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tv   Beyond 100 Days  BBC News  September 18, 2018 7:00pm-8:01pm BST

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you're watching beyond one hundred days... brett kava naugh goes back to the white house for the second day in a row amid turmoil in his confirmation hearing. thejudge is expected to appear before the senate next week to defend himself against charges of sexual assault. the woman who has accused him has also been asked to appear before thejudiciary committee. the president says there should be a fair process. he's an incredible man, he has an incredible intellect. he will make an incredible supreme courtjustice, but we feel that we want to go through a process, we want to hear both sides. six months before brexit a big new study on immigration says the uk should allow in far more skilled workers. also on the programme..... syrian forces shoot down a russian aircraft killing 15 people, while trying to engage israeli fighterjets. vladimir putin says it was a "chain of tragic accidental circumstances". i want to call you my wife! cheering and applause. and a primetime proposal.
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director glenn weiss picks up his gong then asks his girflriend to marry him. but is the stage of the emmy‘s the right place to pop the question? hello and welcome. i'm katty kay in washington... christian fraser is in london. president trump is standing by his supreme court nominee who's been accused of sexual assault. for the second day in a row brett kavanaugh was in the white house today for emergency meetings ahead of expected senate hearings next week. a few moments ago mr trump said he's sure thejudge would do well before the senate. oh, i am totally supportive, yes. very supportive. he is... i would say, few people that i have ever seen, that i have ever known and i have known people of great success, have been so outstanding as judge kavanaugh. it's not the first time america has been through this brutal spectacle.
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in 1991 anita hill was subjected to humiliating questioning by a panel of all male senators. thejudge she accused of harassment, clarence thomas, still sits on the supreme court today. next week christine blasey ford has been asked to testify before that same senate judiciary committee. she has accused brett kava naugh of sexually assaulting her 36 years ago. there is an enormous cultural difference between 1991 and the age of metoo in 2018. so, if the hearings take place, all eyes will be on the members of the committee to see if they treat christine ford better than her predecessor. . .. you testified this morning that the most embarrassing question involved,
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this is not too bad, women's large breast, this is a word we use all the time. no, the most embarrassing aspect was his description of the acts of these individuals. these women, the axe that those particular people would engage in. well this says, quote, this is not a bad, i can read it, thomas like to discuss specific sex acts and frequency of sex. in 1991 anita hill was questioned by an entirely male judiciary committee. today on the republican side that hasn't changed. the 11 republicans members of the committee are still all men. all white men. there is more diversity on the democratic side — where a committee members are women. alexis simendinger covered that hearing back in the early 1990s and since then has reportd extensively both on congress and the president. she is currently national political correspondent for the hill and joins us now. where are we at in these hearings,
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alexis? flash forward from the flashback. it is interesting, where we are today is watching the committee try and figure out after having scheduled at this hearing, delaying what was supposed to take place on thursday and then scheduling it for monday, whether this will take place. we have seen that christine ford's attorney is trying to negotiate what kind of witnesses and democrats are going foran witnesses and democrats are going for an fbi investigation and they wa nt for an fbi investigation and they want to bring more witnesses then and republicans are trying to figure out whether they are going to hold this hearing, even ifjudge cavanagh's accuser does not show up or cannot come of cavanagh's accuser does not show up 01’ cannot come 01’ in some way, cavanagh's accuser does not show up or cannot come or in some way, the democrats continue to block but because the terms they like to see or not met. i spent a couple of hours listing back over the anita hill hearings from 1991 that you
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covered, if she comes to the senate and if she appears before that judiciary committee, do you think there is a quantifiable difference in the way that she will be treated? it depends on some format. senators susan collins is suggesting to the committee that he does not sit on the committee, that they invite the attorneys for bothjudge the committee, that they invite the attorneys for both judge kavanaugh and for dr blasey, in that case she suggest that the attorneys would be more appropriate to ask and interrogate back and forth, that would be different to what i covered in1991. we would be different to what i covered in 1991. we also do not have necessarily the element of race, what we saw with clarence thomas and the way he decided to fight back. that is not an avenue we would expect thatjudge that is not an avenue we would expect that judge kavanaugh would pursue and as christian saying, the toll of 2018 after metoo or what we are seen in the catholic church and
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in business and in media has changed the dynamic in which women expect to be questioned. and maybe that explains why so far on twitter we have had such a muted response from the president. he has been pretty quiet on twitter and that may be because we are 49 days away from the midterms and we know that the republicans are struggling to attract suburban middle—class woman. absolutely. i think you're so right and what we have learned is behind—the—scenes in the white house, the president's advisers have been trying to sit on him and his smartphone to keep him from tweeting and that he has sounded very patient and that he has sounded very patient and not worried and for the second day is trying to say that he backs judge kavanaugh and hopes that the process will be satisfactory to all americans. he knows himself that he has more than a dozen women who have accused him of sexual misconduct or some kind of harassment. he knows that he is an imperfect vessel to be
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arguing this case. as you say, with arguing this case. as you say, with a short distance between now and november the 6th, republicans are concerned about those voters. alexis, thank you for coming in. everyone is treated as carefully. you have written a piece for bbc 0nline. this woman, christine ford isa 0nline. this woman, christine ford is a professor at palo alto university, she is in clinical psychology and her work has been widely published. she is not the kind of person that is going to be easily dismissed. i wanted to write this partly because i have been listening to the anita hill hearings and she was accused of making up the allegations of sexual harassment, but also because i have heard people suggest that this was 36 years ago, maybe it did not happen. the incidence of people falsely reporting rapes is only something like 2—10% of all rape cases and the profile of people who are fake
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accusers of sexual assault tend to be people who have a history of making up things, a history of often have some kind of criminal record and often they are teenagers who say that something happened because they broke curfew 01’ happened because they broke curfew or got into trouble and they want to have an excuse. 0bviously or got into trouble and they want to have an excuse. obviously we do not know what happened in this instance and we do not know that doctor ford is telling the truth, but she certainly does not fit the profile of what academic studies would say is the profile of someone who was someone is the profile of someone who was someone who carries out fake accusations. it's six months until the planned departure of the uk from the european union — and immigration is still a key issue. today a report has been released by the migration advisory committee, recommending that the uk government adjust its migration policies. it suggests that... eu citizens wanting to come to the uk should not be given preferential treatment — unless that's part of a trade deal struck with brussels. it also suggests removing the cap on the number
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of highly skilled workers allowed into britain. and it advises prioritising skilled worker immigrants over those without skills. here in the uk the number of people arriving from eastern europe has actually been falling since the brexit vote in 2016. in fact — net migration from the eu is at its lowest level since 2012. we're joined now by sunder katwala, director of british future, an organisation that recently compiled the biggest—ever public consultation on immigration, holding over 130 meetings across the uk, surveying nearly 20,000 people. welcome to the studio. tell us what your survey told us about british attitudes to migration. we found a very low trust in government on migration and people do not think governments had a grip or had their confidence but we also found about the future that people have very constructive and pragmatic views and they wanted to have a voice in what happens next and most people, we felt, were balance rs happens next and most people, we felt, were balancers who thought there were pressures of immigration
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oi'i there were pressures of immigration on housing and public services and they thought there were of immigration for the health service and the economy and they wanted a voice on how to strike the right balance when things change after brexit. this report today suggest that eu migration has not had much impact on school places, the nhs, wages and employment and the committee thinks the concerns over eu migration are starting to dissipate, largely because the numbers are falling. that is what the committee things, what do you think? they have the itibci'o what do you think? they have the macro economic evidence. what you cannot do, if you're doing a big study from whitehall is really capture how it feels very different locally in differing kinds of places. in big cities, people see the games outweighing the pressures, universities are there and are quite big. you have more skilled work, there is a longer—term history of diversity in those places. people
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are more confident but in towns people feel they have more of the pressures. sometimes there is a different feeling in some towns than others because big employers have damaged the. we found amazon in the east midlands or sports direct actually had a reputation now which people felt was not working fairly because of the big firms. in other places, big local employers were a popular and people would listen to them off. your report recommends that people from the eu should not be given preferential treatment in their application to come to britain after brexit, would that mean that we would have more migrants proportionally coming to the uk from other parts of the world? that has been happening since brexit, before any changes, especially eastern europeans coming for a shorter periods of time have not been coming and employers have been shifting to non—eu migrants. they say if it does
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not come up in the negotiation, we will not offer people preferential treatment, but if it does, it is complex and they have not got advice from the politicians. ministers have to balance how you get consent at home for immigration with how you strike the deal you want and the migration advisory committee said it was above their pay grade and they would not give advice. this is the syste m would not give advice. this is the system if you just deciding on the way. sunder, i do. let's cross now to our political correspondent leila nathoo. 0ne one of the recommendations is to lift the limit on highly skilled workers from non—eu countries. if they were to do that, the government, how can you do that and at the same time keep this cap that the government says it has on limiting migration to tens of thousands? this has always been a target and ambition to bring net migration down to below 100,000 and
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it has repeatedly been missed and it is largely due to non—eu migration, this target has been missed. the idea of opening up more highly skilled jobs to migrant workers would clearly make that target more difficult to achieve, but it is already a little bit of a mess at the moment because that target has never been achieved. this report was actually commissioned by the government to help it to come up with the post brexit immigration strategy. it was supposed to help inform the strategy that has been delayed and we think we will get an outline of the policy this autumn. as we have been hearing, it does not really form a model that the government can accept, because it presumes that immigration is going to be entirely separate from then that —— for the negotiations and theresa may has left the door open to including migration from the eu
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asa to including migration from the eu as a negotiating tool in these talks, although she has repeatedly said freedom of movement will come to an end, she has not ruled out giving preferential treatment for eu citizens to work in the uk after brexit. as part of these talks. i think that is the crucial point. the issue of highly skilled workers and low skilled workers is something that america is wrestling with and this report recommends more high skilled workers and less low skilled workers, but how does that leave industries like agriculture and construction? we have heard a lot of criticism from businesses in those areas saying that they are being forgotten about and it will affect their staffing because lots of lower skilled jobs in the uk are filled by migrant workers but the government has been clear about training up british workers to do those jobs and fill those gaps. there clearly is a bit of a disjunct between businesses
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and saying what they need to make their industries work and what the migration advisory committee is recommending. 0k, thank you very much forjoining us. china sells a lot more stuff to america than america sells to china which makes beijing more vulberable in a tariff war. donald trump knows that which no doubt explains why he's currently upping the ante in his trade war with china. he's just announced 200 billion dollars of extra tariffs on chinese exports to america, that's pretty much all goods sold to the us. but china does have some leverage. it can impose tarrifs in retaliation to create as much damage politically to mr trump as possible. a fact the president acknowledged earlier today on twitter. china has openly stated they are actively trying to impact and change our election by attacking our farmers, ranchers and industrial workers because of their loyalty to me..... china has been taking advantage of the united states on trade for many years. they also know that i am the one that knows how to stop it. karishma vaswani is in tiangin, with
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the view from china. this is how china has become rich over the last four decades. making everything from tories to circuit boards for making everything from toys to circuit boards for the rest of the world. and one of its biggest customers, the united states. but now almost half of everything china makes and sells to the us will be covered under the latest tariffs. president trump says this is his way of levelling the playing field. it should have been done many years ago, it should have been done by other presidents. and actually it is a disgrace that it wasn't done. but american companies also manufacture products in china. and in a nod to their concerns, things like smart watches and bluetooth equipment have been left off trump's tariff list. in return, china said it has no choice but to defend itself. china has to retaliate against us measures, to firmly defend our rights and interests and safeguard the global free trade order. china's growing middle
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classes are a big market for american products, that is what has kept us businesses in china. that is what they are worried about losing because of this trade war. and for china, it is the future at stake. it was moving away from the old model of growth into high—tech industries. but these trade tensions could hurt china's ability to get the technologies it needs. ultimately though, that would hurt america also. someone said, it is like a husband and wife, you can quarrel, but you cannot divorce, because you have children. all your babies, the multinationals in both countries, investment being settled there for decades. when two giants crash, the rest of us are caught in the middle. the bigger damage this trade war could do is to the global economy and business confidence at a time when the world could do with more certainty, not less. so, china thinking carefully about
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where it will target its tariffs and obviously will look at where mr trump is vulnerable, how are the democrats taking advantage? this is interesting, the dimension wisdom is that china has more to lose but they are being careful about how they use while average they have and we are already starting to see democrats running in the mid—term elections from agricultural state saying, here isa from agricultural state saying, here is a farmer who liked president trump but has been hit by the ta riffs trump but has been hit by the tariffs because the chinese are retaliating against soya bean exploits for example and this is hurting ourfarmers. i saw one exploits for example and this is hurting our farmers. i saw one today from a democratic senator in a tight race in north dakota, it is an agricultural state, they are going to use this and try and find farmers
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who are saying that this trade war is hurting us and we do not like the policies of the president. one of theissues policies of the president. one of the issues that he might be asked about because he is due to give a press c0 nfe re nce about because he is due to give a press conference at the white house. when he comes to the podium, we will give you those details. he may be asked about this. president trump is taking the unusual step of immediately declassifying documents relating to the russia probe of the 2016 election. they include documents related to the investigation into carter page — a former trump advisor — and text messages between members of the department ofjustice. critics say mr trump is trying to undermine the russia investigation. for more on how this impacts the wider mueller probe we arejoined by franklin foer, staff writer at the atlantic magazine. he is also author of the book world without mind. franklin, thank you for coming in. if you are an american, an informant around the world who is thinking of helping the us and you look at the fa ct helping the us and you look at the fact that the president is
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declassifying information into the russia pro, do you think yourself, i don't know if i will help america because my name might get declassified? you would be spooked, because what ever promises were made to you, in the past, by the investigators you were working with, the intelligence officers you were working with, would appear to be worth nothing if the president of the usa for whatever political reason or self—preservation decided that he was going tojump those agreements and that that secret does not really mean sigrid. also, presumably if you are a foreign intelligence service, you will look at this information and see where you can learn about us intelligence processes . you can learn about us intelligence processes. of course. that is the fundamental story line we see repeated in this russian scandal, which is that there is this antagonistic relationship between president trump and us law—enforcement and intelligence agencies and processes that had once
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been professionalised and are suddenly subjected to the whims of one man and that is undermining, not just the relationship between the civilians and the professionals, it is undermining the credibility of these agencies around the globe. is undermining the credibility of these agencies around the globem these agencies around the globem the cardinal rule of the intelligence services is to protect their sources and now the president says, it is more important that the american public should understand that the intelligence services are biased against me, is that what is happening? yes and it is happening because there is a series of very confusing conspiracies that republicans have been alleging about how the russian investigation first emerged. they are so difficult to understand, it does not necessarily make sense that they would want to expose all this information to the sui'i expose all this information to the sun because there is really a potential that it will actually blowback into their faces, this has happened to some extent when a
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republican congressmen insisted on publishing a memo earlier about the russian investigation, which he thought would discredit the investigation. instead, inadvertently, in this almost vaudevillian sort of way, it ended up vaudevillian sort of way, it ended up reaffirming a lot of the primary accusations against trump and the ability of the investigation. there isa ability of the investigation. there is a lot of their domestic —— information that we do know and we might get more information on that when it is released in the next few days, the information we do not know is that information that paul manna fought has been hiding and maybe if he works with robert miller, because he works with robert miller, because he said that he would co—operate, what sort of risk do you think that might present to the president. what sort of risk do you think that might present to the presidentlj think might present to the president.” think a huge risk. might present to the president.” thinka huge risk. paul might present to the president.” think a huge risk. paul manafort was running the campaign at the height of the alleged collusion between the united states, between the top campaign and russia and the russell ministore lines were paul manafort is the central figure. paul manafort
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had worked with a russian oligarch who was extremely close to vladimir putin. paul manafort old this guy a lot of money and we have e—mails we re lot of money and we have e—mails were paul manafort was corresponding with one of his aides in ukraine saying, can you set up a channel of communication with him? we will give him special access to the trump campaign. 0ne him special access to the trump campaign. one of the reasons that paul manafort was pursuing this relationship so urgently is that he had owed they oligarch a great deal of money and had been his business partner ina of money and had been his business partner in a failed investment. he had every incentive to try and use the trump campaign in order to heal this damage relationship with them oligarch who was incredibly close to vladimir putin putin. thank you for coming in. never a vladimir putin putin. thank you for coming in. nevera good vladimir putin putin. thank you for coming in. never a good position to be and when you were russian oligarch a lot of money. penny for the stars of the former mi6 officer who went out on such a limb to
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present information that he was worried about and he took it to the americans and they passed it the fbi and of course, now he is very much a pawn in this political dogfight. as franklin was suggesting, other people like that out there who may be thinking of cooperating with the us, might wonder if their information will be protected. elon musk‘s spacex company has unveiled the first private passenger it plans to fly around the moon. yusaku maezawa — this is him here — is a a2—year old japanese billionaire. he's bought space for himself and his guests at an undisclosed price, for a 2023 trip on the big falcon rocket. but mr yasaku doesn't need to worry about his packing just yet. because mr musk hasn't actually built the rocket, and he is not ‘100% certain‘ he will. but mr maezawa is making plans nonetheless for who he will take him. the billionaire says he'll be inviting a handful of artists from around the world hoping they'll be inspired by what they see.
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i buy you a shirt, he bought his friends a trip to the moon. i don't know whether it is worth it. we don't know what sort of rocket it will be, how comfortable it will be, whether it will stop, whether there is anywhere to stay, can you take any trinkets with you? it is not exactly a package tour to the caribbean. no, we will reserve judgment. this is beyond 100 days from the bbc. coming up for viewers on the bbc news channel and bbc world news — russia says syria shot down one of its military planes with 15 people on board... but it blames israel. we'll find out why. hello there. we have got some very windy weather that has come
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over the next 2a hours, courtesy of storm ali. but as well as ali, there will be further areas of low pressure, coming and going over the next couple of days, bringing wet and windy weather. there is a real risk of some transport disruption over the next few days. first of all, then, storm ali. here it is on the satellite picture and it is continuing to develop and deepen as it heads towards the united kingdom pretty rapidly. so, that is a storm that will be arriving, really as we head on into the early part of wednesday morning. before we get there, though, overnight, there will be wet weather for northern ireland and scotland, a narrow band of rain pushes its way eastwards across england and wales. the first signs of ali arriving will be the wet weather pushing into northern ireland towards the end of the night here. it is the strength of the winds that are going to cause big problems with ali. the squeeze in the isobars is on the southern western flank of ali. at least, that is where the strongest winds will be going, straight across northern ireland, straight across southern and central areas of scotland, and it is here where the met office has issued their amber weather warning for those strong gusts of wind.
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the winds are likely to be damaging, trees could be brought down in places and there could be damage to buildings as well. so, the strongest winds come through northern ireland during the morning, there will be some heavy rain around to come as well, particularly for northern areas. in scotland, the strongest winds through the central belt and southern parts, where we could get costs of 70, potentially 80 mph around some of the coasts and hills and over the grampians we will probably see winds getting over 100 mph. not that that is particularly unusual, really, in the storms, itjust tells you it is not a day to be walking out in the mountains of scotland. there will be heavy rain here as well and the combination of strong winds and rain will make it feel really cool. those temperatures struggling to get above 1a or 15 degrees for many areas of scotland. further south, we hold onto something a little bit warmer, temperatures into the mid—20s across eastern parts of england. we are not done with the wet and windy weather there, because, for thursday, we have got another area of low pressure moving its way in. this will bring strong winds through southern counties of england, with gales expected and again there could be a bit of tree debris brought down, some branches, that kind of thing.
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further north, for wales and for cumbria, torrential outbreaks of rain expected. 80—100 millimetres, bringing a real threat of some localised flooding. that is your latest weather. this is beyond 0ne hundred days, with me katty kay in washington, christian fraser is in london. our top stories: president trump's pick for the supreme court is in a fight to secure the nomination, both brett kavanaugh and his accuser will testify on monday. russia and israel try to ease tensions after a russian plane is shot down by syrian forces during an israeli attack. coming up in the next half hour. a big welcome for the south korean president as he arrives in the north to restart nuclear disarmament talks. and a suprise marriage proposal at the emmy awards, she said yes but was it the right place to ask? israel has expressed its sorrow
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for the death 15 russian service members who died in a plane crash near syria. but that's where the spirit of unity ends. israel says the syrian government is to blame becuase the russian jet was shot down by syrian anti aircraft. moscow is holding israel responsible because at the time of the incident, israeli fighter jets were attacking targets in syria. in an already tense environment it is just the kind of mistake that could have dangerous consequences. here's the bbc‘s sarah rainsford in moscow. i think ithink mr i think mr putin's choice of i think mr putin's choice of language was interesting and deliberate. he did say that this had been cleared with the kremlin and represented russia's official position. he didn't utter those words of condemnation of israel
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himself, but used careful language to describe what happened as an accident. it looks like a chain of accidental circumstances, an israeli jet did not shoot down a plane. for russia is real is a key ally in the middle middle east. they pride themselves on being able to maintain relationships with all key players in the region including iran and syria. russia has been politically backing president assad for some three years. it's a delicate act, i think what has happened now will put a strain on relations, particularly with israel. but also with syria, because despite the fact those allegations have come from the defence ministry, it's clear that it is silly that fired the shots that brought down the plane. there are questions read what is being said behind closed doors. doctrinal questions about what is being said
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behind closed doors. in reality, the questions are between russia and israel. russia isn't accusing syria publicly, that may put a strain on relations, but ultimately it's important that president putin is much more conservatory. he has said they will be a response to this, but it will be to increase protection for russian troops operating inside syria. he said those steps the world will notice. for more on this we are joined by a fellow at washington institute for near east policy. thank you for coming in. it sounds like the russians are keen to de—escalate the situation, but there the potential for lots of different players operating, for some kind of a mistake to be made. the next time could lead to escalation?” mistake to be made. the next time could lead to escalation? i think we are going to see a lot more of this, given the presence of iranian forces
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inafar given the presence of iranian forces in a far stronger position in syria on the ground. the israelis view this as a direct threat to their international security. they have signalled over the last two years that they are willing to hit these targets. and they have to go through a lot of positions where russians are. there is always the potential that something could heat up, if one we re that something could heat up, if one were movies made. how does this game out, if we are really israelis are nervous of the prospect of iranian presence on the border in syria, and the russians wa nt border in syria, and the russians want that uranium presence in syria, how does this shape up politically? —— the russians want iranians presence in syria. well, you can hit certain things there, but make sure we know about it first, no interference, that's one way of doing it, it's interference, that's one way of doing it, its work that way. there has been an increase in temple of israeli strikes. given what happened
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in damascus two days ago, the russian position is going to have two, in some way, dress this further concern. so we may see where that goesin concern. so we may see where that goes in the future, but i think, given the presence of russian forces on the ground there is only so much they can do to stop the israelis and help their allies. i'm starting to wonder how this relationship between russia and president assad is going at the moment, here we have a situation where the syrians shoot down a russian aircraft, but the russian president is setting up a buffer zone at a time when president assad buffer zone at a time when president assa d wa nts buffer zone at a time when president assad wants to remove fluid. is this a relationship that might be under strain? of course, there is definite strain. there are strings even on the russian side, and libya, the iranians, there is potential there.
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there whole other concerns. and now, with the israeli issue, it's... it's quite the part of problems, to be perfectly honest. you can say that ain! perfectly honest. you can say that again! thank you very much. that such a good way to describe syria right now. international monitoring groups say there is no indication that north korea is scaling back its nuclear programme. but the south korean leader is still persuing diplomacy. today he went through the rather bizarre spectacle of embracing the north korean leader at the airport and then driving alongside kimjong un past thousands of cheering north korean citizens. laura bicker has the report on today's summit. this summit began where the last one left off — with a warm hug and a handshake. the leaders of these two countries, which are technically still at war, greeted one another like old friends. and for this chosen north korean girl, she got a hug from a president she probably never dreamed would set foot in her country. moonjae—in took time
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with the carefully—arranged crowds. they were dressed in their best to welcome this son of north korean refugees. more choreography was to come. tens of thousands lined the streets as the leaders' motorcade made its way through the city. their shout means "0ne korea," a cry for reunification. but president moon can't enjoy this moment for too long. he has a lot of work to do. away from the cheering masses, he must persuade kimjong—un to take steps to disarm. i think the most important thing is that the progress of the last year needs to keep going forward. we cannot ever go back to another situation of fire and fury, of kim jong—un threatening to send missiles near guam. we might not escape that situation as lucky as we did last year. moonjae—in has three days to make a difference,
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in south korea there is only a passing interest in this third meeting. unemployment is on the rise, and the president's high ratings are falling. many in the world a re ratings are falling. many in the world are still watching. they know that who has get details plans about denuclearisation. it is time for north korea to show their hand. if they are serious about disarming, if not, these summits will be dismissed. the south korean president has three days to president has three process and his own political career. referrals are going to gangster america, not much progress, so one
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wonders whether kim jong unis playing a long game here. we had a dangerous situation, and kim jong playing a long game here. we had a dangerous situation, and kimjong un doesn't lose from that, does he. but at the same time, neither does the south korean president, even though he might not be able to get the two sides together, at least he staved off the prospect of war for the moment. i guess the question for president who is if the prospect of war re—emerges, is president who is if the prospect of war re—emerges, is he seemed to have been duped with photos of him hugging kimjong un, going to these parades, does it looked like he was, you know, fooled by the norse, if things don't work out as he wants them to with diplomacy? we are keeping an eye on the press conference at the white house where president by the polish by minister have not yet started taking questions. as soon as he starts taking will go to that. as soon as he starts taking will go to that. the head of germany's domestic
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intelligence service has been removed from his post. hans—georg maasen had been facing intense criticism over his response to recent unrest in the eastern city of chemnitz. he questioned reports about far—right extremists randomly attacking immigrants in the city, saying there was good reason to believe the reports were deliberate misinformation. officials say he will take on a new role in the interior ministry. the authorities in the mexican state of jalisco have been forced to store bodies in a refrigerated truck because of a surge in the numbers of murders. the truck, containing more than a—hundred—and—fifty unidentified victims of crime was moved from street to street in the city of guadelajara until residents complained about the smell. it has now been relocated to a warehouse while work continues on a new mortuary in the city. jalisco is home to one of the country's most violent and powerful drug cartels. a video of the venezuelan president, nicolas maduro, eating in a high—end restaurant in turkey has caused outrage in crisis—stricken venezuela. the video shows a turkish
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celebrity chef carving steak for the president and his wife. almost two—thirds of venezuelans have reported losing weight because of food shortages in recent years. red meat is especially scarce. in iowa, police have charged a man with the murder of a young spanish golf champion, who was found dead on a golf course. 22 year old celia barquin — won this year's, european amateur golf championship and was set for a promising future. tiffany sweeney reports. a rising golf star will stop this is 22—year—old celia barquin. celia barquin was finishing her degree in civil engineering, during her time in the us she rose to prominence as a young golfer and was named iowa state female athlete of the year. on
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monday morning, she was discovered to run unattended golf course was celia barquin's body was found near an abandoned bag. someone was found in the water and subsequently identified as celia barquin. she had been stabbed in the upper torso and neck. at approximately 2pm officers encountered colin and daniel richardson, with the date of birth of september the 8th, 1986. colin daniel richards has been charged with her murder. many have taken to twitter to share memories of celia barquin. the iowa state director of athletics described her as having an infectious smile, and the european golf association tweeted this picture.
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this is beyond one hundred days. still to come: the pussy riot protestor flown to berlin after he lost the ability to speak or walk. was he poisoned or wasn't he? more on that next. the liberal democrat leader sir vince cable has told his party conference in brighton that brexit must be stopped, our correspondent jonathan blake is there: insert vince cable's all words brexit isn't inevitable, and must be stopped. that is the central message throughout the party conference in brighton. it is something noble democrats have used to set themselves apart from labour party and tories. they are committed to stopping brexit. we heard more about how service cable would go about doing that, he is attempting to put himself at the heart of a campaign for a public vote on a deal. and, as
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he explained, brexit does not have two be inevitable. the brexit date may be the 29th of march, but it is only maybe. brexit is not inevitable. it can, and it must be stopped. for the true believers, the fundamentalists, the costs of brexit have always been irrelevant. years of economic pain, justified by the pleasure of leaving the european union. economic pain felt, not by them, but by those least able to afford it. the biggest reaction from the supporters in the hall came for his attack onjeremy corbyn, he said jeremy corbyn was indulging anti—semitic bigots, and if he didn't come around to backing a public vote on a brexit deal, then
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he should resign. vince cable also attacked theresa may and said that he thought she didn't believe in brexit either. this may be served vince cable's last as leader, he has announced he will leave before the next general election, but no one seems to know exactly when. at the moment they seem content to let inside his own timetable for departure. inside his own timetable for departure. the big winners from last night's emmy awards were game of thrones which picked up its third best drama award and amazon's comedy the marvelous mrs maisel which went home with five trophies. here in the uk a lot of the focus has been on the british stars who did well winning both the best actress and best actor awards, claire foy for her role in the crown and matthew rhys who starred in the americans. from los angeles the bbc‘s james cook has the highlights. tv may be changing, with debates
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about diversity and a surge in streaming services, but some are fears an eternal. like hollywood's passion for a party and love of a british accent. this was her first emmy, and last chance to win is betraying the queen. i am not going to cry on this programme. i was given a role that i never thought i would ever get the chance to play and i met people who i will love for ever and ever and ever. fellow brit thandie newtown was also honoured for westworld, i don't even believe in god, but i thank her tonight! there was also british success for charlie brooker and the satirist john british success for charlie brooker and the satiristjohn 0liver. game of thrones took the big drama award, while 50s period piece the marvelous mrs maisel won best comedy. the welsh actor matthew rhys
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triumphed in cold war thriller, the americans. the remarkable influence of british actors on the entertainment industry continues, but that's not what eve ryo ne continues, but that's not what everyone is talking about. continues, but that's not what everyone is talking about. jan, you are the sunshine in my life... but all the stars were upstaged by this director. you wonder why i don't liek to call you my girlfriend, because i want to call you my wife. cheering. will you marry me? she said yes. and just as well, hollywood loves a happy ending. james cook, bbc news, los angeles. and for more on the big night we can cross now to hunter harris from new york magazine. i have some pretty strong views about that proposal. thank you very much forjoining us. i don't often read reviews of the
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emmys. but let me read this to you, full of stilted banter, painful mismatches, the ceremony dragged on and all the excitement of an extended commercial break. wasn't that bad? it might almost have been worse! if they were kind of lacklustre hosts, i have to say. they didn't seem very enthusiastic about hosting, and it definitely showed on monday night. the other criticism last night was that there was a lot of talk about diversity and in jokes about diversity, but not very many diverse awards? definitely. a lot of black shows went unnoticed last night, and i think it was very awkward to, because for about an hour awards only went out to white people. james gordon had a joke about it, he said
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bme ‘s were so why did should be trending. i want trending. iwanta trending. i want a spirit thoughtful someone who brought their mum, because they thought she was going to win. she's been nominated several times and still not one. i think sandra oh was the heartbreak of the night for me. i loved the crown, but killing will leave was clearly the best in my opinion. there was a win for regina king who turned up in a lime green dress, what does this mean for the oscars, if she can win a emmy, what does it mean for the 0scars? a emmy, what does it mean for the oscars? she has a really good contender, we are definitely thinking she will try for best supporting actress at the oscars, but she has the emmy awards, and is looking at good chances going forward. thank you very much for joining us. we did say we would go
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to the white house, when they started taking questions. the president isjust being started taking questions. the president is just being asked questions about the plano vasiliev. many americans, most americans are concerned we could be involved in a incident with syria. what are you telling people today about the possibility of a war in syria?” just heard about the instant you have mentioned, and it sounds to me, it seems to me, just based on a review of the facts, that syria shot down a russian plane. i understand about 14 people were killed, at least. it's a very sad thing. but that's what happens. syria, according to early reports, subject to change, syria shot down a russian plane. that's not a good situation. we have done a tremendousjob in
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syria, and in that region to eradicate isis, which is why we are there. we are very close to being finished with thatjob. there. we are very close to being finished with that job. we are there. we are very close to being finished with thatjob. we are going to make a determination as to what we are going to do. we have eradicated isis in a large area of the middle east. these are people who will not be coming here, because they are not around any longer. we've done that in a very short period of time. our great secretary of state, really, thank you very much for the greatjob of state, really, thank you very much for the great job you were doing. and we've been working very ha rd doing. and we've been working very hard on this. then, an incredible job, and we will make the decision fairly quickly, thank you very much. thank you, president, clearly, you said you asked president trump if he would consider a permanent base in poland, of course that also relates to russia. how did the president responds to your position to have a permanent base ? responds to your position to have a
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permanent base? and also, do you currently have concerns over the us and russia's relationship? well, of course. of course. i told mr president about all the aspects connected with the permanent presence of the us in poland. first and foremost, ladies and gentlemen, we cannot say that if there are permanent basis of the us armed forces in poland we will see a deterioration of security, because that will lead to increased russian activity. and increased militarisation. i want to say, clearly, ladies and gentlemen, the very strong militarisation has taken
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place. it is the reality that we live in today. as far as aggressive russian behaviour is concerned, as far as increased military activity, concerning the increasing of militarisation of russia has been conducting such activities. for the first time we are unable to see that. in georgia, in 2008, the then president of pool and took the european leaders and they went to stop russian tanks which were about to attack the capital, georgia. from that moment, that expansion has been developing, it is another attack on ukraine. today, we can see an illegal occupation of the crimea. today we are witnessing constant violations of international law. these are political effects of europe, and the presence of the usa is only providing a guarantee
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security. and a possibility defend, because, let me reiterate again, it is only about the guarantee of security and defence of europe. this is the most crucial issue right now from our perspective. from the perspective of central and eastern european countries, we are speaking in one voice on this one, generally. that is why we wanted to ensure the presence of the united states armed forces. and also, we wanted to have the presence of nato forces in part of europe as well. of course, mr president, his staff and advisers, the pentagon staff, have considered all these issues. there is a whole range of which are in favour of the fa ct range of which are in favour of the fact that it presence of the us armed forces is absolutelyjustified today. that is due to the protection of the interest of the usa as well. iam of the interest of the usa as well. i am absolutely convinced as this one. today, unfortunately, we are
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seeing international law being violated. we are seeing aggressive behaviour, and i am convinced that there is no more effective method of preventing a war, than an deliver a decisive stance stems judging that we are ready to repel a possible attack. at presence, that means a deterrent. when we have a strong military presence in this part of europe where there is a potential threat, we'll well no that happening ever. you have been watching beyond 100 days. he they have been taking questions about syria and will continue to take questions from american and polish reporters. from us, thank you very much for watching. we'll see you back here tomorrow. goodbye.
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hello there. we've got some very windy weather to come over the next 24 hours, courtesy of storm alley. but they will be further areas of low pressure coming and going, bringing wet and windy weather. the real risk of some transport disruption first of all, here is the storm on the satellite picture, continuing to develop and deepen as it heads towards the united kingdom pretty rapidly. that storm will be arriving as we head into the early pa rt arriving as we head into the early part of wednesday morning. before we get there, somewhere at whether for northern ireland and scotland. a narrow band of rain pushing eastwards a cross narrow band of rain pushing eastwards across england and wales. the first signs of the arrival will
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be the wet weather pushing into northern ireland towards the end of the night. it is the strength of the winds causing big problems, the squeezing the isobars on the southern anne western flank, that's where the strongest winds are going. straight across northern ireland and southern and central scotland. the met office have issued an amber weather warning for strong gusts of wind. they are likely to be damaging, and trees could be brought down with some damage to buildings as well. the strongest winds comes in northern ireland. some women around the northern areas. in scotland, strongest winds through the central belt and southern parts. —— some wind around the northern areas. 0ver —— some wind around the northern areas. over the grampians we seek winds of 100 mph. areas. over the grampians we seek winds of100 mph. not areas. over the grampians we seek winds of 100 mph. not that bad is particularly unusual, it's just not a day to be walking out and about. not a day to be walking in scotland!
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the temperatures are struggling to get above 40 or 50 degrees for many areas of scotland. further south we hold on to something warmer, temperatures into the mid—20s across eastern parts of england. for thursday, we've got another area of low pressure moving its way in. this will bring strong winds to seven counties of england, deals are expected. some trees could be brought down, that kind of thing. for wales and cumbria torrential outbreaks of rain, 80 to 100 millimetres bringing a real threat of some localised flooding. that your latest weather. this is bbc news, the headlines at 8pm. a government—commissioned report says it should be easier for highly—skilled workers to the move to the uk after brexit, but those from the eu shouldn't get preference. the impacts of migration depend
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on things like the skill of the migrants, but not fundamentally on their nationality. and so we don't think there should be a preference for eu citizens over non—eu citizens. the eu's chief brexit negotiator promises "improved" proposals on the irish border issue, and says customs checks could be held away from the border. the reservists who died during an sas march in the brecon beacons, two officers in charge of safety are cleared of negligence. a jury says a bus driver in his 70's who crashed into a shop caused the deaths of two people by dangerous driving. bad news for england cricket star ben stokes,
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