that we will have another crisis. ten years on, spain can at least see a road to recovery. but this highway to nowhere is a reminder that uncertainty as well as opportunity lies in the future. ina in a moment we will hear about the business news. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live: hurricane florence makes landfall on east coast of the united states, with high winds and torrential rain. five million people are in the direct path of typhoon mangkhut, due to make landfall in the philippines. "distressing" and "vivid" footage of the moment pc keith palmer was stabbed outside parliament during last year‘s westminster attack has been shown at an inquest into the victims‘ deaths.
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here‘s your business headlines on afternoon live. sports direct boss mike ashley has accused its shareholders of stabbing him and the company in the back. he said they had failed to support him and chairman keith hellawell, who resigned on wednesday. the bank of england governor, mark carney, says it‘s hisjob "not to hope for the best but to prepare for the worst" after brexit. in a speech in ireland he said he had tested the country‘s banks for a no—deal brexit scenario with mortgage rates spiralling, a plunging pound and house prices crashing 35%. british steel has announced that it will cut 400 managerial, professional and administrative roles across its uk, ireland, france and netherlands operations "as part of the company‘s ongoing transformation." so mr carney been saying
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about house prices crashing 35% in a no—deal brexit? he has put the stress test on uk banks and that involves in his view and no deal wrecks it could in the worst case involves 35% collapse on house prices, could involve the pound collapsing as well. but it is not a forecast? no, it is the test they put into the banking system to see if the banks could withstand the worst case scenario. this is how he explained it. as you expect from the moment of the
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referendum, once the decision was made we have been working on making sure that our institutions, those that we continue to supervise, are prepared for contingencies and central to that has been stress testing those institutions to very severe outcomes and i mean very severe. a recession where monetary policy credibility is lost and therefore interest rates have to rise at the same time the economy slows dramatically, that there is dramatic house price falls, losses associated with that, all the correlated risk you need to have quite a big shock. that is not a prediction of what is going to happen but that is what you need to do in orderto happen but that is what you need to do in order to make sure that in the better states of the world the syste m better states of the world the system is very clearly and transparently ready for them, and
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able to continue to be part of the solution and not part of the problem. mark carney, the governor of the bank of england. jamie, i‘ve a lwa ys of the bank of england. jamie, i‘ve always thought you looked like a man who knows a thing or to about fashion. i've always thought you looked like someone who needs glasses! and only reading what it says here. some people are worried brexit could affect the fashion industry seriously. 0ne talks about fashion as if it is something we do occasionally but it is big, it is £20 million worth of business that goes on. actually some people think it is worth a lot more than that. it is part of the great creative industries of the uk. the other thing that is going on this week is
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the environmental side of it. there‘s no fur this week. it has gone out of fashion, so it is to do with the different environmental awareness and cruelty to animals. we have different feelings as the decades go by. we can talk to the chair of the british fashion council. stephanie phair. it isa it is a big theme, isn‘t it? it is a big theme, isn't it? yes, it is something all fashion businesses are looking at in and including in their business plans. we have a strea m their business plans. we have a stream that goes through the work we do called positive fashion and it‘s about giving designer businesses the information they need and guidance to make ethical choices, to think
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about their businesses in sustainable ways and to be educated and get guidance on what choices to make to be sustainable businesses. there is an environmental audit committee looking into the sustainability of british fashion. do you think things are changing within the industry? it is changing and we are seeing that there is a cultural shift. designers are changing how they choose to produce and manufacture and the shift is coming from a consumer led change, a younger demographic, a millennial audience thinking about mission and purpose. we have seen the results of this fashion week as the first fashion week that is fur free. the other thing is brexit. fashion designers do not like it, one survey i have seen says 90% of designers
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voted to remain. do you think it could be quite damaging to this industry which is big in this country? the fashion industry is big. the latest figures released by 0xford economics calculate the fashion industry contributes 32 billion to the uk economy, that is on par with the telecoms industry, and it employs close to 900,000 people which is equal to the financial services industry. if you think about the depth and breadth of the industry and how it works with goods manufacturing, movement of people, and talent, it is a complex industry and the challenges around brexit are difficult. we are having conversations with government to provide a channel to try and assess what it is that it could do to impact the industry. stefanie, thank
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you. it‘s interesting, one thinks of it isa you. it‘s interesting, one thinks of it is a lightweight industry but it is big. a huge number of people employed in one form or another. let‘s take a look at the forecast. seems like the one behind me are pa rt seems like the one behind me are part of our weekend weather story because there will be some spells of wind and rain at times but some dry weather as well and parts of the southeast will see very little rain. we have had some rain moving across north—western areas today but as we head through into the evening, that will fizzle away. most areas will be left dry with clear spells. not especially cold across southern areas, but parts of north—east scotland could get cold enough for a touch of frost. here tomorrow morning we will see spells of sunshine, actually across many central and eastern parts of the uk. it will cloud over from the west as the day wears on and we will see outbreaks of rain into northern ireland and perhaps western scotland with a strengthening breeze. temperatures ranging from 15 to 21.
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those temperatures in the south will climb further into the start of next week. further north and west we will see wet and windy weather at times. hello, you‘re watching afternoon live — i‘m martine croxall at 4pmm. hurricane florence makes landfall on the east coast of the united states, with high winds and torrential rain — a state governor urges people to remain calm. surviving this storm will be a test of endurance, teamwork, common—sense and patience. meanwhile, 5 million people are in the direct path of typhoon mangkhut, due to make landfall in the philippines. "distressing" footage of the moment pc keith palmer was stabbed outside parliament during last year‘s westminster attack has been shown at an inquest into the victims‘ deaths. president trump‘s former campaign manager paul manafort agrees to plead guilty to two
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criminal counts as part of a deal with special counsel robert mueller. coming up on afternoon live — all the sport with hugh woozencroft. jose mourinho leaping to his own defence again? facts only today as jose mourinho makes it very clear that marcus rashford is not being underused in his team. we have other football news, rugby league and davis cup tennis to come in around about half an hour. thanks hugh, and we‘ll bejoining you for a full update just after half—past. ben has all the weather. relatively speaking the uk weather is quiet for this weekend. we will see cloudy, wet conditions at times for parts of the south—east —— but parts of the south—east will stay dry all weekend long. more details later in the programme. also coming up — a special award for the man who rescued the boys trapped in a cave in thailand from the scout association.
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that‘s in half an hour in news nationwide. hello. this is afternoon live. i‘m martine croxall. hurricane florence has made landfall on the us east coast, knocking out power to nearly half a million homes and causing buildings to crumble. and it may be set to drench the state of north carolina with around ten trillion gallons of rain over the next week — that‘s the prediction of one american meteorologist. the hurricane‘s destructive winds hit the coast at about 95 miles an hour, causing widespread damage and flooding. a storm surge has reached nearly ten feet in some places. laura trevelyan is on the north carolina shore — this is her report. dramatic scenes as the leading edge of hurricane florence reaches the north carolina coast. rain and wind pummel the barrier islands
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exposed to the atlantic, then move on. this huge slow—moving storm is now so wide, that it‘s threatening the south—east coast of the us, from the carolinas to georgia. north carolina‘s governor is warning that conditions are only going to deteriorate. people inland could be threatened, too. the first bands of the storm are upon us. but we have days more to go. wind and waves are driving sea water through some coastal streets like rivers. surviving this storm will be a test of endurance, team work, common—sense and patience. there are fears that millions could be without power across the coastal south—east of the us, as the triple hazard of hurricane force winds, storm surge and flooding
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become a reality. many have fled their homes, seeking shelter inland, from the vulnerable elderly, to the very young. while most people in mandatory evacuation zones have left, some are determined to see out the storm. my family and everyone has evacuated pretty much, except for my wife and i, but we are setting up crews now to deal with the aftermath which may take weeks. the track of hurricane florence once it makes landfall is uncertain. but a sustained and damaging assault on the coastline from wind and water is intensifying. in a moment we‘ll be hearing from our correspondent, laura trevelyan, in north carolina. meanwhile, there‘s a major storm on the other side of the world as well. hundreds of thousands of people are having to leave their homes on luzon in the philippines, as typhoon mangkhut approaches with winds of more than 160 mph.
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the typhoon is due to make landfall on the north of the main island over the weekend. alexandra mckenzie has the latest. several million people are in the direct path of this potentially deadly storm. typhoon mangkhut is due to make landfall on the northern tip of the main island of luzon by tomorrow. thousands of people have moved inland from the vulnerable coastal areas, and are doing whatever they can to protect their belongings and their livelihood. this woman said they are terrified. she said they fear for their homes, as this typhoon is much stronger than the last one. the philippines endures about 20 typhoons and storms each year. forecasters say mangkhut is the strongest so far in 2018. it is more than 500 miles in diameter,
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with sustained winds of 160mph. transport has been disrupted, schools shut, and the army is on standby. preparation is already underway for a vital relief effort. officials say this typhoon may cause floods and landslides, with extensive damage expected to infrastructure and crops. and people are seeking refuge wherever they can. some families have come to this makeshift evacuation centre. they hope they have found a place of safety, away from the worst of what‘s been described as a supertyphoon. alexandra mckenzie, bbc news. well, a little earlier bill saffo, the mayor
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of wilmington in north carolina, spoke to my colleague laura trevelyan and began by explain what impact the hurricane is having on the the city. we have a rain event and a wind event and we have got a lot of low—lying areas flooded and a lot of downed power lines, trees. we will be without power for possibly ten days, we will have a lot of people especially in the inland areas that will need additional assistance to get out of their homes. and the unusual thing about this storm is it has been hovering over us and will do that for over two days. tell us about the geography of wilmington. we are on the coast but we also have all these rivers inland? we have the risk of flooding because we're sandwiched between the river and the ocean so we are in this open araa.
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we have several beaches, north carolina beach and kerry beach and they will be covered in water as the storm surge comes over, anywhere from seven to 11 feet. in downtown wilmington along the river we expect it to crest at 25 feet on tuesday so this is going to be with us through tuesday of next week. it is a significant event for our community and we will have to deal with that for the next couple of days. you have lived here all your life, have you ever seen anything like this? not this size, the storm is 400 miles wide and moving it filed mph —— at 5 mph. so you could literally walk with it and that is why it took so long get through and it does not only impact wilmington but the state of south carolina and also cities 100 miles from us. they have a lot of rescues where people stay in their homes. they are being rescued because their river has come into the city, people are experiencing that in the city.
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we seem to be experiencing increasingly slow—moving hurricanes. is this to do with the changing climate? i am not a scientist or a meteorologist but i believe something is going on in the atmosphere. i have never seen storms like this, that seem to stack up during the hurricane season like they do today and then the massive size of the storms and the amount of rain they are carrying and the amount of energy and they are very slow—moving. a lot of times people say, it isjust category 1. the amount of rainfall that falls with it is incredible. that is something, if we do not deal with, it ends up killing more people afterwards, after the storm leaves and causes the flooding situation. we can hear from the governor of...
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we can hear from the governor of... we have the secretary of the north carolina department of transportation and we have colonel glenn mcneill, the commander of the north carolina highway patrol. we have albie lewis, the female coordinating officer, and grace check, the femur director and major—general greg lusk of the national guard for north carolina and lady brittan of the united states coastguard. these are standing with me today and we have more partners all over the state. we begin with a report from mike of merchant management. the operation continues to operate at level one and the impacts to the state from hurricane florence are significant and will continue to be significant. 0ur operations and logistics teams are on standby to the surge to have
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packed —— impact areas for days and we have a significant amount of aviation assets to accomplish various types of mission once it is good to fly again. we continue to focus on shelter operations and we really thank our local partners for stepping up to assist and shelter their fellow north carolina residents from hurricane florence. it means so much to so many and once the storm passes we will work with our outstanding mass feeding partners to establish kitchens and other feeding operations throughout the impacted area. we will closely monitor our rivers and have been sharing flood analysis tools with our county partners. please make sure you follow the guidance of a local officials and please be sure that you are staying tuned to your local media as we do expect historical flooding throughout the state. there is so much. this
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press co nfe re nce state. there is so much. this press conference is taking place in north carolina to update people on the provision is being put in place by authorities to keep everybody safe and out of harm‘s way as hurricane florence makes its self felt. with us is ben rich, our weather presenter. what i have found notable about this particular hurricane is just how slowly it is moving and that is part of why it is so powerful? that is a huge part of the problem and we have heard this a couple of times in what we have watched. it is moving at walking pace and it looks like the storm is moving at something like three or four miles per hour. it is not going anywhere quickly and as places where it is raining heavily it will continue to do so from any hours. in some places it will rain from any days so it is the slow—moving nature of the storm that is the big issue. look at the satellite image, it shows the storm as it was approaching the coastline, quite a slow approach and if you squint you
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can see the eye of the storm. the swirling bands of cloud. what i will show you is the radar picture. this shows with the rain has already been falling and you will see away that rain isjust piling in, particularly to north carolina, you can see that i have the storm close to wilmington. around about 12:15pm our time. bands of rain spiralling into the same places for many hours and the same places for many hours and the storm will drift so slowly down that east coast of the us, into parts of south carolina. but the rainbow go on and the wind is still around about 80 mph in the centre so this is a downgrade in terms of the wind but still damaging wind and rain will be the big issue. 0ne metre of rain in some places, catastrophic flooding likely. and millions in the philippines are embracing —— bracing themselves to cope with this super typhoon? yes, a violent typhoon as it is categorised
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by the japanese radiological agency and look at the satellite, whenever you see the eye of the storm as clearly as that it shows the storm really m ea ns clearly as that it shows the storm really means business. it is approaching the far north of liaison and will track the part —— across those parts of the philippines, not far away from landfall right now. it has stronger wind than the hurricane in the usa and is moving more quickly so there will be more issues with wind damage and will still bring three or 400 millilitres of rain and as you can see, it is then going to track towards southern china. the philippines will not wea ken china. the philippines will not weaken the storm hugely, plenty of warm ocean to keep fuelling it so places close to hong kong need to keep a close eye on that over the weekend. thank you very much. a man has been sentenced to 13 years after being found guilty of conspiring with five others to con 170 investors out of £2.8 million pounds.
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michael nascimento ran a call centre where investors were told their money would go into shares in businesses such as a property development in madeira. andy verity reports. my my mother sold the family home. dave, not his real name, was conned out of his life savings, leaving him and his mum ruined. he was great at line, that was lying, really good at lying. this is one of the criminals are cold dave and others, counting his ill gotten gains. forfour years michael neser men to run a so—called boiler room, a call centre or high—pressure tactics are used to get investors to buy shares in companies with plausible sounding names like morgan forbes or morgan dilley and read. there were promising investors involvement in $20 opposite and nick faldo designed golf course. and supported by local banks and global hotel chains. none
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of which was true, it was a pack of lies. and investors fell for it. glossy brochures promised to double your money, sent from a real address. docklands business centre, that sounds respectable? by canary wharf, where all those well—known banks are. in fact, the business centre is here. in a modest residential area 15 minutes walk from canary residential area 15 minutes walk from ca nary wharf residential area 15 minutes walk from canary wharf —— canary wharf. four years ago the regulators raided the offices and why they rehear the fraudsters were trying to hide the evidence. while investigators were downstairs, in other offices upstairs, massimo diplo is my personal assistant claimed the red chairand personal assistant claimed the red chair and hoisted a computer into a ceiling panel, she later told investigators it was part of a clear desk policy. last week she was sentenced to two and a half years for assisting in this fraud. the essay a later found out the money had gone into arsenal season tickets, school fees and a trip to thorpe park, with this picture was
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taken. today, michael nassamento is going down. joining five co—conspirators behind bars. andy verity is at southwark crown court. what happened ? verity is at southwark crown court. what happened? michael nassamento stood in the witness box weeping as a judge read out a long passage attacking him and condemning his behaviour, talking about serious offences of fraud or related to fraud and talking about how through a period over the last four years mr nassamento devoted himself to the pursuit of riches through fraud. you we re pursuit of riches through fraud. you were selling them up up and you knew it but you are very adept at pretending otherwise. he singled out the targeting of elderly investors as despicable. some of whom took to madeira and met them. you are quite prepared to ruin them to be even you are meeting them face to face and pretending friendship. you‘re
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clearly a mild who was happy not just to defraud people from a distance the people you are looking at in the eye. nassamento was given at in the eye. nassamento was given a sentence of 13 years. thank you very much, andy verity. you‘re watching afternoon live — these are our headlines... hurricane florence makes landfall on east coast of the united states, with high winds and torrential rain. 5 million people are in the direct path of typhoon mangkhut, due to make landfall in the philippines. "distressing" and "vivid" footage of the moment pc keith palmer was stabbed outside parliament during last year‘s westminster attack has been shown at an inquest into the victims‘ deaths. and we will hear from economic researchers who have won the ignoble is for work on the use of voodoo dolls! —— ignoble as. kimi raikkonnen clocks fastest time in the second practice session of the singapore grand prix. championship leader lewis hamilton was second quickest. britain‘s davis cup tie
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against uzbekistan is under in glasgow, dan evans taking the first set but he trails 2—1 against denis istomin. great britain website andy murray and kyle edmund and they must wind to be seeded in next year ‘s new davis cup format. and celtic striker leigh griffiths has signed a new four—year contract with the scottish premiership champions, he scored his 100th goalfor scottish premiership champions, he scored his 100th goal for the club last month and says he is targeting ten titles in a row. celtic have already won the title in the past seven seasons. i will have more just after half past... the inquest into the deaths of five people killed in the westminster bridge terror attack is continuing at the old bailey. today it‘s been focused on pc keith palmer, who was stabbed to death by khalid masood in march last year. the coroner has heard there were "issues" concerning the lack of armed officers near pc palmer when he was attacked. 0ur correspondent helena lee is at the old bailey. we have been hearing this afternoon
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in court some of those police officers who were close to where pc palmer was attacked and the witness box at the moment, pc doug glaze, who was close by. he described to the court how he saw the attacker approaching him and he told the court that i noticed a very large mild with two extremely large knives, one in each hand, and he went on to say he was walking like a robot. his hands moving up and down. he then went on to say that he thought there were multiple attackers in the area and he said that i remember thinking, we are going to die. earlier in court, we heard extremely harrowing footage and audio recordings of the desperate voices of those people who try to save pc palmer as he was
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lying on the pavement, dying. and one mild in the recording was urging pc palmer to fight for his life. the court was shown this photograph of pc keith palmer at the start of the inquest this morning. taken by an american tourist, outside the palace of westminster, it was to be the last photograph of him. he was killed not long after. this is the aftermath of the attack. pc palmer had been on duty and unarmed when khalid masood approached him. there was a struggle, masood then stabbed him. witnesses today have been describing what they saw. 0ne eyewitness whose statement was read to court said as soon as the knives went up, it went from car accident to attack. antonia kerridge, a parliamentary assistant, was in a building opposite the palace. sshe told the court "the policeman had collapsed. the attacker ran over to him, and just leaned down towards him and raised the knife quite high.
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and hejust stabbed him. two or three or four times. i was looking away, it was more than once. he raised the knife up. masood was then shot dead by officers." emergency services tried to treat pc keith palmer at the scene but he died from his injuries. an officer dedicated to hisjob, a father of a young daughter, and a husband. the inquest also heard that he was a public face of parliament. the hearing continues this afternoon with further evidence from those police officers who saw what happened. thank you very much, helena lee. president trump‘s former campaign manager, paul manafort, has agreed to plead guilty to two criminal counts in the investigation by special counsel robert mueller, according to court documents released today. we can go straight to washington —
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and our correspondent, gary 0‘donoghue is following the latest. he has appeared in court, then? the hearing has just got under way and hearing has just got under way and he pled guilty to these two accounts that have been, boiled down to separate cars, conspiracy against the united states and conspiracy to obstruct justice. the the united states and conspiracy to obstructjustice. the first relates to his work on behalf of of ukrainian political party, a pro—political party. he was getting stories, effectively, planted in the united states and lobbying us officials on behalf of of this ukrainian party without registering asa ukrainian party without registering as a foreign agent. the second applies to obstructing justice and applies to obstructing justice and applies to obstructing justice and applies to his attempts, according to the prosecution, to interfere with witnesses in his run—up to the trial which meant his bail was
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revoked at the beginning of the summer so he has been injail since june. this is the second trial that paul manafort has been through, he was convicted in virginia of eight separate counts of tax evasion and banking fraud and this was going to another trial, politically sensitive in the sense it is running up to the mid—term elections, but the deal has been done. we do not know the crucial point about their — the extent to which he has agreed to cooperate with the special counsel, robert mueller, in his wider investigation into alleged collusion between russia and the troubled campaign. is that part of this deal or is it not? we do not yet know that. and that uncertainty will cause the discomfort to the wider president trump team? and some. they are very concerned president trump team? and some. they are very concerned about what people like paul manafort might say. he was a campaign chairman for six months and he knew a lot about what was going on and he was a chairman through the period where, for
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example, the meeting took place in trump tower between those proxies for the russian government and various members of the trump campaign. he was around at that stage. they will worry about what he might say to the special counsel in connection to that. the other big uncertainty of course is the idea has been floated that he will not do that because he feels he may get a pardon from president trump, bearing in mind that presidents can without any justification or argument pardon people for federal crimes. and the president has done that a couple of times already. in the 18 months in charge... it was a pardon, how would that help mr trump? it would not help him after the fact but what it might do with the prospect of it might do with the prospect of it might do with the prospect of it might do is encourage someone like paul manafort not to cooperate too much and not to help the special
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counsel ahead of time. it is a gamble if you are someone like paul manafort, unless you feel you have been given some sort of concrete assurance. we don‘t know any of this, this is speculation, but that is away in which the pardon can help. it can be —— keep people quiet if there is a prospect in the future. thank you very much, gary 0‘donoghue, in washington. don‘t forget, you can let us know what you think. tweet us using the hashtag #afternoonlive. all the ways to contact us on screen right now. time for a look at the weather. and that was not simon mccoy! i would hate to be mistaken! there is literally no mistaken! we have talked about the hurricanes in the atla ntic talked about the hurricanes in the atlantic and the typhoon in the pacific and is another storm in the emphatic that will not be a hurricane any more but will impact our own weather into next week. i will tell you about that. but we
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have the weekend to get through first. it is not looking particularly appealing? this picture was sent in by one of our weather watchers and we have some cloudy, wet weather today but that is about half of the story. there will be dry weather as well and some of us, particularly in the south—east, will stay completely dry. the other story this afternoon? i willjust talk more about that! that's all right! all the details for the weekend... in terms of headlines, it looks like this. we will see some rain at times through the weekend, some breezy conditions. confirmation of what we we re conditions. confirmation of what we were talking about. the driest weather in the south and east. this is how it looked earlier on on the satellite and radar, bands of rain sinking their way south eastwards and sunny skies in between. it stayed largely dry across the south eastern areas and as we go into the evening, those are the we have ending the day. and
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the rain well for the most part fade away and we will see largely dry conditions overnight with clear, starry skies overhead. 0ne conditions overnight with clear, starry skies overhead. one or two showers continuing but it is for some going to turn into quite a chilly night as you can see from these shades on the temperature chart. parts of scotland will get quite cool and 4 degrees in aberdeen, colder in the countryside. not as cold further south, we have further cloud in northern ireland and the north—west of england. many places start tomorrow fine and dry with sunshine and north—east scotla nd with sunshine and north—east scotland and south—east england holding onto the sunshine longest. things gliding overfrom holding onto the sunshine longest. things gliding over from the west with wet and blustery weather for northern ireland and western scotla nd northern ireland and western scotland later and temperatures around 15—20d. in the second half of the weekend the high—pressure dries to hold on across the south—east so we will have the driest weather here but these frontal systems are pushing from the north—west, bringing outbreaks of rain elsewhere and tracking south east wales but
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with uncertainty about just and tracking south east wales but with uncertainty aboutjust how much progress those weather fronts will make. we are likely to have rain moving out of northern ireland into northern england and wales and perhaps fringing into the midlands and maybe the south—west. the south—east, 23 degrees, still cooler across north—western areas for the time being and this is what i was talking about. this area of low pressure was hurricane heather lind. it will not be a hurricane as it heads in our direction but it will bea heads in our direction but it will be a deep area of high pressure. still firming up on the details but most likely this will head towards the western side of the uk, bringing outbreaks of rain and potentially windy weather but it was a hurricane and is tropical air within this so we will bring that in our direction as well, particularly for eastern and southern areas. temperatures in the side into the middle 20s for a time as we head towards the middle of the week and further north and west, blustery wind and outbreaks of rain. more details on the weather in
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the uk and the world weather on the bbc weather website... this is bbc news — our latest headlines. hurricane florence has made landfall with high winds and heavy rain lashing the east coast of the united states. meanwhile, thousands of people have begun evacuating from coastal areas of the philippines as a super typhoon brings powerful winds and torrential rain. prison officers took part in widespread protests over safety concerns due to inmate violence earlier today. the prison officers association warned of "unprecedented levels of violence" in jails. president trump‘s former campaign
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manager paul manafort agrees to plead guilty to two criminal counts in the investigation by special counsel robert mueller. "distressing" and "vivid" footage of the moment pc keith palmer was stabbed outside parliament during last year‘s westminster attack has been shown at an inquest into the victims‘ deaths. sport now on afternoon live with hugh. jose mourinho has been fighting his corner again? good afternoon. jose has been keen on his stats of late... three premier league titles — jose has won more of them than the other 19 top flight managers put together. and there is more... after marcus rashford‘s goalscoring exploits for england
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in the international window. the man utd boss was asked about the amount of playing time he‘s given the 20—year—old. the forward has played 5,744 minutes in 105 games in all competitions. more than any other under 21 player in the premier league during that time. you can‘t faultjose‘s maths. the man that‘s keeping marcus rashford out of the starting line—up is romelu lukaku. he supports his manager‘s strong character — speaking to bbc 0ne‘s football focus programme... lukaku saysjose deserves respect. people know side of him which is who he is — a winner. what i like about him is he doesn't fake his emotions. when he is mad, you know he is mad, and when he is happy, he is happy. my relationship with him is cool. he is a family guy and he fights for his players, but he is real. so people need to appreciate that — at least there are people who are real in this world like him. so what you see is what you get.
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so what you see is what you getm is so nice to see footage of him smiling for a change! and if you are a boxing fan there is a big fight to look forward to? yes, they are not household names. gennady golovkin of kazakhstan will be taking on the mexican, sowl ‘canelo‘ alvarez for the wba, wbc and ibo world middleweight titles in las vegas tomorrow night. particularly when it comes to golovkin, it‘s a wonder he isn‘t more well known. 40 fights, zero defeats, only one draw. that was when the pair last met. it should be the highlight of the sporting weekend... this fight on saturday night will demonstrate once again how big boxing is and how important boxing is to the world in general. we strongly feel that canelo
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and triple g will deliver hopefully one of the best fights in recent years. boxing needs a knockout, whether it is canelo or triple g, we need an exciting fight back and forth. punches and bunches, combinations, we need action every single round. boxing needs it. if we get that on saturday night, boxing is back. it‘s a fight you can hear on radio 5live — live from las vegas from four o‘clock on sunday morning. kimi raikkonen has clocked the fastest time in second practice at the singapore grand prix. ferrari‘s raikkonen led lewis hamilton‘s mercedes byjust 0.011 seconds. hamilton‘s title rival sebastian vettel was ninth after hitting the wall and damaging his car‘s right rear corner. britain‘s dan evans is being pushed all the way in the opening rubber of the davis cup tie
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against uzbekistan in glasgow. evans took the first set, trailed two sets to one against denis istomin before taking the fourth to take it into a deciding set. gb, who are without both andy murray and kyle edmund, must win to be seeded in next year‘s new davis cup format. what‘s been described as a ‘civil war‘ in rugby league appears to be over. the majority of clubs have voted to scrap the super 8s from next season and go back to a conventional promotion and relegation system. 0ur rugby league correspondent dave woods explained the changes to me. the super league clubs were against it, the majority — 11 of the 12, because they said it was too volatile. essentially they have a regular season, play each other home and away, and at the end of that they split into a top eight for the play—off for the grand final and the bottom four play the top four for an extended relegation and promotion play—off and that is the volatility
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the super leagues didn‘t like, that up to four teams per year could be relegated. and a change to something more familiar? it is a format the game has had before, it will still be a 12—team super league but now there will only be the bottom team relegated and the top team from the championship promoted, and it will be a top five play—off for the grand final instead of the top eight, which favours the teams that finished first and second in terms of reaching the old trafford finale, that showpiece in october. we‘ll return to football finally, and celtic striker leigh griffiths has signed a new four—year contract with the scottish champions. griffiths, who scored his 100th goal for the club last month, says he is targeting ten titles in a row. celtic have already won the title in the last seven seasons. that‘s all the sport for now. lizzie greenwood hughes is here with more in the next hour. thank you. let‘s bring you some
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breaking news regarding paul manafort, we have already told you he‘s been in court pleading guilty to one count of conspiracy against the united states and one of conspiracy to obstruct justice. the united states and one of conspiracy to obstructjustice. we are now hearing from the prosecutor in court that paul manafort has completed a cooperation agreement with the united statesjustice department. this springs from special investigator robert mueller‘s inquiries into collusion with russia. that the tweet... we know that last month he was found
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guilty on a number of fraud charges, so why has paul manafort decided to cooperate now? we don‘t know what that cooperation means, that is the big question. which part of robert mueller‘s investigation has paul ma nafort mueller‘s investigation has paul manafort agreed to cooperate with and why now westjean marc so there will be more on that in bbc news at five o‘clock. now on afternoon live, let‘s go nationwide and see what‘s happening around the country in our daily visit to the bbc newsrooms around the uk. let‘s go to all vowles in bristol, where a british diver who was one of the first to reach 12 boys trapped in a thai cave has been honoured by the scout association.
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so, ali... of the first to reach 12 boys trapped in a thai cave has been where was he given the award? in the most appropriate place, close to home in long ashton in bristol. john doesn‘t really see himself as a hero and positively flinches when the word is mentioned but uk scouting along with the rest of the world think differently and this morning he was presented with the bronze cross, the highest award the scout association gives out, and his collea g u es scout association gives out, and his colleagues were delighted. it's amazing he did it and i like it, it is really cool that he is our cub leader. they could have passed away and he helped them survive. he's a national both in thailand and the uk
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but he wouldn‘t see it that way and went above and beyond what was expected of any human being. he was so modest that he didn‘t really give very many interviews after the rescue, did he? no, he certainly didn‘t, hejust no, he certainly didn‘t, he just saw that extraordinary act as something he could do and as part of the team, and he was just so modest. he could do and as part of the team, and he wasjust so modest. we he could do and as part of the team, and he was just so modest. we saw the footage of when he shone the light on the boys and their football coach and realised everyone was alive. then we followjohn as he delivered supplies and it was so dangerous. it was their skills that eventually manoeuvred them through the passageways to safety. getting the passageways to safety. getting the award today did mean quite a lot to the reluctant hero. i am very humbled because i started caving in the scouts so it is a full circle really from brighton scouts, i still ta ke really from brighton scouts, i still take scouts caving so it is an honour to be given this kind of
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medal. and those cubs are going on a local diving trip in a couple of weeks withjohn. they couldn‘t be in safe hands, could they? absolutely not. thank you for taking us nationwide. if you would like to see more on any of those stories you can see them on the bbc iplayer. we go nationwide every weekday afternoon at 4:30pm on afternoon live. if you‘re suffering with kidney stones, taking a ride on a roller—coaster might be the medicine you need — that‘s the conclusion of research that has won this year‘s ig nobel prize for medicine. these are spoof prizes published in the annals of improbable research but perhaps being shaken about in order to dislodge a kidney stone isn‘t as daft as it might sound. 0ur science correspondent pallab ghosh has been looking at the evidence. thrills, spills and
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medical treatment. what more could you want from a fairground attraction? a ride on big thunder mountain at walt disney world is an effective treatment for dislodging kidney stones. not so effective are scarier rides involving prolonged plunges. what‘s needed, as well as the ups and downs, are lots of side to side movements to rattle the stones out. though it sounds like mickey mouse science, it has been scientifically proved and could form the basis of a new treatment. and it was a recipient of the ig nobel prize for medicine at an awards ceremony last night. the real credit goes to one of my patients. laughter. my patient went on spring break with his family to the walt disney world resort to the magic kingdom and rode on a roller—coaster called
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the big thunder mountain railroad roller—coaster. he rode the ride, got off, and about two minutes later passed a kidney stone. the nobel prize ceremony celebrates excellence in research and the arts. the ig nobels are a parody and celebrate the quirky. right hand, put into the collar... some people rudely suggest that scientists can be obsessive and up their own backsides. in this case, this researcher really is for his do—it—yourself colonoscopy kit. if the winners speak for too long, a girl gives them a gentle reminder to wrap it up. please stop. thank you very much. doug brown and fellow psychologists at the university of waterloo in ontario won the economics prize for investigating whether it is effective for employees to use voodoo dolls to retaliate against bullying bosses.
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doug hasjoined me now from boston. first of all congratulations. how serious was this research? this research was quite serious. for several years research was quite serious. for several yea rs now research was quite serious. for several years now my research team andi several years now my research team and i have been investigating how people respond to only bosses, the types of reaction they have, what makes bosses bully employees and something i always found very curious is why it is that people retaliate against their boss when their boss can escalate their bullying, can harm them in some other way so that was the motivation behind our study, to answer this question — why would you strike out back against your boss when you could end up harming your own career? and what did you discover? we discovered the underlying reason
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for retaliating against your boss was that it fulfils a higher—order need for people which was to re—establish a sense of fairness or justice in the world. that when people are bullied by their bosses, it harms their sense of the world is afairandjust it harms their sense of the world is a fair and just place and when they have a chance or an opportunity to retaliate, they feel much better about themselves and the world. but ultimately it doesn‘t stop the bullying happen so what do they do about that? no, ultimately it won't stop the bullying, itjust really stops how badly you feel about having been bullied. i assume you would have to take yourself out of the situation or go through some type of hr procedure to eliminate the bullying. how was your research
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and the winning of this prize received at the ceremony? i imagine a lot of people were cheering you on? my whole family were there. i had a big cheering section and my co—authors had relatives there. it was quite exciting. i will be fascinated to see what you choose next. doug brown, thank you for talking to us. thank you for interviewing me. let's remind you what‘s happening in the united states with regard to paul manafort, president trump‘s former campaign chairman, who has pleaded guilty to two guilty charges and entered into a cooperation agreement in exchange with certain other charges being dropped. the prosecutor mentioned to
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judgejackson, said dropped. the prosecutor mentioned to judge jackson, said that dropped. the prosecutor mentioned to judgejackson, said that a portion of the plea agreement mentions the completion of his successful cooperation. we don‘t know what form that takes, which part of special investigator robert mueller‘s investigation he‘s helping with. jon sopel has been tweeting about this... there has been a statement from the white house press secretary on this plea deal and the cooperation agreement and she says this had absolutely nothing to do with the president or his victorious 2016 presidential campaign. it is totally unrelated. that is the big question,
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why has paul manafort decided to do this now and to what extent has he agreed to cooperate with personal investigator mueller? that is what we are waiting to find out. jamie is here, poised with the business news. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live: hurricane florence makes landfall on east coast of the united states, with high winds and torrential rain. five million people are in the direct path of typhoon mangkhut, due to make landfall in the philippines. "distressing" and "vivid" footage of the moment pc keith palmer was stabbed outside parliament during last year‘s westminster attack has been shown at an inquest into the victims‘ deaths. here‘s your business headlines on afternoon live... sports direct boss mike ashley has accuded it shareholders accused shareholders
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of stabbing him and the company in the back. he said they had failed to support him and chairman keith hellawell, who resigned on wednesday. the bank of england governor mark carney says it‘s his job "not to hope for the best but to prepare for the worst" after brexit. in a speech in ireland, he said he had tested the country‘s banks for a no—deal brexit scenario with mortgage rates spiralling, a plunging pound and house prices crashing 35%. british steel has announced that it will cut 400 managerial, professional and administrative roles across its uk, ireland, france and netherlands operations "as part of the company‘s ongoing transformation." what about mr carney — what‘s he been saying this week? there have been a lot of headlines about house price crashes of 35% if
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we have no deal brexit. that has been implied but it‘s not quite like that because he has done a stress test on banks in the uk which means putting numbers into their accounts and saying if we had the worst case scenario after brexit, 35% crash in house prices, the pound collapses and the ftse goes into freefall, if that happens can the banks stand up to it, and he says yes. that‘s what it means when he says he is preparing for the worst and not hoping for the best. hisjob is not to hope for the best but prepare for the worst. so retailers have been pretty high profile this week. yes, mike ashley has been talking about being stabbed in the back by his
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shareholders, and some of his shareholders, and some of his shareholders voted against mike ashley‘s reappointment as chief executive. but also because sports direct took over house of fraser, which was said to be interested in taking over debenhams. .. which was said to be interested in taking over debenhams... which hasn‘t happened so as a result mike ashley has been making something of a splash. the other big story was john lewis, where their sales or their profits fell 99%. profits, let‘s get this right. i‘m sure simon derrick who‘s going to join us now can get these figures right. i know it‘s not listed but it is still indicative of what‘s going on on the
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high street, isn‘t it? indicative of what‘s going on on the high street, isn't it? yes, what happened with john lewis was a reflection of the discounting taking place. this was the year the house of fraser was under pressure, ultimately went into administration and the discounts there reflected out into the market more generally so givenjohn out into the market more generally so given john lewis out into the market more generally so givenjohn lewis has never knowingly undersold, they have the downward pressure on prices. things weren't doing that badly, certainly on the waitrose side, things were going well so you have got to see that as a one—off rather than being a reflection ofjohn lewis' strength or weakness but retailers are still very much under pressure despite the fa ct we very much under pressure despite the fact we are doing so well in the economy. what do you think mr ashley is playing at, saying his shareholders stabbed him in the back? there have been rumours about
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him and debenhams which haven‘t happened, and house of fraser which today we heard they won‘t be giving out any refunds for orders that were taken before they took over.” out any refunds for orders that were taken before they took over. i think he's probably playing at trying to get away for the weekend and hope the news dies down. he doesn't like the news dies down. he doesn't like the media much, does he? it was a co nflu e nce the media much, does he? it was a confluence of things this week. the debenhams story was there at the start of the week, maybe they were talking about administration. they owned a part of debenhams sale that became talk about perhaps could they doa became talk about perhaps could they do a merger. perhaps that had been discussed but it turned out it hadn't really. it will like an unfortunate confluence of things and the comment about being stabbed in the comment about being stabbed in the back was a bubbly irritation at the back was a bubbly irritation at the end of the week. 61% coming
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still has by far the majority of control. somebody suggested he might ta ke control. somebody suggested he might take it private, do you think he would? i don't know. is it the right market generally for people to go private? we market generally for people to go private ? we are market generally for people to go private? we are close to the top on markets globally, at least in western europe and the us, but who knows. mark carney has been making waves, he‘s changing his citizenship to be british. he‘s had some flak, it isa to be british. he‘s had some flak, it is a controversial position. the simple fact is he has been steadily criticised throughout his entire tenure at the bank of england but the reality is he's been a stable pairof the reality is he's been a stable pair of hands. the reality is he's been a stable pairof hands. in the reality is he's been a stable pair of hands. in the immediate aftermath of the referendum, he was there is a voice of calm for the markets. in the city it seen as a
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positive he's staying on. clearly as you said earlier, hisjob is to prepare for the worst and certainly the way he's been thinking you can understand that. he's talking about what can happen with brexit, china, cyberspace, household debt. of course you are going to worry about those things coming up to the brexit which none of us knows will play out. he's being sensible. he's making sure the roof is ok. that is the way to do it. simon, thank you. let's have a look at the market. sports direct actually moved up. debenhams coming down. the pound a little bit stronger, and the ftse reasonably positive. the word cropping is always worth getting right, isn‘t it? word cropping is always worth
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getting right, isn't it? why are you saying that? thank you. let's return to the news paul manafort has entered into a plea deal with the us justice department. you may recall last month he was convicted of eight cou nts last month he was convicted of eight counts of fraud brought by a special investigator robert mueller‘s team. at the time donald trump praised paul manafort for not entering into a plea deal at that point. let‘s look atjon sopel‘s tweet... just to confirm sarah sanders, the press secretary at the white house, has said this plea deal has nothing to do with the president or his victorious 2016 presidential
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campaign. it is totally unrelated. more on that in the bbc news at five but that is it from the afternoon live team and i will hand over to jane hill in a second but first the weather forecast. this is the earlier satellite and radar picture comic and see bands of rain that had been sinking eastwards. we have had rightness across northern scotland with a scattering of showers. as we get into the evening most of the rain across the uk will fade away to leave clear skies overhead and especially across the north and east of scotland, notice these green and blue colours on the chart. temperatures in aberdeen getting down to four degrees. in the
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countryside temperatures will dip lower than that with a touch of frost. here tomorrow morning we will see spells of sunshine, actually across many central and eastern parts of the uk. it will cloud over from the west as the day wears on and we will see outbreaks of rain into northern ireland and perhaps western scotland with a strengthening breeze. temperatures ranging from 15 to 21. as we get into the second half of the weekend, frontal systems will bring outbreaks of rain and breezy weather but there is uncertainty about how far south and east these weather front ‘s will get. it looks like we will bring rain in across parts of england and wales. in east anglia and the south—east it‘s expected to stay dry with sunshine. h efty expected to stay dry with sunshine. hefty showers across parts of scotla nd hefty showers across parts of
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scotland and northern ireland. then we look ahead into the start of next week. this is the remnants of what was hurricane helene. it is heading our way. it looks like western parts of the uk particularly could see wet and windy weather. remember, it used to bea and windy weather. remember, it used to be a hurricane, there is warm and tropical air within it and we will start to see the effects across south eastern areas, perhaps with temperatures up into the mid—20s celsius. further north wind and rain at times. today at five: hurricane florence makes landfall on the us bringing high winds and storm surges. eight months‘ worth of rain is predicted to fall in the next two days with fears of potentially "catastrophic" floods. evacuation warnings are in place for more than a million people, and scores are already waiting to be rescued.
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ido want i do want to emphasise that this is only the beginning. florence is a very slow mover and will continue to track along north carolina and south carolina coastline to the next 24 to 36 hours. what is arab rising here as hurricane florence batters north carolina. the risk of catastrophic flooding is
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