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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  September 19, 2018 2:00pm-5:01pm BST

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sunshine. jazzers is being dry with sunshine. temperatures actually should be at this time of year. hello, you're watching afternoon live. i'm simon mccoy. today at 2pm: so long, farewell — the prime minister heads to salzburg and has 10 minutes to pitch her brexit proposals to all the other european leaders. but will they like the sound of her chequers proposal? i am christian fraser in salzburg, where eu leaders are gathering for what promises to be a critical two day summit? a woman dies after being blown off a cliff in her caravan, as parts of britain are battered by storm ali. £2 billion to build social housing in england. the government says it wants to remove the stigma of social housing. coming up on afternoon live, all the sport.
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good afternoon. coming up, we have more champions league action. now it is the turn of the manchester clubs as they kick off their campaigns later. we will have all the build—up at half—past. and we have the weather. yes, records have been broken for the strongest wind gusts in northern ireland for september. the strongest winds are moving away from here and into scotland. more damage is quite likely. the amber warning expires at 6pm but there is more wet and windy weather in the outlook. hello, everyone.
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salzburg in austria — the home of the von trapp family donald tusk is giving a new quote —— news conference and we can see from him now. therefore, every day that is left, we must use the talks. i would like to finalise them still this autumn. this is why at tomorrow's meeting of the 27, i will propose calling an additional sum it around mid—november. this evening, i will call on leaders to stop the migration blame game. the aggressive
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rhetoric. things are moving in the right direction. mostly because we have become focused on external border control. and cooperation with countries that has brought down the number of irregular migrants from almost 2 million in 2015 to fewer than 100,000 this year. in fact, this is less than in the years before the migration crisis. so instead of taking political advantage of the situation, we should focus on what works and just get on with it. we can no longer be divided into those who want to solve the problem of migrant flows and those who want to use it for political gain. tonight, iwill ask
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for support for our efforts to intensify cooperation with north african countries and the idea of calling and eu league of arab states the met in egypt in february next year. thank you we will see later tomorrow, during our regular press conference. thank you. so, donald tusk there, sort of outlining the plans for the next few weeks, as that countdown, six months to brexit gets under way. speaking in salzburg in austria, the home of the band trapp family. and theresa may's brexit proposals are on the menu: she has 10 minutes to sell her chequers proposals to her european colleagues. some believe she has a longer way to go, but the mood music may be changing. let's go to christian fraser, who's there for us now. yes, so many music fans we could throw at you. the birthplace of
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wolfgang amadeus, of course the filming venue for the sound of music but when it comes to the meeting we are likely to see tonight, very precious little harmony between theresa may and the other eu leaders. he is coming here really to underline what she has really underlined at home, that the is the best proposal to avoid a no deal scenario. 0n the head of the summit, she has written to mac pieces, one for the domestic audience, in the daily express she says the chequers plan observes the freedoms that they voted for at the referendum, she is also rolling out another referendum, and then she has written a separate piece for the european audience, that has been published today. she said, both sides need to respect the red lines of the other, just as the uk understands it cannot have all the benefits of membership when it is not part of the club, so the european union has to understand that we cannot have external customs
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checks within the borders of the united kingdom. in that light, she's not likely to make much of the so—called compromise that michel barnier has put forward today. the of that in this next report —— the details of that. this salzburg summit on the edge of the alps marks the start of the final arduous ascent to a brexit deal. the decisive phase of the talks start here, as eu leaders will, behind closed doors, plot their strategy for the coming weeks. here's one part of that — michel barnier, eu chief negotiator, last night said he's prepared to soften the eu proposal for how to avoid a new border in ireland. we can also clarify that most checks can take place on way from the border, at the company premises, or in the markets. we need to de—dramatise the checks that are needed — these checks are caused by the uk's decision to leave the eu, its single market and the customs union. but that's not a major shift butjust a way
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to make it more palatable. the move at the last possible minute, after they have tested your metal and to the cliff edge, to use that phrase everyone's fond of, and that's what will happen. it is here at northern ireland's ports, not at the land border with our ireland, that some other checks may still be needed. the uk still isn't buying it. we have been very clear that we will not accept something that separates out our united kingdom, creating some sort of customs border between great britain and northern ireland. that would be unacceptable — constitutionally, economically and indeed i would question its consistency with the belfast good friday agreement. the problem is the eu won't accept the uk alternative. it closed doors, theresa may will tonight try to persuade eu leaders her idea of a customs deal followed by the chequers plan is a workable way to lock down a brexit deal. it seems the best mrs may can hope
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forfrom her trip to it seems the best mrs may can hope for from her trip to the alps will be some warm words. eu leaders are not going to negotiate with her and not going to negotiate with her and not going to change their position towards the talks and they are not going to instruct michel barnier to comp going to instruct michel barnier to co m p eyes going to instruct michel barnier to comp eyes at this stage. instead they will do the opposite and say they will do the opposite and say the uk has to agree a solution to the uk has to agree a solution to the irish border if it wants an excellent treaty. and that means that the coming weeks will see fraught and difficult talks if a deal is to be settled. —— exit treaty. some additional detail on that plan reported in ireland this afternoon, they are saying that as part of these checks, you would have a trusted trade system where the shipper scans a bar code, the shipper scans a bar code, the
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shipper could then work out the vat and whether the goods fit with eu regulations and you could work out if the goods that are being shipped oui’ if the goods that are being shipped our food, if the goods that are being shipped ourfood, or linked to animals in any sort of way. in which case, there would need to be higher checks. 10% of live animal shipping is subject to checks. michel barnier is subject to checks. michel barnier is saying it would need to be nearer 40 is saying it would need to be nearer a0 or 50%. as we have heard, not a cce pta ble a0 or 50%. as we have heard, not acceptable to the british government. 0ur chief political correspondent, vicki young, is at westminster. i don't think there are many people here who see it as a softening and certainly intervention by the dup, crucial in all of this, notjust because they represent a sizeable number of people in northern ireland but also because they prop up theresa may ‘s government. they have said it does not matter what kind of checks they are, they say it still means there is a border down the irish sea. and that is something
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that theresa may and the labour party have said would not be a cce pta ble party have said would not be acceptable to any prime minister. still that sticking point really and it is very difficult to see how they are going to get through this. i'm going to discuss this a little more 110w. going to discuss this a little more now. on that issue of the border, do you take any... do you think it is good that michel barnier has said this? i don't think it is a softening of their position really because it still is about a border down the irish sea. but what is important is that they have accepted the principle that you can do some customs behind the border and not at the front itself and that very much reflects what i was told in brussels yesterday, that would be suitable for the dover calais border also. and i can see maybe there is potential for a compromise if and i can see maybe there is potentialfor a compromise if that sort of behind the border administrative process can be used for other borders around the outside of the eu. but when it comes to it,
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you do not be so—called chequers plan, do you? the compromise theresa may is putting on the table, that is what they are negotiating on. why do you not think that is acceptable? what they are negotiating on. why do you not think that is acceptable7m is clear it will not work. i was in brussels the last couple of days with the association of customers, brokers and forwarders. and they all said that from the professional point of view, it is just an unworkable solution. that is what the eu has said also. it isjust unworkable solution. that is what the eu has said also. it is just not a realistic thing. you cannot have free circulation of that kind. it justis free circulation of that kind. it just is not working customs terms. what is much more practical is we can go fora what is much more practical is we can go for a free—trade agreement, which is what the eu one, and where you can have that behind the border processing so that there aren't actually physical checks out the border itself. but you want at this late stage for theresa may to rip up what she has on the table and start with something completely new. that
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is not give business very long to get ready. i think it would be a sensible compromise. many businesses have been getting ready for a long time now already. if we are a country without a deal, we need to do those border processes. the whole thing is about trying to make them as simple as possible and as costless as possible in that way, the concerns of business can be addressed. what we talked about in the ee rg paper last week was using the ee rg paper last week was using the vat system where we already have to make a declaration even now when we are crossing a border with goods, we are crossing a border with goods, we can use that to actually bolt on the other declarations that might be made and with a digital system which can do that in advance of goods crossing. it really does not have to bea crossing. it really does not have to be a massive change of the way businesses go about life. thank you very much indeed. theresa may still in the position she was in before where her compromise has not got the backing in parliament,
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certainly from those on the remain side of the argument and those who we re side of the argument and those who were on the brexiteers side of the argument and also it sounds as if she does not have the backing of brussels either. 0k, thank you very much. yes, it is interesting. a lot of the brexiteers making the pie today it was not so long ago the eu was saying technological solutions was magical thinking and now it seems to form pa rt thinking and now it seems to form part of the solution. not the right solution but that will form part of the negotiation tonight and going forward in the coming weeks. michel barnier will speak to eu leaders tomorrow but the progress that has been so far. two or three things he needs to sort out, obviously, how fardo needs to sort out, obviously, how far do they want to go on the island border issue? the other thing is what sort of political declaration is going to go hand in hand with the withdrawal agreement? some months ago the british government wanted lots in that. they wanted a commitment from the european side, but now it seems they would prefer a
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rather vague, loose language in that political declaration, so that he does not alienate the brexiteers. the problem is if she does not put enough detail in, she will alienate the remainers and then on this side, the remainers and then on this side, the german chancellor, angela merkel is saying, if we don't have some direction for businesses in a political declaration, it is not going to work so what sort of document will that be when we get to the nub of it in november? and the other thing that they need to work out is this extra special summit in november, where presumably, they hope, everything is going to be rubber—stamped. it was down for the 13th of november, but you just heard donald tusk saying it will be somewhere in the middle of november. if you look at your diary, you will notice that the 13th of november is in fact my birthday. you have left me completely speechless with that. what is that all mean? they will have to postpone it to be 1ath? exactly that, yes! back to you later, christian. enjoy
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salzburg. and later on bbc news, we're giving you the opportunity to ask our business editor, simon jack, any burning questions you may have about the uk's future outside the eu. that'll be at 5:20pm. to take part: a woman has died, after her caravan was blown into the sea, as storm ali batters ireland and parts of the uk. the vehicle ended up on a beach in county galway while the woman was asleep, as winds of up to 95 miles an hour tore down trees and power lines, destroying vehicles, and causing widespread travel disruption. in scotland, the storm has led to travel problems on roads and railways, with dumfries and galloway council declaring that the major !76 road is closed due to a fallen tree. the forecast is for powerful winds across northern parts of the uk, until tonight. an amber warning remains in place in
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many areas. there is a risk of further travel disruption and flying debris. school pupils havejust further travel disruption and flying debris. school pupils have just been banned from walking home in parts of scotla nd banned from walking home in parts of scotland over safety fears. this is also in dumfries and galloway. our correspondent, emma vardy, is in belfast. we will talk about the situation where you are. a picture paints a thousand words, looking at the devastation behind you. we are just getting this news of a cruise liner in some difficulty in scotland. yes, that's right. it happened at the port of green lock in inverclyde. a cruise ship coming free from its moorings. just another sign of how powerful these winds are
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proving to be. we have had a statement saying that the nautica in countered it extremely strong winds that resulted in the parting of mooring lines and the vessel being detached from the dock. the company says all guests and crew on board are safe, there were no injuries. the vessel is currently being held. some a78 guests and 28 crew are now ashore. just another incident, just really showing the widespread disruption and potential danger of these winds. i canjust disruption and potential danger of these winds. i can just tell you a little about that incident in ireland, in which a caravan was blown off a cliff in galway. irish police this morning searching the beach below where that happened recovered the body of a woman in her 50s. recovered the body of a woman in her 505. it recovered the body of a woman in her 50s. it is reported this was a
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tourist from switzerland who had been asleep in her caravan at the time it happened. elsewhere across northern ireland and the republic of ireland, now more than 200,000 homes and businesses are without power. there is all sorts of cancellations on travel with planes, ferries, trains that are cancelled, lots of staff and officials trying to clear debris from the tracks. as you can see, this road is closed in belfast. a number of trees along the road are down. a number of branches which are com pletely down. a number of branches which are completely blocking the way. a police cordon is in place. that amber weather warning is going to be in place until five o'clock this evening. what that amber warning means is that there is a risk to life and that it should be expected there may well be more damage to buildings and more power cuts to come. thank you very much. you're watching afternoon live.
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these are our headlines: the prime minister heads to austria for a ten minute pitch to sell her chequers proposal to european leaders. britain is battered by storm ali, leaving one woman dead after being blown off a cliff ina caravan. the prime minister announces £2 billion to build new homes in britain and calls for an end to the stigma of social housing. and manchester city assistant coach at etter says they are better prepared for the champions league this season. they begin their campaign tonight. ben stokes and alex hales are both selected in england's one—day squad for the tour of sri lanka. they were charged yesterday for bringing the game into disrepute after an incident outside a nightclub in
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bristol. england have lost to australia, 52—a7 down under. i will be back with more on all those stories at 2:30pm. cornish pasties, parma ham and champagne, you wouldn't think, could be possible threats to britain's smooth departure from the eu. but where a product is made, can be a very valuable part of the brand, and the eu wants that protected, after brexit. 0ur europe reporter, adam fleming, is in parma in northern italy for us this afterrnoon. you've been in that shop all day. i hope everything is going all right. what is the issue here? hello, simon. you know that parma is famous for a couple of blockbuster products, parma ham and parmesan cheese. they are protected from co pycats
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cheese. they are protected from copycats under european union law. it is not just copycats under european union law. it is notjust a big deal in italy, it isa it is notjust a big deal in italy, it is a big deal in france as well. particularly in the region of champagne. if you've celebrated anything recently with a bottle of fizz and it was champagne, it was produced in this region of france, which has become a battleground in the brexit talks. it's over the eu's system of geographical indications, gis, which protect products that have a link to a particular location. if your patch earns a gi, then no—one else can use the name in the eu. the producers love it. people know that champagne only comes from champagne, that region, so it's very important and we have a good organisation fighting for that worldwide. it's notjust things made from grapes. there are more than 3,000 other products on the list including parma ham, balsamic vinegar and feta cheese. and there are some british gis, like scotch whisky and cornish pasties. the eu wants the uk to guarantee all the existing gis under british law after brexit.
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the government hasn't agreed to that, with some voices in britain saying the whole thing is a barrier to free trade. it's impossible to understand, you know, i would say, 300, a00 kilometres from here, that not respecting, you know, the tradition and the name, the very important name, you know, of french wine or italian wine. it may sound a bit weird that wine and cheese have become this kind of roadblock but grumbles about gis have been a feature of global trade for decades. for example, america makes its own champagne... (whispers) . . much to their annoyance. i'm very sad. it's american sparkling, it's californian sparkling, it's napa sparkling but it's not american champagne. if there's no brexit deal on this, there's no brexit deal at all and no celebratory fizz for the brexit negotiators.
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iamjoined by i am joined by an economist to discuss this. is it possible to quantify the value of this to italy and to parma? yes, in italy, the total value of gi productions accou nts total value of gi productions accounts for almost nearly 7 billion euros. 20% of which is produced in parma. it is big money we are talking about. yes, it is. and for italy. but sales for other countries in europe. and the uk get something out of the existing scheme as well because some of its products are protected. yes, the uk has 70 products already, which is a high
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numberfor products already, which is a high number for non—mediterranean countries. and the number is increasing. this means that 70 supply chains benefit from european union legislation. are you surprised that this has become a big stumbling block in the brexit talks? no, i'm not surprised. the european union thinks that gis are unimportant beverage, an important factor for the success of the economy of in particular mediterranean but also other european countries. particular mediterranean but also other european countrieslj particular mediterranean but also other european countries. i have heard there is the world trade organisation that has a version of this. what is the difference? the differences that the world trade organisation provisions account for gis under the agreement, which
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provides weaker protection than the one provided by the european union legislation. what do you think the chances are radio will be reached on this? both sides will agree something? i can't tell you at the moment because... well, the brexit negotiations are at the final stage but there is so much uncertainty on gis. but of course, we do all hope for a gis. but of course, we do all hope forafair gis. but of course, we do all hope for a fair agreement. we will find out soon enough because, simon, the british negotiators have realised this is such a big priority for the european union said, they think it isa european union said, they think it is a good trump card and they are planning to deploy it at the endgame of the brexit talks. as we have been hearing, that endgame is rapidly approaching so it might happen quite soon. we are talking about the protection of names and things. on top of that
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menu board, can you see that logo? that london underground logo. that is actually protected, you know!|j is actually protected, you know!” will ask the owner. i am telling you, you can ask them about that. i will just throw that in there. you, you can ask them about that. i willjust throw that in there. i just want to fill your time. we will talk to you later on. attention to detail! detectives are investigating whether an incident in which a car hit pedestrians outside a mosque in london was an islamophobic attack. police say the incident is being treated as a possible hate crime after three people were struck by the vehicle in cricklewood in north—west london, with reports that those inside the car were making "anti—islamic taunts". joining me now from cricklewood is our correspondent, keith doyle. just expect what has happened here.
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at around half past midnight this morning, this street was full of hundreds of people who were leaving the commemorations taking place in the commemorations taking place in the building behind me. some stewards from this centre approached the car that was parked nearby with four people in it. and then there was some sort of altercation. the police said the stewards were subjected to a trade would like to read of islamophobic abuse. the car then drove off, and then drove into a number of people on the street. the police have said two people were seriously injured but they are not ina seriously injured but they are not in a critical condition. here is the account of one eyewitness. i saw the car driving at a crazy speed. i was concerned about the people. i was looking forward, backward, just to make sure no one was on the street. what i did, i ran towards the car, trying to move the people out of the road. so, i
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managed to push a few people off the road but the car, once he saw me, he tried to run me over. sol road but the car, once he saw me, he tried to run me over. so i tried to move out of the way and then the car was that close to hitting me, but i managed to move off the road and i have as well helped a few people, i did not know what to do. the police say they are treating this as an islamophobic and hate crime but that the moment they are not treating it asa the moment they are not treating it as a terrorist incident. they are looking for the four people who were in the car they have put in measures to make sure that the rest of the commemorations pass off safely. thank you very much. let's catch up with the weather forecast. yes, we have a couple of weather
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watcher pictures for you. first off in northern ireland. this one is showing power lines down, some trees coming down, thousands of people still without power across parts of northern ireland. and this was close by, this is where we have the strongest of the guests this morning. the strongest gust ever recorded in september in northern ireland, 91 mph. we have had higher numbers of other —— over higher ground. wind is picking up in prestwick. the strongest of the wins now, simon, are moving their way into scotland. we are getting the peak of the winds now in scotland and the weather watchers are sending as pictures, rather blurry wins, it has to be said, of trees falling down. we need to make the point, as we a lwa ys we need to make the point, as we always do, don't put yourself at risk. absolutely. do not take photographs in the car, especially when driving. we do get some like
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that and we will of course not use those pictures. let mejust that and we will of course not use those pictures. let me just show you the warning. we still have this met office amber warning. and it covers an notjust office amber warning. and it covers an not just northern office amber warning. and it covers an notjust northern ireland but central scotland. the strongest of the winds, these are inland guests, that we are expecting. they are moving into the central belt of scotla nd moving into the central belt of scotland over the next hour or two. that is because the storm is moving, of course. this is the season because it is at this time of the year that you see changes in temperature which strengthens the jet. we looked at this yesterday when rebecca was presenting the programme. laughter keep going. the jet stream is
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powering everything that's coming in from the atlantic. if you pick up an area of low pressure there is a good chanceit area of low pressure there is a good chance it will deepen and spin across the uk and that is exactly what we're today. this is the centre of storm ali. that is now moving away from northern ireland and it is moving towards scotland. it is a windy day across the rest of the uk today, particularly on this line here. that is taking patchy rain down into england and wales. we will see some sunshine below that. it will be up to 2a degrees even though it is windy and quite warm elsewhere in england and wales. the wind does ease down this evening and overnight. showers in the north—west. the rain from the south stops and gets more widespread,
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heavier and moves northwards. south of that quite warm air and north of it quite chilly air. some strong winds across northern scotland but those will ease tomorrow. sunshine and showers before it clouds over from the south and we get some rain later in the day. heavy rain developing in wales and northern ireland. east anglia and the south—east largely missing out on thatis south—east largely missing out on that is rain and temperatures likely to be in the low 20s. focus on this because this could be the next spell of nasty weather as we head into thursday night. heavy rain overnight in the hills and wales. the wind is going to be picking up widely across england and wales up to 60 miles an hour. the reason that is happening is the weather front producing rain, slows it down and intensifies the rain. it picks up the wind. they
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will strengthen and everything will get blown away by that weather fronts including any warm air and we we re fronts including any warm air and we were the into fresher cooler conditions on friday. quite a few showers running southwards across scotla nd showers running southwards across scotland and northern ireland. to the south that it will probably be dry with some sunshine. most temperatures back to where they should be at this time of year. it will feel cool and fresher everywhere. don't be fooled if you are out on saturday because sunday could see the return of some more stormy weather. this is bbc news — our latest headlines.
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a woman in herfifties has died after a caravan she was in was blown into the sea in the west of ireland. storm ali has brought high winds and rain to western parts of ireland and the uk, leaving almost 200,000 homes and business across ireland and northern ireland without power. the met office has issued an amber weather warning. the prime minister heads to salzburg — where later she'll pitch her brexit proposals to her european colleagues. the president of the european council donald tusk has said there is "more hope but less and less time" in the negotiations and said he wants a special summit in mid—november. the prime minister pledges £2 billion to build new homes in england, and says she wants people to be proud of living in social housing. sport now on afternoon live with holly... and after a dramatic night in the champions league yesterday, we're ready to do it all over again with both manchester
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clubs in action, holly? after that late drama for liverpool and spurs lsat night, now, it's all about manchester. but let's talk about city first of all. the premier league champions and arguably one of the favourites for the title. but they begin their campaign without their manager when they host lyon tonight. he'll have to watch from the stands. he's serving a touchline ban after he was sent off during last season's quarter final defeat to liverpool. instead his assistant mikel arteta will look after the team and the former arsenal star has already taken a step up, replacing guardiola at the official uefa press conference ahead of tonight's match where he made a big claim — for me we have the best players in the world. i look at our players like they are the best. i see them training every day. i see how they behave and how they react against positives and negatives and other qualities and i know their weaknesses. i wouldn't change my players for any others.
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they are absolutely fantastic, the group of players we have. the mix we have between senior players and young players. the hunger that is in this group... as for manchester united — they're away to young boys in the swiss capital bern. they'll play on an artificial pitch... which means they'll be without captain antonio valencia because of concerns over how he'll react to the surface following a knee injury. bossjose mourinho isn't keen either, but chose who also has to make a certain swiss sportsman — roger fedeerer — who also has to make do with a surface he doen't like — to make his point that they'lljust have to get on with it. i am pretty sure that the big man sometimes isn't happy to play such a surface but he has to play. and he has to win. and everybody knows he has a favourite surface but he has also to win in the surfaces that he is not in love with. so we will have to do it. that makes sense, doesn't it?
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elsewhere, cristiano ronaldo is set to make his champions legaue debut forjuventus, while real madrid get the defence of their title under way. those games all kicking off at 8pm tonight. the summer cricket season has only just finished but already england are looking toward the winter team. it's not much of an off—season is it... england's cricketers head to sri lanka for a five match one day series, which begins on the 10th of october. both ben stokes and alex hales have been included in the squad — that's despite both players being charged by the english cricket board yesterday, for bringing the game into disrepute after an incident outside a nightclub in bristol. they'll face a disciplinary hearing in december. but here's confirmation of the full 16—man squad... warwickshire bowler olly stone has been given a first call—up, as a replacement for liam plunkett —
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who will miss the first three matches for his wedding. how nice! both of the curran brothers — sam and tom — are also in the squad. now, five months on from their historic victory over australia in the final of the commonwealth games, england's netballers have been beaten by the diamonds in their quad series clash. it was the first time the two sides sides have met since the gold coast — but this time, the hosts proved why they're still number one — as emily croyden reports. english netball has changed. for the first time here they faced australia as the number two side in the world. with the world cup on the horizon they wanted to prove they are the tea m they wanted to prove they are the team to beat. they attacked the match with purpose. england were dominating australia. strong a defensive effort from the site. but things can change quickly in this game and australia finally found a way through and swung the match in
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their favour at half—time. tracey neville wanted more from her roses aside but it was australia who took aside but it was australia who took a big lead into the last quarter. but this england team has a new belief and they came back with real energy. ultimately though australia reasserted their status as the best tea m reasserted their status as the best team in the world with ten months ago to the world cup. but england will note that despite missing key players they were not far short. hugely disappointing for the roses. that's all the sport for now. theresa may, has announced plans to make an extra £2 billion available, to build more affordable and social housing in england. councils, housing associations and other bodies, can bid for the money for new projects, from 2022. the prime minister says she wants to remove the ‘stigma' surrounding social housing. here's richard lister. at this site in south london, they're building a mix of private and social housing, homes that are badly needed — notjust in
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the capital, but across the country, where demand for affordable housing far outstrips supply. today the prime minister announced an additional £2 billion for housing associations to build more homes. under the scheme, associations will be able to apply for funding stretching as far ahead as 2028—29, the first time any government has offered housing associations such long—term certainty. mrs may said it was time to end the stigma that many people still attached to social housing. many people in society, including too many politicians, continue to look down on social housing and, by extension, the people who call it their home. mrand mrs parkerapplied to buy their house... it was this tory prime minister who really shook up the housing market with an emphasis on home ownership which still reverberates today. but those who couldn't afford to buy were left in sink estates run by housing associations. it's very good to hear that the government now wants to be able to invest in housing
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associations, notjust this year but in a much more strategic way into the future. but there's a long way to go. the government says it has built more than 357,000 affordable properties since 2010, but a survey this year found a shortfall of 30,000 affordable homes every year since 2011, which could create a shortage of 335,000 homes by 2022. we have 180,000 families who are in temporary accommodation because we do not have enough social and affordable housing for them to live in. they are in that housing right now. we need funding right now. the grenfell disaster brought social housing issues into sharp focus. too little investment, too little attention. the government is now promising more of both. richard lister, bbc news. let's return to the countdown to brexit. we are six months away and bbc correspondents have been travelling round the country to assess the public‘s view on progress so far. today the newsbeat camper van
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travelled down from hull and arrived in mansfield. that is a very long camper van. their politics editor jim conolloyjoins us now — so how is oscar doing? 0h, oh, my word. this is all going very well. were going to get more from jim ina well. were going to get more from jim in a moment but we are going to hear from jim in a moment but we are going to hearfrom him when he heard from a football tea m hearfrom him when he heard from a football team earlier. there are a lot of frustration from people that voted to leave. they don't think it seems to be sorted out. are you frustrated? on board more than anything. if i'm honest it isjust going more than anything. if i'm honest it is just going round more than anything. if i'm honest it isjust going round in circles. coming up with new deals and getting backtracks. there is no easy split
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from this kind of decision. it is going to be hard regardless so why don't you just nip it in the bud and deal with the aftermath as it goes. you have been talking about it like talking about splitting up with a girlfriend. yes. just get it over and done with. nobody is saying it is easy but you are milking it. if you're not happy thenjust leave. is easy but you are milking it. if you're not happy then just leave. do you're not happy then just leave. do you agree? when you hear them saying that you think that is what i think is well? completely. i'm not saying that i am old. you just is well? completely. i'm not saying that i am old. youjust been playing! i try my best. i've been living in mansfield for quite some years. we think brexit is going to help but we don't know if it is. i think it will not affect this country dramatically at all i just
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think it will be better for us. does it frustrate you when you hear the prime ministers saying it is her deal, this thing cold checkers, or no deal at all. does that worry you? it doesn't frustrate me because with the faith i have i believe in a higher power. i believe he is in control so ijust higher power. i believe he is in control so i just take higher power. i believe he is in control so ijust take each day as it comes. the quicker it is over and done with the quicker everyone can get on with it. same for you? what do you make with a deal, no deal situation? it as she is throwing her about. it is the equivalent of a dodgy car salesman. you want something for nothing and she is trying to milk it out and get as much as she can and give nothing to them. just split it. 50—50, straight down the middle, what ever the cost. splitted 50—50 and get it over with.
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there's honestly some frustration with both of you that it isn't going quickly enough. any frustration on the pitch tonight? we got a draw and we wanted a win so not what we'd hoped. but all the lads pitched together and it is not the end of the world. is that the lesson the government? yes. we've got an absolutely first—class team tonight. if the government can finish the job like we can it will be a good thing. 7796 like we can it will be a good thing. 77% of people here voted for leave so this sense of frustration we have heard tonight is mirrored across the town as people just want brexit to happen. talk to us about oscar because that is the name of your van. it is correct. it seems our connection is about as reliable as oscar. a few issues. this came off yesterday. we went the wrong way through a service wash at a service station so that
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wash at a service station so that was a problem. when we arrived in mansfield we didn't realise how many hills there were and we could not get it into gear. we had to push it out of the car park. all in all, the whole experience is fantastic. what is your sense about the mood out there with just six months ago?” think the really interesting thing is driving into the town today, this town voted 70% to leave. the feeling is very such strong here. we had a young quy is very such strong here. we had a young guy shouts exit means brexit earlier. as you can see we are heavily branded up. there we go. we're going to have to leave it there not thatjim can respond to that. then is there with the business news injusta then is there with the business news injust a moment but then is there with the business news in just a moment but let's then is there with the business news injust a moment but let's bring then is there with the business news in just a moment but let's bring you the headlines first. the prime minister heads to austria — for a ten minute pitch to sell her chequers proposal
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to european leaders. the woman has been killed in the west coast of ireland as storm ali batters the west coast of ireland and now arrives in the uk. the prime minister announces £2 billion to build new homes in britain — and calls for an end to the "stigma" of social housing. here's your business headlines on afternoon live. clear the aisles — there's a new supermarket player in town. tesco has launched its new discount chain — called jack's — to take on cheaper rivals aldi and lidl. the first store is in a mothballed former tesco store in cambridgeshire. another outlet in lincolnshire opens later. up to 15 stores are planned for new locations. average prices for goods and services rose faster last month than they did injuly.
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inflation unexpectedly went up to 2.7% in august. that's the highest level in six months — and higher than forecast. wages though, are still rising by more than inflation. transport costs — especially air and sea fares — went up most sharply as did clothing prices. but prices of household goods and furniture are not rising as quickly as they did a year ago. orla kiely — the british handbag and homeware retailer — is closing its stores and website. it stopped trading earlier this week as its parent company went into administration. but its accessories and homeware will continue being sold through partners. famous for vintage prints. now, china... why are you smiling? because everything that could go
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wrong is going wrong. china has hit back at accusations that it is using its currency as a tool in the trade war with the us then? yes — china's premier li keqiang said beijing will not actively weaken the yuan to boost exports. a country can intentionally undervalue its currency by selling its own currency to drive down its value, making its exports cheaper and more competitive. president donald trump has repeatedly accused china of manipulating its currency to combat us tariffs. but currency maniuplation is very hard to actually prove. and this is all against the backdrop of the trade row between washington and beijing? yes — let me just update you with what has happened in the latest exchanges. on monday america announced it will slap tariffs on a further $200 billion of chinese goods. china of course retaliated with tariffs on $60 billion of us goods coming into china. in his speech the chinese premier used the opportunity
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to highlight his country's support of multi—lateral trade. translation: it is of course important to maintain free trade. they offer us inclusive to you. it is progress for human civilisation. if there are problems we should resolve them through negotiation. unilateral action does not stand a chance of solving problems. and the other big story around — tesla in the headlines again? laughter why are you chuckling? if only you knew what was going on over there. i'll tell you about the electric car company i'll tell you about the electric car com pa ny tesla
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i'll tell you about the electric car company tesla then. the electric car company says the department ofjustice is investigating a tweet by it's boss elon musk — about taking the firm private. last month he surprised investors with the move — saying funding secured. joining us now is samira hussain, our new york business correspondent. would we know about this investigation? the investigation is keep piling on to tesla. it all stems from that sweet. the issue of that sweet is that elon musk said that sweet is that elon musk said that he had secured funding but what these officials are trying to figure out is whether he secured funding or not. what happened when that sweet came out, the stock price shot up by 996. came out, the stock price shot up by 9%. the accusations are that he sent it out to try and manipulate the stock. what mr musk has said is that the department of justice
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stock. what mr musk has said is that the department ofjustice had asked for information and he would cooperate. this information is in addition to another enquiry. it comes at a time when the company is in the news a lot because of production delays. and some of other things such as the defamation lawsuit by a british diver. the company can use the director's twitter feed is a company can use the director's twitterfeed is a legitimate company can use the director's twitter feed is a legitimate source of information, ca ntlay? twitter feed is a legitimate source of information, cantlay? yes but the issue is whether he had the funding or whether he just tried to boost the stock and people were able to cash out and make a lot of money. it is what we cool short sellers. what is what we cool short sellers. what is funny about that is that elon musk is very vocal about his trust
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of short sellers. thank you for your ta ke of short sellers. thank you for your take on that. now you're going to surprise me with a quiz apparently. iam... take a look at this picture, simon, do you see anything wrong... there is a missing f. an airline has had to send a new plane back to the paint shop after it... how did this happen? how can you painta plain how did this happen? how can you paint a plain wrong? it has given people on twitter a lot of amusement. is this real? yes, they shared it on their twitter accounts
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saying oops. some people have come up saying oops. some people have come up with ways around it. believe it or not it was spotted by passengers. they looked at it and thought something didn't look quite right. this whole story doesn't feel right but 0k this whole story doesn't feel right but ok will take it as that. there is no pleasing some people, is there? let's take a quick look at the markets. the ftse 100 has picked up this afternoon. a boost coming from mining stocks. meanwhile home improvement retailer kingfisher slid after reporting weaker profits. an unexpected jump in uk inflation boosted sterling. it jumped above $1.32 to its strongest level in nine weeks on the back of that higher than expected inflation figure. that tends to give the bank of england cause to think about raising interest rates and that makes the pound increase in value. that's all the business news. a british satellite, nearly 200 miles above earth,
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has managed to clear up tonnes of spacejunk, using a giant net. it's part of a series of trials looking at the best way to remove the old hardware left circling our planet. some 7,500 tonnes is said to be drifting aimlessly overhead, posing a collision hazard for space new missions. our science correspondent, jonathan amos has the story. it's getting crowded up there. 60 years of space exploration have littered the skies above our heads. old rockets, defunct satellites, even accidentally dropped astronaut tools. the fear is this junk could start a series of runaway coalitions, making space unusable. but perhaps this is the solution. this is the moment a net is thrown around some junk to capture it. it was thrown by a uk satellite that carries the first practical demonstrations to remove orbiting debris. what we are demonstrating is a possible technology to capture some of this debris, and we tried to look at cost
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effective technologies like a net, so the idea is you cast the net, capture your piece of debris, the satellite, then the orbit together so you burn into the atmosphere. coming next, a more pointed demonstration. a harpoon that can pierce reluctant objects so they can be dragged out of orbit. projectiles like this may be the simplest way to deal with some deeply. to deal with some ——debris. this is the harpoon that we've been developing, and on the remove debris mission they're going to be testing the kind of smaller brother of this one to show that we can successfully capture a piece of space debris in space using a harpoon. the british mission, launched injune, still has a few months left to run, but its work could lay the path to a safer future for the thousands of satellites that will follow. these systems risk being damaged or even destroyed if we don't find ways to clean up the existing mess. jonathan amos, bbc news.
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that catch up with the weather forecast. storm ali has already been battering in northern ireland with winds of over 70 miles an hour. it is heading to scotland right now and this is where we have the amber warning from the met office. it is valid from six o'clock. this is where we are expecting the main winds to be. the centre of storm ali will track away from northern ireland, take the strongest of the wind away and push across scotland. gradually through the afternoon we will start to see the wind easing just a little. mind you, it will be pretty windy across the border. there will be frequent heavy showers following into western and northern scotla nd following into western and northern scotland and showers for that area. patchy rain will also move down across england and wales. still some
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warmth in particular in the south—east. across england and wales. a different story for the north. the wind tends to ease overnight and then we focus on this rain that is developing further south. having ground to a halt, the rain starts to pep up again and drive northwards. south of that will bea drive northwards. south of that will be a very warm night was north of that it will be quite a bit cooler and windy. the wind will gradually eased down tomorrow. further south the wind will be up for most of the day. we will see the rain developing more widely and pushing northwards towards northern ireland and scotland. heaviest rain over the hills. the south east and east anglia largely dry. the sunshine and probably the last of the warmth. two things happening overnight. the rain continued to mount up over the higher ground of wales in north—west england. it could be up to four inches of rain. girls developing more widely —— gables
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—— gales developing overnight. as we head into friday it will be a cooler and fresher feel. more vague north—westerly wind. still very gusty winds on friday. we're not out of the woods just yet. there will be some showers over parts of wales and northern england. south that it will bea dry northern england. south that it will be a dry day. here the term will be lower. no better than 18 celsius. hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy.
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today at 3: as the prime minister heads to salzburg to pitch her brexit proposals to the other european leaders, there are warm words from the president of the european council. the inquest into the westminster terror attack hears the attacker, khalid masood, had a history of violent outbursts. a woman dies after being blown off a cliff in her caravan, as ireland and parts of the uk are battered by storm ali. a cruise ship detaches from its moorings in in greenock, as dumfries and galloway declares a major incident coming up on afternoon live, all the sport with holly hamilton. good afternoon. both manchester clu bs good afternoon. both manchester clubs syahrin good afternoon. both manchester clu bs good afternoon. both manchester clubs syahrin champions good afternoon. both manchester clu bs good afternoon. both manchester clubs syahrin champions league action later. i will of course have all the build—up to both those games. and i will have the details
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of who has made the england one—day squad for the series in sri lanka. and we have that all—important weather forecast. yes, storm ali continues to bat as pa rt yes, storm ali continues to bat as part of the uk. the strongest winds are moving away from northern ireland and pushing their way into scotland. the amber wind warning from the met office expires at 6pm. but there is more wet and windy weather to come. also coming up, a british satellite goes litter picking in space. good afternoon. salzburg in austria —
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the home of the von trapp family featured in the sound of music and the venue tonight of a dinner for all the eu leaders. and theresa may's brexit proposals are on the menu: she has 10 minutes to sell her chequers proposals to her european colleagues. some believe she has a longer way to go. but the mood music may be changing. our europe correspondent, damian grammaticas has more. this salzburg summit on the edge of the alps marks the start of the final arduous ascent to a brexit deal. the decisive phase of the talks start here, as eu leaders will, behind closed doors, plot their strategy for the coming weeks. here's one part of that — michel barnier, eu chief negotiator, last night said he's prepared to soften the eu proposal for how to avoid a new border in ireland. we can also clarify that most checks can take place on way from the border, at the company premises, or in the markets. we need to de—dramatise the checks that are needed — these checks are caused by the uk's decision to leave the eu, its single
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market and the customs union. but that's not a major shift butjust a way to make it more palatable. the move at the last possible minute, after they have tested your metal and to the cliff edge, to use that phrase everyone's fond of, and that's what will happen. it is here at northern ireland's ports, not at the land border with our ireland, that some other checks may still be needed. the uk still isn't buying it. we have been very clear that we will not accept something that separates out our united kingdom, creating some sort of customs border between great britain and northern ireland. that would be unacceptable — constitutionally, economically and indeed i would question its consistency with the belfast good friday agreement. the problem is the eu won't accept the uk alternative. it closed doors, theresa may will tonight try to persuade eu leaders her idea of a customs deal followed by the chequers
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plan is a workable way to lock down a brexit deal. it seems the best theresa may can hope forfrom her trip it seems the best theresa may can hope for from her trip will be some warm words. leaders are not going to negotiate with iran not going to change their position towards the talks and they are not going to instruct michel barnier to compromise at this stage. instead they will do the opposite, they will say that the uk has to agree a solution to the irish border if it wa nts solution to the irish border if it wants an exit treaty. and that means that the coming weeks will see fraught and difficult talks if a deal is to be settled. in the last hour, the european council president, donald tusk has giving a cautious welcome to theresa may's chequers proposals and called for a brexit summit in mid—november where he hopes for a final deal to be agreed.
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i would like to stress that some of prime minister theresa may ‘s proposals from chequers indicate a positive evolution in the uk ‘s approach as well as a world to negate the effects of brexit. by this i mean, among other things, the readiness to cooperate closely in the area of security and foreign policy. on other issues, such as the irish question, or the framework for economic cooperation, the uk's proposals will need to be reworked and further negotiated. today, there is perhaps more hope but there is surely less and less time. therefore, every day that is left, we must use for talks.
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let's get reaction from our chief political correspondent, vicki young, whojoins me now from westminster. we are hearing from the brexit secretary as well. yes, those words from donald tusk saying there is more hope, i am not sure that is how people here see it and also him saying that it needs to be reworked, theresa may is saying, what i am putting on the table is the compromise i have hammered out, that is as far as i can go, and yet they are still demanding more. talk of michel barnier saying he is softening his position, already, the dup whose votes theresa may relies on the house of commons, they say does not make any difference at all. they said there could be different kinds of checks between britain and northern ireland but actually it still means there is a border effectively splitting up the united kingdom. and they will not accept it. all sorts of problems for theresa may and as i say, in
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parliament, the problems she has got as she is not pleasing anybody. we have those on one side who campaigned to remain in the eu, they are not satisfied. i spoke to one of them earlier, justine greening, she is one of those calling for another referendum, saying that it is only in the end the people who can decide how to get out of this impasse. the problem is actually that for mps and communities around the country, our constituents don't understand chequers and they support it. if you have leave voters in your patch, theyjust don't think this gives us theyjust don't think this gives us the break from europe that they want. they cannot see why we would still take all these rules, the whole point was breaking free of those. and for remain folders, they are thinking, hang on a second, why are thinking, hang on a second, why are we still having rules now we don't get to actually shape them and actually the people who wanted to leave aren't happy with the leave that we are going to have, so what was the point of all of this? we have to find a route forward that
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genuinely can get people behind it but i don't think what —— we will know what that is unless we go back to them with a final say referendum. i spoke to one of the leave mps earlier, he was saying exactly that, they are absolutely not behind the chequers deal that theresa may is talking about, they now think that the only option is to go to a free—trade arrangement. it is very clear that it won't work. i was it is very clear that it won't work. iwas in it is very clear that it won't work. i was in brussels the last couple of days with the association of customs, brokers and forwarders, and they all said that from a professional point of view, it is an unworkable solution and that is what the eu said also. and it isjust not a realistic thing. you cannot have free circulation of that kind. he justis free circulation of that kind. he just is not working customs terms. what is much more practical as if we can go fora what is much more practical as if we can go for a free—trade agreement, which is what the eu want, and where you can have that behind the border
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processing so that there aren't actually physical checks at the border itself. we have also heard from dominic raab this afternoon. he has written to his labour opposite number saying that he wants urgent clarification on labour's brexit policy. specifically he is saying, is labour in favour of another referendum? he is saying that the government has ruled that out, saying it would be wrong on principle and in practice but he says there are mixed signals coming from the labour party, including sadiq khan, and others, who are keeping open the option of having another referendum, so he wa nts having another referendum, so he wants clarification on labour's policy. i think we can imagine what labour will say in response to that. you are in government, we need clarification on what you want as well. and later on bbc news, we're giving you the opportunity to ask our business editor simonjack any burning questions you may have about the uk's future outside the eu. that'll be at 5:20pm. a woman has died, after her
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caravan was blown off a cliff and into the sea, as storm ali batters ireland and parts of the uk. the vehicle ended up on a beach in county galway while the woman was asleep, as winds of up to 95 miles an hour tore down trees and power lines, destroying vehicles, and causing widespread travel disruption. meanwhile in scotland, a cruise ship carrying more than 500 people detached from its moorings at greenock port near glasgow. and in south west scotland, dumfries and galloway council has declared that the major a76 road is closed due to a fallen tree. school pupils in the area have been banned from walking home over safety fears, after some children were injured by flying debris. an amber weather warning, meaning ‘be prepared', remains in place across northern parts of the uk, with powerful winds forecasted until tonight. earlier i spoke to our correspondent
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emma vardy, who's in belfast. she began though by giving us the latest on a cruise ship that's got into trouble off the coast of scotland. it happened at the port of greene and inverclyde, a cruise ship coming free from its moorings, just another sign of how powerful the use winds are proving to be and we have had a statement from oceana cruises which has said that the nautica encountered extremely strong winds, which resulted in the parting of mooring lines and the vessel being detached from the dock. the company though says all guests and crew on board are safe. there were no injuries. and the vessel is currently being held off her birth. some a78 guests and 26 crew are now
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on the shore. another incident showing the widespread disruption and potential danger of these wins. ican and potential danger of these wins. i canjust and potential danger of these wins. i can just tell you a little bit more about that incident which happened in the west of ireland. a fatal incident in which a caravan was blown off a cliff in galway, irish police this morning searching the beach below where that happened recovered a body of a woman in her 50s. and it is being reported that this was a tourist from switzerland who had been asleep in her caravan at the time it happened. elsewhere across northern ireland and the republic of ireland, now more than 200,000 homes and businesses are without power. there is all sorts of cancellations on travel, with planes, fairies, trains that are cancelled, lots of staff and officials trying to clear debris from the tracks. and as you can see, this road is closed in belfast. there is a number of trees along the
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road which are down. a number of branches which are completely blocking the way. a police cordon is in place. amber weather warning is going to be in place untilfive o'clock this evening. that is not only for northern ireland but also scotla nd only for northern ireland but also scotland and parts of northern ireland and what that means is there isa ireland and what that means is there is a risk to life and there may well be more damage to buildings and more power cuts to come. the inquest into the westminster terror attack has heard details of the attacker‘s life. the court heard khalid masood's motherfeared he would kill someone while he was still a teenager. his failed relationships, violent criminal past and conversion to islam during a spell in prison were also discussed. we can cross to the old bailey now and speak to our reporter, jenny kumah. yes, today we heard details of the life of khalid masood, who killed
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four people on westminster bridge when he drove a car into them and then later went on to stab pisi parma after entering parliament. today we heard from the counterterror investigator about his life. he was born in south london. moved to tunbridge wells as a teenager. and his first criminal offence occurred at 1a, a shoplifting offence. as he got older, he became increasingly violent and the old bailey heard that his mother told police he would go out to pubs and clubs looking for a fight as an older teenager. she also described him as an angry person and she was worried he would kill someone through fighting. now, during the 1980s, he was involved in a number of violent incidents, many of them involving alcohol and in may 2003, he stammered daniel smith through the nose. the blade went through the nose. the blade went through the nose. the blade went through the palette of his mouth
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with such force that the blade fell off. later, khalid masood attributed his acquittalfrom this off. later, khalid masood attributed his acquittal from this attack and also the survival of his daughter from a serious car incident to his islamic faith. he described it as one of two miracles which prove the truth of islam. we heard that khalid masood converted to islam during the first of two spells in prison and where he started to read the koran. we also heard that he later went on to study for an economics degree at university in brighton but he could not get a job and ended up working asa not get a job and ended up working as a cleaner. and we heard that his mother said that he visited her shortly before the incident on the 22nd of march, shortly before that attack, he visited her on the 17th of march and he said to her, don't say i'm a terrorist, i am not. the headlines. the prime minister
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heads to austria for a ten minute pitch to sell her chequers proposal to other european leaders. ireland and other parts of the uk are battered by storm ali. the inquest into the westminster terror attack here is how the man responsible, khalid masood, had a history of violent outbursts. and its board, ben stokes and alex hales are both selected in england's one—day squad for the tour of sri lanka. both men were charged by the ecb yesterday for bringing the game into disrepute. mikel arteta says manchester city are better prepared for the champions league this season. they begin their european campaign tonight at the etihad stadium. he will be in charge while pep guardiola serves a touchline ban.
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england's net bowlers have been beaten by australia. they were beaten 52—a7 in the series down under. i will be back with more on all bolstered —— stories at half past three. the rate of inflation has risen to its highest level in six months. thejump in august, to 2.7 per cent, surprised many economists, who'd expected a slight fall. rising prices for recreational goods, transport and clothing are to blame, as our economics correspondent, andy verity, reports. this leicester—based food supplier makes its spring rolls, samosas and otherfrozen indian snacks by hand, but that means big labour costs, and it's also being squeezed by the surge in energy prices. with the raw material, that's going up, so potatoes — that's going up in price. the raw material like peas, carrots, that's less of a big pressure. the electricity, just in the last year the price has gone up by 20%. because we use electricity quite a lot because it's a frozen food business, that's something that's impacting us a lot as well,
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and wages as well — that's increasing over time. but wages aren't rising fast enough for many workers to feel obviously better off. yeah, things are going up, prices are going up. so it's a bit difficult. sometimes i feel very bad. everybody can't afford to buy all the things. earlier this year we had some good economic news. the squeeze on living standards had lifted. pay was finally rising faster than prices, meaning you could buy more with what you were paid. that's still happening, but with inflation at 2.7%, onlyjust. among the items driving up the cost of living were clothing and shoes. in the year to august, gas bills rose by a.3%, electricity was up 7.a% and petrol jumped by 11.7%. there is still a lingering effect from the fall in the pound after the brexit referendum, and we see that in terms of very high imported prices, so import price inflation is still around 10% per annum.
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that means that energy costs are rising, at a pretty hefty pace. if you leave out volatile items such as energy and food, the rise in the cost of living looks a lot more manageable, just 2.1%. nevertheless, on the markets today the betting was that the bank of england would have to raise interest rates again by may next year. andy verity, bbc news. detectives are investigating whether an incident in which a car hit pedestrians outside a mosque in london was an islamophobic attack. police say the incident is being treated as a possible hate crime after three people were struck by the vehicle in cricklewood in north—west london, with reports that those inside the car were making "anti—islamic taunts". our correspondent, keith doyle is in cricklewood and he sent this report. at around half past midnight this
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morning, was full of hundreds of people who were leaving the commemorations which were taking place in the building behind me. some stewards from the centre approached a car that was parked nearby with four people in it and then there was some sort of altercation. the police said the stewards were subjected to a thai raid of islamophobic and racist abuse. the car then drove off and mounted the payment and drove into a number of the people on the street. the police have said that two people we re the police have said that two people were seriously injured but they are not ina were seriously injured but they are not in a critical condition. here is the account of one eyewitness. i saw the car driving at a crazy speed. i was concerned about the people. i was looking forward, backward, just to make sure no one was on the street. what i did, i ran towards the car, trying to move the people out of the role. so, i
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managed to push a few people off the road. but the car, once he saw me, you tried to run me over. so i tried to move out of the way and then the car was that close to hitting me, but i managed to move off the road. and i hope a few people. it was terrifying. i did not know what to do. they say they are treating this as an islamophobic and hate crime but at the moment, they are not treating it as at the moment, they are not treating itasa at the moment, they are not treating it as a terrorist incident. they are looking for the four people who were in the carand looking for the four people who were in the car and they say they have put in measures to make sure the rest of the commemorations pass off safely. the leaders of north and south korea say they've taken a dramatic step forward, in achieving a lasting peace, on the peninsula. after meeting in the north korean capital pyongyang, the south korean president, moonjae—in said he and his north korean counterpart, kimjong—un, had ‘agreed on a way to achieve denuclearisation', as the north says it'll shut one of its main missile testing sites.
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mr kim also said he hoped to visit seoul ‘in the nearfuture' — if that happens, he'd be the first north korean leader to go to the south korean capital. more than five million children are at risk of famine in yemen, as the ongoing war increases food and fuel prices, according to the charity save the children. it said disruption to supplies coming through the embattled port of hodeida could cause starvation on an unprecedented scale. save the children say two thirds of yemen's population already don't know where their next meal is coming from. a british satellite, nearly 200 miles above earth, has managed to clear up tonnes of spacejunk, using a giant net. it's part of a series of trials looking at the best way to remove the old hardware left circling our planet. some 7,500 tonnes is said to be drifting aimlessly overhead, posing a collision hazard for space new missions. our science correspondent, jonathan amos has the story. it's getting crowded up there. 60 years of space exploration have littered the skies above our heads. old rockets, defunct
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satellites, even accidentally dropped astronaut tools. the fear is this junk could start a series of runaway coalitions, making space unusable. but perhaps this is the solution. this is the moment a net is thrown around some junk to capture it. it was thrown by a uk satellite that carries the first practical demonstrations to remove orbiting debris. what we are demonstrating is a possible technology to capture some of this debris, and we tried to look at cost effective technologies like a net, so the idea is you cast the net, capture your piece of debris, the satellite, then the orbit together so you burn into the atmosphere. coming next, a more pointed demonstration. a harpoon that can pierce reluctant objects so they can be dragged out of orbit. projectiles like this may be the simplest way to deal with some deeply.
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this is the harpoon that we've been developing, and on the remove debris mission they're going to be testing the kind of smaller brother of this one to show that we can successfully capture a piece of space debris in space using a harpoon. the british mission, launched injune, still has a few months left to run, but its work could lay the path to a safer future for the thousands of satellites that will follow. these systems risk being damaged or even destroyed if we don't find ways to clean up the existing mess. jonathan amos, bbc news. the tv presenter and comedy writer denis norden has died. the mission has been a success so far, has it? yes, we are delighted how things have gone so far. wiley a
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net? a net seems to be a relatively simple way to capture debris. and similarly a harpoon, we are going to test that when next few weeks. you are trying to slow it down so it falls back to earth and then burns up falls back to earth and then burns up on re—entry. falls back to earth and then burns up on re-entry. yes, we are going to ca ptu re a up on re-entry. yes, we are going to capture a piece of debris and this will be slowed down so that it burns off in the atmosphere. it is quite amazing to think of how much junk there is out there. if you think that there is about 60 years that we are using space to put in orbit satellites, that do very useful things, so all the satellite technologies are very useful but after a certain amount of years, maybe the satellites must stop working, so we have now an issue with old satellites that have to be
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cleared. you say they have to be cleared, because they pose a threat, do they? yes. in practice what you haveis do they? yes. in practice what you have is there is a probability of a new satellite being hit by one of this debris. and this could be a whole satellite or it could be just a fragment because there have already been some collisions in space. now is the time to try to act in order to keep the situation under control. some of thisjunk is quite big, the size of a bus. is a net or a harpoon going to be able to do something about that? yes, indeed. you have to capture it. the net can be relatively large. once you have ca ptu red be relatively large. once you have captured this piece of debris, you can slow it down until it burns off in the atmosphere. the jury is still out on what the best technology to ca ptu re out on what the best technology to capture debris is going to be. there are also other people proposing a robotic arm to go on to capture a
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piece of debris. but what we wanted to demonstrate, the net and the harpoon cost—effective technologies in order to achieve this goal. don't ta ke in order to achieve this goal. don't take me the wrong way but with this mission, aren't you just putting morejunk into mission, aren't you just putting more junk into space? mission, aren't you just putting morejunk into space? no, no. this mission everything is going into orbit relatively quickly, a matter of months, so indeed, we have to make sure that we will not adding to thejunk, of make sure that we will not adding to the junk, of course. make sure that we will not adding to thejunk, of course. i am glad you took that the way i hoped he would. in terms of the risks of this, presumably, there is a moment where if one bit ofjunk bumped into another, you could start an effect that would really cause problems for many? indeed, indeed. that is exactly the issue. indeed, you will
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have problems if you have a collision of relatively large satellites or pieces of debris, they could break in fragments that then in turn causes other debris and you have a chain reaction, a snowball effect, and that is why it is important to go and remove some of the larger pieces of debris because there are those that actually could pose a threat and actually trigger this effect. and presumably this is the technology people decide is the best way to clear up this mess, there is money to be made out there. yes, the wood will butler first thing would be to persuade the stakeholders around the world that it makes sense to do this. that's why were tried at focus on cost—effective technologies because of we maintain the cost to an affordable level, it is more likely to happen as a real business. if the costis to happen as a real business. if the cost is extremely high, then maybe people will prefer to take the risk. so far, so good. congratulations.
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thank you. that is brilliant. thank you ford joining us. time now for the weather forecast. damaging winds from storm ali have been buffeting northern ireland. they are blowing their way into scotla nd they are blowing their way into scotland as well. perhaps the far north and north—east of england. this is where we have the amber wind warning from the met office until six o'clock this evening. pretty windy elsewhere across the uk. we are seeing lots of showers coming in after the rain across scotland and northern ireland. a line of rain moving into the south—east of the uk. still quite warm for england and wales. windy across scotland, we will keep those showers going. more rain arriving across england and wales overnight. the winds will
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continue to ease across scotland on thursday. some heavy rain developing later across the hills of wales and north—west england. still quite warm in the south—east but it will turn wet and windy for england and wales during the evening. this is bbc news — our latest headlines. a woman in her 50s has died after a caravan she was in was blown into the sea in the west of ireland.
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storm ali has brought high winds and rain to western parts of ireland and the uk, leaving almost 200,000 homes and business across ireland and northern ireland without power. the met office has issued an amber weather warning. the prime minister heads to salzburg — where later she'll pitch her brexit proposals to her european colleagues. the president of the european council donald tusk has said there is "more hope but less and less time" in the negotiations and said he wants a special summit in mid—november. the prime minister pledges £2 billion to build new homes in england, and says she wants people to be proud of living in social housing. and the inquest into the westminster terror attack hears how the man responsible, khalid masood, had "a violent temper". sport now on afternoon live. with holly hamilton.
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it was only last week that england's cricketers finished their season, but already they have announced their squad for the first tour of the winter? that's right, simon. no rest for the wicket. that has taken me ages to, without joke. england's cricketers head to sri lanka for a 5 match one day series, which begins on the 10th of october. much of the talk though had been around whether or not ben stokes and alex hales would be included.. both players were charged by the english cricket board yesterday, for bringing the game into disrepute after an incident outside a nightclub in bristol. they've both been named in the squad... although they will face disciplinary hearing which is scheduled for december 5th and the 7th, which luckily enoug falls in between the sri lanka and west indies tours. let's take a look at the full 16—man squad... which includes warwickshire
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bowler olly stone — he's been given a first call—up, as a replacement for liam plunkett — who will miss the first three matches for his wedding. lovely! both of the curran brothers — sam and tom — are also in the squad. because why have just one curran when you can have two simon. absolutely. let's talk about football. we had champions league action last night and that was exciting. but if you are in manchester there is no escape tonight. after that late drama for liverpool and spurs last night ...now, it's all about manchester... but let's talk about city first of all... premier league champions and arguably one of the favourites for the title... but they begin their campaign without their manager when they host lyon tonight. he'll have to watch from the stands... he's serving a touchline ban after he was sent off during last season's quarter final defeat to liverpool.
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instead his assistant mikel arteta will look after the team and the former arsenal star has already taken a step up, replacing guardiola at the official uefa press conference ahead of tonight's match where he made a big claim — stating that city are the best in the world. for me we have the best players in the world. i look at our players like they are the best. i see them training every day. i see how they behave and how they react against positives and negatives and other qualities and i know their weaknesses. i wouldn't change my players for any others. they are absolutely fantastic, the group of players we have. the mix we have between senior players and young players. the hunger that is in this group... as for manchester united — they're away to young boys in the swiss capital bern. they'll play on an artificial pitch... which means they'll be without captain antonio valencia because of concerns over how he'll react to the surface following a knee injury. bossjose mourinho isn't keen either, but chose a certain swiss sportsman — roger federer who also has to make
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do with a surface he doen't like — to make his point that they'lljust have to get on with it. i am pretty sure that the big man sometimes isn't happy to play such a surface but he has to play. and he has to win. and everybody knows he has a favourite surface but he has also to win in the surfaces that he is not in love with. so we will have to do it. five months on from their historic victory over australia in the final of the commonwealth games, england's netballers have been beaten by the diamonds in their quad series clash. it was the first time the two sides sides have met since the gold coast — but this time, the hosts proved why they're still number one — as emily croyden reports. english netball has changed. for the first time here they faced australia as the number two side in the world. with the world cup on the horizon they wanted to prove they are the team to beat.
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they attacked the match with purpose. england were dominating australia. with a strong defensive effort from the side. but things can change quickly in this game and australia finally found a way through and swung the match their favour at half—time. tracey neville wanted more from her roses side but it was australia who took a big lead into the last quarter. but this england team has a new belief and they came back with real energy. ultimately though australia reasserted their status as the best team in the world with ten months to go to the world cup. but england will know that despite missing key players they were not far short. they will be so disappointed with that result. that is all your sports for now. i will have more sport in the next hour. thank you very much, holly. lots of whether to talk about. we're
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hearing about trains being cancelled in scotland. but in the meantime i wa nt to ta ke in scotland. but in the meantime i want to take you to north carolina. air force one has just landed at cherry point in north carolina. donald trump is about to get off the plane and make those in the clear up operation of hurricane florence. in the last few hours he has posted a message on his twitter account which has got him a bit of mockery because he said that storm florence, and i am quoting, was one of the wettest we have ever seen. many in the united states are wondering what thatis
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united states are wondering what that is meant to mean. but as he prepares to disembark he will be meeting members of the federal emergency management agency and the military, people he said have been working so hard. 15,000 people remain in shelters. more than 200,000 customers are still without power across north carolina and this is six days after florence came ashore as a category one hurricane. and the river is expected to hit 61 feet which is four times its normal height later today. that is in the southern part of the state in a city of 200,000. that is according to be national weather service. this is destructing efforts to restore power to summon people have been affected. any moment now... there he is.
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president trump arriving in north carolina in what is his first visit since hurricane florence hit. he has praised those workers involved in the clear up operation after florence which has killed at least 35 people, including 26 people in north carolina. eight people have been killed in south carolina where authorities say that to mental health patients drowned yesterday. one person has been killed in virginia bya one person has been killed in virginia by a tornado which spun off from florence. thousands of rescues have been taking place in the carolinas as a result of that storm. president from which taking a look for himself at some of the devastation wrought by that storm. 16 rivers remain at major flood
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stage with three others set to hit their peaks in the coming days in north carolina. so the crisis is by farfrom north carolina. so the crisis is by far from over. north carolina. so the crisis is by farfrom over. in the north carolina. so the crisis is by far from over. in the town of should there be any other in images to show you, we will bring those to you. you are watching afternoon live. theresa may, has announced plans to make an extra two—billion pounds available, to build more affordable and social housing in england. councils, housing associations and other bodies, can bid for the money for new projects, from 2022. the prime minister says she wants to remove the ‘stigma' surrounding social housing. here's richard lister. at this site in south london, they're building a mix
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of private and social housing, homes that are badly needed — notjust in the capital, but across the country, where demand for affordable housing far outstrips supply. today the prime minister announced an additional £2 billion for housing associations to build more homes. under the scheme, associations will be able to apply for funding stretching as far ahead as 2028—29, the first time any government has offered housing associations such long—term certainty. mrs may said it was time to end the stigma that many people still attached to social housing. many people in society, including too many politicians, continue to look down on social housing and, by extension, the people who call it their home. mrand mrs parkerapplied to buy their house... it was this tory prime minister who really shook up the housing market with an emphasis on home ownership which still reverberates today. but those who couldn't afford to buy were left in sink estates run by housing associations.
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it's very good to hear that the government now wants to be able to invest in housing associations, notjust this year but in a much more strategic way into the future. but there's a long way to go. the government says it has built more than 357,000 affordable properties since 2010, but a survey this year found a shortfall of 30,000 affordable homes every year since 2011, which could create a shortage of 335,000 homes by 2022. we have 180,000 families who are in temporary accommodation because we do not have enough social and affordable housing for them to live in. they are in that housing right now. we need funding right now. the grenfell disaster brought social housing issues into sharp focus. too little investment, too little attention. the government is now promising more of both. richard lister, bbc news. wasps are just as useful as bees despite their image as picnic—ruining pests, according to a new study.
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researchers at university college london are backing a campaign to promote the benefits wasps bring, amid concerns they are being neglected. our science correspondent pallab ghosh has more. they are despised by picnickers and their stings are fears, wasps are among the least loved insects. more common words coming to mind of those surveyed were "sting", "annoying" and "dangerous". what do you think when you see a wasp? a little uncomfortable. can be dangerous with stings, especially when you have young children, which i have. the main problem is wasps have a bad press. they pollinate flowers, kill pests and are just as good for the environment as bees but because people do not know about the good work, they are regarded as nuisances. what people do not realise is how incredible valuable they are.
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these are natural pest controllers, so they are doing the job that we use chemicals, pesticides, to do. that is because they are hunters, predators. although you might think they are after your beer or your jam sandwich, they are much more interested in finding insect prey to take back to their nest or to feed to their larvae. the team brought in a campaign to try and raise awareness about how important wasps are so he can try and put as much effort into saving their population as we do with bees. ben bland is here — in a moment he will be telling us what's hot and what's not in the business news. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live. the prime minister heads to austria
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— for a ten minute pitch to sell her chequers proposal to european leaders. ireland and parts of the uk are battered by storm ali — leaving one woman dead after being blown off a cliff in a caravan in galway. the inquest into the westminster terror attack hears how the man responsible, khalid masood, had a history of violent outbursts. here's your business headlines on afternoon live. average prices for goods and services rose faster last month than they did injuly. inflation unexpectedly went up to 2.7% in august. that's the highest level in six months — and higher than forecast. wages though, are still rising by more than inflation. transport costs — especially air and sea fares — went up most sharply as did clothing prices. but prices of household goods and furniture are not rising as quickly as they did a year ago. the £15 billion merger between supermarkets sainsbury‘s and asda will be referred for a more in—depth investigation according to the regulator. the competition and markets authority said the deal "raises sufficient concerns to be referred for a more in—depth review". the merger would create
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a business taking £1 in every £3 spent on groceries. the airline cathay pacific has had to send a new plane back to the paint shop after the compa ny‘s name was spelled incorrectly on it. eagle—eyed travellers spotted the mistake at hong kong international airport and contacted the airline. what's i think is all you can say to that. woops is all you can say to that! clear the aisles — there's a new supermarket player in town. tesco has launched its new discount chain — called jack's — to take on cheaper rivals. aldi and lidl. the first store is in a mothballed former tesco store in cambridgeshire. another outlet in lincolnshire opens later. up to 15 stores are planned
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for new locations. for some time now the big supermarket giants have been facing fierce price competition from discount stores. earlier we spoke to karl mckeever, a retail analyst at visual thinking. it isa it is a massive corporate experiments but one they have to do. this is not launching a new brand but about stopping the progress of algae and little. —— aldi and lidl). this is all impacting on tesco's market share. what they want to do is to get as many of their sales as they can. if you cannot compete against them try and compete in their own backyard. another way of dealing with competition is to merge — as sainsbury‘s and asda are doing?
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yes — the old adage "if you can't beat em, join em". that £15 billion merger between supermarkets sainsbury‘s and asda will have to go through an in—depth competition investigation. the regulator — the competition and markets authority — said the deal "raises sufficient concerns to be referred for a more in—depth review". this is because the plan would create a business that takes £1 in every £3 spend on groceries and would create the uk's biggest retail chain, with 2,800 stores. the regulator is concerned because their stores overlap in hundreds of local areas, and it says — shoppers could face higher prices or worse quality of service — and suppliers could be squeezed and have to accept less for their goods. the chains say actually prices will fall. we'll see what happens with that review. while one retailer expands and others merge — another calls it a day? yes. orla kiely — the british handbag and homeware retailer — is closing its stores and website. this is the brand known for its 1970s style vintage prints. it stopped trading earlier this week
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as its parent company went into administration. but its accessories and homeware will continue being sold through partners. it becomes the latest victim of the difficult retail landscape. high—profile failures include maplin and toys r us, across the high street. while high street chains such as marks & spencer, house of fraser, there's fresh talk of regulating crypto currencices like bitcoin more tightly? yes — a committee of mps says bitcoin and other digital currencies are a "wild west industry" and need to be regulated to protect investors. problems include volatile prices, minimal protection for consumers and risks of hacking and money—laundering. this is all according to the treasury committee. the committee said there were no well—functioning crypto—currencies and preferred to call them "crypto—assets". let's talk to oscar williams—grut, senior reporterfrom
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business insiderjoins me now. what sort of thing do they mean? they had two recommendations. one was a deposit scheme for exchanges to protect customers against any losses if there is a hack of exchange. the other recommendation was to implement anti—money—laundering and knowing your customer regulation which applies to most regulating investments and basically means people have two checked the identities of who is buying this investment to make sure it is not mafia laundering money or some corrupt despots trying to move money out of a country or things like that. it strikes me that people know what they are getting into now. they have seen how volatile the price is. isn't it a case of you addressed at
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your own risk —— you invested your own risk was? in most of uk investments you have to be a qualified investor to get into these more sophisticated, complex and risky products. what they are saying is that ordinary retail investors, the man on the streets, shouldn't be allowed tojust the man on the streets, shouldn't be allowed to just put their life savings into this crypto asset even if they think they know what they are getting into because the risks are getting into because the risks are just so high. just a couple of weeks ago finance ministers were meeting in vienna to talk about regulating. i suppose the difficulty is for them to grasp how quickly the technology moves on and to keep up with it. certainly the speed of the space makes it incredibly difficult to regulate. another point as the
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committee pointed out in the report is that the government may want to make the uk into a home for the sort of crypto businesses because as risky as it is and the bad headlines we have seen around hacking and money lost, it is seen as an interesting technology that will play a role in financial services in the future. they don't want to be too draconian whether any rules they do put in place because it could be against growth in the future. do you think cryptocurrencies are with us to stay or are they a fad that will pass? what is interesting is that mps describe it as crypto assets rather than cryptocurrencies and i think that speaks to be constantly evolving and fast moving nature of the space. what we see in bitcoin
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and other leading cryptocurrencies will continue to a volvo and play an ever—growing part in both tech companies and more mainstream financial services. —— will continue to evolve. whether they will be around in five or ten years' time remains to be seen. the ftse100 has picked up this afternoon. a boost coming from mining stocks. meanwhile home improvement retailer kingfisher slid after reporting weaker profits. an unexpected jump in uk inflation boosted sterling. it jumped above $1.32 to its strongest level in nine weeks on the back of that higher than expected inflation figure. because that tends to give the bank of england cause to think
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about raising interest rates and that makes the pound increase in value. stronger than it has been for several weeks and months. you are watching afternoon live. the tv presenter and comedy writer denis norden has died. he was 96. best known for hosting the itv blooper programme, ‘it‘ll be all right on the night,‘ he began in showbiz writing routines to entertain the troops, during his time in the raf, in the second world war. david sillito looks back at his life. 19a8 and a new bbc comedy series, take it from here, written by frank muir and denis norden, a young writer from london who had started out entertaining troops in the second world war. it was the beginning of a 50 year comic partnership. there were 328 episodes which brought us catchphrases such as "trouble at mill" and disgusted of tunbridge wells. balham, gateway to the south.
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he wrote for peter sellers, jimmy edwards, david frost and then in 1977 he had an idea. the funniest material was often the stuff we did not see, the mistakes. some people claim there are no mistakes... and so began nearly 30 years of it'll be all right on the night and laughter file. he finally retired in 2006. he and frank muir had seen the horrors of life in their wartime experiences, among them a concentration camp. well, let's have another drink. for years after, their career only ever had one objective... ..seeing the funny side of life. denis norden, who's died, at the age of 96. time for a look at the weather
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with darren bett. storm ali has already been battering in northern ireland with winds of over 70 miles an hour. it is heading to scotland right now and this is where we have the amber warning from the met office. it is valid from six o'clock. this is where we are expecting the main winds to be. the centre of storm ali will track away from northern ireland, take the strongest of the wind away and push them across scotland. gradually through the afternoon we will start to see the wind easing just a little. mind you, it will be pretty windy across the border. windy across the ——board. there will be frequent heavy showers following into western and northern scotland and showers for that area. patchy rain will also move down across england and wales. still some warmth in particular in the south—east. a different story for the north. the wind tends to ease overnight and then we focus on this rain that is developing
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further south. having ground to a halt, the rain starts to pep up again and drive northwards. back into wales, the midlands and lincolnshire. south of that will be a very warm night was north of that it will be quite a bit cooler and windy. the wind will gradually ease down tomorrow. further south the wind will be up for most of the day. we will see the rain developing more widely and pushing northwards up towards northern ireland and scotland. heaviest rain over the hills of wales and north west england. the south east and east anglia largely dry. the sunshine and probably the last of the warmth. two things happening overnight. the rain continues to mount up over the higher ground of wales in north—west england. it could be up to four inches of rain here. gales developing overnight in wales and northern england. as we head into friday
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it will be a cooler and fresher feel. more of a north—westerly wind. still very gusty winds on friday. we're not out of the woods just yet. there will be some showers blown in over parts of wales and northern england. south that it will be a dry day. here the temperatures will be lower. no better than 18 celsius. hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy. today at a: so long, farewell — the prime minister heads to salzburg and has 10 minutes to pitch her brexit proposals to all the other european leaders a woman dies after being blown off a cliff in her caravan, as ireland and parts of the uk are battered by storm ali. a cruise ship detaches from its moorings in in greenock,
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as dumfries and galloway declares a major incident the inquest into the westminster terror attack hears how the man responsible, khalid masood, had a history of violent outbursts. coming up on afternoon live, all the sport. good afternoon. coming up, both manchester clubs are in champions league action later. i will have all the build—up. and i will have the details on who has made the squad for england's one day international series in this rancour. and we have the weather update. storm ali continues to bat as part of the uk. the strongest winds are moving away from northern ireland, pushing their way into scotland. thank you. also coming up a farewell
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fly— past thank you. also coming up a farewell fly—past for the last of the navy ‘s sea king helicopters. theresa may will be here in a few hours and will have ten minutes to present her case to the other 27 leaders. they will be meeting for dinner. those of you who are fans of the sound of music will know that backin the sound of music will know that back in 1936, this was the location where the von trapp ‘s won first prize for their singing. this is an opportunity for theresa may to impress upon the european leaders that there needs to be more
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compromise and again she will insist that herd checkers customs plan which is much criticised at home is the best way to avoid a no—deal brexit. she has been setting out her thoughts today. she has been speaking to a domestic audience in the daily express saying the checkers can respect the freedom is brexiteers voted for in 2016. she has also written for a german audience and in that article, she has said both sides need to respect each other‘s red line. just as the uk understands it cannot have all the benefits of eu membership if it's not part of the club, so the european union has do understand that the uk could never accept external border checks within its own borders. now, the eu commission negotiator, michel barnier, has set out some proposals today which he hopes is going to take the heat out of the island border issue. at the moment, they seem to be unacceptable to the uk said. this salzburg summit on the edge
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of the alps marks the start of the final arduous ascent to a brexit deal. the decisive phase of the talks start here, as eu leaders will, behind closed doors, plot their strategy for the coming weeks. here's one part of that — michel barnier, eu chief negotiator, last night said he's prepared to soften the eu proposal for how to avoid a new border in ireland. we can also clarify that most checks can take place on way from the border, at the company premises, or in the markets. we need to de—dramatise the checks that are needed — these checks are caused by the uk's decision to leave the eu, its single market and the customs union. but that's not a major shift butjust a way to make it more palatable. the move at the last possible minute, after they have tested your metal and to the cliff edge, to use that phrase everyone's fond of, and that's what will happen. it is here at northern ireland's
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ports, not at the land border with our ireland, that some other checks may still be needed. the uk still isn't buying it. we have been very clear that we will not accept something that separates out our united kingdom, creating some sort of customs border between great britain and northern ireland. that would be unacceptable — constitutionally, economically and indeed i would question its consistency with the belfast good friday agreement. the problem is the eu won't accept the uk alternative. it closed doors, theresa may will tonight try to persuade eu leaders her idea of a customs deal followed by the chequers plan is a workable way to lock down a brexit deal. it seems the best theresa may can hope forfrom her trip it seems the best theresa may can hope for from her trip to the edge of the alps will be some warm words.
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eu leaders are not going to negotiate with iran they are not going to change their position towards the talks, and they are not going to instruct michel barnier to compromise at this stage. instead, they will do the opposite. they will say the uk has to do agree a solution to the irish border of it wa nts solution to the irish border of it wants an excerpt treaty. and that means that the coming weeks will see fraud and difficult talks if a deal is to be settled. these are some of the issues that are linked to these negotiations. in the invitational letter, donald tusk said there is still a real possibility that they'll be heading toa possibility that they'll be heading to a no—deal brexit. a lot of work neededin to a no—deal brexit. a lot of work needed in the next few weeks. donald tusk was speaking to the media on his arrival in saltford just over an hour ago. let's have a listen to what he had to say. some of prime minister theresa may ‘s proposals from checkers indicate a positive
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evolution in the uk's approach as well as a will to minimise the negative effect of brexit. by this i mean the readiness to cooperate closely in the area of security and foreign policy. on other issues, such as the irish question, or the framework for economic cooperation, the uk's proposals will need to be reworked. yes, it is worth bearing in mind that they are of course trying to get the withdrawal agreement over the line. 80% of it is agreed. but it is the island border issue and the issue of the european court of justice, border issue and the issue of the european court ofjustice, whether the court would oversee that, that is the thorny issue keeping those two sides apart. we have seen some softer language
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from the eu leaders over the last few weeks. british ministers have been touring europe, trying to get them onside. do you feel that they are sort of arriving at a position where they might be able to get a view across the line? i think it is too early to say that. they are certainly trying to be helpful. they know theresa may does not have a majority and much of the party is against her and they don't want to force a position where she cannot accept it. but if you look at this, the nice noises that donald tusk and michel barnier hubby making the last few weeks, a lot of it is just nice noises. they are saying, we can't change our plans a little bit but the fundamental of what they are saying on the issue of ireland, particularly, they are not actually shifting their position at all. they are trying to make the presentation of ita are trying to make the presentation of it a bit better. yes, this insurance policy we are talking about is in the absence of any future trading arrangement. what
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michel barnier is saying it is that great britain, the rest of the united kingdom, stands outside of the european union, goods that are going to ireland have to stop at a port and that is the best place to carry out some of the controls and checks that they want. when you have conversations with people on both sides, they are so far apart on this, they really don't understand the other side ‘s point of view. europe think it is just a practical thing, there has to be checked somewhere, and from the uk point of view, this is a fundamental issue about our constitution and really, there is no real understanding of there is no real understanding of the other side. that is the worrying thing. we do not have long for them to find a way through. not so long ago, the european union said it was magical thinking to apply technical solutions to this problem and yet we have michel barnier, we have some technical issues, some technology that can solve the problem. has he
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not just that can solve the problem. has he notjust made a rod for theresa may ‘s back? notjust made a rod for theresa may 's back? in fairness, he is trying to be helpful. maybe there are some things we can do. they are trying to use language that they think will be helpful to britain because what they really don't want is a no deal scenario. the one thing that really does worry people in europe is the idea of this whole thing collapsing and it feels sometimes the strongest ca rd and it feels sometimes the strongest card britain has got two players that threat of walking away. the problem is in europe, nobody believes that britain would do that. that is the problem, she does not have any leveraged. we do access obsess about brexit. but for europe, migration will be the bulk of what they are discussing here this evening with one eye on the divisions that are within the european union. donald tusk saying on his way into the meetings today that if they all work together rather than try to use migration for
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political benefit, then there are solutions. but he has one eye on hungary, which was sanctioned last week by the european parliament. he has one eye on italy and there is this very public spat between the italian and french governments on where migrants should be landed once they are picked up in the mediterranean. all that to sort out, as well is that tricky issue of brexit. and later on bbc news, we're giving you the opportunity to ask our business editor simon jack any burning questions you may have about the uk's future outside the eu. that'll be at 5:20p. a woman has died, after her caravan was blown off a cliff and into the sea, as storm ali continues to batter ireland and parts of the uk. in scotland — a warning of ‘threat to life' has been issued for dumfries and galloway after some children were injured by flying debris. and at greenock port near glasgow, a cruise ship carrying more than 500 people detached from its moorings.
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amber weather warnings — meaning be prepared — remain in place across large parts of the uk. torn from the top of the cliff in 90 mile an hour winds. this caravan was swept away in galway. the woman inside it died. northern ireland, scotla nd inside it died. northern ireland, scotland and northern england have also been battered by storm ali. trees have crushed cars and blocked roads. flights have been cancelled and thousands of people have been left without power in some areas. at the port of greenock, a cruise ship became detached from its moorings. fortu nately, became detached from its moorings. fortunately, no one was injured. some roads have been close, causing
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chaos for drivers and shoppers braving the wind and rain. scot rail says there is severe disruption to train services and is warning people not to travel. the first storm of the autumn has prompted the met office to issue an amber alert until six o‘clock this evening, warning flying debris is likely and could lead to injuries or a danger to life. the woman who lost her life here this morning has not been named but is believed to be a swiss tourist who was asleep when the storm winds struck. the yellow weather warning for northern ireland, scotland and much of northern england remains in place until ten o‘clock tonight. anyone heading out is being warned to be prepared for travel disruption. let‘s speak now via webcam to martin ogilvie, resilience manager at dumfries and galloway council — he‘s been helping co—ordinate the local response to the storm. what is the situation right now? we
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we re what is the situation right now? we were hoping now that the worst of the high winds have passed. we have been in constant contact with our colleagues in the met office all day. we have good relations with them. they have been telling us the winds should now start to ease. we were surprised the guests were strong as they were. we would hoping that we were hoping the most might be 55 mph. but we have been experiencing 77 mph or more. it brought a lot more trees than we we re brought a lot more trees than we were expecting. that has led to considerable disruption across your area. yes, we declared a mention would have a major incident at 12:15pm. our colleagues in the police are working with us. our colleagues in the fire service have deployed 16 local fire stations. we are trying
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to get these roads open as best as we can. they are still out there now trying to clear the minor roads. and it is not just trying to clear the minor roads. and it is notjust the roads. scotrail are advising people not to travel in many areas. i think the best thing is to go onto the website and check local times. the fairies i believe are now starting to operate back to northern ireland. the worst of the weather is moving east, away from some of the towns. scotland is used to bad weather but this seems to be particularly extreme. we are prepared. last year we suffered a number of storms and over recent yea rs, number of storms and over recent yea rs , we number of storms and over recent yea rs, we have number of storms and over recent years, we have become very experienced in doing this. we have plans and we are following them. i just wanted to say the public heeded the warnings really well. we use
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social media a lot to get messages out. there was less transport out today. we know there has been disruption for schools. we wanted to keep the school children safe, so we have extended the school day, which is never popular. but the safest places to keep the children in a places to keep the children in a place of safety and we have moved the school buses back a little bit until the worst of the weather is passed. then we can open the roots and those children can get home. we have 115 children in dumfries and galloway. a000 pupils use buses to get home. we have to get them home safely. thank you very much for that update. the inquest into the westminster terror attack has heard details of the attacker‘s life. the court heard khalid masood‘s motherfeared he would kill someone while he was still a teenager. his failed relationships, violent criminal past and conversion to islam during a spell in prison
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were also discussed. we can cross to the old bailey now and speak to our reporterjenny kumah. today we heard details of khalid masood, he was 52 when he was shot dead after he had run overfour people on westminster bridge, killing them and then went on to killing them and then went on to kill pc palmer near the front gates of parliament. and today dci brown, a counterterrorism investigator gave details of his early life. he spent his early years in south london before moving to tunbridge wells and his criminal records began at the age of 1a, with a shoplifting offence, that he was cautioned for. at the old bailey heard that khalid masood ‘s mother told police that he would go out to pubs and clubs looking for fights as a teenager. she also described him as an angry person and she was worried he would
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kill someone to fighting and during the 1980s, he was involved in a number of violent outbursts, many of them involving alcohol. in may 2003, he stabbed a man called daniel smith in the face after he accused him of being an undercover police officer and we heard in court that the blade went through his mouth, through his tongue, through his jaw with such force that the large inch of the blade fell off. he ended up being acquitted for that incident on the grounds of self defence. the inquest heard he attributed this acquittal, as well is the survival of his eldest daughter after a serious car incident to the truth of islam and we also heard that he had begun his conversion to islam after he began reading the koran during his first speuin reading the koran during his first spell in prison. we also heard about the last movements in the days
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before the attack of khalid masood and we heard that he make video calls to his younger children, they we re calls to his younger children, they were living in london when he was living in birmingham before the attack. and he said to them that he had been having dreams and that he was going to die, fighting for god. and we had about one of the last things he said to his mother, he travelled down from birmingham where he hired the car used in the attack to wales to visit his mother and his stepfather. as he was leaving, he said to her don‘t say a terrace, i am not. the inquest is continuing and we are expecting more details on khalid masood ‘s live tomorrow —— don‘t say i am a terrorist, i am not. bringing you news from the foreign office, britain is advising british iranian dual nationals against all
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but essential travel to iran. this tightens the existing travel advice and the foreign office warning it only has limited powers to support them if detained and it quotes jeremy hunt saying he has taken the decision, british citizens who also holds iranian nationality face risks if they travel to the country, as we have seen all too sadly in a number of cases, he says. now, this advice is tightening existing regulations. the iranian government does not recognise dual nationality. a tightening of the advice there. you‘re watching afternoon live, these are our headlines: the prime minister heads to austria for a ten minute pitch to sell her chequers proposal to european leaders
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a woman dies after her caravan is blown off a cliff clef. the inquest into the westminster terror attack hears how the man responsible, khalid masood, had a history of violent outbursts. manchester city say they are better prepared this season. they begin their european campaign tonight. mikel arteta will be in charge while pep guardiola serves a touchline ban. and england‘s netballers have been beaten by australia in their first meeting since the victory in the final of the commonwealth games earlier this year. i will be back with more on all those stories at half past four. theresa may, has announced
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plans to make an extra £2 billion available, to build more affordable and social housing in england. councils, housing associations and other bodies, can bid for the money for new projects, from 2022. the prime minister says she wants to remove the ‘stigma‘ surrounding social housing. here‘s richard lister. at this site in south london, they‘re building a mix of private and social housing, homes that are badly needed — notjust in the capital, but across the country, where demand for affordable housing far outstrips supply. today the prime minister announced an additional £2 billion for housing associations to build more homes. under the scheme, associations will be able to apply for funding stretching as far ahead as 2028—29, the first time any government has offered housing associations such long—term certainty. mrs may said it was time to end the stigma that many people still attached to social housing. many people in society, including too many politicians,
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continue to look down on social housing and, by extension, the people who call it their home. mrand mrs parkerapplied to buy their house... it was this tory prime minister who really shook up the housing market with an emphasis on home ownership which still reverberates today. but those who couldn‘t afford to buy were left in sink estates run by housing associations. it‘s very good to hear that the government now wants to be able to invest in housing associations, notjust this year but in a much more strategic way into the future. but there‘s a long way to go. the government says it has built more than 357,000 affordable properties since 2010, but a survey this year found a shortfall of 30,000 affordable homes every year since 2011, which could create a shortage of 335,000 homes by 2022. we have 180,000 families who are in temporary accommodation because we do not have enough social and affordable housing for them to live in. they are in that housing right now. we need funding right now.
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the grenfell disaster brought social housing issues into sharp focus. too little investment, too little attention. the government is now promising more of both. richard lister, bbc news. the rate of inflation has risen to its highest level in six months. the jump in august, to 2.7%, surprised many economists, who‘d expected a slight fall. rising prices for recreational goods, transport and clothing are to blame, as our economics correspondent, andy verity, reports. this leicester—based food supplier makes its spring rolls, samosas and otherfrozen indian snacks by hand, but that means big labour costs, and it‘s also being squeezed by the surge in energy prices. with the raw material, that‘s going up, so potatoes — that‘s going up in price. the raw material like peas, carrots, that‘s less of a big pressure. the electricity, just in the last year the price has gone up by 20%. because we use electricity quite a lot because it‘s
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a frozen food business, that‘s something that‘s impacting us a lot as well, and wages as well — that‘s increasing over time. but wages aren‘t rising fast enough for many workers to feel obviously better off. yeah, things are going up, prices are going up. so it's a bit difficult. sometimes i feel very bad. everybody can't afford to buy all the things. earlier this year we had some good economic news. the squeeze on living standards had lifted. pay was finally rising faster than prices, meaning you could buy more with what you were paid. that‘s still happening, but with inflation at 2.7%, onlyjust. among the items driving up the cost of living were clothing and shoes. in the year to august, gas bills rose by a.3%, electricity was up 7.a% and petrol jumped by 11.7%. there is still a lingering effect from the fall in the pound after the brexit referendum, and we see that in terms of very
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high imported prices, so import price inflation is still around 10% per annum. that means that energy costs are rising, at a pretty hefty pace. if you leave out volatile items such as energy and food, the rise in the cost of living looks a lot more manageable, just 2.1%. nevertheless, on the markets today the betting was that the bank of england would have to raise interest rates again by may next year. andy verity, bbc news. five days after hurricane florence made landfall in north carolina, president trump is visiting the state to see for himself the immense damage it caused. at least 33 people are now known to have died, and thousands of homes and roads remain submerged. some rivers are still rising, so the threat has not completely passed. laura trevelyan covered the storm for us. she‘s watching from washington.
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you are looking a lot better than you were not so long ago. yes, very fortunate for me to be warm and dry but for people in north carolina, there are more than 10,000 still living in shelters, 200,000 people without power and the governor of the state has just been talking to president trump, welcoming him to north carolina and saying there is still a danger out there and that people who have evacuated should not yet returned to their homes and that is because even today, the cape fear river which i we re today, the cape fear river which i were standing next to last week is not due to crest until later today. if you can imagine. it is going to be four times its normal height. because of all the rainfall that hurricane florence dumped on north carolina, there is a real risk of flooding still. and still a tremendous rescue and recovery
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effort to go. president trump was just telling the people of north carolina that whatever it costs the federal government will help them. he took care to express sympathy for those who have lost their homes and for those people who have lost their loved ones. remember, you was criticised for his response to hurricane maria in puerto rico and last week he was disputing the fact that 3000 people are thought to have been killed there. he is taking care to strike a different note today. as ican to strike a different note today. as i can tell you that florence really was a horrendous weather event and i was a horrendous weather event and i was there in wilmington north carolina just as the eye wall of the storm itself made landfall last friday. this is what it looks like when you are in the centre of a category one hurricane. we are experiencing winds of 90 mph, torrential rainfall. there is debris everywhere. 300,000 people including us are without power in the state of north carolina. people are waiting to be
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rescued. this area has flooded just in the last couple of hours. imagine, we may get up to a0 inches of rainfall in the next couple of days. and in fact, days. and infact, part days. and in fact, part of north carolina received three feet one metre of rain since last friday, as a result of hurricane florence. president trump is going to tour some of the areas badly damaged by floods this afternoon before he returns to washington but right now there are 16 rivers in north carolina that are at major flood stage. the worst is not yet over. thank you very much. the weather is making news across the globe. we now have the weather forecast. yes, we had the typhoon last week and we
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have had gusts of around about 90 mph and a couple of inches of rain in places, compared with three feet of rain. still, as you say, it has caused problems. this was northern ireland this morning where we had power lines down, trees down as well and it was across this part of northern ireland where we saw the strongest of the wins this morning. that was in county down. the winds have dropped a bit in northern ireland. the strongest pushing their way across scotland. recently we have seen the wind is picking up at aberdeen airport. it seems a bit windier in scotland and perhaps people were expecting. no. ok, well, i have just been talking to the man who is managing dumfries and galloway for the council and he said it isa galloway for the council and he said it is a bit worse than they were
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expecting. ok. this is scotland. we have had some very dangerous waves, it has to be said. it exposed places are always going to get the worst of the wind. a lot of damage to this car. a lot of damage across scotland and northern ireland. this is the warning that was issued by the met office. these were the england gusts that were expected. that was what was expected inland. northern ireland, central southern scotla nd northern ireland, central southern scotland and along the east coast. as was predicted by the met office. no better than 18 celsius. what is the next few hours like? this yellow warning covers a large area for a bit longer. but the wind
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will ease down. the wind drops in northern ireland and scotland. that is because storm ali is moving out of the way. we have had some gusty winds as well into england and wales. it is pretty lively out there as we head into this evening. not just across scotland and northern ireland. things will calm down overnight with the wind continuing to drop. more blustery showers in the west of the uk. the rain in the south comes back into the south again and drives northwards into wales, the midlands, lincolnshire into east anglia. south of that will bea into east anglia. south of that will be a really warm night and north of that will be chillier than it has been for a while. the wind will be quite strong in northern scotland to begin with tomorrow that these will ease. much lighter winds across the uk. all this cloud and rain is starting to push its way northwards. it will be turning much wetter in
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wales and across northern england. the southeast and east anglia missing most of the rain. as we move into thursday and thursday nights we are looking at some very wet and also some very windy weather. there is an area of low pressure developing on that weather front which is slowing down and intensifying the rain and picking the wind up overnight across england and wales. that gets out of the way by friday morning with the last of any warmth as well and instead we will be drawing down a cooler and fresher north—westerly winds. that will bring quite a few showers across scotland, northern ireland and northern england. the south of that you may get away with dry day. temperatures will be lower across—the—board which temperatures will be lower across—the—boa rd which is temperatures will be lower across—the—board which is a more typical temperature for this time of year. as we look ahead into the weekend, saturday looks ok and it should be generally fine and dry with some sunshine but we still have the potential for some stormy
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weather on sunday so we‘re not out of the woods yet. another big area of the woods yet. another big area of low pressure set to arrive on sunday which should prick up —— pick up sunday which should prick up —— pick up the winds and some rain, all because we have a very strong jet stream. this is bbc news — our latest headlines. a woman in her 50s has died after a caravan she was in was blown into the sea in the west of ireland. storm ali has brought high winds and rain to western parts of ireland and the uk. the met office has issued
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an amber weather warning. the prime minister heads to salzburg — where later she‘ll pitch her brexit proposals to her european colleagues. the president of the european council donald tusk has said there is "more hope but less and less time" in the negotiations and said he wants a special summit in mid—november. the prime minister pledges two billion pounds to build new homes in england, and says she wants people to be proud of living in social housing. and the inquest into the westminster terror attack hears how the man responsible, khalid masood, had "a violent temper". sport now on afternoon live with holly hamilton. it was only last week that england‘s cricketers finished their season, but already they have announced their squad for the first tour of the winter? that is right. as i said earlier, no rest for the wicked. —— wicket. it‘s not much of an
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off—season is it... england‘s cricketers head to sri lanka for a 5 match one day series, which begins on the 10th of october. much of the talk though had been around whether or not ben stokes and alex hales would be included.. both players were charged by the english cricket board yesterday, for bringing the game into disrepute after an incident outside a nightclub in bristol. they‘ve both been named in the squad... although they will face disciplinary hearing which is scheduled for december, which luckily enough falls in between the sri lanka and west indies tours. well, let‘s take a look at the full 16—man squad... which includes warwickshire bowler olly stone — he‘s been given a first call—up, as a replacement for liam plunkett — who will miss the first 3 matches for his wedding. both of the curran brothers — sam and tom — are also in the squad. no rest for the wicked. i‘ve always heard that you‘ll not meant to make a joke for a second time if it bombs the first time. i thought you liked
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it! and more champions league action tonight — this time it‘s the turn of the manchester clubs. after that late drama for liverpool and spurs last night. now, it‘s all about manchester... but let‘s talk about city first of all... premier league champions and arguably one of the favourites for the title... but they begin their campaign without their manager when they host lyon tonight. he‘ll have to watch from the stands... he‘s serving a touchline ban after he was sent off during last season‘s quarter final defeat to liverpool. instead his assistant mikel arteta will look after the team and the former arsenal star has already taken a step up, replacing guardiola at the official uefa press conference ahead of tonight‘s match where he claimed city can go far in the competition this year. we feel we are better prepared than the previous two years. we are preparing every single detail to improve what we have done in the past because we believe we can do better. it is a very open champions
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league as was the case last season and it will be the case this season and it will be the case this season and there will be surprises because the difference between the teams is not that big. as for manchester united — they‘re away to young boys in the swiss capital bern, where they‘ll play on an artificial pitch. united are going for a third straightaway win in all competitions and the managerjose mourinho thinks their season‘s been heading in the right direction since that 3—0 defeat to spurs at old trafford last month. i was happy after the tottenham defeat, not with the results but happy with many of the things that i saw. we felt as a team that the match was ok, it was the beginning of our improvement. we managed that into difficult matches away and let‘s see if we can in our third. england‘s netballers have been beaten by the australia in the quad series. it was the first time the two sides
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sides have met since england‘s historic win in the final of the commonwealth games earlier this year. emily croyden reports. english netball has changed. for the first time here they faced australia as the number two side in the world. with the world cup on the horizon they wanted to prove they are the team to beat. they attacked the match with purpose. england were dominating australia. with a strong defensive effort from the side. but things can change quickly in this game and australia finally found a way through and swung the match in their favour at half—time. tracey neville wanted more from her roses side but it was australia who took a big lead into the last quarter. but this england team has a new belief and they came back with real energy. ultimately though australia reasserted their status as the best team in the world with ten months to go to the world cup. but england will know that despite missing key players
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they were not far short. that‘s all the sport for now. there is more on the bbc news channel throughout the evening. goodbye for now. now on afternoon live — let‘s go nationwide — and see what‘s happening around the country — in our daily visit to the bbc newsrooms around the uk. let‘s go to tara mills in belfast, where storm ali has been sweeping across northern ireland. we‘ll have more than just a moment from her. in plymouth is janine jansen, where two sea king helicopters are performing a final farewell fly— past around the south west. with you very shortly, janine. what are the conditions like in northern ireland? two men had died, it is understood
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that they were hit by a tree outside the park which is a popular tourist attraction. a woman has died after her caravan was blown into the sea at clifton. the strongest gusts of wind to 91 miles an hour. fallen trees have caused the most travel disruption with more than 60 roads closed and other transport affected, some rail services have been cancelled because of debris the line and speed restrictions were placed on the trains that were still able to run. the ferries between northern ireland and scotland were cancelled because of high winds and one flight that was en route to belfast via milan had to be diverted to liverpool with one passenger describing the plane as all over the place as it tried to land.
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precautions i‘ve already been put in place in belfast with parks, playing fields closed with the course of the day. what are we expecting weather—wise this evening and in to tonight? the amber warning was expected to be lifted at 6pm this evening but that has been updated and will now stay in place until 10pm tonight. after that the wind is expected to subside. the wind caused destruction for homeowners as well. farmers have been out helping the emergency services clear the roads and lift some of the fallen trees. other tourist attractions such as the giants causeway and derry‘s historic walls have been closed for the day. we also expecting lightning towards the north coast this evening. it seems were a few —— it seems there we re seems were a few —— it seems there were few places in ireland, north and south, that will not impacted by
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storm ali today. let's go to plymouth now. and janine... what is special about these helicopters? the trouble is they are getting a bit old and 50 years old. you don‘t see many ca rs bit old and 50 years old. you don‘t see many cars that are 50 years old do you? these aircraft need a large crew to keep them going. one of the pilots has described them as chitty chitty bang bang meets star wars. they have an eclectic mix of equipment described as old bells and whistles in the cockpit with more military surveillance in the back. they have seen action in the falklands, both golf wars and afghanistan. the information they fed back led to the arrest of hundred 50 terrorist suspects and they found more than hundred tonnes
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of drugs. recently they have been the eyes in the sky as and rescue helicopters. great to see those pictures. why are they doing the flyover today? it isa it is a tremendously sad day. these helicopters are retiring today at 50 yea rs helicopters are retiring today at 50 years old. the staff wanted to give them a proper sendoff so today was their farewell flight from the south—west. two of them took off from cornwall this morning and they flew for three hours flying through cornwall past plymouth, round the coast of devon and lending back at around 2p pm this afternoon. the staff say they were dreading today. very fond of these aircraft and they say they are wonderful girls to fly. the main reason was to show them off one last time but the other reason is because they are rather noisy. todayis is because they are rather noisy. today is an opportunity to say thank you to the local places that have
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helped us out and training, specifically the airport in lands end when we did a lot of our night vision training. it is an opportunity to say thank you to them as well for putting up with us. what‘ll happen to the next? they are being flown out to a military base to be retired. taking over will be the more modern helicopters which are more advanced in a project called crows nest. we had a cameraman on one of the new helicopters today. we will have lots of fantastic pictures at 6:30pm on spotlight tonight. maybe a bit of emotion as well. thank you very much to both of you. if you‘d like to see more on any of
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those stories you can access them on bbc i play we go nationwide every afternoon at a:30pm here on nation lives. —— nationwide. let‘s get more now on the eu chief negotiator michel barnier saying he‘s willing to offer the uk an improved offer on the irish border. the chancellor, philip hammond said he was confident theresa may would get the best dealfor the uk. theresa may has the opportunity today for the first time since we tabled the chequers proposal to sit down with all of the european member states, not talking to the commission that talking to the politicians that represent the populations of the european union. to explain to them why this will work more weight is the right deal for the uk work more weight is the right deal forthe uk and work more weight is the right deal for the uk and for the european union as well. i‘m very confident that talking directly to the political leaders of the member states the prime minister will get
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that message across. of course, this is not going to be a decision to be made today but we have a european council in october and confirmation today we will have a special summit in november. across a period of time i‘m confident we will be able to deliver for i‘m confident we will be able to deliverfor britain this i‘m confident we will be able to deliver for britain this chequers a deal. in belfast is the dup‘s brexit spokesman, sammy wilson. thanks arejoining thanks are joining us. thanks arejoining us. the compromise as it is, is this a deal—breaker? compromise as it is, is this a deal-breaker? i think the important thing for us in northern ireland is that whatever deal the prime minister reaches with the eu that it does not in any way separate northern ireland from the rest of the united kingdom, that we are not treated differently, that we are not left half in the european union and of course what the prime minister has an offer from michel barnier at present will do exactly that. it will lead a sword hanging over the
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head of the people of northern ireland where we could be taking out of the united kingdom at any time if the united kingdom were to divert from eu rules and of course the eu proposing that any goods from gp and northern ireland will be subject to eu controls. this is a point that theresa may made in her panorama interview the other night, wasn‘t it? it is. the poor minister has made it quite clear that she will never ever accept that kind of demand from the eu. expect her to hold true to the promise that she has made. don‘t forget this is not just about northern ireland, this is about the potential to break up the united kingdom as a whole because if that kind of arrangements were put in place for northern ireland then the exact same argument could be made in scotland and the scottish will be demanding special relationships for them as well. i think this is a testing time for the
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primer minister‘s promise but the united kingdom voted as a whole to leave the eu and the united kingdom will be leaving as a whole, no part of the united kingdom will be left half in. given how reliant the prime minister is on the dup, does chequers fried? i think there are two considerations. does chequers fly? it will be accepted by the eu —— would it be accepted by the eu? so far they have said that it won‘t be. our bottom line is that the prime minister must not deviate from the promised that northern ireland will be treated differently from other parts of the united kingdom.
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or? it's very simple. she depends upon us in the house of commons and pa rt upon us in the house of commons and part of the arrangement we entered into is that she would deliver on she made in relations to the united kingdom as a whole leaving the eu. it is not just kingdom as a whole leaving the eu. it is notjust the dup that are saying this. the conservative party have said this as well. many of their backbenchers are as prounion as we are and indeed even the labour party has said it would not find a cce pta ble party has said it would not find acceptable the break—up of the united kingdom and they would not support the deal which led to the break—up. so we‘re not standing alone in this. but of course we are the ones who are most concerned about the kind of outcome the eu is proposing for northern ireland in the negotiations so far. the one encouragement we will take out from
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what‘s michel barnier has said is that for the last two years the eu negotiators have said there is no way in which you can deal with the issues of trade crossing the border between northern ireland and the irish republic by technological means and using technology and using notifications, etc. now they are saying they can apply that for trade coming from gb to northern ireland. if those methods are now deemed to be acceptable by the eu then they can be used in relation to the thorny problem of trade from northern ireland to the republic. thank you very much for your time this afternoon. ben bland is here — in a moment he will be telling us what‘s hot and what‘s not in the business news. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live. the prime minister heads to austria — for a ten minute pitch to sell her chequers proposal to european leaders. a woman dies after her caravan is blown off a cliff,
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as storm ali batters ireland and parts of the uk. the inquest into the westminster terror attack hears how the man responsible, khalid masood, had a history of violent outbursts. here‘s your business headlines on afternoon live. average prices for goods and services rose faster last month than they did injuly. inflation unexpectedly went up to 2.7% in august. that‘s the highest level in six months — and higher than forecast. wages though, are still rising by more than inflation. transport costs — especially air and sea fares — went up most sharply as did clothing prices. but prices of household goods and furniture are not rising as quickly as they did a year ago. house prices in the north west rose the fastest in the uk compared with a year ago, according to the office for national statistics. annual growth in property values in the region stood at 5.6% byjuly. the maker of wagon wheels,
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burton‘s biscuits company, has sold its chocolate manufacturing assets in merseyside to swiss firm barry callebaut for an undisclosed fee. the swiss company — one of the world‘s biggest chocolate suppliers — will retain burton‘s current staff of a8. it sounds quite audacious — charging people for something they‘ve already paid for — but that‘s what‘s happening with mobile phones? yes — on some contracts with some providers. we all like to update our handsets and get a new phone — you have just got a message. so i have. if that is from you there will be trouble. you might still be paying for a handset that you‘ve already paid off. citizens advice reckons about a million people have continued being charged even after they‘ve paid off the cost of the phone. so effectively — paying for something they already own. altogether that‘s an extra
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£500million in unneccessary charges. could it lead to compensation claims? that is what i asked a telecoms analyst earlier. when you sign up to a deal you can think of pa rt of sign up to a deal you can think of part of your bill paying for the handset but it is a fully bundled deal so there is no contractual obligation. you are paying one price. i don't think there is a legal problem but in terms of what they are saying publicly, they are emphasising that you are free to move to a simmer only deal after two years. and indeed some encouraging. closing — orla kiely — the british handbag,
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accessories and homeware retailer — known for its vintage 1970s style prints — is closing its stores and website. it stopped trading earlier this week as its parent company went into administration. an interesting announcement. it has been a busy day come along with tesco announcing new stores. let's start with the first one. it is quite a shame. orla kiely have obviously struggled and they've had to close some stores. that is due to rising costs and weaker sales and competitions on line and unfortunately they have had to close the business as a result. the competition and markets authority announcing an in—depth review because of the concerns over competition. phase one is out of the way and phase two is looking into
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whether we are disadvantaged as consumers. they decided there were sufficient concerns to take a two phase two and what that means is that they are going to speak to stakeholders, everybody in the industryjust to see what the impact might be. they are concerned enough about it to take it to stage two so they are not giving it the green lightjust yet. they are not giving it the green light just yet. we have to talk about the inflation figure which is higher than expected. they always tend to go up in august but this is more than what was expected? that is correct, 2.7% rise. in means in the la st correct, 2.7% rise. in means in the last 12 months the price of a basket of goods has risen. the main driving factors behind it are the goods and services are very factors behind it are the goods and services are very volatile price—wise. we would expect this to die down but it is still between that goldilocks figure of two and 3% and it is importantly below the average wage increase of 2.9%. it
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does indicate to a degree the bank of england decision to raise interest rates at the time that it did. slightly sharper than possibly many thought. inflation relates to the price of goods and services. one place they will be getting cut is jack‘s place they will be getting cut is jack's that is great. there are going after aldi and lidle's customers here. people don't want to pay premium prices for products. they want to be the cheapest in town, they say. they will focus on certain areas to make sure they compete specifically and not cannibalise their own market share. it is being called jack's and they are looking to open stores and it is
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are looking to open stores and it is a direct reaction to threats posed by aldi and lidle. let‘s have a quick look at the markets. sterling looking good and it might mean that the bank of england looks at putting up interest rates. just slipping back a little bit after the little excitement. can we mention the misspelling on the plane? we had some fun with that on line. this is the plane that had the spelling mistake of the company‘s name. no f in pacific. exactly. a bit of embarrassment really. name. no f in pacific. exactly. a bit of embarrassment reallym name. no f in pacific. exactly. a bit of embarrassment really. it is all on twitter. and on the website.
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have a look. that is it from your afternoon live team today. next is the 5pm news. time for a look at the weather... here‘s darren bett. pretty windy elsewhere across the uk but as we head further into the afternoon the wind will start to ease off just a afternoon the wind will start to ease offjust a little. we are seeing lots of showers coming in after the rain in scotland and northern ireland and a line of rain leading into the south—east of the uk. still quite warm for england and wales and pretty windy overnight across scotland. some more rain arriving over england and wales arriving over england and wales arriving overnight. the wind continues to ease across northern scotla nd continues to ease across northern scotland on thursday but this rain develops more widely across england and wales. heavy rain developing
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later over the hills of wales, north—west england. the south—east and east anglia will be dry for most of the day but it will turn wet and windy for england and wales during the evening. today at 5 — crunch time for the prime minister, as she arrives in salzburg to present her brexit plan to eu leaders. mrs may is expected to tell the eu not to demand "unacceptable" terms in negotiations over the irish border after the european council president donald tusk said the uk‘s plans would need to be reworked. today there is perhaps more hope. but there is surely less and less time. i‘m damian grammaticus, live in salzburg. we‘ll have the latest on her meeting, and we‘ll be talking to former ukip leader nigel farage. the other main stories on bbc news at 5...
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