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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  September 19, 2018 11:00am-1:01pm BST

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this is bbc news i'mjoanna gosling. these are the top stories developing at 11. the eu's chief brexit negotiator says it is "ready to improve" its offer on the irish border, ahead of a meeting of eu leaders in salzburg this evening. most checks can take place away from the border. at company premises or in the markets. we need to dejohnette ties the checks that are needed. a woman has died after the caravan she was in was blown off a cliff in the west of ireland. an amber warning is in force for parts of the uk as storm ali sweeps in with high winds and heavy rain. the prime minister will pledge £2 billion to build new homes in england, and says she wants to remove the "stigma" of social housing. i want to see social housing that is so i want to see social housing that is so good people are proud to call it
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home. proud to tell people where they live. tributes are paid to the tv host and comedy writer denis norden. he was famed for his dry delivery introducing bloopers and outtakes on it'll be alright on the night. a british team fires a huge net into space as part of a plan to clean up the millions of pieces of rubbish floating around in the earth's orbit. good morning. it's wednesday the 19th of september, i'm joanna gosling. welcome to bbc newsroom live. there's been a move to break the deadlock in the brexit talks. the eu's chief negotiator, michel barnier says he is willing to improve his offer to the uk over the irish border. both sides have agreed to avoid a hard border after brexit, but have until now been unable to establish how this will be achieved.
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the move comes ahead of a meeting of eu leaders in salzburg where theresa may will use a dinner this evening to sell her chequers plan. our europe reporter, gavin lee has more. michel barnier spent last night briefing eu ministers on the latest brexit negotiations ahead of today's summit in salzburg, where theresa may will stress that her chequers plan is the only way to avoid a no—deal, and will ask the eu to show willingness to compromise. mr barnier says eu leaders are now ready to offer an improved proposal to prevent the need for a hard border in ireland. he went further than before, stating that eu and british officials could work together and come up with locations to carry out technical checks of goods coming to northern ireland from the rest of the uk, on sites away from ports and airports. we are clarifying which goods arriving in northern ireland from the rest of the uk would need to be checked, and where, when and by whom these checks could be performed.
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we can also clarify that most checks can take place away from the border. but that proposal would mean britain agreeing to the eu's so—called backstop plan, that would effectively keep northern ireland in the eu's single market and customs union, while the rest of the uk leaves. as for a new, improved proposal, that is not the kind of compromise theresa may is looking for. british officials have described it as unacceptable, and a threat to the constitutional integrity of the uk. it is unlikely to loosen the deadlock ahead of tonight's summit in salzburg. gavin lee, bbc news, brussels. in a moment we will talk to our chief political correspondent, vicki young at westmisnter. but first to damian grammaticas in salzburg. so, what is the view there on
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whether theresa may can sell this plan? well, i think she will have an opportunity over dinner tonight to address the leaders, the issue, really, is not about selling the chequers plan, the chequers plan deals with future trading relationships, what she will be doing is pushing eu leaders to say they should accept that, they should buy that, they have many reservations, but the real difficulty is that one around the ireland border. that's the real problem in negotiations. i think, are not, what she will say is, the argument you heard there, a second ago, that the eu idea is not a cce pta ble ago, that the eu idea is not acceptable to the uk. the uk has already signed up, theresa may has agreed they will be no border under any circumstances between northern ireland and ireland. she has agreed that will be a fallback plan or
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backstop where northern ireland will remain under most eu custom union and single market rules, but held the question is how to achieve that. today they are trying to soften the eu plan, join a new border between northern ireland and the uk, it is about dispersed checks on goods coming across from the uk to northern ireland. they could be in factories or distribution centres, they don't have to be at ports. where goods would cross. theresa may once eight, sort of, customs idea that could be a bridge to the future. she will be pushing that. but the leaders will not engage in negotiations as i have happened at every summit. she can address them, but she cannot negotiate. let's go now to vicky young. does michel barnier‘s intervention make much of a difference in terms of getting closer together? i'm not sure it does. we've
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immediately had reaction from an important group in the house of commons, the dup. they are important because they represent a large chunk of northern ireland, and they prop up of northern ireland, and they prop up the prime minister. it's the only reason she is able to govern, because she has the support of their mps in parliament. they have reacted today, as you might expect, by not welcoming this at all. they don't put much whilst all by what michel barnier has said. the backstop being insisted upon by the eu still means a border down the irish sea, although a different kind of checks. they say that with theresa may and the labour party saying before, no british prime minister could accept that. although it sounds like a small change, basically, they are saying, we still need checks, you can do them yourselves. it doesn't look like that's going to be a laugh. it's still an acceptable to
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the uk. then the border issue which you were talking about there, there was broad agreement getting over the first hurdle, next is the bigger part, the bigger picture, what kind of future relationship to we have with the eu? as we have heard, that proposal by theresa may is all about staying closely aligned when it comes to goods and agricultural products, staying alongside the rule book for the eu. that has not gone down well at all with many in the conservative party, and david davis, the former brexit secretary said today that he believes that theresa may will have to accept a much looser trade arrangement.” may will have to accept a much looser trade arrangement. i think we get to a point where we she will not be able to accept what they offer and they will not be able to accept what she offers. we need to step back to what was offered in march. donald tusk said you can have a free trade agreement. people talk about canada, south korea, there are a
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whole range of different things. there are plenty of precedents for this. for countries like france, the most difficult negotiations, they have said that you will have a better deal than anyone else. it is possible, and it's almost possible off the shelf. the point of a free—trade deal is a ready—made version which is sitting around. that's not true with the chequers deal or various others. david davis also had a barbed comment for his colleague michael gove, they both wanted brexit but have a very different approach to the plan put forward by theresa may. michael gove said it is fine to accept it, voted through, and then maybe later it could be changed. well, david davis's response was to say that michael gove is a clever man, but clever people sometimes miss things. his view is that once we have handed over billions of pounds to the eu, that will be at, they will no longer be interested in
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further negotiations. thank you very much to both of you. later this morning on bbc news: we're giving you the opportunity to ask the experts any burning questions you may have about the uk's future outside the eu. joining us at eleven thirty am is professor anand menon from the uk in a changing europe and jill rutter from the institute for government. to take part you can text your questions to 61124, email to ‘askthis@bbc.co.uk‘ or tweet using #bbcaskthis. a woman has died after a caravan was blown off a cliff as high winds from storm ali batter the west of ireland. police and emergency services are at the scene in county galway. the woman is thought to be in herfifties. storm ali is the uk's first named storm of the season.
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an amber, "be prepared", weather warning is in force in northern ireland, scotland and northern england, and heavy rain is forecast. the public are being warned to take precautions. the public are being warned to take precautions. our ireland correspondent, chris page is in belfast for us now. it is very blustery here in deed. up to 70 mph. particularly strong along the coast. the storm is causing widespread disruption across northern ireland, some 30,000 homes and businesses are without electricity at the moment. some 50,000 homes are without electricity in the silence of ireland. a woman in her 50s died when her caravan was blown off a cliff in galway. we are told she was a tourist with the ca rava n told she was a tourist with the caravan landing on the coastline below. widespread disruption to
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journeys today, lots of cancelled flights and a number of close roads. we are also told that northern ireland really have imposed speed rejections on lines, and staff are working to clear daybreak from their tracks and monitor the situation through the day. —— cleared debris. it is also a meeting of officials this morning to look at a response to the disruption caused by the storm. we are told that it hasn't quite reached its peak yet, it is due to peak around midday or early afternoon. thank you very much, emma. let's talk to our weather presenter about it now. where did it right now? its push into the north of northern ireland at the moment, it should peak shortly. you canjust see the centre of the storm to the north of ireland working its way towards scotland. it is on the southern flank where we see the strongest winds. it's going to have
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an impact in some way, shape, or form, across an impact in some way, shape, or form , across many an impact in some way, shape, or form, across many areas. but the big zone, the biggest concern for the met office ‘s northern ireland, southern scotland and the north—east england. this is where we could see winds up to 70 or 80 mph. it is still the start of autumn, all the trees are in full leaf and acting like sales at the moment. it could quite drizzly bring those trees down. that will have an impact on travel i suspect. it's notjust northern ireland and scotland, we've got issues with widespread gales ta kers got issues with widespread gales takers into the afternoon. how does it compare with previous storms? it's the first major storm of the autumn, we see these storms throughout the autumn and winter every year, it is still early. and the impact could be that little bit greater. we will keep you updated
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and have regular updates throughout the day. two billion pounds of new funding to build affordable and social housing in england has been announced by theresa may this morning. housing associations, local authorities and other organisations will be able to bid for money to spend on projects that will start development after 2021. the national housing federation, which represents housing associations in england, says the announcement is "extremely welcome". speaking at the summit theresa may said she wants to remove the stigma of social housing. i want to see social housing that is so good people are proud to call it their home. proud to tell people where they live, proud to be thought of as an estate person. ourfriends and neighbours who live in social housing are not second—rate citizens. they should not have to put up with second—rate homes. and that applies to management, every bit as much to design and construction. (detectives are investigating
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whether an incident in which a car hit pedestrians outside a mosque in london was an islamophobic attack. police say the incident is being treated as a possible hate crime after three people were struck by the vehicle in cricklewood in north—west london, with reports that those inside the car were making "anti—islamic taunts". two men in their twenties suffered minor injuries, and a man in his fifties is in hospital with a serious leg injury. the cost of living rose by 2.7 % in the year to august, according to figures released this morning by the office for national statistics. the figure is well above the 2.4% average predicted by economists. it compares to pay rises which at the last count were just 2.9 % in the year tojuly. we'll have more reaction to this in business, later in the programme. the leaders of north and south korea have signed a declaration with the goal of ridding the peninsula of nuclear weapons.
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the president of south korea, moonjae—in, has been on a three day visit to pyongyang and said both leaders wanted to eliminate the risk of war. they also discussed plans to allow family reunions and co—host the 2032 olympics. the headlines on bbc news. the eu's chief brexit negotiator says the eu is ready to improve its offer on the irish border ahead of a meeting of leaders in salzburg this evening. a woman has died after a ca rava n evening. a woman has died after a caravan with her inside was blown offa caravan with her inside was blown off a cliff in the west of ireland. an amber warning is in force for parts of the uk as storm annie sweeps in. and the prime minister is pledging an extra £2 billion to build affordable housing and social housing in england, she says she wa nts to housing in england, she says she wants to see better quality homes. and in the sport, late drama in
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anfield as liverpool were leading paris st germain to kneel before the french side fought back. but there was then a winner in stoppage time. and tottenham's manager says they deserved much more from their champions league defeat away to inter milan last night. the spurs conceded two late goals. and england's netball is play australia in the second quad series match. the hosts are looking for revenge after england beat them in the final of the commonwealth games in april. they are into the second quarter and england leading 12 points to nine. the mayor of london, sadiq khan, is planning a new approach to tackle the serious violence which has seen a hundred people murdered in the city this year. a violence reduction unit will follow the approach of a scheme in glasgow,
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where the murder rate was almost halved over a decade. the idea is to treat the problem as a public health issue. keith doyle has more. a gang in london, caught on cctv, about to stab a man to death. the latest figures for england and wales show there were 1.3 million violent incidents last year. in london, there have been 100 murders so far in 2018. a new approach to combating violent crime is to tackle the causes. this centre in south london provides support for young people already caught up or likely to be caught up in a cycle of violence. i've seen young people that have been shot, young people that have been stabbed, or young people that have, like, low—level boxer fractures from punching the wall, not wanting to get into the fight. the interventions that we do are for when we actually meet them at that point, and we're able to make a difference. we're able to say, you can change. dawn's own family was helped by all—round support.
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she is now helping one teenager who has turned away from violence after being given a sense of worth. slowly, slowly, he came to understand that it wasn'tjust cooking, that he had to turn up on time, that he had to be — you know, if he turned up late, he was letting me down. the basis of this approach to tackling violent crime is accepting that violence is not inevitable. it is preventable, and it can be cured rather than just punished. this approach is already in place in glasgow, and has helped cut murders by half in a decade. now, it is to be tried in london. keith doyle, bbc news. the mayor's initiative comes just hours after another victim of knife crime died in the capital. a man, believed to be in his twenties, was stabbed on a north london street. he was found with serious injuries in tufnell park at around 9pm and died an hour later. he hasn't been formally identified and nobody been arrested. let's return to our brexit coverage now,
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and when you think about the uk leaving the european union, parma ham, champagne and cornish pasties probably don't spring immediately to mind. however, the issue of whether the uk will respect the eu's system linking products to a particular location is causing a roadblock in the overall negotiations. adam fleming reports from the french wine—making region our europe reporter adam fleming is in parma — home of parmesan cheese. it's amazing here. this is a good gig- it's amazing here. this is a good gig. the eu is incredibly strict about rules that say parma ham can only be called parma ham if richard produced in this region. it's the same with parmesan cheese. it is the same with parmesan cheese. it is the same in italy and france. particularly in the champagne region which i visited recently. if you've celebrated anything recently with a bottle of fizz and it was champagne, it was produced in this region of france, which has become a battleground in the brexit talks.
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it's over the eu's system of geographical indications, gis, which protect products that have a link to a particular location. if your patch earns a gi, then no—one else can use the name in the eu. the producers love it. people know that champagne only comes from champagne, that region, so it's very important and we have a good organisation fighting for that worldwide. it's notjust things made from grapes. there are more than 3,000 other products on the list including parma ham, balsamic vinegar and feta cheese. and there are some british gis, like scotch whisky and cornish pasties. the eu wants the uk to guarantee all the existing gis under british law after brexit. the government hasn't agreed to that, with some voices in britain saying the whole thing is a barrier to free trade. it's impossible to understand, you know, i would say, 300, 400 kilometres from here, that not respecting, you know,
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the tradition and the name, the very important name, you know, of french wine or italian wine. it may sound a bit weird that wine and cheese have become this kind of roadblock but grumbles about gis have been a feature of global trade for decades. for example, america makes its own champagne... (whispers) . . much to their annoyance. i'm very sad. it's american sparkling, it's californian sparkling, it's napa sparkling but it's not american champagne. if there's no brexit deal on this, there's no brexit deal at all and no celebratory fizz for the brexit negotiators. let's talk to a representative from the producers of parmesan cheese. of course, i'm not going to call its parmesan, am i? well, we have a
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different name for it. you can call it parmesan in the eu. what makes it so it parmesan in the eu. what makes it so unique? what's so special about it? it is produced in a specific area, where you have a land that has particular characteristics from our point of view. it is something you find naturally in the land that you can find find naturally in the land that you canfind in find naturally in the land that you can find in the cheese. of course, the method of production. it is perfected down the centuries. how important is to protect this name in the uk brexit? very important. as you know, parmesan is one of the products that has the most important number of imitations. so, it sounds
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italian, and that is common with the imitations. how do you clamp down on fa ke imitations. how do you clamp down on fake parmesan? in the eu we don't have too, luckily, because there are already regulations that protect the name. outside of the eu, we have registered a trademark in approximately 70 countries, so wherever there is authorisation on the product we tried to register the trademark. but the eu system gives more protection than, say, the world trade organisation, doesn't it? yes, it provides a very important function, because, of course, member states have to control and sanction these producers who are not respecting the regulations. have you taken proportions already to protect
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the product in the uk? yes, we have. actually, the trademark has been registered way before anything happened. and when we heard about the results of the brexit, we reregistered parmesan as well. so in england, you should find both cheeses. just in case you are going to you'd trademark a lot to protect in the uk as well? as far as the regulations, we do not need to, but we have it registered already, yes, just in case. thank you forjoining us. just in case. thank you forjoining us. i'm off for some cheese and ham 110w. us. i'm off for some cheese and ham now. it is worth bearing in mind that british brexit negotiator see this as a trump card, the eu really wa nts this as a trump card, the eu really wants this to happen, and i'm told the brits are saving it for the
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endgame. this could get salt right at the last minute. enjoy your cheese and ham. more than five million children are at risk of famine in yemen, as the ongoing war increases food and fuel prices, according to the charity save the children. it said disruption to supplies coming through the embattled port of hodeida could cause starvation on an unprecedented scale. save the children say two thirds of yemen's population already don't know where their next meal is coming from. four million people have been charged more than they need to for their mobile phones according to research by citizen's advice bureau. it says three of britain's biggest mobile phone networks, — ee, 3 and vodafone — routinely carry on charging customers for their handsets after the cost has been paid off. the industry regulator, ofcom says it has set out plans to force companies to tell customers when their minimum contract ends. tv host and comedy writer denis norden has died aged 96. his family said he passed away after spending weeks at the royal free hospital in north london.
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the presenter was famed for his dry delivery and for holding a clipboard, as he introduced bloopers and outtakes on it'll be alright on the night. so, it was rudyard kipling who said, if you can smile while all about you is going wrong, then you're probably gathering more material for another cock—up programme. it's been exactly what our researchers have been doing all year. welcome to this edition of alright outtakes, each one guaranteed morning—fresh, lemon—scented, and just the type of thing they don't tell you about in media training courses. as usual, i'm the price you have to pay for the funny bits. time for the weather. the latest on that storm, simon. yes, indeed, storm ali already having an impact in northern parts
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of the uk. wind speeds so far about 50 to 70 mph, but they will increase further over the next few hours across northern ireland, and then into scotland as well. we've got a met office amber warning in force. some heavy gusts across central scotla nd some heavy gusts across central scotland into this afternoon. the winds continue to bring damage and disruption. on top of that, heavy rain moving its way north and eastwards a cross rain moving its way north and eastwards across scotland, that will bring into the afternoon. those wind gusts are round about 50 to 60 mph. even further south, a0 to 50 mph wind gusts this afternoon. as we go through the rest of the day the wayne did rain continues for scotland. dry and broke to the cells, brighter skies and sunshine in northern parts of england and wales. gradually easing out this afternoon. this is bbc news.
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our latest headlines: a woman in her 50s has died after a caravan with her inside was blown off a cliff in the west of ireland. storm ali has brought high winds and rain to western parts of ireland and the uk. an amber weather warning has been issued by the met office. the eu's chief negotiator, michel barnier, said the eu is "ready to improve" its offer on the irish border ahead of a summit in salzburg this evening. the prime minister pledges £2 billion to build new homes in england, and says she wants people to be proud of living in social housing. a british team fires a huge net into space as part of a plan to clean up the bits of debris floating around in the earth's orbit. the tv host and comedy writer denis norden has died aged 96. he was famed for hosting it'll be all right on the night. sport now. here's holly hamilton. it was one of those special
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champions league nights at anfield as liverpool left it very late to beat paris st germain but it was a very different story for tottenham, who will still be wondering how they lost to inter milan at the san siro. another spine tingling raw. would it be another special night? anfield hoped and there heroes soon obliged. daniel sturridge's first champions league start for six years. talk about an impact. paris st germain posted the two priciest players in history but they were both wayward and psg all at sea. a penalty converted by james milner, and psg all at sea. a penalty converted byjames milner, liverpool in dreamland, but then a bolt from the blue. one was pulled back at the break. it was breathless stuff. the second half was no different. with ten minutes left, psg thought they had snatched a draw. but deep in
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stoppage time, the fairy tale finish, as roberto firmino fired liverpool to a 3—2 win. drama, glory, just your average anfield night. earlier, tottenham began theircampaign at night. earlier, tottenham began their campaign at inter milan with a seemed to be heading for three points. christian eriksen‘s first effort kept out but not his second. hardly pretty but spurs were hardly bothered. in truth, they should have had more, and how they will wish they had. this folly giving inter milan the most spectacular of equalisers. suddenly, tottenham were clinging on, and deep into injury time they capitulated. spurs will be wondering quite how they lost but first night drama they could have done without. elsewhere in the champions league, there was a a8th hat—trick for
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lionel messi in his career. barcelona beat psv eindhoven a—o. the chair of barcelona beat psv eindhoven a—o. the chairof uk barcelona beat psv eindhoven a—o. the chair of uk sport has added her voice to calls for russia to remain banned from world athletics. the world anti—dopey agency's committee is expected to end a three—year suspension of russia's anti—doping agency when they meet tomorrow. the move has been criticised by athletes. katherine grainger says the integrity of sport and competition has to be protected to maintain public trust and support and its responsibility rests with leaders at every level. the most decorated olympian of all time, michael phelps, has called for more support to be given to athletes when they step away from the spotlight. the american, who retired after winning the 23rd gold medal of his career in rio in 2016, says he
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contemplated suicide during the worst period of his depression. and england's netball players are backin and england's netball players are back in action down under. they are facing australia in a rematch of the commonwealth games final. england dominated the first quarter in newcastle but momentum shifted in the second and at half—time it is the second and at half—time it is the hosts who are leading 2a—25. and the umpire who encouraged nick kyrgios has been suspended from his next two tournaments. the umpire was heard telling him that he wanted to help the australian as he helped —— trailed by a set and a break. the atp says his actions were deemed to have compromised the impartiality thatis have compromised the impartiality that is required of an official. that is all be sport for now but you can find more on all those stories on the bbc sport website. we will
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have more for you in the next hour. well, many questions remain about what a post—brexit britain will look like. so now it's time to take your questions on brexit and ask what the uk's future outside of the eu will look like in ask this. we've been asking you to send in your questions to our guests, professor anand menon — director of the independent research body uk in a changing europe, and jill rutter from the thinktank institute for government. welcome. if there is to be no hard border with the republic of ireland, how do we conduct immigration checks on people crossing the border who are not authorised? it is slightly different from the eu because between the uk and the republic is something called a common travel area and so people will be able to ci’oss area and so people will be able to cross the border as before, even in the event that we don't come to some deal. the real issue is going to be the checking of goods as they pass,
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which might require infrastructure. but does it not give a very easy way into the uk from the eu? what the government is saying is basically they are not going to do checks on they are not going to do checks on the border. if you want to work in the border. if you want to work in the uk or stay in the uk, they will be checked in other places, so your employer will be able to check that you have got permission to work in the uk, your landlord will be asked to check that you have got permission to rent somewhere long term in the uk, so those are going to be with the czechs will take place and that is why they say they can manage without people checks on the border. but will it become an obvious place for anyone wanting to come in illegally to come? it will be an easier path into the united kingdom than going through dover or somewhere else, absolutely. but despite the rhetoric about borders, how much of our immigration policy is delegated to landlords or employers to do the checking for the
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government? most people here illegally are people who came in legally through a uk court and then ove rstayed legally through a uk court and then overstayed their visas or work on a tourist visa or something like that. that is why they have those checks. francis wants to know, if there was a pupil's vote and we voted against the deal, would we automatically be allowed back into europe on the same deal we had or would we be expected to renegotiate going back in? the first thing to say is, until march 29 next year, we are in, we haven't left. it is not a question of rejoining, it is a question of the terms under which we remain. there isa terms under which we remain. there is a degree of uncertainty over this but most people assume will be to change our minds, either via parliament or a referendum, the european union would find it very ha rd to
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european union would find it very hard to say no. the question we don't know the answer to is, that is fine, there is no doubt that the european union wouldn't have a problem about is remaining a member state. it is all in the timing. the paper put out today on a pupil's vote, they are seeking an extension to article 50 or the prime minister picked it —— basically withdrawing article 50 so that we have a referendum while we are still a memberand then we referendum while we are still a member and then we can stick with the same terms we have now and that seems like having tojoin the euro, having our re bate seems like having tojoin the euro, having our rebate and budget, all those things we have negotiated. if we we re those things we have negotiated. if we were trying to renegotiate our way back in, the eu wouldn't cut is that special deals that we have been managing to secure for ourselves through negotiations over the last as through negotiations over the last a5 years. that is why it is important to have a referendum while we are still a member. but if people
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wanted to object, this could be quite messy so we can't take it that it is up to us. how will we bridge the employment skills gap post—brexit? and he asks how will the nhs continue to attract highly skilled doctors and nurses?” the nhs continue to attract highly skilled doctors and nurses? i think it is interesting because there has clearly been some thinking that it is easier to go out and recruit in other european countries than to train her. jeremy hunt has said we are increasing the number of places for medical students. that doesn't give us experienced doctors yet. down the line hopefully it gives us a pipeline there. a bit more investment in capital. that might boost our productivity. possibly
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those are options. what's really interesting about the report that came out yesterday is that it very must emphasises that we should have a regime that is quite liberal towards highly skilled migrants, which actually means highly paid migrants, over £35,000... because they are a financial asset to the uk? that's right. it makes it very clear that the public sector shouldn't be left of this, so it is saying no special deal for the big sector. obviously, that is advice, not government policy. so it is quite interesting because there are clearly some sectors... agriculture is one that is already having problems because eastern europeans are no longer so keen to come and work here and they have already had to introduce a revived seasonal
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agricultural workers scheme to bring in people to go and pick fruit, jobs it has been very difficult in which to recruit brits. why so difficult? because it is hard, quite unpleasant, quite badly paid work. one question is whether wages rise in these areas. do people pay rates that will attract brits to do jobs where they can't find people who are willing to work for the rates they offer. basic economics tells you thatis offer. basic economics tells you that is what the market should do. as the government undertaken any analysis of the impact of the chequers plan? yes, the treasury has undertaken impact assessments and looked at the impact on the british economy of various outcomes. they are keeping that close to their chest at the moment. parliament will have a sight of these before we leave. but apart from a leak when some of those impact studies were
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lea ked some of those impact studies were leaked to the press, we haven't had an official announcement from the government. why not have complete transparency when assessments are undertaken? what the government said when the original figures were lea ked when the original figures were leaked was that it is still a work in progress. i imagine that is the line they will stick to. simon asks, how much has the process cost the country so far, including the thousands of civil servants that have been working on it? cost is quite interesting because there are lots of things included but if we look at how much the government has spent on brexit, it wouldn't have had to spend if we hadn't had brexit, we calculate that to the beginning of this financial year, they probably spent about half £1 billion. the chancellor, in march,
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allocated out another £1.5 billion for this year. at those two together, that is £2 billion. he has already earmarked another £1.5 billion for the next financial year, but that is when we start seeing, a lot of this depends on the nature of out lot of this depends on the nature of our deal, when some of the big costs might kick in. we are having to pay money for upgrading our customs system, we have to integrate new migration regimes, and some of those will be covered because we charge businesses, so the cost doesn't necessarily stay with government, if you want to employ migrants, you have to pay the home office to get them to process your migrant visa. so the cost doesn't necessarily fall just a government. i think dominic raab said there was some 7000 new civil servants do to brexit so far but recruitment is going on so that number is going to rise. maybe about
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10,000 people in total working on brexit who otherwise would not be working on that. and this feeds into jeremy miles mac question, why won't the impact reports and migration advisory committee reports done before the referendum ? advisory committee reports done before the referendum? how much was this out there? it doesn't feel like the irish border was something that was widely discussed. issues like ireland were discussed in the referendum campaign. they never caught the public imagination. i remember tony blair and john major going to northern ireland and doing an event there before the referendum. itjust an event there before the referendum. it just didn't an event there before the referendum. itjust didn't get any traction. was that the media? i think the media cover that quite well. it was what was prevalent in pupil's mind when they were thinking about this and the irish question didn't loom large. they were not
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asked to report on these numbers prior to the referendum so they didn't. and there was a degree of hubris on the part of the cameron government because this ocean was that this government would be one and the civil service were explicitly told not to do any contingency planning for the event ofa contingency planning for the event of a vote to leave. the thing we did see before the referendum was the treasury's assessment of the economic impact, which were branded project fear. there was one, the study of the long—running impacts, but if you looked at the leaked analysis, the forecasts that were leaked to both read injanuary, they actually look pretty similar to the numbers the treasury did on the long—term economic impact. numbers the treasury did on the long-term economic impact. suddenly, this is emerging. when they get into the heat of a referendum campaign,
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what we don't have is an external arbiter of facts. they are all part ofa campaign arbiter of facts. they are all part of a campaign and certainly the treasury analysis, both short—term analysis, which was the emergency budget, crisis response and so on, which has been subsequently quite discredited and one of the reasons why people dismiss a lot of the long—term forecasts, they were all actually part of the referendum rather than an objective dispassionate analysis done by someone independently. there aren't any someone independently. there aren't a ny fa cts someone independently. there aren't any facts about the future. economic forecasts aren't predictions, they arejust forecasts aren't predictions, they are just forecasts. economists are generally very careful. quite a lot does get filtered out when it reaches the newspapers. they will find a headline figure and they will go with it. these things need to be handled with care. they did model the potential impact and they all
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gave rangers but it is very hard to be specific. thank you very much. and thank you for your questions as well. in a moment, we'll have all the business news, but first the headlines on bbc news. the eu's chief brexit negotiator says it is "ready to improve" its offer on the irish border, ahead of a meeting of eu leaders in salzburg this evening. a woman dies after a caravan with her inside was blown off a cliff in the west of ireland. some 55,000 homes in ireland are without power and there are weather warnings in force for parts of the uk. the prime minister pledges an extra £2 billion to build affordable and social housing in england and says she wants to see better quality homes. now the business news. inflation rose unexpectedly last month, hitting 2.7%, the highest level in six months. that's higher than forecast and followsjuly‘s increase to 2.5%, that was the first rise since november.
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wages though are still rising by more than inflation. the £15 billion merger between supermarkets sainsbury‘s and asda will be referred for a more in—depth investigation, according to the regulator. the competition and markets authority said the deal "raises "sufficient concerns to be referred for a more in—depth review". the merger would create a business taking £1 in every £3 spent on groceries. and staying with supermarkets — there's a new player in town. tesco has launched its new discount chain — called jack's — to take on cheaper rivals aldi and lidl. the first store is in a mothballed former tesco store in cambridgeshire and another outlet in lincolnshire opens later. up to 15 stores are planned for new locations, next to existing tesco stores, and a small number of converted tesco outlets. our top story this morning, uk inflation has hit a six month high, according to data released today
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by the office for national statistics. and the pound rose on the news. the uk inflation rate unexpectedly rose in august to 2.7%, beating analyst expectations of a 2.a% rise. wages are still rising more than inflation with data last week showing wages, excluding bonuses, grew by 2.9% in the three months tojuly. rising prices for recreational goods, transport and clothing drove the rise. injuly, cpi was 2.5%, which had been the firstjump in the index since november. joining us now is sarah hewin, a senior economist, standard chartered. what do you make of these figures? they were a bit of a surprise. on the outside, most people had expected that inflation would be continuing on a downtrend. having said that, we ascribe some of this
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increased to one—off factors. a rise in computer games, a rise in theatre tickets, also we are continuing to see the impact of high energy prices. that is feeding through to inflation still. overall, this is probably a temporary uptake and we would expect inflation to resume a downtrend in the coming months. and let's be clear as far as what inflation measures. it is the price of things we buy in shops going up. one way is the bank of england can rain that in is by raising interest rates. when we had that increase in interest rates recently, that would suggest it was a good thing because inflation is starting to go up. the bank of england wanted to raise interest rates because they could see over the horizon that cost pressures would be rising. they have held rates very low for a long time, even when we have had inflation
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above 3%, so what they are trying to do is stop inflation from becoming a problem in a year or so's time. they own forecast suggested inflation will continue to decline over the next year, the next few months. that should suggest that they won't need to raise interest rates very high in the very near term. and a quick word on wages, finally going up faster than prices, so we should feel that in our project. —— in our pocket. that is good news because we had a period when wages were not rising as fast as prices. people should be feeling better off and that should continue in the coming month will stop thank you. let's get more on those retail
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stories this morning. a mixed bag — we've learnt today that the proposed tieup between sainsburys and asda will be referred for further scrutiny — over concerns it would have too much power over what we spend at the supermarket. also today, rival tesco has opened the first of around 15 new discount stores, that will trade under the name jack's and are designed to take on cheaper rivals like aldi and lidl. and we've had an update on results from the owner of b80 - it said profits fell 30% despite the hot summer weather. joining us now is karl mckeever, a retail analyst and director of retail agency visual thinking. hopefully this is the regulator doing itsjob. the proposed merger is huge and there are many consequences they are starting to look at. as far as competition in
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the market is concerned, we suggested the merged entity would ta ke suggested the merged entity would take £1 in every £3 spent on groceries. that would be huge power. it absolutely would. as you start to look at the deal, there is more benefits to the business side of it in terms of their buying power and how they can influence what happens with suppliers, rather than the selling benefits for consumers. in terms of their ability to squeeze prices, to be able to strike a better deal in terms of what they are buying in prices, and there will be efficiencies they would get. but the overlap in stores, how that might impact job roles, the overlap in stores, how that might impactjob roles, how it could impact head offices, they are serious considerations and that is why it is good detailed scrutiny is going to take place. let's talk about tesco because they have opened their jack‘s stores. about tesco because they have opened theirjack's stores. what interests me about this is that some of them are old tesco stores, so they have
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just been rebranded, but how do they save a lot of money, because it is run by tesco, it is going to be the same sort of supplies, why are they cheaper? this is a massive corporate experiment but when they have to do. the move they have announced today is purely defensive. this is not about launching a new brand, this is about launching a new brand, this is about trying to stop the progress of aldi lidl in their tracks. aldi is already announced that it wants by 2022 to have thousands of local stores in the uk. this is all impacting on tesco's market share. 0f impacting on tesco's market share. of course, what they want to do is try and get as many of their sales as they can. if you can't compete against them, try and compete within their own backyard. this is a concept which will be very similar in look and feel and we have seen that already today from those first shots of the store that has opened in cambridgeshire, but what it means
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is that they have got to keep the operation lean. there will be no online delivery service. this is purely a retail experience store where you have to visit. the purpose of this is absolutely to stop aldi and lidl in their tracks by laying down a challenge that says, we can have a discount operation and we can be just as well on quality and price as you do. it will be interesting to see how that plays out. let's show you what all of that has done to the numbers. tesco and sainsbury is on the board. tesco, having launched a new discount chain, it will be interesting to see what that does to its share price. and the pound spiking this morning after that higher than expected inflation figure. but all of that leaving the ftse100 pretty much unchanged. a british satellite has
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for the first time successfully thrown a net into orbit to demonstrate how to capture a piece of space debris. there are millions of items of space junk floating around the earth which pose a risk to operational spacecraft and satellites. the experiment was a demonstration of the type of clean—up operation scientists say will have to become routine if we want to keep exploring and using space. our science reporter laura foster has more. from old bits of rocket to small tools dropped by spacewalking astronauts, there is more than 7,500 tons of space junk littering earth's orbit. there is so much, this rubbish could cause problems for our gps systems, phone and television signals, and the systems we use to predict the weather. so scientists have devised this satellite, called remove debris. launched injune, it has now successfully fired a net and captured a piece of rubbish. the idea now — that the junk will burn up when dragged back to earth.
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but the net isn't the only cleaning method the satellite has to test. next up is the on—board harpoon. this is the harpoon that we've been developing, and on the remove debris mission, they're going to be testing the kind of smaller brother of this one, to show that we can successfully capture a piece of space debris in space using a harpoon. some had questioned whether the problem of spacejunk could really be solved by adding more devices to the earth's orbit, but these early results suggest low—cost techniques such as these could work, though this project is still at an early stage, and more tests need to be done before it can be used to collect every piece of rubbish. laura foster, bbc news. the headlines are coming up on the bbc news channel. first, here's the weather. the full force of storm ali is now
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being felt across ireland and northern ireland. we have had some recent wind gusts in excess of 70 mph but won in the south—east of northern ireland reporting 91 mph. the centre of storm ali is just to the north of northern ireland and it is to the south of that way you get the strongest winds. soon, those stronger gusts will move their way through scotland and that is the reason we have got this amber warning in force this afternoon. 65-75 warning in force this afternoon. 65—75 mph wind gusts within the amberarea. 65—75 mph wind gusts within the amber area. potentially as high as 80 mph in localised spots. heavy rain as well across northern and eastern areas but even away from northern parts, there will be strong winds continuing across england and wales this afternoon. lots of cloud
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around and that rain will continue in the north and north—east of scotland. there will be some brighter skies developing behind the rain in england and wales is. those are the temperatures. through this evening, those winds will gradually ease away but it is going to stay quite blustery into the early hours of thursday morning and with it some more rain spreading into south—west england, wales, the midlands and eastern england. temperatures will remain in double figures across the south. further north, chilly nights with temperatures down into single figures. rain on thursday could cause some concern. out in the atlantic, a wiggle in this weather front and that is going to bring heavy rain as the day goes on on thursday. these blues get darker, some green turning up across wales, into the north west midlands, and thatis into the north west midlands, and that is indicative of some
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torrential rain during thursday. down towards the south—east, it should be dry and brighter. that is our weather system, which will eventually shift further east and behind it the isobars are travelling back north, so a fresher feel as we go into the end of the week. there will be some blustery showers coming into northern and western areas so we keep fairly strong winds during friday but the temperatures will be lower. watch out for storm ali this afternoon. this is bbc news i'mjoanna gosling. these are the top stories developing at midday. a woman dies after a caravan with her inside was blown off a cliff in the west of ireland. an amber warning is in force for parts of the uk as storm ali sweeps in with high winds and heavy rain. 55,000 homes in ireland are without power. 55,000 homes in ireland are without power. an amber warning is in force for northern ireland, scotland and northern england
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as storm ali sweeps in with high winds and heavy rain. the eu's chief brexit negotiator says it is "ready to improve" its offer on the irish border, ahead of a meeting of eu leaders in salzburg this evening. most tracks can take place away from the border. on company premises, or markets. we need to make the checks less dramatic. we need to make the checks less dramatic. the prime minister pledges £2 billion to build new homes in england, and says she wants to remove the "stigma" of social housing. i want to see social housing that is so good people are proud to call it their home. proud to tell people where they live. proud to tell people where they live. tributes are paid to the tv host and comedy writer denis norden he was famed for his dry delivery introducing bloopers and outtakes on it'll be alright on the night. a british team fires a huge net into space as part of a plan to clean up the millions of pieces of rubbish floating around
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in the earth's orbit. good afternoon. it's wednesday the 19th of september, i'm joanna gosling. welcome to bbc newsroom live. a woman in county galway has died after a caravan she was in was blown off a cliff by high winds brought by storm ali — which is battering western areas of the uk and ireland. the woman, thought to be in her 50s, was found near the coastal town of clifden. she had been inside the caravan during the storm. amber weather warnings are in force in scotland, northern england northern ireland. authorities are warning the public to take precautions when going out. these are some pictures to emerge from the republic of ireland now — showing one of three cars struck by a fallen tree in dublin. elsewhere around teh city
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authorities released pictures of similar scenes. and the irish president has urged roadusers to take care when travelling in the stormy conditions. officials have warned that further power cuts and flailing gabriel passa ble power cuts and flailing gabriel passable as the storm sweeps through. passable as the storm sweeps through. our ireland correspondent emma vardy has been braving the elements and says the weather is having an big impact in both northern ireland and the republic of ireland. storm ali is causing widespread disruption across northern ireland, some 30,000 homes and businesses are without electricity. some 50,000 homes are without electricity in the republic of ireland. and there was
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the tragic incident of the woman in her 50s who died when her caravan was blown off a cliff in galway. we are told she was a tourist. the ca rava n are told she was a tourist. the caravan landed on the coastline below. widespread disruption to journeys today. flights have been cancelled, a number of roads are closed. also, we are told that northern ireland railways has imposed speed restrictions on its lines and staff are working to clear the tracks and working to monitor the tracks and working to monitor the situation is the day. there is also a meeting of officials this morning to look at the response to the destruction that has been caused by storm ali. it hasn't quite reached its peak yet, is due to peak around midday or early afternoon. i spoke earlier to our weather presenter matt taylor — where he said there's more to come. it is going to peak in the short—term but look at the pressure chart, you can see the centre of
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that storm, working its way toward northern parts of scotland. it is the southern flank where we see the strongest winds at the moment. its uk wide. it will impact all of us in some way shape or form. the big zone, the most concern, as far as far as the met office is concerned is part of northern ireland, southern and eastern scotland and the north east of england. we could see gusts of wind up to 70 mph. we are still at the start of autumn, the trees in full leaf, so they could quite drizzly be brought down on bad to have an impact as well on travel across these areas. it isn't just across northern ireland and scotland, we've got winds across the uk with widespread gales into the afternoon. how does this compare with previous storms we have seen? it's the first major storm of the autumn. we see songs like this every year, but it's so early in the
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autumn, and the trees are still in full leaf, so the impact tends to be that little bit greater. there's been a move to break the deadlock in the brexit talks. the eu's chief negotiator, michel barnier says he is willing to improve his offer to the uk over the irish border. both sides have agreed to avoid a hard border after brexit, but have until now been unable to establish how this will be achieved. the move comes ahead of a meeting of eu leaders in salzburg where theresa may will use a dinner this evening to sell her chequers plan. michel barnier spent last night briefing eu ministers on the latest brexit negotiations ahead of today's summit in salzburg, where theresa may will stress that her chequers plan is the only way to avoid a no—deal, and will ask the eu to show willingness to compromise. mr barnier says eu leaders are now ready to offer an improved proposal to prevent the need for a hard border in ireland. he went further than before, stating that eu and british officials could work together and come up with locations to carry out technical checks of goods coming to northern ireland from the rest of the uk, on sites away
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from ports and airports. we are clarifying which goods arriving in northern ireland from the rest of the uk would need to be checked, and where, when and by whom these checks could be performed. we can also clarify that most checks can take place away from the border. but that proposal would mean britain agreeing to the eu's so—called backstop plan, that would effectively keep northern ireland in the eu's single market and customs union, while the rest of the uk leaves. as for a new, improved proposal, that is not the kind of compromise theresa may is looking for. british officials have described it as unacceptable, and a threat to the constitutional integrity of the uk. it is unlikely to loosen the deadlock ahead of tonight's summit in salzburg. gavin lee, bbc news, brussels. our chief political correspondent, vicki young is at westminster.
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wejoin her now. vicky. we join her now. vicky. even before that meeting in salzburg there was a report of intervention by the dup, the party that not only represents northern ireland, but also props up theresa may's government. they aren't happy with what has been set. they said today that michel barnier says he can do different kinds of checks between northern ireland and the rest of the uk as if it makes it more palatable. the fundamental point is that internal checks and only needed to try and separate northern ireland from great britain. something they aren't willing to see you. that's also something theresa may has said she doesn't want to see. i'm joined by the former conservative cabinet minister justine greening, talking about the possibility of a second referendum. the so—called people's vote. theresa may has said its chequers, or no
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deal. that's pretty stark. that is a false choice. there are other options ahead of brexit. i think the only way to resolve this is to put those fundamental choices between hard brexit, soft brexit or staying in back to the british people, now that we know what they are. i think we should come back with a deal and give people a say on it. some people say you were a remainder, you represent a constituency where people voted remain and you're trying to stop brexit happening.” ama trying to stop brexit happening.” am a pragmatist and i think people should have the chance to pick the route ahead themselves, knowing the details of the different options on the table. i think it's a false choice to say it's my way, from the prime minister, the chequers deal, which only ia% of people support, or no deal. up until now nobody was better than a bad deal and i think chequers is a bad deal for britain. graphene, half out, no say, i think
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leave voters, this is not the brexit they voted for. it doesn't jawline under the brexit wrote, and we absolutely have to do that. —— would draw a absolutely have to do that. —— would drawa line. absolutely have to do that. —— would draw a line. we have issues of social mobility, housing, and social care, and we won't get onto those until we will go to parkhead on brexit. wasn't any deal that theresa may came up with always going to be a compromise, a fudge, the worst of all worlds, some say, but it always had to be a compromise given the way the country voted on the make—up of parliament. for mps in communities around the country, our constituents don't understand chequers, and still supported. if you have leave voters, they don't think this gives us the break from europe they wanted. they can't see why we would still take all these rules. the whole point was breaking free from that. and remain vote rs breaking free from that. and remain voters are thinking, well, hang on,
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why are we still having rules, now we don't get to shape them. the people who wanted to leave aren't happy with leave that we will have, then what was the point? we have to find a route forward that is genuinely getting people behind it. we won't know what that is unless we go back and give the people say in a referendum. ken clarke, arch remainder, of course, says this is the point of democracy, we have a parliament, except to people in there to sort it out. ordinarily i would agree with that, but parliament is in stalemate when it comes to brexit. i don't think that parliament would vote for the negotiated chequers deal. i don't believe that although she has threatened no deal, parliament would vote against that as well. all parliament can do is say what it doesn't like, that's why the only
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who are really going to be able to unblock this next stage in the future by the british people, making the choices for themselves.” future by the british people, making the choices for themselves. i spoke to my colleague in salzburg earlier he explained why the irish border is still such a big issue. i think she will have an opportunity over dinner tonight to address the leaders, the issue, really, is not about selling the chequers plan, that deals with the future trading relationship, what she will be doing is pushing eu leaders to say they should accept that, they showed by that, they have many reservations. the real difficulty is the issue of the island border. that's a real problem in the negotiations at the minute. i think, problem in the negotiations at the minute. ithink, are problem in the negotiations at the minute. i think, are not, problem in the negotiations at the minute. ithink, are not, what problem in the negotiations at the minute. i think, are not, what she will say years, the argument you heard just there, a second ago, that of the eu idea is not acceptable to
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the uk. the uk has already signed up and agreed they will be no border, and agreed they will be no border, and any circumstances, between northern ireland and ireland. that is in some way a fallback plan, a backstop when northern ireland would remain under most customs union and single market rules. the question is, how to achieve that. today michel barnier is trying to soften the eu plan think this isn't about drawing a new border between northern ireland and the uk, it's about having dispersed checks on goods coming across from the uk to northern ireland. that could be fact is, distribution centres, orat ports. they could happen anywhere where goods cross. theresa may once a customs idea that could be a bridge into the future. she will be pushing that, but leaders will not engage in any negotiations as has happened at every summit. she can
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address them, but she cannot negotiate. the cost of living rose by 2.7% in the year to august, according to figures released this morning by the office for national statistics. the figure is well above the 2.a % average predicted by economists. it compares to pay rises which at the last count were just 2.9 % in the year tojuly. we'll have more reaction to this in business, more on today s main stories coming up on newsroom live here on the bbc news channel, but now we say goodbye to viewers on bbc two. £2 billion of new funding to build affordable and social housing in england has been announced by theresa may this morning. housing associations, local authorities and other organisations will be able to bid for money to spend on projects that will start development after 2021. the national housing federation, which represents housing associations in england, says the announcement is "extremely welcome".
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speaking at its summit, mrs may said she wants to remove the stigma of social housing. i want to see social housing that is so good people are proud to call it home. proud to tell people where they live. proud to be thought of in they live. proud to be thought of in the words of the interview we are of an estate person. ourfriends and neighbours in social housing are not second—rate citizens and should not have to put up with secondary tones. that applies to management every bit as much as to design and construction. joining me now is dan tomlinson, an analyst at the resolution foundation thank you very much for coming in and talking to us. is this com pletely and talking to us. is this completely new money? the thing about this is that it's about 2020, and it's covering a time period that the government hasn't announced funding for, so it is new
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money because they haven't spoken about this time period yet in terms offunding. about this time period yet in terms of funding. but the significant thing about this announcement wasn't the numbers, or specific figures, but the change in tone from the conservative government. we've seen relative ambivalence towards social housing, but theresa may was really speaking as an ally of social housing today, saying she wanted to see the sector build more houses. and that is true, actually. the social housing factor is important in terms of both security in the uk and affordability. when it comes down to it though, in terms of what will be delivered from what you're hoping to embrace as a shift, £2 billion, what difference will it make? it is actually spread over a number of years, so it's a relatively small amount of funding. it's similar to the amount the government spending at the moment, but the crucial thing that funding is now in place and the sector can
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begin to plan for the years ahead which ups for investment and enables the sector to continue to grow and deliver. that's what we need. in mix of different types of housing in the uk. houses that people can buy, and rent, in the social sector. you are sounding optimistic, but it's not really a shift from where we are at the moment in terms of a big increase in funding? it'sjust outlining the future years. why is their cause was so much optimism? the hope is that this is a beginning ofa the hope is that this is a beginning of a change in attitude towards social housing in the uk. it will mean more money is social housing in the uk. it will mean more money is announced, and more certainty about future housing. the spending review that the government is planning on doing next year, it still quite a long way away, and lots of things would be changing. with the overall amount of money isn't going to be greater than it is at the moment, why will it
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deliver anything different? the crucial thing is that it delivers that certainty for people who were living in social housing, or housing associations, so they can plan for that time period. really, it's important that theresa may has identified a housing crisis, and one of the issue she wants to focus on, it's kind of obvious, isn't it. back in the 1980s, a typical family it's kind of obvious, isn't it. back in the 1980s, a typicalfamily in their 20s could take three years to serve a deposit to get on the housing ladder. now it takes 19 yea rs. housing ladder. now it takes 19 years. it is a difficult hurdle to surmount to get onto homeownership. while there are millions of families in the private rental sector and the social rental sector and can't access ownership even if they want to we need to build more social rental properties to give people that security. thank you very much. thank you very much. the leaders of north and south korea have signed a declaration with the goal of ridding the peninsula of nuclear weapons.
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the president of south korea, moonjae—in, has been on a three day visit to pyongyang and said both leaders wanted to eliminate the risk of war. they also discussed plans to allow family reunions and co—host the 2032 olympics. our seoul correspondent laura bickerjoins us now. how much are things moving forward, laura, in terms of rapprochement? how much are things moving forward, laura, in terms of rapprochement7m really is moving forward. they have taken a step towards ending the korean war. it ended in 1953 with an armistice, not a peace treaty. at this summit the two sides have taken very clear steps towards one another. in fact they are going to start moving guard post from the heavily militarised border and look at removing landmines. at the moment
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it is surrounded by barbed wire and you can't get through. that is how serious they seem at this point. but moonjae—in needed serious they seem at this point. but moon jae—in needed to serious they seem at this point. but moonjae—in needed to do something else, he needed something to push the united states into the war, the koreans can't do it on their own, they need the us to help. they need they need the us to help. they need the usa to sign that treaty and so far the usa is saying they won't do that unless north korea takes serious steps towards disarming. well, president moonjae—in managed to secure at least a couple of details. he's got kimjong—un, agreeing to dismantle his missile launch site in front of independent inspectors. that is key. and certainly, president tramp said it was very exciting news. he is also offering, he says, to dismantle and destroy his nuclear site. but only
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if the usa acts. so it's up to president tramp detectives are investigating whether an incident in which a car hit pedestrians outside a mosque in london was an islamophobic attack. police say the incident is being treated as a possible hate crime after three people were struck by the vehicle in cricklewood in north—west london, with reports that those inside the car were making "anti—islamic taunts". in a statement posted on social media, the mosque said people were ‘indiscriminately mown down in a suspected premeditated islamphobic attack.‘ two men in their twenties suffered minor injuries, and a man in his fifties is in hospital with a serious leg injury. the headlines on bbc news... a woman dies after a caravan with her inside was blown off a cliff in the west of ireland. some 55,000 homes in ireland are without power, and there are weather warnings in force for parts of the uk. the eu's chief brexit negotiator says it is "ready to improve" its offer on the irish border, ahead of a meeting of eu leaders in salzburg this evening. the prime minister pledges an extra two—billion pounds to build affordable and social housing
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in england and says she wants to see better quality homes. sport now. the chill of uk sport has had it. the chill of uk sport has had it. the chair of the chill of uk sport has had it. the chairof uk the chill of uk sport has had it. the chair of uk sport has had at her voice to the names of people who wish to see the ban on russia continue. the three—year suspension is expected to end tomorrow. that would lead to a lifting of a blanket ban on russians taking part in world athletics. the potential move has been criticised by athletes and anti—doping bodies around the world, will feel that the russian agency is nowhere near meeting original criteria for readmission following evidence of state—sponsored doping. katherine grainger says the
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integrity of sport and competition has to be protected to maintain public trust and support. michael phelps has called for more support for acid when they retire. the american who retired after winning his 23rd gold medal at the 2016 games said that he contemplated taking his own life during the worst periods of his own depression. england's netball is have just lost their latest series match beaten by australia. it was a rematch of the commonwealth games final which england won earlier this year. they played in newcastle, new south wales, and in the last couple of minutes australia has won 52 points to a7. after late drama for liverpool and spurs in the champions league last night it's all about manchester. the assistant coach will
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look after manchester city for their match against lyon at home. their bosses serving a ban after he was sent out in last season's quarterfinal defeat to liverpool. manchester united died away in the swiss capital, they will play an artificial pitch. jose—maria ennio isn't keen but he used the example of switzerland's number one sportsman who also doesn't always get to play on his favourite surface. your mac or i'm pretty sure that the big man, sometimes, is not ready to play on such a service. but he has to play and win. everybody knows he doesn't favourite services, but he has also to win. he has to win on services he is not in love with, so we have to do it.” win on services he is not in love with, so we have to do it. i don't think anything was wrong there, i think anything was wrong there, i think it'sjust dodgy
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think anything was wrong there, i think it's just dodgy camera work. i didn't notice. i was just thinking how he wasn't very happy. he never is! thank you very much, ollie. let's get more on the eu's negotiator michel barnier saying he will offer the uk in the dude ryan improved from the uk border. he said most customs checks could take place away from the border after brexit. we can discuss this now with chris morris from reality check. so much focus on the irish border, what is michel barnier now offering. i think some people assumed that he meant the border between northern ireland and the republic. if you look at what he was saying, he wasn't saying that at all. he was saying, we need, in the event of needing this backstop, there is no border in
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ireland. we need northern ireland to stay on as customs area with the european union. therefore he's talking about the border in the sea between northern ireland and great britain. he is saying we don't want that seen as a border. he is saying we need some kind of checks going from britain to ireland. maybe that could be in fact is, or on—board fairies, don't think of it as a border. he is trying to wrap up the same packaging more attractive paper. he is saying they could be checks along the border between the two parts of ireland. is it that different, and are we hearing that the times is reporting that theresa may is going to reject what he is saying. the dup aren't happy no british prime minister could ever accept the idea of a land border up or see border between britain and northern ireland. that is why they said they weren't calling it a border. it seems the new language is
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not really working. the problem with thatis not really working. the problem with that is that time is running out the one thing we hear today is that without a hard and fast agreement on the way they backstop would be put in place to avoid any return of a ha rd in place to avoid any return of a hard border in ireland, there can be no overall withdrawal agreement for brexit. the clock is ticking. sometimes things get said in public and different things get said in private. they've tried to introduce new language and in a different way what is the backstop? it's an insurance policy. basically, back in
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september the british government and the eu pledge, yes, they've agreed they will be no hard border in ireland. but then, the problem is, how would you turn that into a general pledge coming to practice? what the prime minister also agreed was that in the event of us leaving without a future trade agreement in place, which is the way we are going to leave, if we leave, then we need to leave, if we leave, then we need to have this insurance policy. that would mean there were no checks along the internal irish border. the problem is, we don't know how to do it. we are leaving in six months. thanks, chris. later on bbc news we will be given another opportunity to ask your questions of our business editor, simonjack. ask your questions of our business editor, simon jack. he ask your questions of our business editor, simonjack. he would be answering later. if you've got any questions about our future outside the eu that will be at 5:20pm. get your questions in by texting them to the number on the screen. the mail of londoners planning a new
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strategy to tackle violence. a violence reduction unit will follow the approach of a scheme in glasgow, where the murder rate was almost halved over a decade. the idea is to treat the problem as a public health issue. keith doyle has more. a gang in london, caught on cctv, about to stab a man to death. the latest figures for england and wales show there were 1.3 million violent incidents last year. in london, there have been 100 murders so far in 2018. a new approach to combating violent crime is to tackle the causes. this centre in south london provides support for young people already caught up or likely to be caught up in a cycle of violence. i've seen young people that have been shot, young people that have been stabbed, or young people that have, like, low—level boxer fractures from punching the wall,
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not wanting to get into the fight. the interventions that we do are for when we actually meet them at that point, and we're able to make a difference. we're able to say, you can change. dawn's own family was helped by all—round support. she is now helping one teenager who has turned away from violence dawn's own family was helped by all—round support. she is now helping one teenager who has turned away from violence after being given a sense of worth. slowly, slowly, he came to understand that it wasn'tjust cooking, that he had to turn up on time, that he had to be — you know, if he turned up late, he was letting me down. the basis of this approach to tackling violent crime is accepting that violence is not inevitable. it is preventable, and it can be cured rather than just punished. this approach is already in place in glasgow, and has helped cut murders by half in a decade. now, it is to be tried in london. keith doyle, bbc news. the tv host and comedy writer dennis norton has died... —— tv host and comedy writer
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denis norden has died aged 96. his family said he passed away after spending weeks at the royal free hospital in north london. the presenter was famed for his dry delivery and for holding a clipboard, as he introduced bloopers and outtakes on it'll be alright on the night. so, it was rudyard kipling who said, if you can smile while all about you is going wrong, then you're probably gathering more material for another cock—up programme. it's been exactly what our researchers have been doing all year. welcome to this 10th collection of alright outtakes, each one guaranteed morning—fresh, lemon—scented, and just the type of thing they don't tell you about in media training courses. as usual, i'm the price you have to pay for the funny bits. remembering denis norden. now it's time for a look at the weather. hello, good afternoon. just had a cast of 91 mph recorded in northern ireland, the strongest one ever in northern ireland in september, all
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due to the storm coming in and the strongest —— some strong winds are heading to scotland as well, these are the gusts inland, this area will get the worst of it, the met office and the warning. it is very gusty across the rest of the uk, late in the afternoon, the most of those winds will ease down. what showers coming into scotland and northern ireland. a bit of rain heading towards england and wales in the air as well. continuing overnight, those winds, rain gathering in the south—west, pushing up towards wales, the midlands and lincolnshire, a warm night tonight i flat, looks like it'll be cooler than recently down here. cooler in scotland, lighter winds further still on thursday, this rain will become more expensive and heads northwards, northern ireland, northern england and southern scotland, the now back north east is dry and the last of the warmest coming up now. and coming up on bbc news.
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this is bbc news. our latest headlines... a woman in herfifties has died after a caravan she was in was blown off a cliff in the west of ireland. storm ali has brought high winds and rain to western parts of ireland and the uk, leaving almost 200,000 homes and business across ireland and northern ireland without power. the met office has issued an amber weather warning. the eu's chief negotiator, michel barnier, said the eu is "ready to improve" its offer on the irish border, ahead of a summit in salzburg this evening. the prime minister pledges two billion pounds to build new homes in england, and says she wants people to be proud of living in social housing. a british team fires a huge net into space as part of a plan to clean up the bits of debris floating around in the earth's orbit. the tv host and comedy writer denis norden has died aged 96. he was famed for hosting it'll be alright on the night. more brexit coverage now —
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and when you think about the uk leaving the european union, parma ham, champagne and cornish pasties probably don't spring immediately to mind. however, the issue of whether the uk will respect the eu's system linking products to a particular location is causing a roadblock in the overall negotiations. adam fleming reports from parma. so there are rules around parma ham, it can only be called that if it is made ina it can only be called that if it is made in a precise way, the same with parmesan cheese and that is notjust in italy, but in france as well, particularly the champagne region which i visited recently. if you've celebrated anything recently with a bottle of fizz and it was champagne,
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it was produced in this region of france, which has become a battleground in the brexit talks. it's over the eu's system of geographical indications, gis, which protect products that have a link to a particular location. if your patch earns a gi, then no—one else can use the name in the eu. the producers love it. people know that champagne only comes from champagne, that region, so it's very important and we have a good organisation fighting for that worldwide. it's notjust things made from grapes. there are more than 3000 other products on the list including parma ham, balsamic vinegar and feta cheese. and there are some british gis, like scotch whisky and cornish pasties. the eu wants the uk to guarantee all the existing gis under british law after brexit. the government hasn't agreed to that, with some voices in britain saying the whole thing is a barrier to free trade. it's quite impossible to understand, you know, i would say, 300,
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a00 kilometres from here, that not respecting, you know, the tradition and the name, the very important name, you know, of french wine or italian wine. it may sound a bit weird that wine and cheese have become this kind of roadblock but grumbles about gis have been a feature of global trade for decades. for example, america makes its own champagne... whispers: much to their annoyance. i'm very sad. it's american sparkling, it's californian sparkling, it's napa sparkling but it's not american champagne. if there's no brexit deal on this, there's no brexit deal at all and no celebratory fizz for the brexit negotiators. let's talk to a representative from the producers of parmesan cheese. i'm not meant to: bat, and i? well, the realtor nomination is parmesan
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origiano but you can convert parmesan in the eu. at the real turn. what is so special about it? it is produced in a specific area where you have a land that as particular characteristics from a botanical point of view and those are things you find naturally in the land, you can find them are things you find naturally in the land, you canfind them in are things you find naturally in the land, you can find them in anywhere else, inhale, the bay of the cheese and for production, that is perfection. how important is it that the name is protected and protected in the uk after brexit? yelling very important. as you certainly know, parmesan origiano is one of the products that has the most important number of invitations in the name sarah the italian soundings are very numerous. “—
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sarah the italian soundings are very numerous. —— so there are several imitation products. what do you do to clamp down on the fake parmesan? in the eu, we do not have to do as much because there is a regulation that protects the name already, the denomination of parmesan origiano and parmesan as well. outsole that the outside of the eu, we have registered trademark in approximately 70 countries. —— outside of the eu. there is commercialisation on the product that we try to register the trademark. the fact is that the eu system gives more protection than saying they will trade organisation version, doesn't it? it provides a very important protection because it asks member states to control and eventually sanction those producers who are not respecting the regulation. have you taken precautions already to protect your product in the uk after brexit? yes,
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we have. actually parmesan origiano, the trademark, has been registered way before the eu happens and when we heard about the results in the brexit referendum, we registered the term parmesan as well, so in england, you shall find both parmesan origiano and parmesan in correspondence to our cheese hopefully. just in case coming eu trademark law to protect in the uk? —— just trademark law to protect in the uk? ——just in case, trademark law to protect in the uk? —— just in case, you are using new eu trademark law. yes, we are, we haveit eu trademark law. yes, we are, we have it registered but we are doing so much morejust in case. thank you for joining so much morejust in case. thank you forjoining us, i will go and eat some cheese and some ham now. it is interesting to note that the brexit negotiators think this is a bit of a trump card because they really want this to happen in the eu but the
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british governments are saving it right for the endgame. four million people have been charged more than they need to for their mobile phones according to research by citizen's advice bureau. it says three of britain's biggest mobile phone networks — ee, three and vodafone — routinely carry on charging customers for their handsets after the cost has been paid off. the industry regulator, ofcom says it has set out plans to force companies to tell customers when their minimum contract ends. in the wake of the grenfell tragedy, the school at the base of the tower had to move to a neighbouring borough. 15 months on, kensington aldridge academy has just returned to its old site, and is taking measures to make sure its pupils can look positively to the future. our reporter ashleyjohn—baptiste went to meet one survivor whose grandson attends the school. as this 13—year—old goes back to school, he has more to and other academic year. he lived in the first
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floor of grenfell academic year. he lived in the first floor of g re nfell tower academic year. he lived in the first floor of grenfell tower with his grandmother. just after 1am on the night of the fire, they woke up to smoke and eventually escaped after scrambling down a stairwell. he attends kensington academy where last week, 15 months after the fire, the school reopened at its old base which sits directly below the tower. he has autism and that he settles back into school, his concerns about the impact of seeing a car every day will have on him. —— the mpeg —— the impact of seeing the tower.” will have on him. —— the mpeg —— the impact of seeing the tower. i am worried about what will happen to him, look at grenfell, look at the school, he comes out to play and thatis school, he comes out to play and that is what he sees that he's excited, he wants to go back to school but yesterday, when he came back from school, he said to me, oh, when i saw grenfell, i saw the heart andi when i saw grenfell, i saw the heart and i remember my friend who
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believed in it so it is all about remembering, he remembered it every time he goes to school. do you think, between you and him, will he ever get used to the site of seeing g re nfell tower ever get used to the site of seeing grenfell tower when you bring into school? never. the academy was like children to the fire and for the last academic year, moved to a site in the neighbouring borough. despite challenges, it has been rated outstanding by ofsted. the school declined an interview with david this statement. —— but gave us this statement. they are working to ensure the well—being of students and staff. they are working to ensure the
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well— being of students and staffm is not harmful to see the tower but what might legitimately be worrying people is the memories. however, what the children and young people, community members, have engaged in treatment with us so there have been some structural changes made. for example, classroom windows at facing tower had been very sensitively adapted. they have window screens put in place with inspirational quotes or portraits. windows still let the light in the is not there within the classroom. even with the available support and the willingness of others to return to the old site, this young boy still has —— this young boy's mother still has —— this young boy's mother still has concerns for him. i know he is resilient, he is a very clever young child. it is worrying about his subconscious, what that is absorbing. the head of germany's domestic intelligence service has been removed from his post, after being strongly criticised
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for remarks about recent unrest in the eastern city of chemnitz. hans gay—org ma—sen cast doubt on reports about far—right —— doubts were cast on reports about far—right extremists attacking migrants at random. caroline rigby reports. disturbances broke out after a german miners fatally stabbed in a fight with migrants. —— a german man was fatally stabbed. xenophobic results emerged, with demonstrators a p pa re ntly results emerged, with demonstrators apparently taking down foreigners to attack them. but germany's spy chief was sceptical of the investigation because he said it had no reliable information about such hunts taking place he was also quoted as questioning the authenticity of the
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radio saying there are good reasons to think that was purposefully wrong information aimed at distracting people from what else is happening. his comments downplayed the intimidation of the far right and even contradicted the german chancellor, angela merkel, who condemned the violence. it was said it was soft on far right extremism and had calls from angela merkel to sack hans—george maasen. now after a high—level meeting between the chancellor and her coalition partners, hans—george maasen has been removed from his post. they will instead served as deputy to the interior minister. the minister is an outspoken critic of angela merkel‘s handling of immigration. it isa merkel‘s handling of immigration. it is a move billed as a promotion by some are also appears to further highlight the fragility of the german coalition. a british satellite has for the first time successfully thrown a net into orbit to demonstrate how to capture a piece of space debris.
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there are millions of items of space junk floating around the earth, which pose a risk to operational spacecraft and satellites. the experiment was a demonstration of the type of clean—up operation scientists say will have to become routine if we want to keep exploring and using space. our science reporter, laura foster has more. from old bits of rocket to small tools dropped by spacewalking astronauts, there is more than 7,500 tons of space junk littering earth's orbit. there is so much, this rubbish could cause problems for our gps systems, phone and television signals, and the systems we use to predict the weather. so scientists have devised this satellite, called remove debris. launched injune, it has now successfully fired a net and captured a piece of rubbish. the idea now — that the junk will burn up when dragged back to earth. but the net isn't the only cleaning method the satellite has to test. next up is the on—board harpoon.
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this is the harpoon that we've been developing, and on the remove debris mission, they're going to be testing the kind of smaller brother of this one, to show that we can successfully capture a piece of space debris in space using a harpoon. some had questioned whether the problem of spacejunk could really be solved by adding more devices to the earth's orbit, but these early results suggest low—cost techniques such as these could work, though this project is still at an early stage, and more tests need to be done before it can be used to collect every piece of rubbish. laura foster, bbc news. the headlines on bbc news... a woman dies after the caravan she was in was blown into the sea in the west of ireland.
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there are weather warnings in place for high winds in parts of the uk. the eu's chief brexit negotiator says it is "ready to improve" its offer on the irish border, ahead of a meeting of eu leaders in salzburg this evening. the prime minister pledges an extra two billion pounds to build affordable and social housing in england and says she wants to see better quality homes. wasps are just as useful as bees despite their image as picnic—ruining pests, according to a new study. researchers at university college london are backing a campaign to promote the benefits wasps bring, amid concerns they are being neglected. our science correspondent pallab ghosh has more. they are despised by picnickers and their stings are fears, wasps are among the least loved insects. more common words coming to mind of those surveyed were staying, annoying and
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dangerous. what do you think when you see a wasp? a little uncomfortable. can be dangerous with schemes, especially when you have young children, which i have. the main problem is wasps have a bad press. they pollinate flowers, kill pests and ourjust as good for the environment as bees but because people do not know about the good work, they are regarded as nuisances. what people do not realise is how incredible you valuable they are. these are natural pest controllers, so they are doing thejob pest controllers, so they are doing the job that we use chemicals, pesticides, to do. that is because they hunters, predators. although you might think they are after your beer or your sandwich, they are much more interested in finding insect prey to take back to their nest to feed to their larvae. the team brought in a campaign to try and raise awareness about how important
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wasps are so he can try and put as much effort into saving their population as we do with bees. a royal barge built for napoleon bonaparte so he could inspect his imperial fleet — is beginning its journey to a new home. the boat was constructed in 1810 — and was only ever used once by napoleon before his abdication. it was moved to paris during world war two. a huge hole will have to be knocked through one of the walls of the museum where it is currently being kept, to get it out. the polar maidens are a team of five women, each born in a different decade, who are about to embark on a gruelling expedition to the south pole. they are going to conduct an experiment during the trek to find out what affect a woman's age has on her level of fitness. tim muffett went to meet the women in training. jan is approaching 7ath birthday. and one of the world's toughest challenges. before my husband died,
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he died of cancer at a7, he lost classical music and after he died, i felt like i had to live for him as well. jan has ridden to the atlantic, the north pole and now she wa nts to atlantic, the north pole and now she wants to know how women of different ages react to extreme conditions by leading the polar maidens to the south pole. what is the difference? between ages, how do we recover physically and emotionally. it is done with men and athletes but not much with women. today's training session is near inverness. it is particularly ha rd session is near inverness. it is particularly hard pulling in the neck on sand but this will give us a goodidea neck on sand but this will give us a good idea of snow conditions. —— it is difficult pulling on sand. caryn is difficult pulling on sand. caryn is younger than jan. the training is hard. being a young, they want us to adapt fast physically. didn't level
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than the ones b medal proudly exposition. it will help find out what this does to people of different ages and how it affects their fitness. —— it different ages and how it affects theirfitness. —— it will different ages and how it affects their fitness. —— it will be determined through the expedition. well, all that people have —— older people have more resilience, that is what we are trying to prove right now. older people are more top when it comes to the weather. are you getting on in comparison to the younger members? we are giving them a run fortheir younger members? we are giving them a run for their money. we hope age is no barrier. we hope that the difference in the blood sugar levels or maybe the oxygen levels will not be too different. my grandfather went to the antarctic three times and on the second expedition, he was sent back 150 miles from the port so he was absolutely gutted and he actually cried, so it would be an honourfor me to actually cried, so it would be an honour for me to finish as journey.
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we are different women from different cultures and different ages. we are representing all the women all over the world. to those who say you're too old for things like this, what do you say? age is just a number. best of luck. thank you very much. thank you, see you andi you very much. thank you, see you and i get back. christmas in the antarctic await the temperature is -30 antarctic await the temperature is —30 celsius. 73 is an age in which you take things easy but no one told jan. that now — here's a question for you — why has a non—league football team in the east end of london become an internet sensation in spain?
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the answer lies in a conflict that began more than eighty years ago. tim allman reports. members of clacton football club are ready for take—off wearing their away strip but this is no ordinary shirt. the members of clapton fc. they fought these in the spanish civil war. the club posted this photo from a pre—season game online and soon, clapton fc trending. so popular had they had to stop taking orders for the shirt after receiving 5000 requests. what you do? you wake up 5000 requests. what you do? you wake up with this in a orders for your shirts, you're attending all the world, all over the news, bbc, shirts, you're attending all the world, all overthe news, bbc, on radio four as well, they all want to know about your shirt and we love it. by some estimates, as many as
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a0,000 people fought with the international brigade. many were killed in a civil war they would ultimately lose. the club said it wa nts to ultimately lose. the club said it wants to champion progressive causes and they now have an international following. translation: we're very happy about the shirt. it pays to be to those who came with the international brigade to fight against fascism and we are all easily grateful for that. the motto on the back of the shirt is an anti—socialist black antifascist slogan —— is an antifascist slogan but clapton fc have proven they can pass and school wearing this shirt. in a moment it's time for the one o'clock news. this, the weather.
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storm ali is on its way in, that is where it will bring some strong, damaging winds to be, mainly in the central scotland. the centre of the storm, storm ali, will track away from northern ireland, taking the drugs that they went away and pushing them towards scotland so gradually, three afternoon —— taking the stronger winds outlay. it'll be pretty windy across the board and it will be frequent, heavy showers following into western and northern scotland. showers for northern ireland, sunshine but also patchy rain moving to england and wales, it will be quite warm in the south east and across england and wales but different story further north. gradually, overnight, the winds do tend to tease and we need to focus on this rain that is developing across the south. after grinding to across the south. after grinding to a whole, the rain drives northwards back up into wales, and the midlands
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as well. a windy night but quite a bit cooler. the winds gradually eat down towards northern scotland. further south, they are lighter and most of the day, we will see the rain developing more widely and pushing northwards towards northern ireland, scotland and the heaviest rain over the hills of wales and north—west england, the south—east and east anglia are largely dry and the sunshine will bring the last of the sunshine will bring the last of the warmth so two things are happening. as we head overnight in the wind continues to mount up over the wind continues to mount up over the higher ground of wales and north—west england, to four inches of rain here and gale developing more widely through the night for england and wales because we have this area of low pressure forming on the front that slows the rain down and brings asked more winds. the stronger wind and rain will mean we will be blowing them away and playing a lady last of the warmth as well. heading into friday, a bit of a more north—westerly feel. still
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very gusty winds on friday, not out of the woods just yet. some showers blowing in, moving down to what part of wales, pa rt blowing in, moving down to what part of wales, part of the midland, a bit of wales, part of the midland, a bit ofa dry of wales, part of the midland, a bit of a dry day but here, the temperatures will be lower, no better than 18 celsius. theresa may prepares for a european summit where she'll be selling her plans for brexit directly to other eu leaders. but the prime minister has issued a warning — do not demand the unacceptable over the future of the northern ireland border. so what are the chances of eu leaders accepting her brexit plans? also on the programme: a woman dies after being blown off a cliff in her caravan, as parts of britain are battered by storm ali. there's an unexpected rise in the rate of inflation, reaching its highest level in six months. £2 billion to build social housing in england, but government critics, say it's not enough. and the comedy writer and television presenter,
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denis norden, has died, at the age of 96.
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