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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  September 20, 2018 2:00pm-5:01pm BST

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hello, you're watching afternoon live, i'm simon mccoy. today at 2.00: a senior eu source says european leaders are being "deliberately kind in public" in their remarks about theresa may — as the irish prime minister warns that time is running out to sort out the border issue. ireland is a country that obviously wants to avoid and no deal scenario. we want to avoid a no—deal brexit and we are preparing for that. a damning verdict on a summer of rail chaos — a report finds "nobody took charge" as new timetables disrupted hundreds of services. westminster bridge attacker khalid masood attended the same mosque as extremists convicted of plotting a series of bomb attacks. an inquest hearing continues at the old bailey. coming up on afternoon live all the sport... the breaking news about the world and you'd be association? yes, they are letting russia back in from the cold, lifting a ban from the
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country's anti—doping agency about isa country's anti—doping agency about is a deeply unpopular move. louise, one storm is gone but we're looking at another? yes, they are coming thick and fast. we have torrential rain in wales and northern england and overnight, some pretty squally, damaging gusts of wind. more details coming up. thanks louise. also coming up... lily allen, noel gallagher, and arctic monkeys are among the heavyweight contenders for music's prestigious mercury awards. we'll be live at the venue with our correspondent colin patterson. hello everyone, this is afternoon live. efforts need to be doubled to reach
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a deal over the future of the irish border after brexit — that's the message from the irish prime minister leo varadkar today. following a meeting this morning with theresa may, he warned that dublin was gearing up for no resolution, as there were still fundamental differences over the way forward. both leaders are in salzburg, where mrs may has been trying to sell her plans for brexit, to the rest of the eu. she says her proposals are "serious and workable," our europe correspondent damian grammaticas has the details. we will hear from theresa may in the next hour or so. but to bring us up todayis next hour or so. but to bring us up today is damien grammatical ‘s. for theresa may this
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has been a busy summit. the pressure is rising, the stakes are getting higher. a task this money was to try to win over ireland's prime minister. so a little earlier she'd met face—to—face with leo varadkar. behind their smiles lay the differences that have left the brexit negotiations gridlocked. we want to avoid any new barriers to the movement of goods or trade or people. just think of all the people every day who cross the border into work or study. thin of the businesses who trade across the border. arriving for their summit this morning, the more candid among the leaders put it simply. has there been any progress on brexit? no, there is no progress. there is only position explained. stand—off still is in place. last night, the sounds might have been soothing. but behind them lies discord. after dinner in the famous venue where salzburg
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stages its musical festival, mrs may made her pitch, telling the other leaders she could not accept any brexit deal which might one day split the uk into two different customs territories. applause. the prime minister is trying to get eu leaders to accept her idea. customs arrangements covering the whole of uk. they are not convinced. mrs may says she thinks both sides need to compromise if a deal is to be reached. eu leaders have agreed with her but there is no sign they will do that here at this summit. they are not changing their approach, not for now. instead, the eu is standing by ireland, insisting a backstop guaranteed to avoid any new land border is a must. saying the uk has not proposed a legally workable alternative. regarding the irish border, it was in march and it was endorsed by the 27 members. we need to find collectively, and we need a uk proposal precisely preserving this backstop in the framework of a withdrawal agreement.
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and to sign off that agreement with the uk, the eu leaders have now set a new target date. a special summit in november. so here in the shadow of salzburg's famous castle, it seems theresa may has not been able to breach the eu's unity. there are heading for a final, tends endgame. germany's chancellor angela mekel is holding a news conference in salzburg. also donald tusk and jean—claude juncker is expected to speak. then we expect to hear from theresa may.
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but we are monitoring what is going on in salzburg and any development we will go straight back there. want to bring you more on the breaking news in the last few minutes from the world anti—doping agency. it has voted to reinstate the russian national anti—doping agency. they said members voted to make the complaint subject to strict conditions. but it has voted to reinstate the russian anti—doping agency. we will be talking about that shortly to analyse what it means. there will be considerable unease about bad decision, but it was after a vote at the world anti—doping agency. lots more to come. we are keeping an eye on what is happening in salzburg as well. "nobody took charge" when new rail
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timetables were introduced in may, leading to weeks of chaos and thousands of services being cancelled. that's the finding of the office of rail and road who say network rail, the two train companies involved, and the department for transport, all made mistakes and the failings were systemic. our transport correspondent tom burridge reports. for people commuting in and out of manchester, like marcus, it's been so bad recently he's sometimes been forced off the train. it's just been absolutely terrible. ram—packed on the train. obviously the cost of it just keeps going up. i get this train every morning. sometimes i've not actually been able to get on the train because it's been that packed. new timetables in may brought chaos here. 300 scheduled trains didn't run each day. 0n govia thameslink, nearly 500 services in and out of london disappeared into thin air. today, a report by the rail regulator. it finds network rail mainly to blame for causing the chaos on northern. infrastructure upgrades overran, and northern wasn't left with enough
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time to draw up and implement complicated new timetables. problems on govia thameslink were partly caused by a late decision by the department for transport on how to phase the changes in. then the train company failed to train enough drivers on new routes. the chief executive of the gtr stepped down. you must have considered your position at some point. well, look, this issue is about sorting out the problems for passengers. myjob is to make sure they have a railway that is fit for purpose going forward. passengers have been let down this summer. they've been let down by a system. the report says very clearly that there are problems all the way across the rail industry. works are what ourjob in government is. myjob now is to make sure we have a better way going forward. today the government, which was forced to take control of the east coast main line, is launching a review of the railways. industry sources admit the system isn't fit for purpose. the review will look at fundamental questions, like whether the contracts between the government and the companies that run these
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trains need to be more flexible, how to integrate the public track and the private trains, and whether the railways across the country need to be managed more at a regional level. that's been the case on scotrail — some say the track and trains there are more closely co—ordinated. the body representing the rail operators says substantial change is needed. we know we need to improve. we know we need to change, and we're hoping that the review will help us unlock those systemic issues and deliver a service that passengers want to take, that they'll look forward to getting on the train in the morning. however, the government's review will not consider labour's policy — that the whole system should be nationalised again. tom burridge, bbc news. returning to salzburg and those
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crucial eu talks. we have just heard from angela merkel who hasjust crucial eu talks. we have just heard from angela merkel who has just said it's clear that we need substantial progress on brexit by october and should finalise the deal in november. we were already hearing there is an extra summit planned for mid—november. that was predicted by christian fraser, who joins mid—november. that was predicted by christian fraser, whojoins me now from salzburg. you do get the sense christian, but the urgency of all this is beginning to catch up on people? yes it is. at the moment you get the sense that both sides are digging in and there's not much compromise. although veteran brussels watchers will always say to you, this is an organisation which feeds on compromise and it always look stark until the last hour and then there is always a deal in the european union. that is the hope on both sides. but at the bowman, i am
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just going to pause because i think we have donald tusk coming to the podium. let's listen in to donald tusk and jean—claude juncker. a hard brexit for england... he speaks in native language
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studio: we have a problem with the translation on this. i will bring vicky young in from westminster as we try to sort out the translation. theresa may will be giving a news conference in the next hour or so, what do you expect her to say? both sides are saying we want a deal, but neither is willing to budge on this issue of the irish border. the uk government would save they have made more compromises and now it's time for the eu to do that. there is talk
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of new proposers on the table, she met leo varadkar earlier today. so i think there is some movement there. but the response from michel barnier saying, there will still need to be checks down the irish border, but the brits will do them themselves. that was met with derision by some of the brexiteer is here saying, how kind of them saying we can check our own gods. this idea of ireland being split off and treated differently was always the sticking point. it looks like they haven't come up with a solution to that and it is holding up a solution to that and it is holding up the whole withdrawal agreement. now they are talking about an emergency summit. who is that putting pressure on? some would say it is putting pressure on theresa may. yet again i spoke to her cabinet minister earlier who is a brexiteer, but they are backing
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chequers deal, they are willing to go along with that but they need to show to the eu that we are willing to walk away without the deal. and that puts pressure on the eu to say we are willing to walk away with no deal and then we will get a better deal. that has always been the argument from the brexiteers and the government, but the preparations haven't been done in time to make that a credible threat in any way. that is where we are at the moment, theresa may doesn't have room for manoeuvre. it is all right saying this chequers agreement as to be watered down but eventually has lost a ball—macro cabinet ministers over this and people lining up to say they are not behind it, that she doesn't have much room for manoeuvre. but showing clearly. a new voice came into this saying they
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cannot back chequers, it is significant, work with her as a minister in the home office, ran her leadership campaign, short though it was, mike penning. he has said he feels theresa may isn't handling this properly. she has said chequers is the best she can get. chequers isn't good enough and she needs to say to parliament, use the likes of what i have said to the european parliament, to turn round and say, if moderates are saying we cannot get chequers through, you need to give me more. ithink she get chequers through, you need to give me more. i think she can do that, i have worked with her and she can be the most bloody—minded lady in the world and she needs to show it now. that is the problem she has got, even if she gets a deal with the eu, it is bringing it back to parliament. we should go back too far with this, several mps have been asking me how they will vote on something they don't know what looks
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like or what the alternative is going to be. until it is clear, you shouldn't write off but she cannot get it through. things could change. there could be many mps, if they think the alternative to chequers or something similar to that deal is a no deal they might not be willing to go down that road either. there are all sorts of scenarios. vicky thank you, we will go to salzburg because donald tusk is speaking. it is not an empty compliments. congratulations. if you mentioned happily discuss migration and internal security and brexit here in salzburg. the migration debate showed we might not agree on everything but we agree on the main goal, which is stemming illegal migration to europe. there was a
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constructive debate and a good atmosphere and we decided to continue our focus on what unites us and what has eroded the results. this means strengthening our external borders as well as strengthening cooperation with third countries. such cooperation should notjust be on migration or fighting smugglers and traffickers, it should bea smugglers and traffickers, it should be a much broader division of partnership. we have started a dialogue with the egyptian president and now we can say that there is backing the european council for this and similar dialogues. i will meet the president of egypt on sunday to take this forward. we will be reaching out to other african partners in the coming weeks. with
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the chancellor, with the commission and with a group of countries. i mean member states. in this context, we also agreed to organise a summit with the league of arab states in february next year in egypt. on internal security, we agreed priorities for immediate action. that is why the determination to ta ke that is why the determination to take forward the commission's proposal both strengthen the european borders and coastguard as a priority. at the same time, as the chancellor underlined, it is also clear that regarding sovereignty will need to be discussed. we need to step up the fight of all fronts of cyber crime, manipulations and disinformation. the importance of
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the european cooperation and it is an example of solidarity. it is also in this context we decided to speed up in this context we decided to speed up work on the civil protection mechanism. at our eu 27 working lunch today, we had a good discussion on brexit, which once again we confirmed our full unity. let me highlight three points. first, we reconfirmed that there will be no withdrawal agreement without a solid operational and legally binding irish backstop. and we continue to fully support michel barnier in his efforts to find it. second, we agreed to have a joint political declaration that provides as much clarity as possible on the
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future relations. everybody shared the view that while there are positive elements in the chequers proposal, the suggested framework for economic cooperation will not work. not least because it risks undermining the single market. third, we also discussed the timetable for further negotiations. the moment of truth for breaks in negotiations will be the october european council. in october, we expect maximum progress and results in the brexit talks. then we will decide whether the conditions are there to call an extra summit in november to finalise and formalise the deal. last, but not least, again thank you, sebastien for your efforts here in salzburg. we owe our thanks, we are impressed with what
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you have achieved. thank you very much. thank you and now the president of the european commission, jean—claude juncker. studio: we will leave jean—claude juncker. but donald tusk said that chequers framework for economic reparation will not work. so huge pressure on theresa may and he announced the october european meeting, he said that will be the moment of truth. so just a few weeks for some major issues to be sorted and he said only if they are sorted in october, will they then agree for
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a summit to be held in november to fill in the detail. but as i say, we re fill in the detail. but as i say, were saying that at the moment, mood music is farfrom were saying that at the moment, mood music is far from positive. let's return to jean—claude juncker. translation: although there are detailed aspects which still have to be discussed. further questions still arise but i give the example of getting rid of content, advocating terrorism, which should be withdrawn from the internet as soon as possible. that proposal has been accepted and the question of... combating terrorism, working
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together with the european prosecutor and national prosecutors, that was fully supported by everybody, although the detailed questions still arise. i am very optimistic now, i wasn't before, about the external protection of borders. but we have made progress. everyone agrees with all the details of the commissioner's proposals, but there is a basic consensus, thanks to the efforts in austria in particular, are referred to the coast and border guard, ifeel progress will be made. i think that conclusions can be reached during the austrian presidency and the same applies to the reinforcement of catastrophe, natural disaster
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prevention. we have sent a proposal in 2017 and we know what happened in the summer. we think there will be support so i have every reason to thank the chancellor for the good work of the austrian presidency. i am glad we were able to do this in salzburg. salzburg is a guarantee of success salzburg. salzburg is a guarantee of su ccess over lots salzburg. salzburg is a guarantee of success over lots of summits and every summit is more beautiful than the other summits. but i don't need a summit to come to salzburg, i am here once a year. i am very fond of austria. this is a declaration of love. so all that is well and fine and things will be better still.|j
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see the first question here to the right. microphone. closer. translation: on egypt, you said egypt is not going to opt for refugee centres, does that mean in egypt you see no opportunity of setting up the so—called disembarkation platforms? or why should a country be proud of the fa ct should a country be proud of the fact that nobody is leaving that country any more? why would they wa nt country any more? why would they want to set up a platform then from which other people from other countries would be sent back. you need to be cautious when it comes to the rather curious expression, disembarkation platform. we are still trying to figure out who came up still trying to figure out who came up with that in the first place. but it's not really necessary for
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resolving the issue of illegal migration. what you have got to do is ensure that as few people as possible legally leave northern african states and head for europe. basically the issue is, if they do, then the issue should be dealt with as close to the north african coast as close to the north african coast as possible. above and beyond that, it is not possible to carry out the eu rescue close to the coast, but on the high seas. the question is, who does the rescuing? it is only when people arrive in our coastal waters on the rescue takes place, only then is the european union legally bound and obliged to bring these people to europe. if you take a look at whether rescues are taking place now, almost rescue action has taken place near the coast of regions of the european union countries. but quite often are mostly close to the north african coast. the ngos
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sometimes sailing to those coastal waters and in the case of the aquarius, what we have found is, some have expressed the suspicion there is at least an informal kind of arrangement with the smugglers and aquarius is attempting to pre—empt rescue by the libyan coastguards. not only to rescue lives, but in particular to bring people to europe rather than having them brought back to libya. if that is criticised by the maltese prime minister, he is perfectly right. don't make the mistake of classifying him as a right—wing populist because of his opinion coming he is a social democrat, but he is perfectly right to criticise what is happening in the mediterranean in this way. if you look at the number of deaths, nobody can claim this policy has saved lives because there were never as many deaths in the mediterranean as in the past few years. so the system
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needs to be changed completely. this change to a new system can only be initiated if we have strong partners in northern africa. it is notjust an artificial expression of creation, but rather we need strong north african partners, strong and efficient countries like egypt and we want others to emulate this. we will support them when it comes to their coastguards, so that the rescue can take place as efficiently and rapidly as possible in their coastal waters. and ideally, as in the case of egypt's, boats would not launch in the first place. that is the objectives we are pursuing. we have come closer to this agenda than a year ago. three years ago, these ideas were condemned as being radical and right wing. ideas were condemned as being radicaland right wing. now ideas were condemned as being radical and right wing. now more and more people are supporting them. we
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are working in this direction and i look forward to every step we take forward. egypt has served as a beacon in stopping illegal migration and we want to engage with them on this. we hope with other countries in the north african region, we will have the same success. the signs are there, the member states have shown they are willing to support this. translation: you can... studio: we have a problem, we will try and re—establish contact with salzburg. but let's reiterate what donald tusk has said. he said the chequers framework for economic cooperation in his words, "will not
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work". so still huge pressure on theresa may. if you don't, over the irish border issue, isn't there a danger you are estimating theresa may will back down and the uk parliament will accept it if she does? if that is a case, it is a gamble leading to an odious and are saying you don't want. president tusk, if you could answer first, thank you? everything is more or less clear now. and i think the essence of european politics, we need to compromise on both sides. this is the very sense of negotiations. it must be clear that there are some
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issues where we are not ready to compromise and first of all this is our fundamental freedoms and single market. this is why we remain sceptical and critical when it comes to this part of the chequers proposal. the irish questions remains our priority to and for this we need not only goodwill, what we feel today, the atmosphere today and yesterday was much better than two or three weeks ago. but the irish question needs something more than only good intentions. we need a tough, clear and precise guarantees
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and this is why we need more time, but our hope is that we will be ready with this in october. for us, this is the condition to continue this is the condition to continue this process in november. without clear and precise solution for irish question and for the whole context of our economic future relations, it will be difficult to imagine a positive process after october. and we have to do, i think, it is quite easy to understand that sometimes theresa may and her staff and also on our side, that we will use sometimes tough communication. we should not hide the obvious truth
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that we are in the middle of really difficult negotiations. it means it is also a tough thing. but today, as you know, iwas is also a tough thing. but today, as you know, i was always very sad because of brexit, but today i am a little bit more optimistic when it comes to a positive outcome of our negotiations. but unfortunately we can't exclude at this stage a no deal solution. it depends on both sides. this is the very idea of negotiations. we go to the other side of the room. you have said a final decision on the brexit emergency summit will be made in october. we have heard from various made in october. we have heard from various sources made in october. we have heard from various sources they could be an
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extra summit on the 17th and 18th of november. i wonder at this stage can you already give an observation if an emergency summit will be decided then this will be the date. and also, how do you want to prepare and step on your contingency plans for a no deal scenario in order to avoid chaos and airports and in everyday life, transport of goods and so on? if we feel that we are able to finalise and formalise our deal in november, i will call this extraordinary meeting, but not as an emergency, as a punch line of effective negotiations before october and during our european council meeting. it means that our
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partners who are here are absolutely clear that what we need today is a common determination on both sides to end our negotiations in october, but for some legal and formal reasons, we will need a summit to formalise this agreement. without october's grand finale in a positive sense of this word, there is no reason to organise a special meeting in november. this is the only condition when it comes to the possible november summit. if then it
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would be november 18, possible november summit. if then it would be november18,19, possible november summit. if then it would be november18, 19, yes question —— saturday and sunday, yes. 17 and 18. as we need a positive conclusion, i would like is to have this conclusion in october because time is running out. no deal is not my working assumption, but should this happen, then we are prepared because the commission has prepared in detail all the elements of consequences of a no deal, so don't worry. be happy, don't worry. not a lot to add. i agree that it
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shouldn't be our goal to reach no deal. i think we have to avoid a ha rd deal. i think we have to avoid a hard brexit but we are prepared for all scenarios. it doesn't make sense now to discuss the no deal scenario because i hope that a deal is the more realistic scenario. thank you. i conclude the press conference. so the end of that news conference. we are awaiting a news conference with theresa may. that is way she will be taking to the podium. now, the only real positive to come out of that was from donald tusk, who said he is a little bit more optimistic on a positive outcome, and then went on to outline every reason why he doesn't think there is going to be won. he said october is when they will decide whether to
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call a when they will decide whether to calla summit in when they will decide whether to call a summit in november two finalise a brexit deal. he has described that october meeting as the moment of truth, so just a few weeks away. i have no doubt theresa may will be asked about this when she takes to the podium shortly. he said the chequers framework will not work. he said he did not want to risk the single market. he said anything that put that at risk would not be considered. he said there was some way to go for theresa may and the british team to satisfy them on the british team to satisfy them on the economic framework of their proposals. so there is still a lot of pressure on the british, as he said. these negotiations will be all about compromise on both sides, but it would appear theresa may's
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proposals in her chequers proposals will not fly when it comes to the economic framework. on a positive side, they are clearly feeling that the departure framework is pretty much in place. there was a much more positive mood music about that, but it is on the future relationship with there is clearly going to be a problem in the coming weeks. the next meeting of the european union will be in october and will be that moment of truth. donald tusk said that while there are positive elements in that chequers proposal, the economic framework will not work, not least because it risks undermining the single market. the moment of truth will be the october council and they expect maximum results in the brexit talks. so plenty for theresa may to react to. we are expecting a question and
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a nswer we are expecting a question and answer session from her when she gives that news conference. everybody is there so she could turn up everybody is there so she could turn up atany everybody is there so she could turn up at any moment and when she does we will take you straight back to salzburg for that news conference. any movement on that, we will return to that. now, a total ban on gambling during sporting events is being proposed by the labour party. the deputy leader tom watson says problem gambling has now become a public health emergency. our sports correspondent richard conway has more. it matters more when there is money on it, that is the message being sent, but there are claims gambling is now becoming a public health emergency. with nearly half a
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million gambling addicts and the gambling commission telling us that sitting behind them there are 2 million problem gamblers who are at risk of becoming addicts, i think as a country we have got to say enough is enough and we need better regulation and new laws to trim the worst excesses of the gambling industry. the party also wants to introduce a mandatory levy to fund treatment for addicts and to stop betting by credit card. this man's father went to prison after stealing over £50,000 to fund his gambling habit. if measures like this were in place a few years ago when my dad was at the height of his gambling addiction, we wouldn't be in the position we are in now. he used credit cards, he was sucked in by the adverts, the free bets, every sports game the betting was there. if this regulation was in place, i don't think he would have gone to prison. the advertising industry believes
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change is necessary. we have already got very strict rules in place, in fa ct, got very strict rules in place, in fact, one of the strictest rules of any advertising sector. it is overseen by the gambling commission, is subject to constant review. sport, particularly football, has become increasingly reliant from revenue from gambling companies in recent yea rs. revenue from gambling companies in recent years. and the links in other sports are growing. this week formula 1 announced it would now allow in play betting and it is seeking over £75 million of investment from gambling firms. for now, the ads will continue to roll. but the issue of betting advertising around sport is now firmly part of a wider political debate. an inquest has been told
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that the westminster bridge attacker khalid masood, attended the same mosque as extremists convicted of plotting a series of bomb attacks, after he converted to islam in jail. masood was shot dead after driving into pedestrians on westminster bridge, and fatally stabbing a police officer. jenny kumah is at the old bailey. this morning the inquest heard that khalid masood could have been radicalised as early as 200a. lawyers representing the victims' families raised questions as to whether the authorities missed opportunities to identify him as a terrorist threat. his brother said ina terrorist threat. his brother said in a statement that carried matsuda converted to islam after his second speuin converted to islam after his second spell injail and converted to islam after his second spell in jail and that he talked about it constantly and try to push it on others. he moved to crawley in 2003 where he attended the same mosque as one of the fertiliser bomb
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plotters. he came under the radar of the security services but was not picked up as part of the investigation. after the attack, material was recovered from his electronic devices and the material referred to killing enemies of islam, such as filthy misguided dues and christians and non—believers. and on his laptop were images of the world trade center attack, they were images of explosives and knives and an sum bin lard and biography. later today, we will hear evidence from khalid masood's mother. the inquest continues. the chief executive of the prison and probation service has been told to leave his post after almost nine yea rs to leave his post after almost nine years in charge. it comes after a number ofjails in years in charge. it comes after a number of jails in england years in charge. it comes after a number ofjails in england and when is recorded record levels of drug taking and self harm. millions of unpaid carers are being warned
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that they are putting their health at risk looking after their loved ones. the local government association and the charity care uk says around five million people helping ill relatives or friends are unable to take a break from their roles. the department of health says its looking at how to improve access to breaks and respite care. the democratic unionist mp ian paisley, will not face a by—election, after the first ever parliamentary recall petition. it was organised after his suspension from the house of commons, forfailing to declare three luxury holidays to sri lanka, that were paid for by the country 5 government. a by—election would have been called if 10% of registered voters in north antrim signed the petition, but the final figure was 9.4%. one hundred years ago this month, the world experienced an outbreak of flu like no other. the spanish flu epidemic left as many as 100 million people dead and was one of the worst pandemics ever seen. it was spread as troops moved from country to country at the end of world war i. our global health correspondent smeetha mundasad looks back at the legacy of the outbreak.
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in the final year of world war i, a flu virus like never before swept around the globe. it spread to almost every country. and, injust 18 months, it had infected a third of the world's population. doctors, nurses and hospitals were overwhelmed. this is the diary of basil hood, dr basil hood, who was medical superintendent at the st marylebone infirmary. it's one of the few written accounts to reveal what it was like to live through the pandemic. each day, the difficulties became more pronounced as the patients increased and the nurses decreased, going down like ninepins themselves. people were warned to stay away from public gatherings and anyone who was unwell, but many suffered, starving of oxygen and going blue as they tried to take their last breath. you've got this virus that killed somewhere between 50 and 100 million people in a little over a year, and yet no—one really knows that much about it.
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for me, having read the personal accounts, it really drives home how traumatic an experience this was for normal people. the modern world is a very different place. people are no longer weakened by years of world war. now transportation is much better, linking every major city, and while that means people can travel around much faster, the worry is that any diseases they carry could spread much faster too. it's estimated that if a new pandemic virus were to emerge, it could spread around the world to every global capital within 60 days of emergence. that doesn't leave a lot of time. experts also say these global threats need more attention, so new vaccines can be made and better public health systems developed to stop worldwide spread. 100 years on, spanish flu is being remembered. this modern dance company is commemorating the virus that even affected political figures like david lloyd george, woodrow wilson and mahatma gandhi.
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shoba na jeyasingh‘s choreography illustrates warfare taking place inside and outside the body. while people were fighting each other, and one side they thought they'd won, actually the virus at the same time was actually fighting a much bigger battle where everybody lost. spanish flu was one of the greatest infectious disease disasters in history. the hope is the world is now better prepared to respond if it happens again. smitha mundasad, bbc news. and if you'd like to find out more about the spanish flu pandemic, including how different parts of england were affected, just go to our website at bbc.co.uk/england the prime minister is giving a news conference following the eu leaders summit in salzburg.
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donald tusk said that everybody shares the view that while there are positive elements in the chequers proposal, the economic framework will not work, not least because it undermines the single market. theresa may already under huge pressure at home with many of her backbenchers saying the chequers proposals will not fly. so no doubt she will face questions on that. just final sound checks and so on going under way there. it is pretty imminent. in fact, going under way there. it is pretty imminent. infact, it going under way there. it is pretty imminent. in fact, it is looking as though... it is one of those where if we pull away now, she will appear. but let's take that risk. i will keep an eye on that.
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over the years, hundreds of thousands of britons have chosen to set up home in other eu countries, with more than 300,000 in spain. our correspondent sarah corker has been to the south of the country to find out how some expats are coming to terms with all the changes that lie ahead. music: la bamba. parts of the costa del sol look and sound more british than they do spanish. more than 300,000 expats live in resorts like torremolinos and benidorm. steve and jill run the mariners bar — a little slice of grimsby on the costas. and then we brought pictures because my grandad was a trawlerman, steve's dad was trawlerman. and mention the b—word here, this is the response. you see, the spanish aren't going to stop brits coming to spain, they're not going to get shut of us — we pay too much money into the system. they moved here four years ago.
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now brexit, they say, has forced them to choose between spain or the uk. we thought we'd best move, lock, stock and barrel, there was a good discussion over dinner yesterday about the generational challenge posed by migration on which the uk is committed to working closely with the eu both now and in the future. and i spoke about what could read and to eliminate people trafficking and to eliminate people trafficking and the vile adverts being put online to newer migrants to make perilous journeys and the uk will be at the forefront of efforts to make sure that social media can never be a platform for this appalling crime. we had a session this morning on internal security where i gave an update on salisbury. i thank eu leaders for their strong response to this reckless and criminal act by two offices of the russian agency,
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and this sends a very strong message on our collective determination to defend the international rules —based system. this informal council has also been an opportunity to discuss our chequers proposals directly with eu leaders. i have just had a frank bilateral meeting with donald tusk and he has confirmed the commitment of the other 27 member states to reach a deal as soon as possible but there are two issues we need to resolve. we both agreed there can be no withdrawal agreement without a legally operative backstop. but that backstop cannot divide the united kingdom into two customs territories and we will be bringing forward our own proposals shortly. on the economic partnership, there is no solution that will resolve the northern ireland border which is not based on the frictionless movement of goods. our white paper remains the only serious and credible proposition on the table for achieving that objective. so there
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isa achieving that objective. so there is a lot of hard work to be done but if the political will is there on the other side, i am confident we will reach a deal and to do so is in the eu's interest as well as the uk's. the president of the eu council has made it clear he doesn't think your plan can work. angela merkel has said there is still substantial progress to be made. other european leaders have made a claim today, they do not think that chequers can work. so with the eu against your plan, with large chunks of your party at home against your plan, how can you credibly cling on to the deal you struck at chequers with your cabinet? iam your cabinet? i am negotiating hard in the interest of the british people. i am negotiating to deliver on what the british people voted for in the
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referendum. but i am also clear that if we are going to deal with the commitments we have made in relation to northern ireland, wiki new to ensure there is no hard border between northern ireland and ireland andi between northern ireland and ireland and i need to do that in a way that retains the integrity of the uk. to do that we need to have the frictionless movement of goods across the border. the only proposal on the table at the moment that will deliver on that frictionless movement of goods is the proposal that we have put forward in the white paper. yes, concerns have been raised. i want to know what those concerns are. there is a lot of hard work to be done but i believe there is willingness to do a deal, but let nobody be in any doubt that as i have always said, we are preparing for no deal so that if we get to the position where it is not possible to reach a deal, the british people can be confident that we will have done what is necessary to make sure we make a success of leaving the european union regardless of the terms on which we do so.
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have the chances of no dealjust gone up? we are continuing to work for a good deal. you have just we are continuing to work for a good deal. you havejust heard we are continuing to work for a good deal. you have just heard a we are continuing to work for a good deal. you havejust heard a number of eu leaders say that they are looking and hoping and working to that good deal, but there is a lot of work to be done and we will be doing that over the next few weeks and what will continue to drive me will be delivering for the british people. it was you that said rather recently, it is either my deal or no deal. as we have heard, the eu council having talked about this, it has said chequers won't work. the dutch prime ministerjust look at that leptin and said the netherlands is better prepared for no deal than the uk. isn't this starting to fall apart? i have always said these negotiations were going to be tough and at different periods different tactics would be used as part of
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those negotiations. what i'm focused on is delivering on the vote of the british people and delivering that ina way british people and delivering that in a way which ensures we maintain our commitment is of no hard border between northern ireland and ireland, that we do so by containing the union of the united kingdom and we protect jobs the union of the united kingdom and we protectjobs in doing that. the proposal we have put forward is the only proposal on the table that actually the livers on that long—term sustainable future by offering the free and frictionless movement of goods across borders. so if there are concerns from the european union, let's hear what those concerns are and let's sit down and look at those concerns. but what we need to ensure is that at the end of the day, the deal that comes out of this is one that delivers for the british people. i believe we can reach a good deal that does exactly that but is also in the interests of the european union. you came here hoping for some warm
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words of encouragement on chequers and also for a firm date in the diary in november to actually get a deal hammered out. you have got the eu presidency in your proposals would work and the prospect of that sum it seems to be receding. this is a setback, isn't it? you say i came here hoping for a date in november but no, i have consistently said we are working to the october deadline, which was originally the one set by the european union. what has been agreed today by the 27 is that they work to that of october deadline. and then they will consider whether an agreement can be finalised at a november date, but we are working to that october deadline. we welcome the fact they have said that is the date that we are working for because thatis date that we are working for because that is what we have always seen as the point. as i havejust said, there is no counterproposal at the
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table at the moment that actually delivers on what we need to do and respects the integrity of the uk and respects the integrity of the uk and respects the integrity of the uk and respects the result of the referendum. that is what we have put forward. you said your proposal is the only one on the table at the moment to continue with frictionless trade or goods but if the eu come forward with their own proposal that would continue frictionless movement of goods, would you be prepared to move away from chequers? and you said you don't want a new customs border down the irish sea. is your new proposal a new regulatory border down the irish sea? you will see what our new proposal is when we come forward with it. what i have said consistently is that we need to make sure that nothing is done which effectively carves northern ireland away from the rest of the uk and that is why i have raised the issue and objected
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to the commission's original proposal in terms of what they said which would have effectively created a border down the irish sea. as i have just a border down the irish sea. as i havejust said, if a border down the irish sea. as i have just said, if there are concerns about the proposal be put forward for frictionless goods, let's understand what those concerns are. i understand reference has been made to the integrity of the single market. we believe we looked at that, we recognised the eu's desire to respect the integrity of the single market and that is why we put forward a proposal that we believe does forward a proposal that we believe d oes exa ctly forward a proposal that we believe does exactly that. two eu leaders said today they should be a second referendum in the uk and the prime minister of malta said the eu were unanimous in wanting to see a second referendum. do you think too many people in the eu are pinning their hopes on britain changing its mind about brexit and do you think the voices back home calling for a second referendum are undermining you?
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i think ithinki i think i want to make my position absolutely clear, there will be no second referendum. the government will not accept a second referendum because there has been a vote of the people. people voted to leave the european union. of course, you have heard those voices who talk about a second referendum, actually others i think now have started to recognise perhaps rather more this is going to happen, we are going to leave the european union. so we will leave on the 20th of march 2019 and there will be no second referendum. people made their choice and it is the duty of me as prime minister and ministers across the hazards of commons to deliver on that vote. last question, james? prime minister, do you wish now last year you never agree to the principle of the northern ireland backstop because it has cause to no end of
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trouble? it is essential for us as the united kingdom government to recognise the needs of the people in northern ireland. the people in northern ireland. the people in northern ireland. the people in northern ireland want to be able to carry on their daily business and their daily lives across the border with ireland as they do today. it is a key pa rt with ireland as they do today. it is a key part of these negotiations, as i have made very clear, we deliver for the people of northern ireland. the deal i am working for is going to bea the deal i am working for is going to be a deal in the best interests of the people of the whole of the uk. even if that means no deal? if there is no agreement on a deal that is acceptable to the united kingdom, we are preparing for no deal. i believe we can get a good deal and there is a growing desire to sit down and make sure we can achieve a good deal. i am pleased we are looking at the october deadline in order to be able to do that. but i am clear, what i am doing is to
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negotiate for the people across the whole of the united kingdom and that includes people of northern ireland. thank you. studio: that is theresa may, the british prime minister giving her reaction to events here at the informal summit in salzburg. i am christian fraser. over the last hour we have had various comments from european leaders they don't think her chequers proposal is ago. donald tusk, on the way into this european summit, the european council president said he thought there had been a positive evolution in negotiation. in his press conference today he said chequers won't work. he was as blunt as that. but he does hold out for the negotiation. we confirmed there will be no withdrawal agreement without a solid operational and legally binding irish backstop. we continue to fully
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support michel barnier in his effo rts support michel barnier in his efforts to find such an order. the second, we agree to have a joint political declaration that provides as much clarity as possible on the future relations. everybody shares the view that while there are positive elements in the chequers proposal, the suggested framework for economic cooperation will not work. not least because it risks undermining the single market. work. not least because it risks undermining the single marketm work. not least because it risks undermining the single market. it is that intractable issue of where to put a customs border. how do you pulled the uk out of the european union when goods are going across borders daily and hourly with all the customs, tax and safety checks that go with that, where do you put the border? the european union wants this backstop, this insurance policy if there is no deal at the end of these negotiations, they want to see
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customs controls, perhaps there will be regulatory controls between great britain and northern ireland. that is not acceptable, said theresa may, no government will accept part of its country being cleaved away from the other. she says her chequers plan is the only way to move goods across borders from north to south without inhibiting the flow of those goods. but they still think there is a lot of work to be done on that pa rt a lot of work to be done on that part of the negotiation. earlier today, theresa may met with the taoiseach, leo varadkar, and she said in the meeting she didn't think they would find a compromise by the summit in october. when you look at the dates, there is a much time. we have the party conference at the end of the month and then two weeks the other side of that. much more likely this negotiation will go towards november. donald tusk is saying he sees november as not negotiation but
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the punch line. they seem in entrenched positions. let's listen tojean—claude entrenched positions. let's listen to jean—claude juncker. entrenched positions. let's listen to jean-claude juncker. translation: i would like this conclusion drawn in november because no deal is not my working assumption, but would it happen, then we are prepared because the commission has prepared in detail, all the elements of consequences of a no deal, which could be entrenched by no deal. don't worry, be happy, don't worry. the hope was they would move the ball forward a little at this summit. when you listen to the collective press conferences this afternoon, head ten minute speech last night doesn't seem to have moved their negotiating position at all. the hope on the british side
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was they could go over the heads of the rule—based commission and appeal to the pragmatism of the european leaders. perhaps the firm line taken by donald tusk is because the likes of emmanuel macron, who has spoken in the last hour, no, the integrity of the single market has to be protected. you cannot split goods from services and the 27 seem to be united on that front. it would appear to be the british side who has to move first to get some negotiation over the line but there isa negotiation over the line but there is a lot of work to do over the coming weeks and time is short. studio: that this christian fraser in salzburg, underlining what has gonein in salzburg, underlining what has gone in the last two hours. the mood music has changed and particular you could see that on the face of theresa may. under some pressure and underlining, in her words, that we are preparing for a no deal, but still hopeful there will be a deal.
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she said her proposals were the only serious, credible way to avoid a ha rd serious, credible way to avoid a hard border in northern ireland. she was responding to those comments from donald tusk. it is worth reiterating them. they really do hit the nub of this. everybody shares the nub of this. everybody shares the view that while there are positive elements in the chequers proposal, the suggested framework for economic cooperation will not work. three words that undermine theresa may's confidence that there is some cause for optimism that the chequers proposals will go through. of course, the uk is due to leave the eu on the 29th of march. in october, the meeting of the eu then is, in the words of donald tusk, the moment of truth. only then will they decide whether or not to hold another meeting in november. i want to pick up on this because vicky
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young has been monitoring the events of the last hour. i don't know about you, but things took a huge step towards a no deal? theresa may did not happy, she looked angry. it was interesting when she said she had had a frank, bilateral meeting with donald tusk. that is normally diplomatic language for an undiplomatic row. clearly there is an issue, she looked angry and she is making the point that yes the uk has left and it is the uk's responsibility to come up with some options. we have come up with options, she says, the chequers deal and that is the only deal on the table and there has been no alternative that solves this seemingly intractable problem of not having this hard border. she seems to be saying to them, you need to tell me what's wrong with this plan and give us some kind of
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alternative. i think the warm words that maybe she was expecting, she said she wanted this to be a sort of summit which gave encouragement and then people looked ahead to october and there was talk of this emergency summit in november. but no firm date for that. donald tusk‘s point says there is no point in having an unscheduled meeting in november if there is nothing to agree. there has to be some kind of progress between now and october and theresa may also saying the uk are going to come forward with new proposals. pretty soon, i think. forward with new proposals. pretty soon, ithink. they forward with new proposals. pretty soon, i think. they will have to look at those to see if it shifts things enough. what the uk government wants is for there to become kind of shift on the other side as well. this morning she spoke to leo varadkar, the irish prime minister and they are getting twitchy, they want this soul. as eve ryo ne twitchy, they want this soul. as everyone keeps saying, time is
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running out. vicky, you know better than anybody, the problem she has back home with her backbenchers, the only way those of them that have said, chequers is a no—go, the only way they might have considered backing it was if they thought the eu was behind it. if the eu isn't, she hasn't got a prayer on that, has she? they would say we're not at the end of the road yet. we do get to october and these things do end up going down to the wire. ministers here are saying, we are trying to predict a vote at some point in the next three months and we don't know what it will be on, or what the alternative will be. that is crucially important as to what people think the alternative will be. some think the alternative is another referendum, others think the only alternative is no deal. we don't yet know, there are all sorts of other possibilities in this and it does depend what it looks like.
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but i would agree with you, in terms of the diplomatic language, it doesn't sound warm, it doesn't sound supportive. we have had president macron saying this is the moment of truth and saying that those who say we can live without europe are liars. they have upped the anti—here i think. of course, this will be pa rt i think. of course, this will be part of the negotiation, it is part of putting pressure on the uk government to give away more concessions and that is what this negotiation is all about. i think interesting, theresa may yet again, choosing to talk about preparations for a no deal and it does bring home what one cabinet minister said earlier today, we have to show the eu we are willing and ready to leave with no deal. i think that has been an ongoing problem. there aren't many in the eu to think that it is a credible thing for the uk to say, we are ready to leave in less than six
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months without a deal. it is interesting when she answered laura kuennsburg question, there is an element of tactics being played by the europeans. i got the impression that it the europeans. i got the impression thatitis the europeans. i got the impression that it is an tactics, this is where they stand ? that it is an tactics, this is where they stand? both sides have got their so—called red lines. but this isa their so—called red lines. but this is a negotiation and we shouldn't be too naive about that. people are trying to get the best deal for them and there are others, we have been hearing in the eu, who are wanting their to be a deal because they do fear what the repercussions will be for the 27 as well as the uk. in all of these things, many people will have predicted it was going to come to this. it was going to be a very fraught time and we are getting into that fraught time because we are getting into the end of the negotiations. this is a last—minute attempt by the eu to put extra pressure on the uk. of course, it doesn't help theresa may that back
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home there seems to be very little support for what she is putting forward. of course it helps those in the eu 27 to put more pressure on her because they are sitting there thinking, what is the point of agreeing to this because it won't get through anyway. so we are down to the negotiation, all eyes on october. that was being played down asa summit october. that was being played down as a summit where not much would happen. what has happened today certainly, has been ramped up again where people want there to be a breakthrough. moment of truth, that was the phrase. vicky young, thank you very much. "nobody took charge" when new rail timetables were introduced in may, leading to weeks of chaos and thousands of services being cancelled. that's the finding of the office of rail and road who say network rail, the two train companies involved, and the department for transport, all made mistakes and the failings were systemic. our transport correspondent tom burridge reports. for people commuting in and out of manchester, like marcus,
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it's been so bad recently he's sometimes been forced off the train. it's just been absolutely terrible. ram—packed on the train. obviously the cost of it just keeps going up. i get this train every morning. sometimes i've not actually been able to get on the train because it's been that packed. new timetables in may brought chaos here. 300 scheduled trains didn't run each day. on govia thameslink, nearly 500 services in and out of london disappeared into thin air. today, a report by the rail regulator. it finds network rail mainly to blame for causing the chaos on northern. infrastructure upgrades overran, and northern wasn't left with enough time to draw up and implement complicated new timetables. problems on govia thameslink were partly caused by a late decision by the department for transport on how to phase the changes in. then the train company failed to train enough drivers on new routes.
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the chief executive of the gtr stepped down. you must have considered your position at some point. well, look, this issue is about sorting out the problems for passengers. myjob is to make sure they have a railway that is fit for purpose going forward. passengers have been let down this summer. they've been let down by a system. the report says very clearly that there are problems all the way across the rail industry. myjob now is to make sure we have a better way going forward. today the government, which was forced to take control of the east coast main line, is launching a review of the railways. industry sources admit the system isn't fit for purpose. the review will look at fundamental questions, like whether the contracts between the government and the companies that run these trains need to be more flexible, how to integrate the public track and the private trains, and whether the railways across the country need to be managed more at a regional level. that's been the case on scotrail — some say the track and trains there are more closely co—ordinated.
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the body representing the rail operators says substantial change is needed. we know we need to improve. we know we need to change, and we're hoping that the review will help us unlock those systemic issues and deliver a service that passengers want to take, that they'll look forward to getting on the train in the morning. however, the government's review will not consider labour's policy — that the whole system should be nationalised again. tom burridge, bbc news. our correspondent lauren moss is at king's cross. passages have been unhappy before the new timetable was introduced. i have spoken to passengers over the month who have been late home from work, they have not made it into work, they have not made it into
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work or got home in time to put their children to bed. this reading won't be very surprising to them but some comfort that things are being acknowledged and plans are being put in place for review in the hope that some of these issues that have been raised could be addressed. ok, thank you very much for that. you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines. theresa may's plans for economic co—operation with the eu after brexit "will not work" — warns the head of the european council. a damning verdict on a summer of rail chaos — a report finds "nobody took charge" as new timetables disrupted hundreds of services. westminster bridge attacker khalid masood attended the same mosque as extremists convicted of plotting a series of bomb attacks. an inquest hearing continues at the old bailey. and in sport, despite objections from international sports organisations, the world anti—age and is he has lifted the three—year
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ban on the russian anti—doping agency, even though they have compromised on the number of issues following revelations of state—sponsored doping. danny cipriani has been left out of the latest england squad. eddiejones said he has been left out for rugby reasons only. johanna konta is out of the pan pacific open. i will have a full update in the next 15 minutes. the westminster bridge attacker khalid masood, attended the same mosque as extremists convicted of plotting a series of bomb attacks, after he converted to islam in jail. this is what an inquest in to the attacks has been hearing today. masood was shot dead after driving into pedestrians on westminster bridge, and fatally stabbing a police officer. our correspondentjenny kumah is at the old bailey. the mother of khalid masood has been
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giving evidence at the inquest. she said he visited her at her farmhouse in wales six days before the attack. she said they prepared a meal together and he asked to repeat some religious phrases. the phrase was, allah is the one true god and mohammed saeid his prophet. she explained herself she had no religion, she tried to live a decent light but repeated the phrase for him. the following morning he asked her to repeat the same phrase. and that he put his hands on his head and began to sob. because he said he wished that she believed what she was saying. as he was leaving the house that morning, you said to her, his last words, "they will say i am a terrorist, i am not. his last words, "they will say i am a terrorist, iam not. " his his last words, "they will say i am a terrorist, i am not. " his mother explained to the inquest at the time she didn't understand what he was
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saying. she was confused by it and it didn't bring any alarm bells because she had no idea he had terrorist thoughts. she thought now he was leading a settled life because he had children. during the inquest she was asked whether he had ever expressed extremist views and she said no. she was asked whether he expressed hatred of the west? and she said no. she was asked whether she said no. she was asked whether she had supported terrorist violence and she said no. we were shown an e—mail sent to her by khalid masood in may 2000 and 13. i can read some extracts. in it he said, i did not feel i was part of the family, i felt like the stepson, half brother who never fitted in. felt like the stepson, half brother who neverfitted in. on top of felt like the stepson, half brother who never fitted in. on top of that, the upbringing lacked expressions of love and it seemed like a pretty cold and dull experience. janet explained that after that she was heard by a number of things he said
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to her and that it was unbearable. later today we are expecting to hear from its mother further and later today we are expecting to hear from its motherfurther and possibly his partner at the time of the attack. jenny, at the old bailey, thank you very much. a total ban on advertisements for gambling during live sporting events, is being proposed by the labour party, as a way to combat addiction. the party's deputy leader tom watson, says problem gambling has now become a "a public health emergency". our sports correspondent richard conway has more. voice over: think fast, act fast, in play. you can watch it and you can get involved in it. it matters more when there's money on it — that's the message gambling companies often sell to viewers of live sport, but
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labour are concerned problem gambling has become a public health emergency and are pledging limits on when ads can be shown during sporting events. with nearly half a million gambling addicts and the gambling commission telling us that sitting behind them there are 2 million problem gamblers who are at risk of becoming gambling addicts, i think as a country we've got to say enough is enough and we need better regulation and new laws to trim the worst excesses of the gambling industry. the party also wants to introduce a mandatory levy to fund treatments for addicts, and stop betting by credit cards. adam bradford's father went to prison after stealing over £50,000 to fund his gambling habit and believes the proposals are much needed. if measures like this were in place a few years ago when my dad was at the height of his gambling addiction, we wouldn't be in the position we're in now. he used credit cards, he was sucked in by the adverts, the free bets, every sports game the betting was there. if this regulation was in place then i don't think he would have gone to prison. the conservatives have criticised labourfor liberalising the gambling market when it was in power, which included allowing tv commercials. why don't you put a few quid on? i am going to.
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and the advertising industry believes change is unnecessary. we've already got very strict rules in place. in fact we have the strictest rules of any advertising sector. advertising for gambling is overseen by the gambling commission and the advertising standards authority. it's subject to constant review. sport, particularly football, has become increasingly reliant on revenue from gambling companies in recent years. this season, almost 60% of clubs in england's top two divisions have the names of bookmakers on their shirts. and the links in other sports are growing. this week formula one announced it would now allow in—play betting and is seeking over £75 million of investment from gambling firms. and we see everything. for now the ads will continue to roll. we gamble responsibly. but the issue of betting advertising around sport is now firmly part of a wider political debate. richard conway, bbc news. the democratic unionist mp ian paisley, will not face
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a by—election, after the first ever parliamentary recall petition. it was organised after his suspension from the house of commons, forfailing to declare three luxury holidays to sri lanka, that were paid for by the country's government. a by—election would have been called if 10% of registered voters in north antrim signed the petition, but the final figure was 9.4%. millions of unpaid carers are being warned that they are putting their health at risk looking after their loved ones. the local government association and the charity care uk says around five million people helping ill relatives or friends are unable to take a break from their roles. the department of health says its looking at how to improve access to breaks and respite care. the chief executive of the prison and probation service, michael spurr, has been told to leave his post, after almost nine years in charge. it comes as a number ofjails in england and wales face record levels of violence, drug—taking and self—harm. mr spurr has agreed to step down, and will leave next march. now, a look at the weather. what on
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earth is that? i am not sure it is going to work. we are getting towards the storm season and i wa nted towards the storm season and i wanted to talk to people about warnings. we actually call this the grid matrix, invented by the met office. have you seen the movie, the matrix? it is pretty complicated. it isa matrix? it is pretty complicated. it is a cult classic with piano reeves. it isa is a cult classic with piano reeves. it is a brilliant movie, but very complicate it. this is collocated as well. there are three tiers of warning system, yellow, amber and red. the red warning system we only get around 12 issued across the uk
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ina year. get around 12 issued across the uk in a year. the higher up in the grid system you are, the more likely you are of the issues and the further along, the greater the impact. if we are talking about an amber that is higher up are talking about an amber that is higherup and are talking about an amber that is higher up and further along with an amber warning there is a potential to be aware of some substantial damage. so this is what we are trying to explain to people, they yellow is the lighter and the lesser so there is one, two and three, amber is one, a medium level impact. and now we have a yellow amber warning for storm storm bronart. please tell me you understand that, simon? it is complicated and yellow,
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amberand red. simon? it is complicated and yellow, amber and red. yellow means there are likely to be an impact from these weather warnings but not as severe. yesterday we had storm alley. we have storm bronart, which isa alley. we have storm bronart, which is a yellow impact. that means there is the potential for issue due to issues with torrential rain. this is across wales and northern england. if you go on to the bbc website you can see the area is to be impacted. but later on tonight we will see some squally winds moving their way across the country once the rain clears away and it could have an impact as well. the winds might get upgraded to an amber later on in the day, which means the impact could be a bit more severe. so we're getting a bit more severe. so we're getting a storm a day, storm ali yesterday, storm bronart today. it is autumn and that is what happens in the transition from some into the autumn
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period and it looks like it could be pretty stormy into the weekend as well. we are going to be kept on our toes i suspect. i haven't felt like this since i was at school when the teacher looked at me with the utter horror when he realised i wasn't taking anything in. i have some homework to do. you had better give us the forecast. we have another weather warning, storm bronart, a storm that will bring some persistent rain from the west. it will bring a couple of inches of rainfall but once the rain clears through on the back edge on to the south—west, we could see some squally, gusty winds which could have an impact as well. let's move to the here and now and this is the story of the rainfall. we have seen over an inch of rain across parts of wales so we could see two inches, maybe more to higher as well. the rain pushes in from the west and it will affect wales, the midlands and
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open to the north of england. to the south and east of that it is pretty warm. last of the warm days but as we go through the overnight period and the rain pushes through, that is when we are likely to see the wind is picking up. this afternoon, low 20s and possibly down in the south—east it is cooler with squally showers into the north—west. heaviest rain in the early evening rush—hour across wales, pushing into the midlands and the north of england. that is when the gusts of wind are likely to get going as well, to the latter stages of the day and overnight. the rain will push away and we will cede the wind is picking up, 50, 60 mile an hour gusts of wind knocked out of the question. that is when this yellow warning could be upgraded to an amber with the severity of those winds pushing through. as we move into tomorrow, the rain is yet to clear away. the north of england looks likely to start on a wet note, quite windy as well. as we go to the
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date the winds will ease and they will change direction. we use the south—westerly flow. and north—westerly kicks in, cooler direction and that means friday could be a case of sunny spells, scattered showers but notably different out there for all others. top temperatures on friday, around 11 to 17 or 18 degrees. as we go into the weekend, could start a brief ridge of high pressure building and things quiet ning gao. we'll be a chilly start to saturday but another area of low pressure shows its hand and pushes into the south—west. it could be tricky as we move through the weekend. we start saturday on a choir know, wet weather into the south—west. sunday, there is the potential for another deep area of low pressure that is keeping us on our toes. if you have plans for sunday, keep watching the forecast over the next couple of days and we will try to firm up on the details of that. this is bbc news.
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our latest headlines: theresa may's plans for economic co—operation with the eu after brexit "will not work" warns the head of the european council. everybody shared the view that while there are positive elements in the chequers proposal, the suggested framework for economic cooperation will not work. theresa may told her counterparts the plan was the only one to ensure the integrity of the uk and frictionless trade. there is a lot of work to be done and we will be doing that over the next few weeks and what will continue to drive me will be delivering for the british people. "nobody took charge" when new rail timetables were introduced in may. the rail regulator says mistakes were made and failings were systemic. westminster attacker, khalid masood, had a history of violent outbursts and attended the same mosque as extremists convicted of plotting a series of bomb attacks, an inquest hears today. the world anti—doping agency have agreed today to lift a ban on the russian anti—doping agency after being suspended since 2015 over alleged state—backed doping.
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lily allen, noel gallagher, and arctic monkeys are among the heavyweight contenders for music's prestigious mercury awards. we'll be live at the venue with our correspondent colin patterson. sport now on afternoon live with olly foster. russia's anti—doping agency is back in business despite widespread opposition. good afternoon. the world anti—doping agency have let russia backin anti—doping agency have let russia back in from the cold. the russian anti—doping agency. they have been suspended for the best part of three yea rs suspended for the best part of three years following all the evidence of state—sponsored doping on a mass scale. the world anti—doping agency has reinstated them, subject to strict conditions, but it's going to bea strict conditions, but it's going to be a very unpopular decision. they
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have been meeting in the seychelles of all places. numerous sports organisations, influential athlete groups, they have all voiced their concerns that the russians are nowhere near compliant with the original criteria that was laid down for their reinstatement. the world anti—doping agency says there is now another timeline for them to open up the moscow lab that's what all those positive samples four or five years ago. they want access to that data to see if more cheats need to be brought tojustice. to see if more cheats need to be brought to justice. giving their licence back would effectively pave the way for all russian sports men and women to be free to compete internationally. world athletics have still got a ban on the country. that stands but they have got to decide what action to take now. it is going to cause massive rifts in sporting relations. lots of reaction coming in. this hasjust come in from the head of the us anti—doping
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agency, incredibly influential. today marks the biggest decision in the world anti—doping agency's history and it delivered a devastating blow to the world's clea n devastating blow to the world's clean athletes. they have called this bewildering and inexplicable and called for urgent reform at the world anti—doping agency. and called for urgent reform at the world anti-doping agency. now let's look, a year—to—date the rugby world cup gets under way. the big question, will danny cipriani be there? unlikely as it stands. another contentious decision. the gloucester fly— half another contentious decision. the gloucester fly—half danny cipriani has been in brilliant form with his clu b has been in brilliant form with his club this season. he looked good in england's last match over the summer against south africa. but eddie jones clearly does not fancy him. what has he got to do to get back into this training squad? he has been left out of next week's
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get—together. george ford and owen farrell ahead of him in the pecking order at the moment. he has had his scrapes away from the pitch. he was charged byjersey magistrates' court for common assault. manu tuilagi is in. he last played for england two and a half years ago. chris ashton is currently suspended for seven weeks but he still made the squad as well. our correspondent spoke to the head coach today. it's a year until the world cup begins. is there any chance danny cipriani will play in the world cup? 100%. a great chance. i have just spent five minutes discussing where he is. he has got as much opportunity as any of the other players in the squad and outside the squad. and manu tuilagi on the same level? would you be a better team with him in it at the world cup?l
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lot can happen in 12 months. 12 months is a long time in sport. the great thing for us, i have probably never been as excited about announcing a squad in england as today because of the fact i can sense with the players, they are all much fitter, much more fired up than they were 12 months ago. you won a contest is out of the pan pacific open in japan. you won a contest is out of the pan pacific open injapan. she was beaten in the second round in tokyo. she was 4—1 ahead in the second set as well. that is all the sport for now. all this week we ve been on the road with bbc radio 1's newsbeat, as they tour the highways and byways in their campervan, asking people from all four corners of the country what they think about brexit. they are heading to ireland this evening, but they've pulled up at the port of holyhead to have a chat with some truckers. here's newsbeat‘s political reporterjim connolly. simon, welcome to a very wet,
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drizzly and slightly miserable holyhead. it took us quite a long time to get here from mansfield. this is one of the busiest ports in the country, obviously affected potentially by brexit. 400,000 of these trucks passed through her every single year. it makes this place very busy. this is the cafe and this is rosy, who runs the place. as we get out of the miserable weather, tell me, what do the truckers tell you when they come in here when they talk about brexit? are they worried about possible delays? some of them are quite worried about possible delays, yes. they will get back in the port, trucks can't get through or customs issues, so they are generally. also joining us is jonathan issues, so they are generally. also joining us isjonathan from the uk chamber of shipping. some truckers
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are chamber of shipping. some truckers a re pretty chamber of shipping. some truckers are pretty relaxed about the prospects of disruptions if we go out of brexit with a hard brexit or a no—deal brexit, some of them are worried. what is the official view? it is really important that trade can move freely through boards such as holyhead. that is good for british exports and particularly irish exports to the uk. the chequers deal that the prime minister is supporting would allow for that. a hard brexit way trade was stopped imports for checks for the customs papers to be dealt with, that will slow the whole process down. on balance, we want free flowing trade and therefore we want the chequers deal. the cynic in me says maybe if trucks were backed it would be good for business. you could look at it that way but we also like free flowing track movement and we want to keep it moving through the port in holyhead and through our business all the time. let's talk about something
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other than brexit. we have got a beautiful old camper van and you have been giving it a admiring glances. yes, i have got one myself. what is the advice you would give us? we have got a fairly lengthy journey tomorrow. really, iwould say, get a new car. it seems that the plan was always flawed but you probably know that. hopefully we will be speaking to you tomorrow. more fromjim, will be speaking to you tomorrow. more from jim, hopefully, tomorrow. over the years hundreds of thousands of britons, have chosen to set up home in other eu countries, with more than 300,000 in spain. our correspondent sarah corker has been to the south of the country, to find out how some expats are coming to terms with all the changes, that lie ahead. music: la bamba. parts of the costa del sol look and sound more british than they do spanish. more than 300,000 expats live in resorts like torremolinos and benidorm. steve and jill run the mariners
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bar — a little slice of grimsby on the costas. and then we brought pictures because my grandad was a trawlerman, steve's dad was trawlerman. and mention the b—word here, this is the response. you see, the spanish aren't going to stop brits coming to spain, they're not going to get shut of us — we pay too much money into the system. they moved here four years ago. now brexit, they say, has forced them to choose between spain or the uk. we thought we'd best move, lock, stock and barrel, to spain before brexit hits, so because we had business in england and a business here, we thought we'd get shut of the one in england first. so brexit almost made you make the decision to move to spain. brexit definitely made us commit to spain. but since the referendum in 2016, it's become more expensive for brits to buy here — the value of the pound has fallen against the euro.
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since the '60s, the british have been buying here in quite considerable numbers. estate agent ian irvin says, in use recent years, though, the british market has slowed right down and some older expats, now in their 70s and 805, are now selling up. british, as one nationality, are still the biggest market. they probably represent at this point in time roughly about 40% of the market here. so 40% of people buying here are british? that's correct, yeah. whereas before, say in the early 2000s, it was probably closer to 80%. there's been quite a large drop in the market. for brits living and working here on the costa del sol, brexit has thrown up two major concerns — access to health care, and pensions. at the moment, brits get free medical treatment here in spain, but will that continue post—brexit? and the weak pound has, for some pensioners, wiped off almost a third of the value of their pensions. further along the coast,
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in the small town of torrox near malaga, i met two sisters originally from lincoln. they opened a restaurant and hotel here 16 years ago. the brexit vote came as a big shock. the day after the news of brexit came out, i did look at having dual nationality so we could get a european passport and obviously have our british passport. but spain doesn't allow that — you have to renounce your british citizenship if you want to have a spanish passport — so that's obviously a no—go for us. and neither of you wanted to do that. no, we don't want to do that, no. music: these boots are made for walkin'. on the costa del sol, there is a sense of brexit fatigue, frustration it's all taking so long, but a feeling, too, that it will eventually get sorted out. the brits — and the expat bars — are here to stay. sarah corker, bbc news, torremolinos. a hundred years ago
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this month, the world experienced an outbreak of flu, like no other. the spanish flu epidemic left as many as a hundred million people dead, and was one of the worst pandemics ever seen. it was spread as troops moved from country to country, at the end of world war i. our global health correspondent smeetha mundasad, looks back at the legacy of the outbreak. in the final year of world war i, a flu virus like never before swept around the globe. it spread to almost every country. and, injust 18 months, it had infected a third of the world's population. doctors, nurses and hospitals were overwhelmed. this is the diary of basil hood, dr basil hood, who was medical superintendent at the st marylebone infirmary. it's one of the few written accounts to reveal what it was like to live through the pandemic. each day, the difficulties became more pronounced as the patients increased and the nurses decreased, going down like ninepins themselves.
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people were warned to stay away from public gatherings and anyone who was unwell, but many suffered, starving of oxygen and going blue as they tried to take their last breath. you've got this virus that killed somewhere between 50 and 100 million people in a little over a year, and yet no—one really knows that much about it. for me, having read the personal accounts, it really drives home how traumatic an experience this was for normal people. the modern world is a very different place. people are no longer weakened by years of world war. now transportation is much better, linking every major city, and while that means people can travel around much faster, the worry is that any diseases they carry could spread much faster too. it's estimated that if a new pandemic virus were to emerge, it could spread around the world to every global capital within 60 days of emergence. that doesn't leave a lot of time. experts also say these global threats need more attention,
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so new vaccines can be made and better public health systems developed to stop worldwide spread. 100 years on, spanish flu is being remembered. this modern dance company is commemorating the virus that even affected political figures like david lloyd george, woodrow wilson and mahatma gandhi. shoba na jeyasingh‘s choreography illustrates warfare taking place inside and outside the body. while people were fighting each other, and one side they thought they'd won, actually the virus at the same time was actually fighting a much bigger battle where everybody lost. spanish flu was one of the greatest infectious disease disasters in history. the hope is the world is now better prepared to respond if it happens again. smitha mundasad, bbc news. and if you'd like to find out more about the spanish flu pandemic, including how different parts
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of england were affected, just go to our website at bbc.co.uk/england vishala is here in a moment with the business news. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live. theresa may's plans for future relations with the eu risk undermining the single market warns the head of the european council. a damning verdict on a summer of rail chaos. a report finds "nobody took charge" as new timetables disrupted hundreds of services. westminster bridge attacker khalid masood attended the same mosque as extremists convicted of plotting a series of bomb attacks. an inquest hearing continues at the old bailey. here's your business headlines on afternoon live. and let the bidding almost begin. the uk's takeover panel says the future of sky will be settled by auction on saturday. the broadcaster has been subject to rival bids from fox and the us conglomerate comcast.
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frustrated barclays customers have been locked out of their online accounts for hours today. barclays say it's down to a technical problem but that customers can still make payments to existing payees through mobile banking. john hancock, one of the largest life insurance providers in north america, has announced that it will no longer offer policies that do not include digital fitness tracking. holders of its "interactive" policies can earn discounts and rewards such as gift cards for hitting exercise targets. critics say the announcement was "creepy" and "dystopian". so the takeover of the sky is going to be settled by auction. yes, it is a bit ofa to be settled by auction. yes, it is a bit of a strange situation. it is going to be an auction which starts on friday. the reason is because it
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has been going on for months, and end wasn't in sight, so all companies have agreed to engage in this process. so they literally get the envelopes out and weather has got the biggest... whoever has got the biggest wins. it's a corrugated process. sarah bates, a lawyer, is going to explain to us how it is done. if by friday evening there hasn't been another bid and we are not expecting one, they will have three rounds, the first round one offer, it can only be a cash offer so we are talking numbers, thereafter the other bidder will have a chance to improve their offer, and if there is still a deadlock at that point, there will bea deadlock at that point, there will be a third round and both bidders will be able to put forward their best and final bids. so this is to avoid a deadlock? you may still have
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avoid a deadlock? you may still have a deadlock at the end of it. one would expect one bidder to put in a knockout bid, but at the end of the day you should have won winning bidder and then that will be announced and that bid will proceed. speaking of sky, it has been named as one of the country's top brands. yes, top five brands. as well as vodafone and bp. it is surprising really because in the era of the dig economy, but apparently the old companies of the ftse100 are doing very well. you are looking really perplexed. not that old. it started in 1989. jane bloomfield, head of uk marketing, thank you very much for joining us. the list is made up of a couple of different areas that we look at in terms of business performance. one is financial value.
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vodafone, sky, they are worth a lot of money. what is unique to the evaluation is that we ask consumers what they think about these brands. so it includes financial value and consumer perception and we bring back together to establish our top 75 brands. i have had a look at the rest and the research and it talks about how brands need to future proof themselves. how do they make themselves fit for further growth and how do they make themselves fit for the challenges that we might see specifically in the uk from things like brexit, from changes within regulatory regulations but also from competitive threats, both within their context in the uk but also globally, where we see lots of us brands, chinese brands, beginning to enter the brands, chinese brands, beginning to enterthe uk brands, chinese brands, beginning to enter the uk marketplace. is that
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not generally how companies managed to operate though, future proof themselves from rivals? not all. you will be familiar with some uk brands that have disappeared from the high street and our homes. the key thing for a street and our homes. the key thing fora uk brand street and our homes. the key thing for a uk brand to continue to do is about innovation. this is something we looked at when we first started the ranking last year and we have looked at it in more detail this year because what we are finding is that uk brands lagged behind the re st of that uk brands lagged behind the rest of the world in terms of innovation. that is not to say we don't have some truly innovative brands. we see brands like dyson, they are rising up in the ranking and really showing some brands what innovation means within the uk market today. thank you very much. more from you later on. thank you. let's go now to our chief political correspondent,
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vicki young, who is at westminster with jacob rees—mogg, chair of the pro—brexit european research group. theresa may sounding a little bit tetchy at that press conference. it did sound like she may have had a little run—in with donald tusk, talking about a frank meeting with him, which usually means they have had a row. not warm words that some we re had a row. not warm words that some were expecting would go to reason may‘s way. what do you make of what has been said by serbian leaders in the eu today? —— certain leaders? the customs arrangements, the common rule book don't work from the eu's point of view. it is essentially their version of cherry picking and it isa their version of cherry picking and it is a nonstarter. everyone expected there would be some
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softening of we shall barney a's line, but it hasn't happened, and there is very little support for the chequers plan now. the proposal she should come forward with is a cop offensive free—trade agreement which has been offered to us by the european union —— comprehensive. has been offered to us by the european union -- comprehensive. do you think the prospects of no deal are increasing after this or do you think this is partly tactics by the eu to put pressure on the uk? so far, every time the european union has died its heels in, it has got what it wanted. you understand why the european union has been quite stubborn, but i think the time has come to say this is not going to work, we need to go back to the lancaster house speech, back to a
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trade deal, and that is deliverable and can be passed into law, the house of commons would be sympathetic to it, but if we leave on world trade organisation terms, thatis on world trade organisation terms, that is not the end of the world. there are many in the house of commons, the majority probably, who think that leaving on world trade organisation terms would be a disaster and parliament wouldn't allow that to happen. it is hard to see what that means in terms of parliamentary procedure because parliament passed the withdrawal act, which means we leave on march 29 2019 whether we have got an agreement or not. so parliament has already spoken. there is not as endlessjobs for already spoken. there is not as endless jobs for parliament to make its mind... except the prime minister probably wouldn't allow no deal to happen either. minister probably wouldn't allow no dealto happen either. she minister probably wouldn't allow no deal to happen either. she would have to do things she very clearly has said she will not do like extending the day, but then you run into the european elections and our seats have already been given away
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to other countries. extending the date isn't really a starter. we passed into law the decision to leave. and leaving on world trade organisation terms, according to economists on free trade, would be a boost to the economy. the treasury forecasts, the bank of england forecasts, the bank of england forecasts have been so long —— so wrong so far,... are you concerned that talk of another referendum in some form may be gaining traction and if there is a stalemate in parliament, it could well be where we end up in order to resolve this? the prime minister of malta has said they should be a second referendum. it is not just they should be a second referendum. it is notjust people abroad, people here as well. we have had foreign leaders telling us to vote again until we get what they want. we vote and vote and vote and the only vote that counts is the one the european
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union wants. that is not proper democracy. in this country, the only people calling for a second referendum are the people who lost the first. in a general election, both main parties backed leave. a democracy requires that it is delivered on. we wait to see now what the uk government comes forward with. theresa may promising some new proposals soon. this evening, the winner of this year's mercury prize will be announced, with a 25,000 pound cheque going to the best album of the last 12 months, by a british or irish act. previous winners have included the arctic monkeys and elbow, but in an age where we can all stream individual tracks, do albums still matter? ? we can cross to a man who can answer that — our entertainment correspondent colin paterson is outside the hammersmith apollo for us. most people streamed tracks, do they buy albums? two albums matter now?l very good point. in the last year, artist albums have fallen 26% year on yearand artist albums have fallen 26% year on year and that. streaming now
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cou nts on year and that. streaming now counts towards the charts but despite that the conception of albums has fallen. what the mercury prize tries to do is shine the spotlight on it each year. it is the booker prize for music. it is 12 albums chosen by 12 judges and tonight one of them will be announced as the winner. over history, there has been a real support for new music and of the 26 winners, 17 have been debut albums. but this year it is a bit different. a lot of established acts on this shortlist. arctic monkeys, noel gallagher, florence and the machine. there are only two debut albums on there. novelist, who was on bbc brea kfast there. novelist, who was on bbc breakfast this morning. there is not their support of new music. a lot of people saying it has been quite controversial. if you are going to
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get me to predict the winner, you have got no dean sharp, she is —— an album inspired by the syrian immigration or we could have the first ever jazz winner of the mercury prize tonight. it will be announced at ten o'clock tonight. thank you very much. let's have a look at the weather. we have seen autumn proper this week. this afternoon, some torrential rain for some and later tonight we will see some squally damaging gusts of wind. a little bit like a conveyor belt feeding this wet weather in from the south—west affecting wales, the midlands and the north of england. into the
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south—east, it is still quite warm for one more day at least. for the early evening rush hour, some of that rain will be quite relentless through the south—west. heavy bursts into wales and the north of england as well. at least a couple of inches of rain likely. that rain will gradually drift its way steadily eastwards overnight and that is when we will see the wind picking up. we will have some squally damaging gusts of wind during the early hours of the morning —— tomorrow morning. hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy. today at 4pm. a blunt message for theresa may in salzburg — eu leaders say her brexit plan won't work. i'm christian fraser in salzburg where the european council president donald tusk just told where the european council president donald tuskjust told us that theresa may's plan undermines the single market. everybody shared the view that while there are positive elements in the chequers proposal, the suggested
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framework for economic cooperation will not work. there is a lot of work to be done and we will be doing that obviously over the next few weeks. and what will continue to drive me will be delivering for the british people. we'll have the latest from salzburg. coming up on afternoon live — all the sport. that is with olly foster. bewildering, inexplicable, and a devastating blow to the world's clea n devastating blow to the world's clean athletes. jut, just one description of the decision to lift the three—year ban on the russian anti—doping agency. and the weather with louise. hi, simon, storm bronagh is making its presence felt across the country, this one bringing torrential rain later tonight and also some squally gusts of wind.
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more details to come. hello, everyone — this is afternoon live. i'm simon mccoy. theresa may's proposed new economic partnership with the eu "will not work". that was the message she got today. let'sjoin that was the message she got today. let's join christian fraser in salzburg. welcome back to salzburg in austria. when theresa may arrived here yesterday she knew she had ten minutes to speak to the 27 leaders to persuade them about her side of the negotiation. this was the first time she was able to put her chequers proposal to them in the round of 27. today those same 27 leaders had just over 90 minutes to discuss among themselves what they
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had heard from theresa me and a resounding view that we just heard from the press conferences over the course of the last hour or so is that they don't think the chequers plan is acceptable. we are hearing from downing street that in their view the european union is playing hardball. in the words of one downing st official the eu hasjust thrown an elbow and certainly it has made it very difficult for theresa may, and just ahead of that conservative party conference in two weeks' time because the european union doesn't think her chequers customs plan will work, large parts of her party don't think it will work. but as we will show you in just a few minutes she remains very bullish saying it's the only planning town. what was noticeable was the shift in tone from the european council president donald tusk. on the way into the summit yesterday he said there had been this positive evolution in the negotiation. well, today he was calling a —— much more bluntly. it
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just won't work, he said. we reconfirmed that there would be no withdrawal agreement without the solid operational and legally binding irish backstop. and we continue to fully support michel barnier in his efforts to find such a model. second, we agreed to have a joint political declaration that provides as much clarity as possible on the future relations. everybody shared the view that while there are positive elements in the chequers proposal, the suggested framework for economic cooperation will not work. not least because it risks undermining the single market. donald tusk speaking a little earlier. part of the problem, of course, is work to put the border, the customs border, in the event of no deal. the agreement that theresa may signed up to at the beginning of the year suggested that northern ireland would stay in the customs
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union and a large part of the single market and now she's trying to extend the customs union part of it to the united kingdom and european union saying no, that would give you access to the single market through the back door so they are sticking to their guns. they say there must be this legal operational backstop in case there is no end point in the negotiation. in her meeting today with leo varadkar, and there was talk of compromise on both sides ahead of the meeting, she told leo varadkar that she didn't think she could find any compromise in the next weeks before the october summit. the difference now is where the negotiation is headed because what we have heard from jean—claude juncker, the european commission president, is that as far as he's concerned october must be it, that is the bulk of the negotiation. november, he says, must be the punch line, so can they get to wear the need to be in the next few weeks when they haven't been able to get there for the past nine months? here isjean—claude there for the past nine months? here is jean—claude juncker.
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i would like us to have this conclusion being drawn in october because the time is right now for an agreement. no deal is not my working assumption, but would it happen? then we are prepared because the commission has prepared in detail all the elements of consequences of all the elements of consequences of ano all the elements of consequences of a no deal which could be entailed by a no deal which could be entailed by ano a no deal which could be entailed by a no deal, so don't worry, be happy, don't worry. laughter now, as i say, the reaction from downing street officials at the moment is, this is what you would expect in a negotiation, the european union is playing hardball and theresa may was equally hardball in the room. but what you see, of course, is they are both in these deeply entrenched positions. what we have been discussing in the conference centre is why was the language much stiffer? she had hoped to go over the heads of michel barnier and the rules —based system of the commission to appeal to the
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pragmatism of the 27 leaders and we thought we would hear more of the one language on the other side of it but it's much more blunt than we expected and just two weeks ahead of that party conference where, let's face it, she is in political danger. so are they throwing her under the bus at a critical time, or are they trying to z of the british side, you have to have an honest debate among yourselves because what you are proposing right now isn't acceptable? well, theresa may at her press co nfe re nce acceptable? well, theresa may at her press conference remained bullish. —— are they trying to say to the british side. people in northern ireland want to be able to carry on their daily business and their daily lives and their daily business across the border with ireland as they do today. i think it is absolutely a key part of these negotiations, as i've made very clear, that we deliver for the people of northern ireland. because the deal that i'm working for is going to be a in the best interests of the people in the whole of the uk, england, scotland, wales and northern ireland.
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even if that means no deal? if there is no agreement on a deal that is acceptable to the united kingdom then we are preparing for no deal. i believe we can get a good deal. i believe there is a growing desire to sit down and ensure that we can achieve a deal. i'm pleased that we're looking at that october deadline in order to be able to do that. but i'm also very clear that we need to... what i'm doing is negotiating to deliver for the people across the whole of the united kingdom, and that includes the people of northern ireland. thank you. theresa may speaking just a few minutes ago. with me now is barbara wesel, senior european editor at deutsche welle. were you surprised by the tone that you heard from the very european leaders this afternoon? not really because the british assumption that they would schmooze her and sort of help her across her own party conference was just an assumption. there was no proof for that ever. what the european leaders have done here is tell the british side, "we don't have that much time." even though there may be more than some
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people think. "you have to decide, is going to be canada plus, or is it going to be nowhere?" that's really what is on table for britain. this sort of selective participation in december market will not wash, we will not do it. if you listen to mark rutte, the dutch prime minister, he said clearly we are interested in trade with britain but more interested with 400 million people are missing the market.|j don't know about you but i suspected that in the past couple of hours the chances of a no deal went up considerably. in a way, yes. if you think that britain cannot and will not move any further, yes, it has increased. but also, i think what you see here, and we have talked to some sources who were quite astonished that they are playing the long game here. november, yes, we may get to the crunch point, or crunch time, in november, but we may also not, we may have another summit in december. we may even get have one in january,
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in december. we may even get have one injanuary, so they are really ratcheting up the tension and i think what they are doing is waiting for the pressure in london to rise and rise and rise and then maybe something will happen. there is inherent risk in that because there may be a situation, and they certainly want theresa may to lead this negotiation to remain in place, they may push so hard that they unseat her. that's right and i think they are saying if it happens then it happens, it's not our problem and it's not our fault, it happens, it's not our problem and it's not ourfault, we it happens, it's not our problem and it's not our fault, we can't help her, we can't sort of prop her up anymore. also it fosters unreal expectations. we cannot foster illusions anymore on the british side. she needs to tell british people openly what is on the table for britain after brexit. she cannot fudge around and say you can have this and that, no, she can't, it will not happen. they think it is the time to be honest and just say this is what it is about. this idea that perhaps the british side harboured that they could maybe
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split the 27th. there were reports today in the times that mark rutte of the netherlands, belgium, even donald tusk himself was leading a small group saying we have to be more open and compromise. i got the sense the other side, with the press conferences, that they have been told within the 27th we need to stand foursquare behind michel barnier and the commission. that's wishful thinking on the british side, they have tried for months and months to divide and rule and it has never happened. britain knows what it needs, the 400 million and not trade with britain. that's what everybody says. where my preferences ? everybody says. where my preferences? where is what i really need for my economy? they make a very clear choice. britain then comes in a clear second place and we heard people speaking openly about the fact that britain is a leaving member state, so how many compromises do you make for somebody who has decided to go away? they wa nt who has decided to go away? they want a friendly divorce, angela merkel, the german chancellor, really emphasised that. but if it
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doesn't happen it won't happen and they seem to be resigned to that. but, come on, barbara, this is the european union, the body of compromise, there is always a deal in the european union. there can be a deal and merkel talked about creativity also and allsorts of solutions could be found that might accommodate some british wishes. but the core of the chequers proposal, participate in the supermarket was good, it is a no—go and the rest we can have fudges and nice words and great sort of rhetoric but that's sort of the fine line, it comes down to that point. there may be a compromise but it will be something thatis compromise but it will be something that is not what theresa may still promises the british citizens it could be. very interesting, thank you. i'm slightly alarmed by barbara saint could be november, december and january, i was telling you november could be the punch line but it's always the wake in the european
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union, deadlines are missed and it goes right to the wire. maybe sometime in december orjanuary we will be going into the early hours of the morning with no idea whether there is a deal or not. studio: christian fraser, thank you very much. we can speak now to our chief political correspondent vicki young who is in westminsterfor us. that's one view. the other view is that didn't go very well at all. there was no way that that went according to plan if you are sitting in no 10. they wanted someone words, they wanted some encouragement, particularly because theresa may is about to go next week into a very fractious and difficult party conference. so of course it could have gone better. she herself admitted that she had had a frank meeting with donald tusk, which is normally diplomatic speak for a row and she looked pretty angry, i thought, and looked pretty flustered in the press conference. a downing street source has said the eu have just thrown an elbow and it was inevitable that at some point there would be this kind of disagreement between the eu and the uk. but they
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insist that theresa may is standing firm. soi insist that theresa may is standing firm. so i think it's too early to say that no deal is going to happen. it's too early to say that these negotiations aren't going to go any further because as we were hearing there is still time, these things do very often go to the wire. there is the other point as well that in parliament there are hundreds of mps who do not back that option of no deal. they will do anything to stop that being what happens, and there will be, some would say, many in the cabinet who would do anything to stop that being what happens to the united kingdom. so you would think you would have to bear that in mind in all of this, that there is no backing and no warm words for the so—called cheggers plan. but there is also no backing for a no deal. how then that resolves itself is another matter and there certainly many who think that the prospect of another referendum is the way out of it, although theresa may being very adamant today that that wasn't an option. i spoke to a cabin and
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esther earlier who said there were many figures in the eu who had been listening to people like nick clegg and others, some of whom had even gone to brussels, they have been listening to them talking about the another referendum, and he thinks that ron lee the eu believe that that ron lee the eu believe that thatis that ron lee the eu believe that that is the most likely option. the other problem, of course, theresa may was pushed on this is a no deal does seem to be the most likely outcome at the moment. —— he thinks wrongly. if you listen to what jacob rees—mogg and those on the brexiteer side, the problem is parliament might stomach might want to stop no deal, we have triggered article 50 and we are living at the end of march, and if nothing is in place, no deal, going to world trade organisation rules, that is what happens, and he fought one would not uncomfortable with that. but he is ina minority uncomfortable with that. but he is in a minority thinking that would be ok. i spoke to another former canada minister this week who said it would be so disastrous for the british
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economy that the conservative party would be destroyed by it and it had to be stopped at all costs. i think you have to factor into this. this is why we talked for months about a meaningful vote in parliament when theresa may comes back with whatever she comes back with. the reason that they have got that meaningful vote into legislation, it was just for this, so that they could try and stop the prospect of no deal. it is pretty convoluted and it would mean asking for an extension of article 50. it would be maybe asking for a second referendum. a long way to go but from people i speak to in the house of commons on all sides, they really do not think that a no deal should happen. vicki young, thank you very much, vicki young in westminster. you're watching afternoon live. these are our headlines. a damning verdict on a summer of rail chaos, report finds nobody took charge as new timetables disrupted hundreds of services. westminster bridge attacker
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khalid masood attended the same mosque as extremists convicted of plotting a series of bomb attacks. an inquest hearing continues at the old bailey. and m—sport the world anti—doping agency has lifted its three—year ban on the russian anti—doping agency even though they have compromised on a number of issues following revelations of state—sponsored doping —— in sport. gloucester fly— half doping —— in sport. gloucester fly—half danny cipriani has been left out of the latest england rugby union squad. the head coach eddie jones say he has been omitted for purely rugby reasons. world heavyweight champion anthony joshua promised to deliver a performance in his title fight against the russian alexander povetkin. wembley is expected to be a sell out on saturday night. i'm going to be back in about 15 minutes with a full round—up. let's get more on one of our headline stories. "nobody took charge" when new rail timetables were introduced in may, leading to weeks of chaos and thousands of services being cancelled. that's the finding of the office of rail and road who say network rail, the two train
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companies involved, and the department of transport, all made mistakes and the failings were systemic. our transport correspondent tom burridge reports. for people commuting in and out of manchester, like marcus, it's been so bad recently he's sometimes been forced off the train. it's just been absolutely terrible. ram—packed on the train. obviously the cost of it just keeps going up. i get this train every morning. sometimes i've not actually been able to get on the train because it's been that packed. new timetables in may brought chaos here. 300 scheduled trains didn't run each day. on govia thameslink, nearly 500 services in and out of london disappeared into thin air. today, a report by the rail regulator. it finds network rail mainly to blame for causing the chaos on northern. infrastructure upgrades overran, and northern wasn't left with enough time to draw up and implement complicated new timetables.
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problems on govia thameslink were partly caused by a late decision by the department for transport on how to phase the changes in. then the train company failed to train enough drivers on new routes. the chief executive of gtr stepped down. you must have considered your position at some point. well, look, this issue is about sorting out the problems for passengers. myjob is to make sure that we have a railway that is fit for purpose going forward. passengers have been let down this summer. they've been let down by a system. the report says very clearly that there are problems all the way across the rail industry. myjob now is to make sure we have a better way goingforward. we have a better way going forward. today the government, which was forced to take control of the east coast main line, is launching a review of the railways.
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industry sources admit the system isn't fit for purpose. the review will look at fundamental questions, like whether the contracts between the government and the companies that run these trains need to be more flexible, how to integrate the public track and the private trains, and whether the railways across the country need to be managed more at a regional level. that's been the case on scotrail — some say the track and the trains there are more closely co—ordinated. the body representing the rail operators says substantial change is needed. we know we need to improve. we know we need to change, and we're hoping that the review will help us unlike those systemic issues and deliver a service that passengers want to take, that they'll look forward to getting on the train in the morning. however, the government's review will not consider labour's however, the government's review will not consider labour's policy — that the whole system should be nationalised again. tom burridge, bbc news. our correspondent lauren moss is at king's cross. it is all very well for the rail operators, the rail delivery team, to say that they want a service that passengers will one day love to
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useful stuff it's a long way off. what sort of reaction have you seen their today? there's not a lot of surprise from passengers, perhaps unsurprisingly i've spoken to passengers who have faced a lot of upheaval when the new timetable was introduced back in may. i've spoken to people who have been licked into work, or they haven't made it into work, or they haven't made it into work at all because trains were cancelled and many not made a home in the evening to see their children, so this has had a massive lifestyle impact on passengers. to talk numbers for a second, 800 services per day were cancelled when the new timetable was rolled out in may, mainly on northern rail in the north—west of england and go via thames link in the south—east. this report today by the office of rail and road has used some very critical language saying there were systemic failures and that no one took charge. not the rail companies, not network rail and not the department for transport. to put it into a bit of context, though, over the last year the rail industry has undergone
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the biggest update since victorian times. 46% of the network affected. passengers were supposed to be benefiting from improved tracks, better signalling, and faster trains. but that didn't happen on the 20th of may, mainly because most of the departments simply weren't ready. the oh are our report has detailed some of the reasons why that was the case. and was referred to in tom burridge's reportjust now —— the to in tom burridge's reportjust now -- the orr. it to in tom burridge's reportjust now —— the orr. it was overrunning within the strict upgrades so northern rail didn't have time to implement the new timetable. go via thames link at the department for transport left it late to decide when they wanted to bring the changes in and gtr didn't train up enough drivers in time. the orr has criticised its own department and the department for transport saying they were too optimistic about the disruption it would cause. and it probably was unavoidable. the point of turning back was last year when they could have stopped this disruption from taking place. but
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that won't offer passengers whose lives have suffered severe upheaval much comfort. lauren moss, our correspondent at king's cross, thank you. the westminster bridge attacker khalid masood, attended the same mosque as extremists convicted of plotting a series of bomb attacks, after he converted to islam in jail. this is what an inquest in to the attacks has been hearing today. masood was shot dead after driving into pedestrians on westminster bridge, and fatally stabbing a police officer. our correspondentjenny kumah sent this update. this afternoon, the mother of khalid masood, janet ajao, has been giving evidence to the inquest and she explained the last moments she spent with her son. he visited her at her farmhouse in wales on 16th march, just some six days before the attack, and they prepared a meal together. she said that as she was making dinner he asked her to repeat some religious phrases and the phrase was, "allah is the one true god and mohammed is his prophet." she had explained earlier that she herself had no religion, that she just tried to live a decent life.
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but she repeated the phrase for him. the following morning he asked her again to repeat the same phrase and that he put his hands on his head and began to sob because, and then he said that he wished that she believed what he was saying. and as he was leaving the house that he the house that morning he said to her he said to her his last words. his last lives were, "they will say i'm a terrorist. i am not " and his mother explained to the inquest that at the time she didn't understand what he was saying, she was confused by it, it didn't bring any alarm bells because she had no idea that he had terrorist thoughts and that she thought he was now leading a settled life because he had children. during the inquest she was asked whether he had ever expressed extremist views. she said, no. she was asked whether he had ever expressed hatred of the west. and she said, no.
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she was asked whether he ever expressed support for terrorist violence. and she said, no. during the proceedings as well we were shown an email that was sent to her by khalid masood in may 2013 and i can read you some extracts from that e—mail. in it he said, "i did not feel i was part of the family. fitted in." "on top of that, the upbringing lacked expressions of love or affection." "to be honest, it seems like a pretty cold and dull existence." janet explains that after that she was really hurt by a number of things that he said to her and that it was unbearable. later today we are expecting to hear more evidence from janet ajao, his mother, and we could possibly hear from his partner at the time of the attack. a total ban on advertisements for gambling during live sporting events, is being proposed by the labour party, as a way to combat addiction. the party's deputy leader tom watson, says problem gambling has now become
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a "a public health emergency". our sports correspondent richard conway has more. voice over: think fast, act fast, in play. you can watch it and you can get involved in it. it matters more when there's money on it — that's the message gambling companies often sell to viewers of live sport, but labour are concerned problem gambling has become a public health emergency and are pledging limits on when ads can be shown during sporting events. with nearly 500,000 gambling addicts and the gambling commission telling us that sitting behind them there are 2 million problem gamblers who are at risk of becoming gambling addicts, i think as a country we've got to say enough is enough and we need better regulation and new laws to trim the worst excesses of the gambling industry. the party also wants to introduce a mandatory levy to fund treatments for addicts, and stop betting by credit cards. adam bradford's father went to prison after stealing over £50,000 to fund his gambling habit and believes the proposals are
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much needed. if measures like this were in place a few years ago when my dad was at the height of his gambling addiction, we wouldn't be in the position we're in now. he used credit cards, he was sucked in by the adverts, the free bets, every sports game the betting was there. if this regulation was in place then i don't think he would have gone to prison. the conservatives have criticised labourfor liberalising the gambling market when it was in power, which included allowing tv commercials. why don't you put a few quid on? i am going to. i'm going to have a cheeky punt. and the advertising industry believes change is unnecessary. we've already got very strict rules in place. in fact we have the strictest rules of any advertising sector. advertising for gambling is overseen by the gambling commission and the advertising standards authority. it's subject to constant review. sport, particularly football, has become increasingly reliant on revenue from gambling companies in recent years. this season, almost 60% of clubs in england's top two divisions have the names of bookmakers
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on their shirts. and the links in other sports are growing. this week formula one announced it would now allow in—play betting and is seeking over £75 million of investment from gambling firms. and we see everything. for now the ads will continue to roll. we gamble responsibly. but the issue of betting advertising around sport is now firmly part of a wider political debate. richard conway, bbc news. you're watching afternoon live. just to let you know we are hearing reports that authorities are responding to reports of shots fired in maryland just south of the town of aberdeen in the united states. multiple casualties have been reported, several people have been shot near an army facility according to authorities. it's not
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immediately clear whether anyone has been killed and details of this incident remained unclear. agents from the baltimore office of the bureau responded. there you can see the sheriff's tweet,. multiple victims. still a fluid situation. talking about staging an operation for the media. it is 34 miles north—east of baltimore and the area of the reported shooting includes a church and a business district a few miles from the aberdeen proving ground, a large army facility where military technologies developed and tested. just looking at reports that a witness has been speaking to one american networks saying the shooting appear to have occurred at a rite aid distribution centre. was a rite aid distribution centre. was a police activity and ambulances and fire engines on the scene. sketchy
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details at the moment, reports of multiple shots, no idea at this stage of any casualties. anymore on that and i will bring it to you. you're watching afternoon live from bbc news. time for a look at the weather. and whether lesson from louise lear. we're going to try and get an a star out of this lesson. at this time of year we start talking about weather warnings and the impact they have across the nation and only did talk about the great matrix because i want to try and explain to the public that there are three tiers, yellow, amber and red, red is the most severe, and how to explain it. if you look at the bbc weather website, or the met office website, you will see a ticking a box. eerie go. hopefully this will illustrate the point. baha'i up the axis the more likely we are, we considered the storm to be. the further along the greater the impact. so actually this tech represents storm bronagh at the
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moment so we are very confident that this is going to happen. the impacts are perhaps not as significant as the stormzy yet to come. we tend to getjust a the stormzy yet to come. we tend to get just a couple the stormzy yet to come. we tend to getjust a couple of red warnings, severe weather warnings, issued in a year. —— the storms yet to come. if there is a red warning it means we are confident and the impacts mean potentially a loss of life or damage to property. the tick makes all the difference. it does, that's what was missing. that's why i was completely blank last time. darren and i reckon if you were a storm you would definitely be a red because you are likely to cause severe disruption with our weather forecasts. all right, i will you that one! this storm we are expecting in the next... well, it's tonight, which pa rt next... well, it's tonight, which part of the country will that affect? storm bronagh is different to ali that we had yesterday, that was about the winds and this is more about the winds and this is more about the winds and this is more about the torrential rain. but it could be upgraded to an amber warning through the night and in the
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early hours of the wind start picking up because when the rain clears through the winds will pick up, squally gusts which could cause some serious impact, 50—60 mph. and now you're to tell us where. different place to yesterday because yesterday it was further north, today the rain impacts are across wales, the midlands and the north of england. we have already seen over a nature of rainfall in parts of wales. we will see a couple of inches may be more to the higher ground, and! inches may be more to the higher ground, and i want to stop that front because as it moves through on the back edge, that is where we could see the strongest of the gusts of wind is, so after midnight. back to the here and now, this is where the rain has been so far, fairly persistent pulse of wet weather moving through wales, the midlands and north of england, to the north and north of england, to the north and south of that bit quiet and quite warm in the south—east, the last the warm days, though. the rain will continue pushing steadily eastwards overnight tonight. we are going to see some heavy rain. for the early evening rush it could be pretty miserable over the next few
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hours, relentless into wales and stretching up into the north of england just to allow a bit of extra time on the roads over the next few hours. the rain will start to ease but it's going to take most of the evening before it does so. overnight it pushes away, that's where the strongest of the wind gusts will pick up across the midlands, the southeast and in the channel, and some pretty rough seas tomorrow morning, 50, 60 mph gusts of wind is not out of the question. a mild but blustery start to the day. friday will improve because the winds will start pretty strong but then they will ease down. they will change down from this pretty mild south—westerly that we have seen two more of a north—westerly and introduce fresh conditions. if you start with some rain is not expected to last, sunny spells and scattered showers into the afternoon but that north—westerly wind direction has an impact on the feel of the weather tomorrow, noticeably cooler, highs of 11-18d. tomorrow, noticeably cooler, highs of 11—18d. into the weekend things
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get interesting. we could start on a chilly note with this little bump of high pressure building. aj lee start on saturday and not a bad start but there will be some wet weather pushing into the south—west so sad that a*s chilly, and largely fine and dryfor that a*s chilly, and largely fine and dry for many of us, with sharp showers in the far north and eventually some more persistent rain in the south—west. ahead of it, if you keep the dry weather, on the whole not a bad start to the weekend. sunday looks interesting, another deep area of low pressure looks likely to form and we could see further stormy weather conditions. keep watching the forecast for more details on that later. this is bbc news — our latest headlines: theresa may is told her plans for economic co—operation with the eu after brexit "will not work" — by the head of the european council. everybody shared the view that while there are positive elements in the chequers proposal, the suggested framework for economic cooperation will not work. theresa may inisits that her plan is the only one to ensure the integrity of the uk
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and frictionless trade. there's a lot of work to be done, and we will be doing that obviously over the next few weeks and what will continue to drive me will be delivering for the british people. "nobody took charge" when new rail timetables were introduced in may. the rail regulator says mistakes were made and failings were systemic. westminster attacker, khalid masood, had a history of violent outbursts and attended the same mosque as extremists convicted of plotting a series of bomb attacks — an inquest hears today. sport now on afternoon live with olly foster 0. the world anti doping agency have made a decision on russia. they have brought them back into the fold. they certainly haven't. the russians had been suspended for the best pa rt russians had been suspended for the best part of three years. remember all of that evidence of
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state—sponsored doping of various major championship on a mass scale, but the world's anti—doping agency have brought them back in, reinstated them, subject they say to strict conditions. the executive committee had a meeting in the seychelles, numerous sports organizations, and influential asked to leave the athletes groups have voiced their concerns —— influential athletes groups have voiced their concerns the russians are nowhere near compliant with the original criteria laid down to them for their reinstatement. the agency says there's now another timeline in place for them to open up the moscow lab that's what all those positive sampled, covered them up. they want full access to the data now to see if more cheating needs to be brought to justice but they have been reinstated. they have really taken stick for this, wada, for compromising on the original road map towards compliance. there's nothing wrong with blackpool by the way. what sort of reaction have you
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had? an awful lot of anger out there. massive rift in sporting "couple of hours. some serious questions as well being asked of wada's governance. uk anti—doping just released this statement. wada they say has cast aside its responsibilities to clean athletes, sports fans and those who work tirelessly for queen's park. travis who heads up the us anti—doping programme have called the decision he wondering, inexplicable. he said today marks the biggest decision in the history and it delivered a devastating blow to the world's clea n devastating blow to the world's clean athletes. the chair of the iaaf athletes commission, track and field on twitter said: the russian government say they have
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made great strides in becoming more transparent with their anti—doping programme. here is the russian mp in 2006 olympic champions speaking before today's expected announcement. there is political pressure, explaining the situation, a general pressure but there were mistakes made as well which we have recognised, our president to and we have fixed them. i don't understand people who say we should not reinstate us. now is the moment when he anti—doping issues are being solved well. the cluster fly half has been left out of the england by has been left out of the england rugby union squad. the coach says he's taken the decision to leave him out for purely by decision to leave him out for purely rugby union —— reasons even though he's playing well at the moment george ford and ellen farrelly says are ahead of him in the pecking
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order. cipriani was fine last month after being charged with common assault for an incident outside a nightclub. our correspondentjoe wilson spoke to the head coach today. gearing up to the world cup do think there's any chance danny cipriani will play? 100%. a great chance. just spent five minutes discussing where he is. he has as much opportunity as any of the other players in the squad and outside the squad. and on the same level? would you be a better team with him and in the world cup? a lot can happen in 12 months. 12 months is a long time in sports, and those guys... the great thing for us, i have probably never been as excited about announcing a squad in england as today, because of the fact i can sense with the players they are all much better, almost vibrant than they were 12 months ago. a quick
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reminder, chelsea, arsenal rangers and celtic will play in the europa league tonight for a life commentary you can follow on the bbc sports website. he will have more store for you the next hour. —— hugh will have more sport for you in the next hour. now on afternoon live — let's go nationwide — and see what's happening around the country — in our daily visit to the bbc newsrooms around the uk. let's go to amanda parr in bristol, where police investigating a second suspected poisoning in salisbury are examining whether it was a hoax. what is going on, is all a bit strange. any number of theories were being discussed on sunday night as to what might have happened where two people were supposedly taken very ill at a place in salisbury. but the idea and may have been a hoax had not crossed many minds,
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however that is now an active line of inquiry the police are telling us. the incident caused major disruption, evacuation, businesses closed, police in biohazard suits, medical tests, all very familiar. the restaurant has onlyjust react n we the restaurant has onlyjust react —— we opened, that happened at midday so the restaurant has been closed more than three days. —— reopened. the two people that supposedly ta ken ill were reopened. the two people that supposedly taken ill were alex king and his wife anna shapiro. we do not know it was a hoax but we know alex king has been involved in a hoax before back in 2006, at a film premiere where he pretended to be an actor and got to shake prince charles's hand. police are looking into the events of sunday really closely and if it does turn out to have been a hoax this will happen very serious indeed. notjust in terms of losses to prezzo but also in terms of the cost to the emergency services and salisbury itself where people will i think be forgiven for having rather lost their sense of humour. use that
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familiar scenes of course, this is just what they don't need —— of course you said familiar scenes. yes, let's not forget that poisoning backin yes, let's not forget that poisoning back in march and another very serious incident in june back in march and another very serious incident injune in amesbury in which one person died and all had come into contact with the same nerve agent, novichok. earlierthis month the two main suspects in the poisoning case told russian state tv they were just here as forest, they we re they were just here as forest, they were here to enjoy the world—famous cathedral —— here as tourists. you can understand why people took what happened here on sunday so seriously. salisbury district hospital have said that while nerve agents were definitely not involved this time it was still clearly very stressful for staff, and salisbury mpjohn stressful for staff, and salisbury mp john glenn sent stressful for staff, and salisbury mpjohn glenn sent out a resolute tweet this afternoon saying if sunday's incident is found to have been a hoax, the people of salisbury will expect those involved to face the full force of the law. this, he said, is not a game. amanda, plenty
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more, thank you very much. that is nationwide. if you like to see more on any of those stories you can access them via the bbci player and a reminder, we go nationwide every weekday afternoon at 4:30pm here on afternoon at 4:30pm here on afternoon live. this evening, the winner of this year's mercury prize will be announced, with a £25,000 cheque going to the best album of the last 12 months, by a british or irish act. previous winners have included the arctic monkeys and elbow, but in an age where we can all stream individual tracks, do albums still matter? ?our entertainment correspondent colin paterson has more. # now i'm stuck in a rut, kicking stones... lily allen, 12 years and four albums into a career, thrilled to have finally made a mercury prize shortlist with no shame, and she's out to win. it would mean everything to me. i mean, i'd absolutely love for that to happen. it's not going to, but...!
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it's a heartfelt record, which... previous albums have been honest, but maybe a bit, like, finger—waggy, telling other people what i think about them, whereas this is me thinking about what i am. # four stars out of five...# she's up against albums by some very established acts, including previous winners arctic monkeys... # we all have a hunger...# florence + the machine, on the list for the first time since 2009... # get out of the doldrums, baby, now... and noel gallagher, last up for a mercury 22 years ago, as part of oasis. but others on the list are far from household names. # how you gonna sleep tonight? # nadine shah is 32, from whitburn in south tyneside, and her third album, holiday destination, only made it to 71 in the charts. she believes a winter night could change her life. i need the 25 grand a lot more than these guys!
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let's be crude about it, right? noel gallagher'lljust buy a pair of trousers with it! and while the mercury is all about celebrating the album, it's been a tough year for the format. year—on—year, artists' sales have fallen by 26%, and that includes streaming. richard russell knows all about selling albums. he runs xl recordings — meaning he's adele's boss. he's up for the mercury for his own everything is recorded project, and believes the format will survive. i don't expect there to be, you know, dozens of great albums every year — you just look for there to be a few. and that's obviously what this award is to highlight, which is what makes it important. whoever triumphs tonight, they should learn from the calamity which befell the first winners, primal scream — at the after—show party, they celebrated a little too hard, promptly losing their cheque for £20,000. colin paterson, bbc news. an update on that shooting in
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maryland in the united states. we are hearing that five people have been shot, three people have been killed. this is coming from us media reports. the sheriff department who are dealing with this said the situation is still fluid, telling residents to avoid the area and a number of police and ambulances are still at the scene. three dead is the latest we're hearing from the sheriffs department, they have tweeted that there were multiple victims earlier. the first shots just after 9am at the liberty facility, a portion of right aid, a national pharmacy chain. agents from the bureau of alcohol and tobacco, firms do we do permit the explosives
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and fbi at the scene but there are live pictures coming from the scene of the latest multiple shooting in the united states. three dead, five people shot and a huge operation under way there. we have information as to what has happened to the person who was doing the shooting. we will bring you more on that as we get it throughout the evening here on bbc news. vishala is here — in a moment she will be telling us what's hot and what's not in the business news. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live theresa may's plans for future relations with the eu risk undermining the single market — warns the head of the european council. a damning verdict on a summer of rail chaos —— a report finds "nobody took charge" as new timetables disrupted hundreds of services. westminster bridge attacker khalid masood attended the same mosque as extremists convicted of plotting a series of bomb attacks. an inquest hearing continues at the old bailey. here's your business headlines on afternoon live: frustrated barclays customers have been locked out of their online
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accounts for hours today. barclays say it's down to a technical problem but that customers can still make payments to existing payees through mobile banking. and let the bidding almost begin. the uk's takeover panel says the future of sky will be settled by auction on saturday. the broadcaster has been subject to rival bids from fox and the us conglomerate comcast. john hancock, one of the largest life insurance providers in north america, has announced that it will no longer offer policies that do not include digital fitness tracking. holders of its interactive policies can earn discounts and rewards such as gift cards for hitting exercise targets. critics say the announcement was "creepy" and "dystopian". time to look at the markets, the bodyguard has been a huge hit for bbc one and now its heading to netflix. the last episode on sunday. edge of
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your seat stuff. had he been watching a? yes, don't give anything away. —— watching a? yes, don't give anything away. -- have you been watching it? very popular — any idea why simon...? you're right it is heading to netflix, though its not the bbc that's done the deal, its been sold to netflix by itv studios. this is because, the drama was made by production company world productions, which was bought by itv studios. what the companies are joining together in order to stay competitive and we hear more with jeremy will talk to us about the market as well. thank you for joining us. is this basically part and parcel of the whole world is a streaming now that we will have all of this jumble up streaming now that we will have all of thisjumble up of streaming now that we will have all of this jumble up of companies because they arejoining of this jumble up of companies because they are joining forces to because they are joining forces to be able to pool resources together and make high drama. that is right. we have seen the environment really changed beyond recognition over the course of the last few years with the arrival of upstart and the context of amazon and netflix making their own content, so that has really m ea nt their own content, so that has really meant that traditional producers have really had to up
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their games so they are now often banding together in some very unusual patterns, compared to what we used to traditionally in order to facilitate programme making and to make them internationally competitive. speaking of broadcasters, sky this weekend, this interesting contest, bidding war will not be decided by auction. how are the markets reacting to that?m an interesting scenario, not unprecedented. we've seen similar ta keover unprecedented. we've seen similar takeover battles resolved this way over the last ten years or so but we are talking about only one or two examples. if very much the case that the market is anticipating that it is very much the case, the two rival bidders who have been slapping over this company for the best part of two years are likely to be having to they ever deeper into their practice to become the victor in this ta keover to become the victor in this takeover battle so accordingly we have seen shares running for stench —— substantially above the offers the two companies have been watching up the two companies have been watching up until this point. quickly, the two companies have been watching up untilthis point. quickly, do the two companies have been watching up until this point. quickly, do you think there'll be room to grow on the share price? i suspect there probably will be a little bit of
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premium, but whether the majority of the easy money has already been made by shareholders. lastly, sterling up today off the back of that date on shopping. shopping did quite well over the summer because of the good weather. is that likely to sustain? we heard comments today from donald tusk and has not really shifted sterling? it seems to be holding its ground. sterling has lost a little ground, but certainly you are right to say the currency has appreciated against the dollar to the best levels we seen in the last couple of months. i'm not sure it will be able to sustain these levels, but markets are still hoping that there will be some degree of agreement between that you uk over the course of the next couple of months. —— that you and the uk. movements have been improving avidly and that is one of the recent the sterling has been appreciating but i will not be surprised if there's a little bit of a correction over the course of the next few days and weeks and probably that correction will come a little more aggressively against the euro. i think that is where we may well see sterling struggling into the
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next round of negotiations, or the upcoming eu summit in the middle of october. you seem to be shrewd about which date —— you just need to be shrewd about which day you buy your currency. that is correct. a quick look at the markets board. the sky share price is fairly flat given the news today. throughout the day has been fairly flat. we will see what it does next week on that flat note. thank you for that marvellous analysis. thank you. saturday mornings on cbbc are about to get lively. from next week hacker the dog returns to the screen with a new series of saturday mash—up. one of the best known faces in children 5 television, for those of you who've not met him — this is what he gets up to. look who it is, it is mcgee from
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strictly come dancing —— strictly come dancing. it is onlyjoe mcfadden, i've only bumped into ee anyway. hello, iwant mcfadden, i've only bumped into ee anyway. hello, i want to be on the next series. would you put a good word in for us with the relevant authorities? of course i would. what word would you use? authorities? of course i would. what word would you use ?ij authorities? of course i would. what word would you use? i will think about it. i can picture you on this stage. meet? in the ballroom? as the glitter ball, she meant. what is it like to be a top dj on radio one? glitter ball, she meant. what is it like to be a top dj on radio one7m the bestjob in the world. like to be a top dj on radio one7m the best job in the world. you did not let me finish. i was saying would you ask scott mills what he thinks about that. is a great pleasure to say hacker the dog is with me. welcome simon to the bbc, you have done yourself proud you have considering he's got limited skills. you have done yourself proud, nice to meet you. let's talk about your new show. it starts the week of
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saturday 29th of september at 9am in the morning almond that means at the morning, that is what a m stands for on cbbc. it is totally live so anything can happen. anything can occur. oh, yeah axelwhat anything can happen. anything can occur. oh, yeah axel what your role in the new show? i play the character of hacker the dog and i'm goodin character of hacker the dog and i'm good in it and funny and interview i load of celebrities and make it light hearted but keep it real. load of celebrities and make it light hearted but keep it reatm is live? i know, i told light hearted but keep it reatm is live? i know, itold you light hearted but keep it reatm is live? i know, i told you that. that is risky, isn't that? it is, but it is funnier because that means you all know —— always finished at the same time so i can be home at 1130 and watched loose women on catch—up. 1130 and watched loose women on catch-up. you met many stars... hello. you met many stars in your career including the rock. let's see that encounter. oh, yeah. the film is mostly set in the jungle. are you in an actual jungle?
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is mostly set in the jungle. are you in an actualjungle? yes, we were in hawaii in the jungles of hawaii. did you? it was amazing times. you could have yelled at my place. we don't cut the grass for a week it looks like a jungle. that could be a sequel. i mention wiccan, which is my hometown. do you know the rock, you would not want to taken for granted. little joke there. you would not want to taken for granted. littlejoke there. —— taken for granted. how old are you? i'm six, i will be six again in may. in october but i've been on the television ten years, long, long yea rs. television ten years, long, long years. what was the highlight, hacker? this bit now meeting you simon mcquay. we tried to get it: but he said no so we got you and barkis but he said no so we got you and bark is quite literally your uncle. it is true, that is. what are the difficulties doing a live show when you are a dog? i have no thumbs up soi you are a dog? i have no thumbs up so i can't open the door and run away too easily so i'm trapped in
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there because i have no opposable digits. would you like to touch my nose? —— my hooves. try old hooves like sue barker. before you upset anybody else, thank you for coming in. i will leave it there because the lawyers are on the phone. is that it? i want to talk about other newsreaders like sandy and alastair bennett and bob smitty's. thank you. thanks, simon. get me out of here now. it still smells in here. time for a look at the weather... luiz is here. i was going to say follow that. i don't think i can. luiz is here. i was going to say follow that. i don't think! can. it is night to see someone who can get into more trouble than perhaps you do. moving to the weather, what a
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shame we did not get to meet him in person but storm heading in our direction ladies and gentlemen looks as though we will see a spell of very wet weather moving in as we speak and also as we move through the overnight period tonight though winds are going to strengthen with gale force gust 50—60 mph. some of that rain quite heavy as it pushes its way through wales, midlands and northern england and then behind it quite a squeeze to the southern flank of that low, where we will see the squally, potentially damaging gusts of winds, 50—60 mph. this is what's been happening over the last few hours, how significant the rain is at the moment, it's absolutely chucking it down across wales in northwest england at the moment and thatis northwest england at the moment and that is going to stay into the early evening rush hour and take its time to clear away. it will do so, shifting its way steadily eastward behind 50—60 mph gust overnight tonight that will make some pretty rough seas down through the channel first thing in the morning. the cloud and rain around it will not be
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a particularly cold start to friday morning, but the academic when you factor in the strength of the wind and rain. it will clear away, and the wind will change direction despite coming from a south—westerly direction we will see a northwesterly a nd direction we will see a northwesterly and that will make it feel cooler and fresh or so top temperatures perhaps likely of 11-18d temperatures perhaps likely of 11—18d and plenty of showers up into the far northwest. a quick sneak preview of what to expect as we go through the day. really looks likely that through saturday we start up on a chilly note, but relatively dry and quiet. a few scattered showers into the far north, but this could bring wet weather into the southwest by the end of the day. on saturday, so that's certainly worth bearing in mind. as we moved out of saturday there is a potentialfor another area of low pressure to move in on sunday. sunday looks likely we could see another spell of very wet and windy weather and who knows maybe even another named storm. keep
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watching the forecast if you want more details on that. have a pleasa nt more details on that. have a pleasant evening. today at 5pm, eu leaders dismiss the prime minister's plans for brexit, and warn time is running out for a deal. the head of the european council says theresa may's proposals won't work, because they risk undermining the single market. everybody shared the view that while there are positive elements in the chequers proposal, the suggested framework for economic cooperation will not work. the prime minister admits there's still hard bargaining to be done, but insists her proposals are the only "serious and credible" way forward. there's a lot of work to be done, and we will be doing that, obviously, over the next few weeks. and what will continue to drive me will be delivering for the british people. i'm christian fraser and
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