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tv   Victoria Derbyshire  BBC News  September 18, 2018 9:00am-11:01am BST

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hello, it's nine o'clock. i'm victoria derbyshire, welcome to the programme. details of whether a russian businessman who died in mysterious circumstances while out jogging near his mansion in surrey had links with british spies can be kept secret, this programme has learned. an inquest will rule this week on the death — with speculation still rife about what killed him nearly six years ago. i believe that alexandar perepilichnyy was murdered in november of 2012. based on, what evidence do you have for that? well, based on the fact that he was a cooperating witness against russian organised crime. that he was on a hit list, that he went and took out an enormous insurance policy on his life in case he did get killed. we'll bring you more on that mysterious case at 9:15. british actors did brilliantly at the emmy awards in los angeles last night — claire foy, matthew rhys and thandie newton were all named as winners. i had the most extraordinary two and a half years of my life — i'm not going to cry — on this programme. we'll talk to our man in la.
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and we can hear more from the winners. and we can reveal the bomb squad is reguarly being called out to deal with items found in rivers and canals by magnet fishers. we found guns, we found safes and we found a bomb recently. the mod is warning magnet fishers about the dangers of the hobby. we will bring you the story before 10am. hello. welcome to the programme. we're live until 11 this morning. look at this photograph. you may have seen it already. this woman ran an ultra—marathon just three months after she gave birth — and breast—fed her baby on the way round. as well as expressing milk, as you can see. look at that picture. do you find it inspiring, or does it make you feel inadequate? don't you want to know how she did it, as well as running all those
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miles and all that climbing, three months after her son was born. sophie power is here in the studio to tell us about it. there she is with her little boy, cormack, who is sleeping beautifully at the moment. but you can bet that when we are due to speak to her, cormac will be awake! do get in touch on all the stories we're talking about — use the hashtag #victorialive. if you're emailing and are happy for us to contact you — and maybe want to take part in the programme — please include your phone number in your message. if you text, you'll be charged at the standard network rate. our top story today... a trade war between the world's two largest economies has stepped up — with the us imposing new tariffs on thousands of chinese products worth £150 billion. the higher import taxes will apply to almost 6,000 items, including handbags, rice and textiles, marking the biggest round of us tariffs so far. china says it will retaliate to the measures. 0ur economics correspondent andrew walker is here. explain what tariffs are and what
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president trump is trying to achieve? essentially they are taxes applied exclusively to imported goods, sometimes it might be from anywhere in the world, sometimes it is targeted on goods from particular places. it makes them more expensive for businesses and consumers and gives a competitive advantage to producers in your home market. what is president trump trying to achieve? his immediate concern with china is what he calls the theft of technology of american businesses operating in china, he thinks when they go into china they are forced to make agreements to share technology on unfair terms which amount to theft, and he says it is a concern. it is quite widely shared in europe. there is a wider concern that president trump has about us international trade, there is a large deficit, america buys more from abroad than it sells to the
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rest of the world, to the tune of about £600 billion last year. he thinks it reflects ben flower trading behaviour and unfair trade agreements with the rest of the world, —— he thinks it reflects an fairtrading world, —— he thinks it reflects an fair trading behaviour. world, —— he thinks it reflects an fairtrading behaviour. he world, —— he thinks it reflects an fair trading behaviour. he has been trying to re—negotiate with, for example, mexico, canada and career, but he has a particular grievance with china and that is why he is taking such aggressive action. will china slapped big taxes on stuff imported from america? they will very likely do that to some extent, there is a limit to how far they can go. they cannot match this latest action because they just go. they cannot match this latest action because theyjust do not buy and from the us to do that. is this and from the us to do that. is this a trade war? you could call it that, at very least it is a disruptive skirmish with the potential to have an impactaround skirmish with the potential to have an impact around the world. thank you very much. joanna gosling is in the bbc newsroom with a summary of the rest of the day's news. social media sites and the internet have caused harm to one
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in five people in the uk, according to the head of the broadcast watchdog 0fcom. sharon white wants online firms to be subject to proper state regulation, to end what she calls the "standards lottery". jane—frances kelly reports. protesters showing their anger towards facebook earlier this year. one of its executives faced questions from mps, following revelations about the harvesting of users data. what is the rough square footage of your home? i don't know that off the top of my head either. 0k. facebook gathers that information about you as facebook user, as it does its other users, too. i doubt facebook knows the square footage of my home. later this morning, the broadcast watchdog 0fcom will reveal research showing that one in five people in the uk has experienced harmful content on social media sites. conduct ranging from bullying and harassment, to fraud and violence.
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ijust want i just want to be clear on ijust want to be clear on our role... its head, sharon white, will call for an independent regulator to oversee the tech giants. despite facebook and youtube hiring thousands of extra moderators this year to police content, she will say in her speech that trust in such companies is weakening. there remains a disparity between rules for traditional broadcasters, such as the bbc and itv, and unregulated platforms such as facebook, twitter and youtube, creating what sharon white calls a "standard's lottery". —— standards lottery. in germany, social media companies face fines of up to 50 million euros if they do not act on reports of hate speech and illegal content within 2a hours of it being reported, although critics say it is draconian. ms white is to outline a potential blueprint for regulations which she hopes will protect free speech and innovation, while providing safeguards. jane—frances kelly, bbc news. the south korean president — moonjae—in — has arrived
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in pyongyang for historic talks with the north korean leader. he was met at the airport by kimjong—un — as well as large crowds who were waving flags. he's there for three days to try and revive stalled denuclearisation talks between north korea and the united states. a russian military surveillance plane carrying 1a people has disappeared over the mediterranean. russian media is reporting that the plane vanished during israeli air strikes against syria. a us official has said the plane may have been brought down accidentally by syrian anti—aircraft fire. a report considering the impact of brexit on the uk labour market will be published by government advisers later today. the migration advisory committee considered the impact of migration from the eu on a range of areas including wages and unemployment. more than 400 businesses, industry bodies and government departments gave evidence to the report, which is due to make a number of recommendations. it is expected to be used to help create the government's post—brexit migration strategy
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the lib dem leader sir vince cable will call on theresa may to "shock us all" by holding a referendum on the brexit deal she strikes with brussels. he'll tell his party conference that he's "starting to feel sorry" for mrs may as she tries to deliver a policy which — he claims — she doesn't believe in. he will also call brexit the "erotic spasm" of fundamentalists who don't care about the potential economic damage. earlier he told the bbc it was right to allow the public to vote again on previous democratic decisions. the world has moved on, it's a very different place. we have elections. we don't, you know, when we have an election, we don't put governments in permanently, we give an opportunity to people to change their mind in the light of changing circumstances and seems entirely right and democratic that when we have a clear picture of what brexit actually means, that the people should have the opportunity to confirm their original decision or not. elon musk‘s company spacex has revealed the first private passenger it plans to fly around the moon.
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japanese billionaire yusaku maezawa will take off on the big falcon rocket, which was announced by spacex in 2016. 0ur north american technology reporter dave lee has more. finally i can say i very glad to be here. i choose to go to the moon! cheering. this is japanese billionaire yusaku maezawa, he made his fortune with music, retail and fashion and more recently has become one of the world's most lavish collectors of art. in 2023, he may become the first private passenger to go into space. he said he hopes to bring six to eight artists with him on thejourney. they won't actually land on the moon's surface, but instead will travel around it, like nasa's apollo 8 mission of 1978. and this is the craft that might take them there. the bfr, which spacex says it stands for big falcon rocket. it isn't built yet and there
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will have to be several test flights first. this is dangerous. this is no walk in the park here, this will require a lot of training... mr maezawa has paid an undisclosed amount to be the first on the trip, the total project cost will be around $5 billion, mr musk said. also looking to do commercial space travel is a company run by amazon founderjeff bezos, and also richard branson, with his virgin galactic program. elon musk thinks he can get there first, though this is a man with a rather cavalier attitude to his own deadlines. but he might get there, one day. dave lee, bbc news. the british cave diver who helped with the rescue of 12 thai teenagers from a flooded cave injuly is suing the spacex founder and tesla chief executive elon musk for defamation. vernon unsworth was accused of being a child abuser by musk
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on several occasions. the lawsuit seeks around £57,000 in compensation and an injuction to prevent further allegations. it was a glorious night for british screen stars at the emmys, as claire foy, thandie newton and charlie brooker all walked off with gongs in la. foy won the best actress in a drama series, for playing the queen in the netflix royal epic the crown. and newton won a best supporting actress prize, for her role in westworld. that's a summary of the latest bbc news — more at 9.30. thank you very much. at around 10:30am we will bring together one of the wrestlers who was due to tour the uk with the extreme dwarf wrestling 0rganisation, the uk with the extreme dwarf wrestling organisation, and a mother and son, the sun has dwarfism. the
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rest will be will talk to is absolutely -- the wrestler we will talk to is defending his right to earn his living as he sees fit. i had an e—mail from earn his living as he sees fit. i had an e—mailfrom anna who said i am the mother of a gorgeous three—year—old boy with the most common form of dwarfism. both myself and my husband are average height and my husband are average height and his diagnosis was a shock. there isa and his diagnosis was a shock. there is a 125,000 chance of any average height couple having a child with this but we had not heard the term before. recently we heard that dwarf wrestling shows are being brought to the uk by a group touring from the us. iam the uk by a group touring from the us. i am fully supportive of people would dwarfism being employed in whatever career they choose but i'm learning of this event i checked the website and saw them referring to themselves as being voted the number one midget wrestling show by fans in america. i was horrified, this is a highly offensive term. looking at their website further they repeatedly used the term midget,
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referring to comedy and midget tossing. it was clear to me that this group is reinforcing stereotypes in a very negative way and it made me very sad, because having dwarfism as a disability and i cannot think of a single other disability or minority group where these types of shows would be considered acceptable. you may know that one or two venues have cancelled the show is after the outcry, but stay tuned. 0ne cancelled the show is after the outcry, but stay tuned. one of the wrestlers in conversation with the mother of a son with dwarfism. if you get in touch with us, you will be charged at the standard network rate for texting, and you can use the hashtag #victorialive. let's get some sport with chris at the bbc sport centre. great britain have won double gold at the world equestrian games, taking the team eventing and the individual gold too. great britain are world champions. ros canter is the individual world champion.
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canter‘s story a wonderful one. relatively young in the world of equestrian sport and inexperienced too, this was only her second start for the british senior team. so, great britain led the team event overnight in north carolina, but after a couple of mistakes, they were only just ahead. then ros canter and her horse allstar b produced a faultless final round. that gave britain team gold, and when germany's last rider knocked down the final fence, canter had individual gold too. i absolutely can't believe it. quite emotional right now. i am just so proud of allstar b, he is absolutely phenomenal. double gold for great britain in the eventing, how does that sound? absolutely amazing. i do so proud of everybody, the whole team. they are just phenomenal. ireland took the silver team medal — their first team world medal since 1966, and the olympic champions, france, the bronze. and just exactly what do they have to do to win? not everybody is out there doing
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equestrian sports, it is a good question. the gb team — piggy french, gemma tattersall, tom mcewan and canter — had to compete in three disciplines with their horses. there are three disciplines: dressage — ballet for horses if you like, cross—country — jumping over various obstacles over a wide—ranging course and then show jumping, which most of us are familiar with — jumping over fences in a tight arena. basically, it's a measure of skill and speed. how fast can you go without knocking down too many hurdles. gb are good at this and this was a sixth world title. they last won it in 2010. but canter is britain's first individual world gold medallist since zara phillips, who was voted bbc sports personality of the year after her 2006 win. of course, all this made all the more dramatic as it was set against the backdrop of storm florence. offering the united states's eastern
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seaboard. the day's competition was scheduled to take place on sunday. but it was put off and they had to compete on monday, so a lot going on in north carolina and great britain, get out of it well. so, what happens next? six of the top seven countries in the team eventing secured places in the olympics, so britain and ireland are guaranteed a spot at the 2020 games in tokyo. and later today, the paralympic champion, natasha baker, and the rest of the para gb team, get their world championship off and running in the para—dressage. thank you. more from chris throughout the week. welcome to our programme. it was another mysterious russian death on british soil. one afternoon in november 2012, the businessman alexander perepilichnyy went out
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for a jog and never came back. he was later found dead outside his mansion in surrey. mr perepilichnyy was about to give evidence in a huge fraud case linked to russian organised crime. nearly six years on, the inquest into his death is set to draw to a close. this programme has now learnt that the government will be able to keep some key details secret ? including whether the businessman ever had links to the british security services. jim reed has the background to this extraordinary case. the most exclusive private estate in england. houses in this corner of surrey sell for tens of millions of pounds. security is tight, filming inside not allowed. in 2012, a russian businessman was found dead on this estate. i believe that alexander perepilichnyy was murdered
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in november of 2012. he was just 44 years old when he collapsed out jogging near his home. i think you have to say, well, poisoning looks much less likely. the more probable cause is a heart attack. a police investigation later found that alexandar perepilichnyy died of natural causes, but when he collapsed on this road behind me here, he was about to give evidence in a majorfraud case linked to russian organised crime. that case had the potential to embarrass not just the russian state, but president putin himself. forfour years now, an inquest has heard the details of this case. now a judge must decide if he was another victim of russian poisoning on british soil. alexandar perepilichnyy‘s life came to a sudden end on saturday in november 2012. he'd been shopping with his daughter, he had lunch made
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by his wife and then went out running. he was jogging up a hill when he suddenly collapsed. a couple of residents nearby found him, including a chef, who tried to administer first aid to him. we know that someone called the police, who rushed over. by that point, it was too late to save him. what police didn't know that day was who alexandar perepilichnyy really was and who he was working with. we can bring up mr browder in this particular case. vladimir putin is consistently extremely angry about bill browder. the us financier bill browder is one of vladimir putin's biggest critics. he was once a major investor in russia, then one of his companies was the victim of a huge alleged fraud. his russian accountant, sergei magnitsky, was arrested and died in prison. browder says it was back in 2011
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when he was first contacted out of the blue by alexander perepilichnyy. we were sitting in our office and we get an e—mailfrom a person who says he has information showing who got the money that sergei magnitsky was killed over. and we were thinking to ourselves, why would someone give us that information? why would someone have that information? and it slowly emerged that he had the information because the money because he was the money managerfor the people who committed this crime. so how embarrassing could that information have been, notjust to the crime group involved, but to the russian state, the russian government? this was devastating. this information was devastating because that money was then frozen, and there are now 15 life money—laundering investigations which started with that whistle—blowing exposure. what perepilichnyy was promising was explosive stuff. documents that browder says shows
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the fraud was linked to corrupt russian tax officials who laundered the cash buying islands in dubai and property in moscow. what's more, he was prepared to testify in switzerland where some of the money ended up. you said at the inquest, i think, that there was a strong possibility, or you feel, as an organisation, there is a strong possibility that he was murdered. do you stand by that still today? i believe that alexandar perepilichnyy was murdered in november of 2012. based on what evidence do you have for that? based on the fact that he was a cooperating witness against russian organised crime, that he was on a hit list, that he went out and took out an enormous life insurance policy on his life in case he did get killed, and on the fact that he then dropped dead at the age of 44, with no prior health problems. but in the days just before he collapsed, alexander perepilichnyy wasn't at home in surrey, but hundreds of miles away in the french capital, paris. now, exactly what he was doing
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here remains something of a mystery. we so know he was booked into some of the most exclusive, some of the most expensive hotels you can find in the whole world. he arrived in paris just two days before he collapsed, staying in this 5—star hotel. around lunchtime that day, he was joined by a 22—year—old ukrainian designer. it's a woman with a character... so, elmira medynska runs a high—end fashion design business in paris and she met alexander perepilichnyy, she said, through a dating website. she said she hadn't known him very long, but that he would fly over for weekends and take her out. elmira medynska was never
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interviewed by surrey police. the details of what happened in paris only came out much later, when she spoke to buzzfeed and then the inquest into his death. we discovered that they had spent time shopping. and she said during his time in paris, he wasn't quite with it, he was worried, he seemed off. she later said they spent their last evening together at this sushi restaurant. he told her the food tasted strange and sent the dish back. when they returned to their hotel, he was sick three times in the bathroom. he spent the whole night throwing up, and that was the night before he died. so obviously, this witness, elmira medynska, was key to understanding what happened, yet the british police failed to interview her, despite knowing of her existence. but if there was a type of poison in alexander perepilichnyy‘s body, it had proved difficult to find. specialists in plant toxins were brought in, and someone from the defence
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laboratory, porton down. but after many false leads, in the end, no poison was ever detected. we showed the inquest testimony to one of the country's leading toxicologist. he said, based on that, a natural death does look more likely than murder. it's going to be very difficult to completely eliminate any poisoning from a case like this. i think what you have to do is look at the most probable explanation and, in this instance, a heart attack, i think, fits the bill. it's a natural occurrence. it's someone who's over—exerted themselves. and it's not uncommon that, you know, a mid—40s individual, if he hasn't maybe done a lot of sport or something, has gone out for a run. it's just over—exertion and that has brought on a heart attack. how much importance can we attach
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to the fact that he was apparently sick repeatedly the night before he died? he had seafood orfish in some way and it is well known that seafood is the cause of people being sick. it could just be a coincidence? a coincidence in one sense, yes. but unrelated to his subsequent death the next day, if that's what you mean. but because they did not know alexander perepilichnyy‘s background, the british police didn't immediately treat this case is suspicious. that meant key evidence, including his entire stomach contents, were flushed away before they could be fully tested. the loss of those organs, stomach and gut, is really quite important because it might tell you much more about recent ingestion, and that would be crucial for a case like this. so it could have been very important if they had managed to keep hold of that substance? yes, it could've been. whatever the cause of death, critics point to other mistakes made in this case. phone messages were not checked, cctv was deleted before it could be viewed, police lost all the data
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they copied from a family laptop. i think there's so much information now to suggest that this was a murder that it looks like some huge ass—covering exercise inside the surrey police. it looks like they completely messed up this investigation. yet there is no direct evidence, as we're aware, that he was murdered. a lot of this is circumstantial, a lot of it is suspicions around his role in the fraud. part of the reason that we can't prove that he was murdered is because the police threw away all the stomach samples, they lost his computer files, they didn't check for his personal computer, they didn't check the whatsapp messages. the french police have conducted this in an entirely different way. i was invited to give evidence in paris to the murder squad in comparison and i sat down with them for an interview that i thought was going to last
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two or three hours. it was an 18—hour interview, in which they clearly had looked at every possible circumstance connected to his situation, and that showed me what a real murder investigation looks like. surrey police said it would be inappropriate to comment before the end of the inquest, but giving evidence, the lead detective defended the investigation as appropriate and proportionate. he said ultimately, there was no evidence of murder. and others, including his wife, are convinced he died from natural causes. it may be that six years on, it's impossible to know for sure. in 2017, us intelligence sources told buzzfeed and the bbc they believed alexander perepilichnyy was assassinated. then, just two weeks ago, the home secretary successfully blocked his inquest from revealing in public if he ever had contact with m16 or the security services. that decision was made on national security grounds. do you have faith in this inquest at the moment
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as it is to get to the truth? or do you feel that there needs to be a public inquiry into this case? i think that the coroner's quite competent as a judicial official and there's been some quite tough questions asked, but there's so much information that's still not been conducted. so many requests that we have made for further investigation actions which have not been approved, that it would be much better if this was a public enquiry. how many russian deaths or russian assassination attempts would need to happen before everybody wakes up to it? for the moment at least, that public inquiry, which would have far more powers than an inquest, looks unlikely. a recent government review into this case, and 13 others like it, found no need to go back and reopen any investigation. that decision, though, is unlikely to draw a solid line under another unexplained russian death on british soil. we will talk more about that after
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ten o'clock. we will talk to sophie power before ten o'clock. she was running a gruelling alter a marathon. 106 mile race with 10,000m of climbing and every so often commission was breast—feeding and expressing milk for her three—month—old little boy, cormac. sorry on facebook says, i think sophie power is amazing to have run a marathon three months after having a marathon three months after having a baby when her body is still recovering just shows how amazing the female body is alan foster still be able to produce milk during that just adds to my amazement. breast—feeding mothers can do anything and society needs to accept what is an as —— process. that does not mean those who do not breast—feed are any less amazing but i hope it normalises the feeding. plenty of gongs for british actors
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at the emmy awards in los angeles — claire foy among the winners for her portrayal of the queen in the crown. and army bomb disposal teams are regularly being called out to incidents where magnet fishers have found artillery at the bottom of canals and river beds. in some cases, live ammunition — such as grenades — has been found. the mod is no warning about the dangers of the hobby. time for the latest news. our top story today... a trade war between the world's two largest economies has stepped up — with the us imposing new tariffs on thousands of chinese products worth £150 billion. the higher import taxes will apply to almost 6,000 items, including handbags, rice and textiles, marking the biggest round of us tariffs so far. china says it will retaliate to the measures. social media sites and the internet have caused harm to one in five people in the uk, according to the head of the broadcast watchdog 0fcom. sharon white wants online firms to be subject to proper state regulation, to end what she calls the "standards lottery".
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the companies have long argued for self—regulation — earlier this year facebook and youtube hired 30,000. more content moderators. the south korean president moon jae—in is in pyongyang for historic talks with the north korean leader. he was met by kim jong—un. he's there for three days to try and revive stalled denuclearisation talks between north korea and the united states. a russian military surveillance plane carrying 1a people has disappeared over the mediterranean. russian media is reporting that the plane vanished during israeli air strikes against syria. a us official has said the plane may have been brought down accidentally by syrian anti—aircraft fire. an anti—kremlin activist supporting the protest group pussy riot was likely poisoned — that's according to a berlin hospital doctor, where he's being treated. pyotr verzilov is best known for an anti—putin protest at the world cup final in moscow earlier this year. he was flown from moscow to berlin for specialist treatment
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after falling ill last week. the doctor at berlin's charite hospital said that while he is no longer in danger, he still needs intensive care. a report considering the impact of brexit on the uk labour market will be published by government advisers later today. he migration advisory committee considered the impact of migration from the eu on a range of areas including wages and unemployment. more than 400 businesses, industry bodies and government departments gave evidence to the report, which is due to make a number of recommendations. it is expected to be used to help create the government's post—brexit migration strategy. the lib dem leader sir vince cable will call on theresa may to "shock us all" by holding a referendum on the brexit deal she strikes with brussels. he'll tell his party conference that he's "starting to feel sorry" for mrs may as she tries to deliver a policy which — he claims — she doesn't believe in. he will also call brexit the "erotic spasm" of fundamentalists who don't care about the potential economic damage. earlier he told the bbc it was right to allow the public to vote again on previous democratic decisions.
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the british cave diver who helped with the rescue of 12 thai teenagers from a flooded cave injuly is suing the spacex founder and tesla chief executive elon musk for defamation. vernon unsworth was accused of being a child abuser by musk on several occasions. the lawsuit seeks around £57,000 in compensation and an injuction to prevent further allegations. it was a glorious night for british screen stars at the emmys, as claire foy, thandie newton and charlie brooker all walked off with gongs in la. foy won the best actress in a drama series, for playing the queen in the netflix royal epic, the crown. and newton won a best supporting actress prize, for her role in westworld. that's a summary of the latest bbc news. chris is back with the sport. football and cricket to come, but,
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unusually, we start with equestrian sport. ros canter delivered a flawless round on allstar b to give great britain team gold at the world equestrian games in north carolina — and take the individual title too. look at the delight on her face. she described it as a surreal day. regular training but a notable game in store at anfield tonight, as the champions league group stages get underway, with last season's runners—up liverpool taking on neymar and paris saint—germain. that's after tottenham face inter milan at the san siro. brighton rescued a point late penalty from glenn murray — look at the time, there. and that was the second game in a row where brighton have come from two goals down to earn a draw. look at the seams at st mary's! and the media was allowed to film
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the new 100—ball cricket format for the first time yesterday, as trials continued with two north versus south matches at trent bridge. the faster format is designed to attract a wider audience to the sport. i will be back with human half an hour. —— back with you in half an hour. a remarkable night for british actors and actresses at the 70th primetime emmy awards. our correspondent peter bowes was there. lots of british success, thandie newton winning best supporting actress in westworld, matthew rees winning for his lead actor performance in the americans, the spy performance in the americans, the spy thriller set in the ronald reagan era. but i think it was the success of claire foy and the crown that most people are talking about. claire foy, this is the last time she is eligible in this category for
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this performance because the crown and the story of the queen is moving on with a new cast, something that claire foy referenced in her a cce pta nce claire foy referenced in her acceptance speech. it seems it took her by surprise. i was given a role that i never thought i would ever get a chance to play. and i met people who i will love for ever and ever and ever. and the show goes on, which makes me so, so proud. sol dedicate this to the next cast, the next generation, and to matt smith. game of thrones and henry winkler took home the two biggest awards for the night, henry winkler won his first—ever emmy? the night, henry winkler won his first-ever emmy? yes. he was nominated, would you believe, for the first time, for playing the fonz and happy days more than a0 years ago. he was nominated flat that character several times but never won, now he has won for playing an
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acting coach in the comedy barry, a very different performance, not as cool as the fonz. he is in his early 70s and has won and emmy and seemed pretty chuffed. he said he had 30 seconds or so to make his acceptance speech, which is something he wrote, he says, a3 years ago. tell us about what was perhaps the most gorgeous, most heart—warming moment of the whole night when one particular award winner used his a cce pta nce particular award winner used his acceptance speech to do what? this is glen weis, he was the director of the oscars this year and he won the emmy for that role, directing and other awards show. that was fun in itself. but then he referred to his partner in the audience, he said he did not want to
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call her his girlfriend because he preferred her to be his wife. that is the moment we got an inkling that something was about to happen, this is how it played out. jan, you are the sunshine in my life. mum was right, don't ever let go of your sunshine. you wonder why i don't like to call you my girlfriend? because i want to call you my wife. cheering we saw her mousing yes from the auditorium, but then she went on stage? yes. it seems there was a happy ending, or maybe a happy beginning to the rest of their lives. a few people have noted he had to win and presumably did not know he was going to win that particular emmy for directing the oscars earlier this
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year, so he had this planned, he had the ring ready, but if he had not won it would never have happened. peter bowes from la. coming up... sophie power ran an ultra marathon while taking stops to breast—feed her three—month—old son cormac. that is coming up before 10am. army bomb disposal teams are regularly being called out to incidents where magnet fishers have found artillery at the bottom of canals and river beds. in some cases, live ammunition — such as grenades — has been found. magnet fishing — where people attach a big magnet to the end of a rope and throw it into a river to see what they can fish out — is a growing pastime, and many people do it to help to clean up bodies of water. but the canal and rivers trust called it "dangerous". the ministry of defence tells us there have been up to ten call—outs of bomb disposal units over the last three months from weapons found by magnet fishers.
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rick kelsey reports from leicestershire. quiet peaceful canals and waterways of great britain. the place to gently stroll down and take in the fresh air. well, that's one way to spend your time here, but it's increasingly likely you'll see someone with one of these big fellas. a powerful magnet attached to a piece of rope being hurled into the murky depths. it's definitely a hand grenade. magnet fishing has taken off and it's gone pastjust seen people on your local canal. fishers are putting their videos up on youtube and making money from hits. that's a bomb. it's a hand grenade. there's no doubt about it. we're going to have to call the police, called the bomb squad. some are incredibly popular, allowing people to turn their hobby into a part—timejob. callum and his two uncles, james and ian, have been magnet fishing in the local canals for two years. it was one christmas, i was at my mother—in—law's house,
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who is callum's grandma. mmm. he was sat round. he'd actually been doing some terrible youtube videos and he'd made one about his school shoes. yeah. and that was the thing that tipped it, wasn't it, really? yeah. i said, come on, let's do some decent content. we got outside, we went to local history spot, we made a video about it. you had some fun. yeah. i enjoyed it. ian, who is another uncle of yours, he joined us as well, and then we started filming our magnet fishing adventures as well — and we've never looked back. i love magnet fishing the most because you just throw it in and wonder what you find. tell me about some of the stuff that you found. we've found guns, we've found safes and we found a bomb recently. and as a kind of, what is the feeling you get with that big catch? it's very exciting because then you wonder what views you'll get and what kind of stuff you'll get next and if it gets any bigger. we've had over a.8 million channel views now. facebook, one of our videos has been watched by 20 million people.
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ludicrous, the rapper, recently shared one of our videos to his 19 million followers on facebook. so, it's really, really snowballed. yes, something's on here, rick. have you got a knife? so we've only been here about ten minutes and we've already found a knife. and this is a pretty common occurrence for these guys. what was once a safe place for criminals to throw away the evidence has now seen the light of day. there are quite a few videos that obviously people have pulled out bombs or grenades, one that you've pulled out yourself. uh-huh. and the bomb disposal squad have got to come down, the police have got to come down. is this not a waste of taxpayers' money? the bomb is probably safer being out of the canal in the first place and being in the hands of the bomb squad. it's dealt with then. we know it's safe. another is, it's telling the story of what happened. for example, where callum found the bomb, the hand
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grenade that you've just discussed, it tells that the home guard were active in this area. so it's telling the history of this place. it's all pulling it together. see there? these bubbles, that's always a good sign we are onto something good. got your gloves on? yes. oh, hello, what's this? ian, get on this quick. what is it? i don't know. it has got no head. i think it's a rudolph. it's a headless rudolph. what is it, reindeer? it looks like it. is it a reindeer? yes. it looks like it. a bit tangled now. there you are, rick. what? this is not bad for a first—day find, what is that? it's a christmas ornament. why would you chuck that in a canal? they've took it from the clock tower or something in town, probably a bit drunk and it has ended up being lunged off the bridge. is it in there? where is it? i thought i looked for it. get on your side.
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your side is that! have you seen them down here before? no. i have, actually. you know when the canal boats go through them locks? i've seen magnet fishing down there. yes? pretty popular around here, isn't it? yes, they find loads of things in there. like, they found money, guns. well, they found a gun before, but that's not the gun. —— they — — they have —— they have found a gun before, but that's not a good thing. but, yes, they do find lots of things. what you reckon about them, do you reckon they are doing a good clearing up the river, the canal? i feel it is good for the environment. to get things out of the way for the fish. wildlife might have settled in there so there might be wildlife in there. which might be a bad thing, you might be moving somebody's home ina sense. moving the fish's home? yes. there is money to be made from selling scrap iron and many magneteers have also been praised for helping clean up the environment, yet the people who manage these
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areas, the canal and rivers trust, think people need to be aware of the dangers. two men drowned while magnet fishing in huddersfield and the trust says a bylaw means the hobby is prohibited, so it's possible to get a £25 fine. but with little or no enforcement, it's unlikely to put any new people off throwing in the magnet. let's talk now to gillian renshaw, from the canal and river trust. andy morgan is a magnet fisher who goes fishing with his 1a—year—old grandaughter, melody. you may know him from his youtube channel. andy, how'd you react to the fact army bomb disposal squads have been called out up to times because of weaponry ammunition that magnet fishers have found in the bottom of rivers and canals? well,., we are basing the figures on how many videos are out there showing
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magnet fishers. there are plenty of times people not videoing and there will be hundreds of occasions people put stuff out and they are not finding anything like this. it is a very rare occasion. we have done about 70 videos between us and the closest thing we have got to a weapon is basically that. what is that? the end of a shotgun. that is the closest we have got to it. so it is very rare that you find items such as bombs. it does happen, but it is very rare. it is a bit of a waste of taxpayers' money, have the army bomb disposal squad is not got better things to do? would they say that if a canal boat hit one of these things and it blew up? it is how do you look at it? we pull out a lot of shopping trolleys, for instance. it only takes a canal boat to catch one of them, which they do, and to hit a bomb and the boat has
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gone. 0k, gillian. from the canal and river trust. how'd you react to the fact we have learned the omni —— the fact we have learned the omni —— the army bomb disposal squad have been called out regularly to sort out ammunition and weaponry found by magnet fishers? it is not great. it isa magnet fishers? it is not great. it is a cost of taxpayers' money and the canal and river trust who call out the bomb disposal unit. we are not aware if the bombs lives so it isa dangerto not aware if the bombs lives so it is a danger to the community is and the boats. and it isjust endangering people who may not be aware because they might have been under the silt and the water such a long time, they may not look like a bomb ora long time, they may not look like a bomb or a grenade and people have been known to take them home which can endanger your been known to take them home which can endangeryourfamily been known to take them home which can endanger your family and the community and your neighbours. we advise people to work with us and not in isolation. people may not be
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educated or aware of what they are pulling out of the water. how do you view magnet fishing generally? magnet fishing itself, from their point of view, it we are trying to encourage people to get engaged. visit our website and get involved from a professional and safe point of view to volunteer with us. that is fantastic, we want people to clean up theirareas is fantastic, we want people to clean up their areas and to take passion in the canals. magnet fishing itself, it is illegal. so we don't actively enforce the law as such. we are a charity and so...|j thought such. we are a charity and so...” thought magnet fishing, i did not understand magnet fishing to be illegal. if you pull things out of the water owned by your organisation, that is protected with the bylaw which could result in a £25 fine. that is correct. it is a similar principle to metal detecting or deep sea diving and collecting
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things from shipwrecks. but it is not illegal, is it? it is protected under one of not illegal, is it? it is protected underone of our not illegal, is it? it is protected under one of our bylaws which is technically a law that is going back from 200 years that is protected, so people cannot technically remove things from our water without our permission. andy, does that mean you are breaking the law on a regular occasion? are you bothered? it does not look like it by your smile. no, i understand what she is saying but there is also a bylaw about riding cycles on the towpath and that is not enforced, we see so many cyclists and that is far more dangerous riding a bicycle along the side of the canal than somebody throwing in a magnet. that is my opinion. why do you love it? it is exciting because you just open what you will pull out. i am more in it for the historic side of things. i would love to find, i found at the weekend for instance an old spoon. i hope you can see that.”
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weekend for instance an old spoon. i hope you can see that. i can see the spoon, how old is it? we don't know yet. i only just spoon, how old is it? we don't know yet. i onlyjust got it, we are cleaning it up. things like that keep me going. some people like to find things like a safe because you get all sorts in there. for me, it is historic stuff. but it is exciting. especially for my granddaughter. gillian, due except what some magnet fishers say which is what they are doing is good for the environment? -- do you accept? from our point of view, we are ecstatic people want to get engaged with the waterways and we want people to be enthused and clean up the waterways and improve their communities and their areas, so absolutely, it is fantastic. we asked they do that in a safeway and they are aware of the dangers they are putting themselves and other people live and work with us and visit the website and volunteer with us. there are ways to clean up the
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environment and the waterways, but do it with those and make is aware of the way people are doing. thank you very much, thank you. gillian and andy. coming up... we'll find out how brexit could affect the uk's labour market — a major review of eu migration is published shortly. full details just after ten. sophie power is an ultra—marathon runner, and she's also a mum and this picture of her has just gone viral. despite her son, cormac, being only three months old, mum—of—two sophie took part in a gruelling a8—hour ultra—marathon up mont blanc — 106 miles, including 10,000 metres climbing. how are you? very good, how are you?
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iam how are you? very good, how are you? i am really well. tell us about the image that was captured because it is extraordinary, what was going on? this is an aid station partly through the race and i am 16 hours into a a3 hour race. the first time i seen cormac. at the station, everything is a bit crazy. as a runner, you are having a group around you and out of shot is my husband and my friend matt changing my head torch batteries and putting more food in my pack and trying to force —feed more food in my pack and trying to force—feed me a summit and i need to feed my baby and express more milk for another feed and get the feed my baby and express more milk for anotherfeed and get the milk out because it will build up again. and was it painful? it was, a little bit, 16 hours when you are breast—feeding and feeding every three to four hours is difficult. the race starts at six o'clock on a friday night and you have less milk during the night which helps, but i had not expressed all the way. how
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long had you been going before you saw him? 16 hours. through the night. i was going to say, no sleep. no, i went through two knights of the race and i started at six o'clock on a friday night, mice versus sleep o'clock on a friday night, mice versus sleep was o'clock on a friday night, mice versus sleep was ten o'clock for 20 minutes and i finished around lunchtime on sunday. goodness me! how was it possible to do all that three months after this little delight has been born?” three months after this little delight has been born? i have been running alter americans for years and your body has a certain amount of memory in it and i knew i had a place at the special race before i was pregnant. while i was pregnant, i changed my training to prepare for it. 106 miles in the mountains is a lot and i did a lot of strength and stamina training and took it slowly after pregnancy to get back and then i realised that buys to i might not go round the whole race but i could be on the stop line. you are not bothered about the finish? absolutely not. for me, it is such
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an iconic ultramarathon. these are images of you training. oh, my gosh! that is eight months pregnant. in an ultramarathon in the mountains, you have polls and you need stronger arms especially as i knew i would be heavier than normal three months after giving birth. this is your first tv interview about this. tell the audience the reaction to that photograph. it has been incredible. i have had so much positive support from others that but they could not do anything for themselves straight after they had babies, that they had to lose their goals. from running mums and mums with other goals. showing the power of breast—feeding and the human body, the female body and the human body, the female body and the human body, the female body and the endurance it can have. it has inspired so many women around the world, as men —— as well as men to say as a father, i need to give my wife a little more support so she can do the things she wants to do. evenif
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can do the things she wants to do. even if it does not always an ultramarathon! has anyone said, this puts pressure on me as a young mum —— a new mum to get back to fitness? to me, absolutely not. i can see how you would think that from the picture but i never asked for it to be taken. i am not saying, you can run an ultramarathon three months after, look at me. it is not that. it can be done but with a huge amount of preparation and you need to maintain that fitness during pregnancy to get back to fitness afterwards quickly. i think i was one of these, quite a lot of pregnant women think you have to be, you have to take it easy when you are pregnant. but you are saying you don't necessarily have to. if there are medical convocations, of course you do, but if everything is pretty normal, you can do a lot of fitness training. a huge amount. the main thing is listening to your body. i started pregnancy with a full weight—training programme and month by month, it felt wrong so i said i would not do that any more and i
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would not do that any more and i would adapt to that. it is about listening to your body. you have to be careful. that was you just finishing which is extraordinary that you finished. it is really amazing what you have done, i think. thank you. my three—year—old was with us in chamonix and he did his own a00 m race and he saw the other pa rents own a00 m race and he saw the other parents with the other races finishing with their children and he really wa nted finishing with their children and he really wanted to run to the finish with me. 20 minutes sleep and hallucinations and all i am thinking is the fact that he really wanted to run to the finish and three—year—olds children do not understand, he just wanted three—year—olds children do not understand, hejust wanted mummy three—year—olds children do not understand, he just wanted mummy to country the finish line. what was the feeling that he crossed the finish line? i was looking down at how happy my son was and thinking i was inspiring my kids to be sporty and to keep fit and just happy to be mum againfora and to keep fit and just happy to be mum again for a while. how long in terms of both your pregnancies deduced a off the training? my first
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pregnancy, i stopped deduced a off the training? my first pregnancy, istopped running deduced a off the training? my first pregnancy, i stopped running and seven and a half months and weight—training until before i gave birth before it felt normal. running was difficult the first time. i run too late into my pregnancy, i think. this one, i stopped at five months. the extra weight on your undercarriage was quite difficult for me. some women could start again the next day and some it takes a bit longer. the main thing is to look after yourself and do the right exercises and you can get back into it. when somebody like serena williams gets back into playing tennis, somebody as high profile and globally famous as her, is that inspirational? i think it is incredible. it shows that you don't have a baby and you cannot be a world —class have a baby and you cannot be a world—class athlete. i am not a world —class world—class athlete. i am not a world—class athlete. i am not a world—class athlete. i am not a world—class athlete. i think it is inspirational to mums to say we can do what we want to do before, we don't change big —— as we become mothers. it is important it does not
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ta ke mothers. it is important it does not take over everything. thank you so much and thanks, cormac, it has been an absolute delight. good luck. thank you. news and sport on the way at ten o'clock, and matt is here the weather. a lively start across southern coasts. we saw winds up to 50, 60 mph on what is set to be a windy week by and large, stronger winds tomorrow as i will show you. today's windy weather in england and wales brought by the remnants of what was hurricane helene. not causing too much disruption, bringing rain across the country and incredibly mild air. this is where the rain is. the worst of the heavy rain is clearing away but still spots of rain across many parts of northern and western england, wales, northern ireland and scotland, heavy bursts towards the north east. that heads into the north sea and we will see a sunny spells develop more widely into the afternoon. still showers in
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the west, still blustery for england and wales. wind is picking up in scotla nd and wales. wind is picking up in scotland and northern ireland where the winds have been lied so far. the wind coming from a south—westerly direction, feeding in incredibly mild air. we started with temperatures in the mid—to—high teens and we finished the afternoon with temperatures once again in the mid—20s across some parts of eastern england. close to around 20 degrees in scotland and northern ireland. as we finish the day, the winds will be picking up in scotland and northern ireland and right across the country tonight, blustery night in store. showers from west to east. clear skies in between. one or two spots com pletely skies in between. one or two spots completely dry. still the south—westerly airflow keeps temperatures up. another mild night, not as muggy as last night but temperatures in double figures uk wide almost into wednesday, the locally named storm, storm ali, pushing in across the northern half of the country. named by the met office. it will bring potentially
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damaging and destructive winds. the area marked in yellow is where we will see the strongest winds. 50 to 60 mph quite widely and above 70 mph above central scotland green network breeze down and leading to travel disruption. keep checking the travel forecast tomorrow. heavy rain to scotla nd forecast tomorrow. heavy rain to scotland and northern ireland tomorrow. the winds further north tomorrow. the winds further north tomorrow but it is still a blustery day with gales in places. sunshine and showers for england and wales and showers for england and wales and still reasonably warm, temperatures into the low 20s. starting to feel fresh and further north is cooler air works its way in. for the end of the week, we stay fairly blustery, not as strong as the winds on wednesday, but outbreaks of rain across my spots the country on thursday. friday is looking drier and brighter. and into the weekend, the winds will fall later. hello, it's ten o'clock, i'm victoria derbyshire. welcome to the programme. our top story... a major report on immigration
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released in the last few moments has called on the government to make it easierfor high called on the government to make it easier for high skilled workers to remain in the uk. and we'll be getting swift reaction to those figures from a group of european migrants who are working here in the uk. the charity that campaigns to ensure that people with dwarfism are treated the same as everyone else says it's received abuse after calling for an american dwarf wrestling tour to be cancelled in the uk. we'll hear from one of the wrestlers — and from a mum who's worried that her two—and—a—half—year—old son, who has dwarfism, will be stigmatised because of the show. and a pathologist who's been involved in the forensic investigation of 23,000 deaths and suffered from post—traumatic stress disorder as a result will be here. some of them were private tragedies, some of them very high profile — and a number involved mass murder and terrorism. richard shepherd will be here to tell his story later this hour. good morning, it's 10 o'clock. here'sjoanna is in the bbc newsroom
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with a summary of the day's news. a trade war between the world's two largest economies has stepped up — with the us imposing new tariffs on thousands of chinese products worth £150 billion. the higher import taxes will apply to almost 6,000 items, including handbags, rice and textiles, marking the biggest round of us tariffs so far. china says it will retaliate to the measures. a major report on immigration has called on the government to make it easier for high—skilled workers to come to the uk. the migration advisory committee called for an end to the cap on skilled workers, which currently applies to non—eu migrants. it added that there should be ‘no preference' for eu citizens, over those from outside the union. more than a00 businesses, industry bodies and government departments gave evidence to the report, which made 1a recommendations for when britain leaves the eu. it is expected to be used to help create the government's post—brexit migration strategy. social media sites and the internet have caused harm to one
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in five people in the uk, according to the head of the broadcast watchdog 0fcom. sharon white wants online firms to be subject to proper state regulation, to end what she calls the "standards lottery". the companies have long argued for self—regulation — earlier this year facebook and youtube hired 30,000 more content moderators. the south korean president — moonjae—in — is in pyongyang for historic talks with the north korean leader. he was met by kimjong un. he's there for three days to try and revive stalled denuclearisation talks between north korea and the united states. a russian military surveillance plane carrying 1a people has disappeared over the mediterranean. russian media is reporting that the plane vanished during israeli air strikes against syria. a us official has said the plane may have been brought down accidentally by syrian anti—aircraft fire. an anti—kremlin activist supporting the protest group pussy riot was likely poisoned — that's according to a berlin hospital doctor, where he's being treated. pyotr verzilov is best known for an anti—putin protest at the world cup final in moscow earlier this year.
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he was flown from moscow to berlin for specialist treatment after falling ill last week. the doctor at berlin's charite hospital said that while he is no longer in danger, he still needs intensive care. the lib dem leader sir vince cable will call on theresa may to "shock us all" by holding a referendum on the brexit deal she strikes with brussels. he'll tell his party conference that he's "starting to feel sorry" for mrs may as she tries to deliver a policy which — he claims — she doesn't believe in. he will also call brexit the "erotic spasm" of fundamentalists who don't care about the potential economic damage. the headteacher — who starred in the channel a series educating greater manchester has resigned from his role as executive head at harrop fold high in salford. drew povey had been suspended from the salford school injuly. he was suspended along with three other members of staff pending an
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investigation over the incorrect recording of the tendons, exclusions and home—schooling. in a tweet, mr povey said he could "no longer sit quietly under the threat of "you cannot comment or you will breach your code of conduct". the british cave diver who helped with the rescue of 12 thai teenagers from a flooded cave injuly is suing the spacex founder and tesla chief executive elon musk for defamation. vernon unsworth was accused of being a child abuser by musk on several occasions. the lawsuit seeks around £57,000 in compensation and an injuction to prevent further allegations. it was a glorious night for british screen stars at the emmys, as claire foy, thandie newton and charlie brooker all walked off with gongs in la. foy won the best actress in a drama series, for playing the queen in the netflix royal epic, the crown. and newton won a best supporting actress prize, for her role in westworld. that's a summary of the latest bbc news — more at 10:30. chris is back with the sport.
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good morning. it was a great day for great britain at the world equestrian games in north carolina. they led the team event overnight but after a couple of mistakes they were only just ahead — until ros canter and allstar b produced a faultless round. that gave britain team gold — and when germany's last rider knocked down the final fence, canter had individual gold too. i absolutely can't believe it. quite emotional right now. i am just so proud of allstar b, he is absolutely phenomenal. double gold for great britain in the eventing, how does that sound? absolutely amazing. i do so proud of everybody, the whole team. they are just phenomenal. johanna konta enjoyed a quick and straightforward win at the pan pacific open in tokyo, dropping only two games against the canadian qualifier gabriela dabrowski to reach the second round. she barely broke a sweater! dabrowski is ranked at over 500 in the world to konta's a3, and the match was over in little
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more than an hour. the liverpool managerjurgen klopp says that the brazilian star neymar is no cheat. liverpool take on his side paris st—germain at anfield tonight, as the champions league group stage gets under way. neymar is often accused of going down under the slightest challenge, looking for a foul. but klopp says he doesn't blame him. that's, for me, a completely normal reaction, because players are really going for him, that is the truth. and he wants to protect himself and i understand that as well. so, if the opponent gets a yellow card so then he is closer to a red card. so i see from that perspective. i thought it is smart that he saves himself. totteham kick off against inter milan at the san siro just before six o'clock our time. spurs have lost their last two premier league games,
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so they'll be looking to england captain harry kane to spark an upturn in form. in the premier league, brighton came from 2—0 down to rescue a point against southampton, whose pierre emile hoybeer put away a contender for goal of the season as they dominated early on. but brighton responded in the second half and equalised through glenn murray's penalty in stoppage time. trials for the 100 ball cricket format continued with the medial allowed to film for the first time. —— the media allowed. the idea is to attract a new audience to the sport — although there were no fans admitted for the two north versus south matches at trent bridge yesterday. the hundred will feature eight teams, playing in seven uk cities, with games taking around two hours. it's something new, it's got some
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twea ks to it's something new, it's got some tweaks to the t20 format. i think it is really the simplified version. it's taking things to a more simple level that people can come along and really enjoy the fact that it is sharp, shortened compact. we have the t20, one—day cricket, test cricket and that will be hundred ball cricket. that is all this but for now. thank you, chris. today, a new report on immigration is calling on the government to make it easier for high—skilled workers to come to the uk following brexit. the migration advisory committee suggests an end to the cap on skilled workers, which currently applies to non—eu migrants, and calls for a post—brexit system where there is no preference for migrants from the eu over those from outside the union. i:e., treat everybody equally, if
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they are migrant. let's speak to our home affairs correspondent danny shaw, who can fill is thin on the details. we have seen this report, 120 pages, it will probably provide a blueprint for the government's immigration system after brexit, certainly from 2021 onwards. it envisages the ending of free movement of eu citizens to the uk and recommends no preference for eu citizens who want to come here over those from outside the eu. it wants to see a system which encourages the flow of highly skilled people to come and work in britain and suggests that the current cap on highly skilled migrants, which applies to people from outside the eu, it is currently around 21,000, that the cap should be removed com pletely that the cap should be removed completely and there will be no cap on skilled workers. instead, the system should be expanded to include
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medium skilled workers like plumbers and electricians. so the idea behind this is that you want to encourage people who have skills, who can benefit the uk economy, to come to britain and work here. at the same time, it does not suggest any schemes for low skilled workers. that is interesting and likely to be controversial. the only exception is possibly the farming sector where there could be seasonal agricultural scheme so people can do fruit picking and so on. it says as a backstop picking and so on. it says as a ba cksto p if picking and so on. it says as a backstop if there should be some scheme for low skilled workers then it would recommend an extension of the youth mobility scheme, which encourages young people to come for limited periods to work in the uk. highly skilled as good, low skilled, it is really hinting we should encourage more people who are here already to work in those skills.
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those are the key findings from the report and it analyses the impact on the european union from britain. it finds that the impact compared to the other changes which have taken place in the last 15 or 20 years is pretty small. house prices have risen as a result of eu migration, it found, which is certainly interesting. thank you, danny. let's talk to ian mulheirn, author of the report. this report says eu migrants living in the uk contributed £2300 more to the uk economy in 2016/17 than the average uk adult. he's the director of consulting at oxford economics. also with us is paddy duffy, an irish television producer who has lived in the uk since 2011 and isn't surprised by the report's findings. he is from strabane, so on the border. magfali van bulk, who moved
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to london from belgium three years ago with her boyfriend and is now working in financial services. welcome to you all. ian, talk us through your figures? we were commissioned by the migration advisory committee to report on what the contribution of migrants is to the contribution of migrants is to the government's fiscal covers. do they pay more in taxes than they ta ke they pay more in taxes than they take on public services and benefits or the other way round? we found that poor migrants as a whole, the 9 million or so migrant adults in the uk, they make a net positive contribution, they contribute more than they take compared to other uk adults. for eu migrants it is strongly positive, they pay around £2300 a year more than they cost is on benefits and services. they could be highly paid, they are more highly skilled than the average uk adult and they tend to have fewer children and they tend to have fewer children and also tend to be younger, meaning health and social care costs and
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pension costs to as all are lower. this means that if all our eu migrants disappeared tomorrow, it would cost the government's offers around £8 billion a year. that is the equivalent of 2p on the basic rate of income tax. migrants to the uk, especially eu migrants, are a big net positive for taxpayers. really interesting. some people will not believe you. there may be, but it is quite clear when you look at the data and other studies in the past have shown similar things. since the eurozone crisis in 2011, particularly, there has been a big influx of western european migrants such as magfali and paddy, and they are particularly very highly skilled people and often very highly skate, thatis people and often very highly skate, that is why the story has got even strongerfor eu that is why the story has got even stronger for eu migrants that is why the story has got even strongerfor eu migrants over that is why the story has got even stronger for eu migrants over the last two years. paddy, how do you react? i am not remove the
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surprised. the thing that has been worrying for me fast two years is how discredited it almost is to be an eu citizen since the brexit referendum. —— i am an eu citizen since the brexit referendum. —— lam not remotely surprised. the pressure that puts people like magfali and me. i wanted to come here, london was like a beacon for me and it would be for an awful lot of people. television is my game and as corporations go the bbc is the one that stands out. for other people in different businesses and lines of work, the uk was perfectly placed as a place to be, everything from the nhs to places where you can get along and get ahead. that was something... i am from a place where your sense of identity is very important. it is not so contradictory now to be irish, to be northern irish, to be a londoner, to be european. these figures are very welcome but i am
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not remotely surprised. at the end of the day, we want to come here and contribute to what a great country this has been. what do you think? they are not massively surprising. they are not massively surprising. the contribution is quite clear and we are celebrated for that. i feel generally quite celebrated. i feel the uk is a very liberal and open country but i would hate to see that go to waste. paddy talked about the pressure since the european referendum two years ago and people like yourself, have you felt any of that? i personally don't feel the pressure. what i find incredibly frustrating is the conflicting message we get. you have the government saying we are all really welcome and this report fits into that narrative. on the other hand, you have tens of thousands, the government number they fail to achieve and i understand people feel frustrated because of an unfulfilled promise and people might get blamed
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for things they are not really responsible for, and it is up to the government to invest in the surplus would bring to the economy into the problems migration may or may not cause. how do you react to what danny was reporting that those from outside the eu after brexit, those from outside the eu should be treated the same as those from within the eu, so no preferential treatment? freedom of movement will end, says the prime minister, so it will be as difficult or as easy to get a visa from ireland or belgium as it is to get one from south africa or australia. i think there isa four africa or australia. i think there is a four preferential treatment in itself. because freedom of movement is not an immigration system, it is a reciprocal right. ursula xii citizens have the same right as eu immigrants have here and people tend to forget that. so even after brexit, you feel eu citizens, it
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should be easy for them to work in britain? i don't think that's true, i don't think i have said that. but i think there is a completely different, there is a misinformation about the immigration we have. even within the eu, i am a bit distressed at the idea people are saying, you are all right in the republic, but she isn't. 0r people with different skin colours will be different. i am concerned about that. i have no particular problem with someone from australia or south africa wanting to come here. ultimately, open—door immigration is treated with such a demonic side. but ultimately, people wa nt demonic side. but ultimately, people want to come to this country because it isa want to come to this country because it is a good place to be. as the points in brought up, we are net contributors and that is what we wa nt contributors and that is what we want to see. what was interesting in the report, the bit that i saw, was
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that immigrants are not a homogenous group. we all have a very different perspective. we all come here for very different reasons. but the one unifying thing is that we want to make a life here. and that is the key thing as well. we are just not economic numbers, we want to come and we want to live comfortably. we wa nt and we want to live comfortably. we want to socialise and work freely. briefly, before we finish, that pressure you talked about since the european referendum vote, how does it manifest itself? in every conceivable way. if you imagine seeing yourx conceivable way. if you imagine seeing your x down the street, oh, god! and you go to the other side of the street. you imagine that in every possible way, the existential questions you have to ask yourself, whether you are buying a bar of chocolate or getting on a plane can
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make you wonder, am i to buy this chocolate because of import taxes and a couple of months, will i be able to get on this plane will i be queueing for three hours? able to get on this plane will i be queueing forthree hours? i able to get on this plane will i be queueing for three hours? i am 32, there is a lot of questions i have to ask myself as an adult about where things are going anyway, but there... as ian says in the report, it was the dynamic study, we are not alljust standing it was the dynamic study, we are not all just standing still. it was the dynamic study, we are not alljust standing still. everything about the brexit referendum so far has been completely static, in terms of the policy. meanwhile, we are floating in space, trying our best to get along. wondering, what country have we come to, have we been sold a dummy here? thank you very much. thank you very much. later this morning on bbc news: with six months to go until the uk leaves the eu, how will brexit affect your money? will european holidays
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become more expensive? our personal finance correspondent simon gompertz and personal finance expert jasmine birtles will be here taking your questions at 11:30. to get involved, you can text your questions to 6112a, email askthis. coming up... an american dwarf wrestling show has caused a stir ahead of its uk tour. campaigners say the show risks increasing abuse towards people with dwarfism. we'll speak to one of the wrestlers, and a parent who's concerned about the message the show gives to her young child, who has dwarfism. this morning, we've been talking about the mysterious death of russian businessman alexander perepilichnyy, who collapsed in november 2012 while outjogging in surrey. an inquest into his death is due to end this week, and this programme has learned that the government will be able to keep some key details secret, including whether the businessman had ever had links to
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the british security services. jim reed has the background to this extraordinary case. in 2012, a russian businessman was found dead on this estate. alexander perepilichnyy was aa years old. an inquest into his death is just about to finish. he was jogging up a hill. a couple of residents nearby found him, including a chef, who tried to administer first aid to him. what police didn't know that day was that he was about to give evidence in a majorfraud case linked to russian organised crime. the us financier bill browder, once a major investor in russia, was the victim of that alleged fraud. i believe that alexander perepilichnyy was murdered in november of 2012. based on the fact that he was a cooperating witness against russian organised crime. in the days just before he collapsed, alexander perepilichnyy was staying at this hotel in paris. he was there with a ukrainian fashion designer he'd
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met on the internet. she said during his time in paris, he wasn't quite with it, he was worried, he seemed off. she later said they spent their last night together at this restaurant. he told her the food tasted strange and sent the dish back. he spent the whole night throwing up, and that was the night before he died. surrey police did order tests on his body, but despite some false leads, in the end, no poison could ever be detected. we showed the inquest testimony to one of the country's leading toxicologist. he said a natural death does look more likely than murder. i think what you have to do is look at the most probable explanation and, in this instance, a heart attack, i think, fits the bill. it's a natural occurrence, it's someone who has over—exerted themselves. whatever the exact cause of death, critics point to mistakes made in this case. his stomach contents were thrown away before
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they could be fully tested, police lost all the data they copied from his laptop. surrey police said it would be wrong to comment before the end of the inquest but, giving evidence, the lead detective defended the investigation as appropriate and proportionate. he said there was no evidence of murder. in 2017, us intelligence sources told buzzfeed and the bbc they suspected alexander perepilichnyy was assassinated. earlier this month, the home secretary successfully blocked his inquest from revealing in public if he had links with mi6. that decision was made on national security grounds. i think there's so much hidden information from all these government interventions that it really should be a public inquiry, not just an inquest. for the moment, at least, a public inquiry, with far more power than an inquest, does look unlikely. a recent government review into this case, and 13 others linked to russia,
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found no need to go back and reopen any investigation. brian tarpey, a former metropolitan police detective who went to russia to investigate the death of alexander litvinenko, a russian former kgb spy — who was poisoned in london back in 2006 — and i asked him about the risks of not realising a death is suspicious straight away. if, in generic terms, a police officer goes to a call and somebody has collapsed, their first priority is not necessarily to investigate who he was or why he has collapsed. their first priority is the preservation of life. and it would only be afterwards that enquiries would have revealed that perhaps this man had a colourful past. and therefore, there may be reasons why
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somebody would want to do him harm. but the officers would have to treat the circumstances and they find them. and that is really the difficult situation that any police officer will find themselves in. suppose unless a body is found in the street with a knife in the back, you have to take the evidence as you see it. you went to russia to investigate the killing of alexander ripping into, a former kgb spy poisoned here in london. —— macro two. how much of a challenge is that? it is a huge challenge. each case is different. as we have seen with the recent case in salisbury, there is a huge amount of investigative work that goes on behind the scenes in building up the case and building up a profile of in my case alexander litvinenko and trying to find out who or why would
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have poisoned him. the difference that we had in the litvinenko case is that he was able to talk to us for a number of days before he sadly passed away. so he was able to give us some very passed away. so he was able to give us some very helpful leads and, in his view, what had happened to him. which was unlike, different to the skripal case. a former metropolitan police detective. we can speak now to the labour mp and former foreign minister ben bradshaw. the government will be able to keep some key details secret, there may be legitimate reasons on national—security grounds. it feeds into this concern i have about the secrecy surrounding not just the perepilichnyy case but the other 13 cases the government has decided it will not properly reinvestigate without giving both the families and the public a proper explanation as
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to why that is the case. the families and the public will never know whether the businessmen did have links to british security services. the fact the coroner has said stuff will be revealed would indicate there have been contacts. because this guy was a russian x while he was helping notjust bill browder, but our own security services possibly in uncovering russian money—laundering in this country which is very important and must be tackled. it must be frustrating for the families and also the public. we had the skripal case. a murder the week after the salisbury case which the police are taking seriously and treating as murder, and i worry this historic deaths around which there are still many questions will not be properly looked at. either the home affairs select committee or more appropriately the parliamentary intelligence and security committee need to have a proper look at is to
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satisfy the public and the families this was not a case like that of skripal or alexander litvinenko. 40 russians found dead on british soil, the home office is not going to review those, no further investigations are needed. all 14. how would you respond? that is very odd. without a more detailed explanation from the home office, questions will remain, which is why. .. it was questions will remain, which is why... it was only questions will remain, which is why. .. it was only after alexander litvinenko's widow campaigned relentlessly for a public inquiry which theresa may resisted that we got to the truth about the litvinenko murder. and i suspect what the home office has said so forward not satisfy either the home affa i rs forward not satisfy either the home affairs select committee or the intelligence committee or the families of the people concerned. thank you very much. ben bradshaw. labourmp and thank you very much. ben bradshaw. labour mp and former foreign minister. we spoke earlier to the incredible sophie power
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who completed an ultra marathon while breastfeeding her three month old son and expressing milk for in between feeds. this photograph has been shared around the world. she gave us her first broadcast interview today. cat on e—mail says i have so much respect, you are not ill when you are pregnant and your body will allow you to do you can. i was doing gymnastics at five months with my first and snowboarding three weeks after my c section with my third. another viewer says i cannot understand why anyone would want to do an ultramarathon. julie on twitter says such a beautiful, happy baby. the footage of her running with her toddler and babe in arms is wonderful. fiona walked the pennine way in 2007, holding herfive—week—old baby ina sling 2007, holding herfive—week—old baby in a sling and breast—feeding under a poncho. is this right, fiona?
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fiona, can you hear me?” a poncho. is this right, fiona? fiona, can you hear me? i can. you walk to the pennine way with a five—week—old baby in a sling, breast—feeding under a poncho? correct. the elements were very different, it was in december and temperatures could be —a but i would shelter my son against one of the stone walls and breast—feed him. thank you for the photos you have sent, we have just thank you for the photos you have sent, we havejust shown thank you for the photos you have sent, we have just shown those. thank you for the photos you have sent, we havejust shown those. in fa ct, sent, we havejust shown those. in fact, i am told those photos are from the north pole without the baby. even i know there is quite a difference between the north pole and the pennine way! what do you think of what sophie power has done and the image which seems to have inspired so many months?” and the image which seems to have inspired so many months? i think it is fantastic. i think it is amazing. —— has inspired so many mothers? is fantastic. i think it is amazing. -- has inspired so many mothers? you need a reasonable amount of fitness to ta ke need a reasonable amount of fitness to take on anything like this, but i
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keep myself very fit, i spoke to my consultant, the child was not in danger and when i was five months pregnant with my youngest son, conrad, i actually led an expedition across a plateau. the body can carry on. that was in the arctic circle? yes. five months pregnant? yes. how was that? it was amazing. the ha rd est was that? it was amazing. the hardest time for me was not leaving the expedition and walking across the expedition and walking across theice the expedition and walking across the ice and frozen lakes, it was when i was in the tent and because you are quite cramped up, i suffered with heartburn, but other than that it was brilliant. i appreciate you coming on the programme, fiona. nice to speak to you. good thing keep me. still to come.
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more and more of us are working part—time or flexibly, often to fit in with caring commitments, but is this the perfect work life balance? a pathologist who's been involved in the forensic investigation of 23,000 deaths — and was diagnosed with post traumatic stress disorder as a result — will be here. he will talk about some of those cases. time for the latest news. here's joanna gosling. the bbc news headlines this morning: the government has been urged to end any preferential immigration access for eu citizens after brexit by a major report into immigration. the migration advisory committee also said it should be made easier for high—skilled workers to come to the uk. the report is likely to significantly increase the pressure on mrs may not to compromise over freedom of movement in her efforts to secure a brexit deal. more than a00 businesses, industry bodies and government departments gave evidence to the report, which made 1a recommendations for when britain leaves the eu. the government says it will carefully consider the fidings when planning its post—brexit migration strategy. a trade war between the world's two
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largest economies has stepped up — with the us imposing new tariffs on thousands of chinese products worth £150 billion. the higher import taxes will apply to almost 6,000 items, including handbags, rice and textiles, marking the biggest round of us tariffs so far. china says it will retaliate to the measures. social media sites and the internet have caused harm to one in five people in the uk, according to the head of the broadcast watchdog 0fcom. sharon white wants online firms to be subject to proper state regulation, to end what she calls the "standards lottery". the companies have long argued for self—regulation — earlier this year, facebook and youtube hired 30,000 more content moderators. the headteacher who starred in the channel a series educating greater manchester has resigned from his role as executive head at harrop fold high in salford. drew povey was suspended in the summer term, along with three other members of staff,
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pending an investigation over the incorrect recording of attendance, exclusions and home schooling. in a tweet, mr povey said he could "no longer sit quietly under the threat of you cannot comment or you will breach your code of conduct". the british cave diver who helped with the rescue of 12 thai teenagers from a flooded cave injuly is suing the spacex founder and tesla chief executive elon musk for defamation. vernon unsworth was accused of being a child abuser by musk on several occasions. the lawsuit seeks around £57,000 in compensation and an injuction to prevent further allegations. that's a summary of the latest bbc news. here's some sport now with chris. some breaking news to bring you. the arsenal chief executive ivan gazidis is — as expected — leaving arsenal at the end of the month for the italian side ac milan. gazidis was instrumental in bringing unai emery in to replace
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arsene wenger as manager. regular training but a notable game in store at anfield tonight, as the champions league group stages get under way, with last season's runners—up liverpool taking on neymar and paris saint—germain. that's after tottenham face inter milan at the san siro. ros canter delivered a flawless round on allstar b to give great britain team gold at the world equestrian games in north carolina — and take the individual title too. she described it as a surreal day. johanna konta enjoyed a quick and straightforward win at the pan pacific open in tokyo. she only dropped two games against the canadian qualifier gabriela dabrowski to reach the second round. the match was over in little more than an hour. she called it a tough match.
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that's all the sport for now. the charity that campaigns to make sure those with dwarfism are treated the same as everyone else, says it's been subject to abuse since it called for an american dwarf wrestling tour to be cancelled in the uk. extreme dwa rfa nator wrestling has been criticised by campaigners and parents of children with restricted growth. they say the show risks increasing abuse and violence towards people with dwarfism, and encourages audiences to laugh at them. a number of the venues that were supposed to be hosting these wrestling events have cancelled their shows, after pressure from campaigners. but the event organisers are now planning legal action against the venues for discrimination. we can take a look now at some of the comments the restricted growth association has received. and a warning that they are offensive. —— some people will be offended, if you want to turn the tv for volume down. the charity has been compared to nazism. another twitter user suggests lighting up their fb page. another says, "let's just order some of the little bundles ofjoy by the hour and see how far we can throw them." for the first time, we can hear
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from one of the wrestlers planning to tour the uk — derec pemberton. we're bringing him together with lisa sumners and her son, rufus, who's two—and—a—half and has dwarfism. asi as i was reading the messages that the restricted growth association have received, i could hear a sharp inta ke have received, i could hear a sharp intake of breath from you? sorry, we have been campaigning for about a week and the comments online have been horrible, things like that. dwa rf been horrible, things like that. dwarf tossing was a thing back in the 90s, which ended in somebody dying due to the injuries he received. a member of the public, not an entertainer. because of dwarf tossing —— dwarf tossing being a form of entertainment. and they are in support of the wrestlers, that is the bigger picture that we are trying to combat. rufus is happy,
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thatis trying to combat. rufus is happy, that is good. derec is one of the us wrestlers who will be touring, why don't you explain to derec why you are upset? like i said, it is nothing personal against the wrestlers, we understand you want to make a living. it is about making a world for my son and others out there with dwarfism in this country, making a world for them but is safer and more accepting of their disability. and i feel that and more accepting of their disability. and ifeel that events like dwarf wrestling are just mocking people with dwarfism. i feel like it is exacerbating that negative stereotype of people with dwarfism are born to entertain people with average height.” dwarfism are born to entertain people with average height. i can totally understand where you're coming from, especially sitting here reading those comments on that. but i also feel like over the years since the victorian age we have kind
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of had a shelter over us, especially for those who have an average sized parent. the parent wants to protect their child, i get that. so it is almost like we lost our boys. so when we speak up or do stuff like this, people are not taking us seriously. our show, people might have a preconception before they come, but anybody afterwards that leeds has definitely a different opinion. with the dwarf tossing, that has been illegal in america since 1989. i would never allow myself or anybody else to be degraded like that. the thing about this, my message to the world is that i was told always by average sized people that i can't do this or that, at a very young age i was told that, at a very young age i was told that, i had a mindset i could not do
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stuff, until my grampa at age ten told me i could. and so once i started being reassured by him that anything an average sized person can do, ican, anything an average sized person can do, i can, just in a different way, i started going after my goals. i always wanted to be a wrestler. i feel that the wrestling here has never been seen, or hasn't been seen in awhile, so the view on it is a little blurred. ithink in awhile, so the view on it is a little blurred. i think if more people came to our show they would understand that we are just the professional wrestlers in wwe or anything like that. we are not doing anything like that. we are not doing anything to make anybody degrade us. would you ever go? no. i wonder how many people with dwarfism go to your shows? i don't understand why people won't at least give it a chance. if you have never been to one and you
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are worried about it but you will not look at it for yourself first hand and see what i am doing. the rga, which supports dwarfism, they automatically lashed out at me instead of coming to me and asking me, when! instead of coming to me and asking me, when i invited them they shut down my offer. maybe we could talk about your website. the first viewing of it i had was about a week ago, it was advertised as midget wrestling, which is a massively offensive term. it mentioned midget tossing, it said this has not been seen since the victorian era, it described your show as having a sideshow feel. for me, that is not the kind of thing i would want people to see and then see my son in the street after that. what do you think the impact would be on somebody like rufus?” what do you think the impact would be on somebody like rufus? i feel that the kind of people who would go
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and see this show are not the kind of people that would go and see olympic wrestling or something, they are the kind of people who want to go to are the kind of people who want to gotoa are the kind of people who want to go to a bar and watch something funny. iam go to a bar and watch something funny. i am sure that is what your show is like, i am sure it is entertaining and has comedy value, i feel like you are playing on your disability to make it funny, almost, andi disability to make it funny, almost, and i feel like the disability to make it funny, almost, and ifeel like the next disability to make it funny, almost, and i feel like the next day those people that have seen the show the day before might see rufus in the street, might verbally abused him, might think that he is, you know, not capable of doing any otherjob that he wants to do other than being in the entertainment industry. we already have with you —— in the entertainment industry. we already have with you -- we already have the view we can do entertainment as good as them without being laughed at, and you just edge you wanting to feel he can do anything, but then you are telling him you can't do this, you
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can do that. that is not giving him the opportunity to let him pick.” am saying i would liken to think you could do anything, notjust limited to being in the entertainment industry, which lots of people with dwarfism are, or the public perceive that, whereas i have lots of friends in the restricted growth community who are doctors, surgeons, swimmers, teachers. what about the marketing of the event, midget wrestling, midget tossing, those descriptions have been removed from the website? but was outsourced to india... what do you think of those terms? they are offensive and i would never allow anybody to throw me, they are offensive terms, that was definitely outsourced. when i was shown that, the comments on it, i was definitely... felt bad for our company that we allowed that to be put up without editing or proof
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checking it right before the uk tour. what about the abuse received by the restricted growth association from people who ostensibly seem to support you and your tour?” from people who ostensibly seem to support you and your tour? i believe there will be a backlash either way. this is a harsh world and in this world people say things you do not like or you necessarily do not agree with all is not your belief. as my grandfather taught me, you can use words to inspire or crush you. you get to pick those words. if i hear somebody such as a doctors say i have a dream, i let that inspire me. when i hear somebody on the street giggling. when i hear somebody on the street giggling, because i got the lax as a kid and still do, i still get, walking down the street, that double look, but i was taught to not allow it to affect me —— i got the laughter as a kid. it to affect me —— i got the laughteras a kid. i it to affect me —— i got the laughter as a kid. i can't change that perception, i can only do the
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best of me and show that to the world. don't you think this could be an opportunity to change perception? if these shows were cancelled it would send the message to the uk that this is not acceptable, i understand it is yourjob so obviously you will not say that, but... doesn't he have the right to do whateverjob he wants, including this? of course, that is the main argument against it. i am trying to see the bigger picture and it is nothing personal, i get that, it is just i want to see a quality for this disability that seems to be the last frontier in something, a disability you can laugh at. i think things like dwarf wrestling exacerbates that issue and creates a spectacle and something to laugh at. this shows it is not a sport, it is
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an insult to people like myself with dwarfism. this message says, the rest of should be able to do what we want, people from dwarfism are banned from entering the wrestling industry, why? and says that if he wa nts to industry, why? and says that if he wants to wrestle, let him, stop discriminating against him for doing what he wants. the show goes on. we do have the show, some are cancelled but the show goes on. thank you very much. thank you, rufus. thank you very much. thank you. dealing with thousands of deaths from unnatural causes isn t an easy choice of career, but we re about to speak with a man who has done just that for 35 years. he has been involved nationally and internationally in the forensic investigation of thousands of deaths, including that of the princess of wales, and the victims of the 9/11 terror attacks. here to tell us about some of those cases, and the ptsd that he s experienced as a result — is dr richard shepherd, and he's written a book,
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‘unnatural causes — the life and many deaths of britain's top forensic pathologist‘ thank you for being so patient. i wa nt to thank you for being so patient. i want to ask you about being diagnosed with ptsd. whenjudy first think something was not quite right? there was an inkling that the world was beginning to shift slightly. initially, there was a time when i was flying my aeroplane over hungerford which is one of my first really big cases. and ijust felt a little unusual. and that, i think, was the first inkling that maybe the 20 or 30 years were just beginning to ta ke 20 or 30 years were just beginning to take bets out of the edge of my psyche and other things progressed. what impact did those 20, 30 years of forensic psychology have a new? ina sense, of forensic psychology have a new? in a sense, nothing, there were just moments when it came into my
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consciousness. and maybe sleep wasn't as good as it might have been and tempo wasn't as good as it might have been, little tiny deterioration is. and the sudden drop when the whole thing opened up. what is the question you have been asked the most by relatives? grieving relatives. did my relatives offer? that is the most common question —— did my relative suffer? it is so important for people to think, it is a terrible thing for family and it causes so much distress, but think somebody has died peacefully and that death is not painful and distressing, that gives them some comfort. what about if it is painful and distressing, do you tell the truth? a waste have to tell the truth, there is no point in trying to pretend that it was not happening —— i always have to tell the truth. you have to tell the truth, that
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gives the relatives basis and they can begin to grief on a solid foundation and the grieving process is so important. do you suggest to people they see the dead body of their loved one? can that help?” don't say they should do. but if they want to, then they must have that opportunity to do so, because once again, there is the fantasy, the disbelief and the reality. and what i want is for people to have the reality. because we don't want a relative in three months, six months, a year, five years, to think, oh, iwonder months, a year, five years, to think, oh, i wonder if, months, a year, five years, to think, oh, iwonder if, i months, a year, five years, to think, oh, i wonder if, i wonder if. i want them to have that reality. that stems from something really deep and personal because when my mother died when i was young, i did not see her body. and i know the fantasies it left me with. what she really dead, what had happened to her? all those things. no, you don't for somebody to see their relative if they do not want to, but if they
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wa nt if they do not want to, but if they want to, we have to be doing everything we can to enable them to do that. you are forensic psychologist —— forensic pathologist into whether princess diana and dodi fayed's deaths were more than traffic accident, you found it to be an accident, why did that not stop the conspiracy theories?” an accident, why did that not stop the conspiracy theories? i don't know, conspiracy theories have a life of their own, there is always a gap, somebody who told someone who thought of something and such. the investigation would stevens conducted was sober, being is that was so extensive —— lord stevens. it was so extensive —— lord stevens. it was an unlawful killing because of the events that took place with the carand the events that took place with the car and the paparazzi and henri paul, but that is as far as it goes. you are criticised for the removal of some of the marchioness victims which we were told was standard practice and authorise —— authorised
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by the coroner, the public inquiry exonerated the pathologists but how did you deal with that criticism? exonerated the pathologists but how did you deal with that criticism7m was very did you deal with that criticism7m was very hard because it was standard practice and we were caught between the devil and the deep blue sea. we were having to identify bodies that were not in good condition and they could not have been seen by relatives and a positive id made. we did not have dna which is where we would go to now to make identifications and identification is crucial in mass disaster work because people have to be sure, the certainty has to be there they have buried their own relative. and so it was very hard to cope with a lot of criticism over a large number of years for something that i knew we had to do, but could not easily stand up and explain at that time. in 1983, you a pathologist for stephen lawrence's tell us about that case. stephen's death was a tragedy as they all are,
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and we talk about it a lot in the book, but in a sense, it came from nowhere. stephen was stabbed to death by a bus stop in south london will stop in a sense, there was nothing more to that death at that time. we know how many stabbing deaths that are in london. day after day, month after month. in a sense, for the professionals, it was nothing particularly unusual. for his family, it was a disaster. what happened then was the police investigation and that was where it began to unravel. they did not do enough and we know from the macpherson inquiry, institutional racism was the final conclusion he reached. you were back in court for the retrial when stephen lawrence's dna was found on the suspects clothing. yes, dna has made such a fantastic difference to suss —— to forensic science and is to go back over the cold cases and extract dna and convicted two people of
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stephen's murder so many years later, it shows the police do not stop. they might not get it right at the beginning, but they do not stop in the end. looking back, and you feel pathologist should have much more support for the mental health, don't you? having been through what i went through, i am conscious that maybe had someone, early intervention, maybe, icould maybe had someone, early intervention, maybe, i could have been talking to people about this. councillors? counselling and psychologists, the police have it, the fire brigades, my colleagues in the fire brigades, my colleagues in the nhs, working in accident and emergency departments. pathologists are employed on a self—employed basis. so they stand outside these things. i know other pathologists that have suffered significant mental health problems and we are right doing that right there dealing with man's inhumanity to man and it
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has got to take its toll. thank you very much. and richard s book — unnatural causes: the life and many deaths of britain s top forensic pathologist — more and more of us are working part—time or flexibly — but new research suggests that two—thirds of part—time workers feel isolated and struggle to make professional connections. the survey by timewise — which is a company that promotes flexible working — suggests that many people feel so grateful to be allowed to work reduced hours that they accept compromises in their career. i'm joined by karen mattison, who's the founder of timewise, which commissioned the research. we can also talk to vicky matthews, who along with a friend founded her own company, pink spaghetti pa services, after she was unable to progress in herformer career when she went part—time. natalie stone, a mother with two young children working part—time.
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thank you very much. karen, what is the problem? thank you very much. karen, what is the problem ? the thank you very much. karen, what is the problem? the problem is the workforce has changed dramatically. there are not a few people working part—time any more, there are 8 million of us. the challenge is the workplace has struggled to catch up. we know everybody wants to cycle to work, but we're not changing the bus lane, it is like. the real opportunity is that businesses have to understand they need to adapt the workplace because this research is showing part—time workers, one in four of the workforce, do not get the same chances to professionally developed, they do not network and they don't have the opportunities to feel part of the team and their careers tended to plateau. vicky, is that how it was for you? why did you leave? absolutely. when i went back, i was offered ultimately a three—day role, but it was on a much lower level and i was pushed out of the
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senior management development opportunities. and therefore, there was nothing left for me at my former employers. and so it led me to want to create something else for myself that was based around working flexibly to make myself in control of my own destiny. 0k. no regrets? no, absolutely not. i love working flexibly and i love the fact that our business is offering so many other people the opportunity to do the same thing. we have got so many great people working for us, other employees or franchisees, who have great careers and they are now able to do something flexibly and they have all got great businesses. karen, in literally ten seconds, what is your advice to employers not embracing this? i think they have to think part—time workers are as ambitious and want to progress just
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as much as anybody else. thank you very much. bbc newsroom live is coming up next. have a good day. good morning. we have fairly blustery conditions today across england and wales. gusts up to a0, 50 mph. quite a bit of cloud around. we have had rain and drizzle this morning as well but a lot of that will be clearing the way across england and wales where there will be sunny spells developing into the afternoon. showers around western parts. a bit of rain and drizzle towards the north and east which clears away gradually and a maximum
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temperature of 16, 18 degrees in northern areas. the low to mid 20s across the south east. feeling quite warm again. tonight, there will be rain and showers moving across many parts, but the real feature tonight is the strength of the wind developing. we have an amber warning issued from the met office to be prepared across parts of scotland, northern ireland. gusts of 70, 80 mph. so through wednesday, that is likely to cause disruption from storm ali. in scotland and northern ireland, gusts of 70 to 80. this is bbc news.
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i'm joanna gosling. these are the top stories developing at 11:00am. the government is told eu migrants should be given no preference over those from the rest of the world , and the cap on skilled workers should be scrapped , by its migration advisory committee. the trade war intensifies between the world's two largest economies. the us imposes new tariffs on chinese products worth £150 billion. russia admits its military plane was shot down by syrian forces — and blames israel for a ‘set up'... also coming up — with six months to go until brexit... at 11.30 we'll be answering some of your questions about the cost of living, mobile charges and travelling abroad with our consumer experts plenty of gongs for british actors at the emmy awards in la — claire foy among the winners for her portrayal of

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