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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  September 30, 2018 8:00am-9:01am BST

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back not. but some are really good. back in the pavilion if oseto almost over. it is now or never for some. others it will be heartbreak hotel. stay with us. headlines are on the way. good morning. welcome to breakfast with rogerjohnson and sally nugent. our headlines today. devastation in indonesia — more than 800 people have died because of the earthquake and tsunami. on the opening day of the conservative conference, theresa may accuses critics of her brexit plan of "playing politics" with britain's future. a woman in the far east of russia tells the bbc she recognises one of the key suspects in the salisbury attack as a military intelligence officer. can teamwork make the dream work? after another great day for europe at the ryder cup, they take a 10—6 lead over the united states into the final day's singles. another chilly start this morning, with some spells of sunshine to come. there will also be some areas of cloud and a few showers in places.
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all the details coming up. it's sunday, september the 30th. our top story. strong aftershocks have continued to hit the indonesian island of sulawesi, where a major earthquake and tsunami killed at least 832 people. rescue teams are still yet to reach some of the worst affected areas. the country's vice—president says he fears the number of dead could rise into thousands. simon clemison reports. it is the view now from the air which gives you a true sense of the power of this earthquake. a shopping centre, buckled. a road bridge, laid to waste. and what about the damage beyond here, in outlying areas? that picture is still not clear. the earthquake also triggered a tsunami which brought waves ten feet high into palu. a mobile phone captures the moment and a glimpse of the panic. there was a warning,
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but there wasn't long to get to higher ground, not before a packed city was quickly inundated. with strong aftershocks, people have been urged to move away from their homes. outside the hospital, patients are having to be treated in the open, too. the devastation has also made it difficult to get aid in, but the airport has now reopened. meanwhile, the search is on for survivors. rescuers today hunting through the ruins of a hotel. indonesia is used to earthquakes, but with more information coming in all the time, this may only be some of the destruction and loss of life here. simon clemison, bbc news. our indonesia editor rebecca henschke in en route to sulawesi. she sent us this report. rescue teams are working to try
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and free people trapped in the debris of collapsed homes, and teams from outside as well as personnel from the military are trying to get into the affected area. that's proving to be challenging, as we're finding out. we are heading into the area from poso and we're being told that many of the roads are blocked. fresh landslides occurred overnight and one of the main bridges into town has collapsed. the airport also remains closed to commercial flights and people are having to try and find alternative routes to get in. in the town of donggala and three other towns, communications and power is completely cut off. there's no news of the impact of these disasters there. vice presidentjusuf kalla is warning that the death toll could rise into the thousands. from the city of palu, we are hearing stories of local teams having to dig through the rubble with their bare hands. last night in one collapsed hotel,
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they managed to rescue 2a people but the owner of the hotel said he can still hear people trapped in the rubble, crying out for help, but they don't have heavy building equipment in order to rescue them. theresa may is facing a public battle at the conservative party conference with borisjohnson over her plans for leaving the eu. in an interview with the sunday times, the former foreign secretary says mrs may's chequers plan is "deranged". the prime minister says her opponents should stop playing politics with brexit. let's get more detail from our political correspondent, chris mason, who is in birmingham where the conference will start later. not really a lot for them to talk about, what will they chat about other tory conference this week, i wonder? i can't begin to think, roger, how they will manage to pass the diet is —— pass the hours and
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the diet is —— pass the hours and the days. oh, yeah, everyone‘s favourite google brexit will be the stuck record in the next couple of days and no surprise because it has been the stock record of politics for rather a few years and rather a few more years to come. boris johnson grabbing some headlines this morning, the former foreign secretary using the word deranged that you just mentioned to describe the prime minister's brexit blueprint, managing to get headlines with one word, 48 hours after getting headlines with 4000 words, it's like the leaves falling off the trees, in autumn, you can guarantee to things, that and interventions from mrjohnson around conservative conference. the prime minister will be on the andrew marr show in a couple of hours, effectively ploughing on, she will say, with the brexit plan. the key thing for this week will be, does she give any indication that she is willing to shift in any direction and compromise further, given plenty are not keen on that plan? thank you for
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joining us. we hope to be speaking to brandon lewis, the tory chairman, in the next few minutes. a woman in the far east of russia has told the bbc she recognises one of the key suspects in the salisbury novichok attack as a decorated military officer. the bellingcat investigative website this week published what it claims is the true identity of one of the suspects. russia continues to deny any involvement in the poisoning. here's our moscow correspondent sarah rainsford. in the far east of russia, along its border with china, we went searching for clues to the salisbury poisoning. thatjourney led to this tranquil village, almost 5,000 miles from moscow. it's where a russian military intelligence officer, anatoliy chepiga, grew up. this week, the investigative team at bellingcat suggested that colonel chepiga, seen here, is the true identity of a key suspect in the salisbury attack. british officials haven't disputed that. the suspect is now calling himself ruslan boshirov. so our team showed those pictures to residents
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in colonel chepiga's old village. some didn't know him. those who did were nervous of oui’ camera. we agreed they'd remain anonymous. translation: it's him, but much older. and this woman identified the man wanted by british police as anatoliy chepiga. i know where his parents used to live. he was a military man, an officer. he fought in war zones. then he was in moscow. and when i called the last phone number linked to his parents, the man who picked up said he was uzbek, and bought the sim card on the street. the line was then disconnected. just two weeks ago, president putin himself insisted both of the salisbury suspects were civilians. nothing suspicious, he said, nothing criminal. on friday, his spokesman said the kremlin won't discuss what he called "informal investigations into
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the poisoning" any further. but the questions over russia's explanations and the true identity of these men are only mounting. sarah rainsford, bbc news, moscow. the fbi has approached the second woman to accuse us supreme court nominee brett kavanaugh of sexual misconduct as it begins a fresh inquiry into him. the judge is accused of exposing himself to deborah ramirez when they were students in the 1980s. mr kavanaugh denies any wrongdoing. it comes days after dr christine blasey ford testified to a senate panel, and president donald trump ordered a investigation by the fbi. the billionaire entrepreneur, elon musk, has agreed to step down as chairman of the tesla electric car company, over a misleading tweet that said he was ready to take the firm private. he's been fined £15 million, as has the company. he'll remain tesla's chief executive as lebo diseko now reports.
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he's known for pushing boundaries when it comes to tech innovation, leading the way on electric cars and space exploration. but now, it seems elon musk has pushed too far. in august, he tweeted, saying he would take tesla back into private ownership at a price of $420 a share. and, crucially, he said he had the funding secured. the stock market regulator said that was false and misleading and so they charged him. we allege that musk had arrived at the price of $420 by assuming a 20% premium of what tesla's then—existing share price, and then rounding up to $420. and as we have said before in connection with other matters, neither celebrity status nor reputation as a technological innovator provide an exemption from the federal securities laws. trailblazer or not, musk has tested shareholder patience recently with antics like smoking marijuana in an interview. and he's been sued for libel
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after making allegations against one of the thai cave rescuers. things could've been much worse for musk — the regulator had wanted to remove him as ceo as well. he'll now stay on in that position while stepping down as chairman. but with the company's image so closely linked to his own, investors may be wondering if that is a good thing. lebo diseko, bbc news. it is 11 minutes past eight. good morning. there are fresh divisions oi'i morning. there are fresh divisions on brexit this morning ahead of the conservative party conference. former foreign secretary boris johnson says the prime minister's plans for leaving the european union are, to use his words, deranged. lots of quotes from him, particularly an interview sunday times which we will talk about in a moment, the sunday times has an
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interview borisjohnson, moment, the sunday times has an interview boris johnson, also moment, the sunday times has an interview borisjohnson, also with theresa may, meanwhile, theresa may has accused opponents of her chequers plan of playing politics with britain's future. let's talk about this in more detail the conservative party chairman brandon lewis who is in birmingham. good morning. conference begins today under what must be difficult circumstances for the conservative party. i know you are saying you are delighted that you have more under 25s coming to the conference than ever before and with that in mind, you have designed a app for the conference to keep people up to date with what is happening and enabling them to send m essa 9 es happening and enabling them to send messages and relay information but yesterday, we heard the app went disastrously wrong and pertinent information belonging to many tory party members was available to anybody. what happened. —— what happened? we have had more young members commit numbers and we've run a botha the last years and we look
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to improve it but yesterday we found them are a small number of delegates, and we have contacted all the delegates that downloaded the app and we will download more delegates, with more members coming than ever before, well, for a few yea rs, to than ever before, well, for a few years, to outline exactly what happened, what happened is that someone was happened, what happened is that someone was able to get —— if somebody could get the e—mail address of a person's profile, they could login as that person and as soon as we were aware, we could login as that person and as soon as we were aware, we dealt with it in half an hour and it has only affected a small number of people but any data breach is serious and we are investigating it. we have already contacted the information commissioner's office and we will offer a full report to them and that is why we as a party and the third—party company who developed the botha have apologised. you were chatting about the app to the evening standard a couple of nights ago, saying it would be usually successful and big step forward so essentially it is your responsibility. i outlined to the evening standard we would be running a app conference this year like last year, it is a app developed by a
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third party company that has provided apps for companies like ba rclays, provided apps for companies like barclays, nissan, provided apps for companies like ba rclays, nissan, ebay provided apps for companies like barclays, nissan, ebay and others, doing thousands these kind of conference apps. there was a mistake and the company has put out a statement apologising to the party and the delegates who used it and we have as well. any data breach is serious and we believe a small number of people have been affected but it is a serious matter, any kind of data breach, which is why we are investigating and taking it seriously. moving on to the business of the day, i'm showing everybody the front page of today's sunday times, ifi the front page of today's sunday times, if i can, which has an interview with both theresa may and borisjohnson. conference starts today. how on earth are you going to unite everybody? actually, i think what you will see this week at conference is the members come together and as i say, we've got more members at conference than we had last year, than we had last time
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we we re had last year, than we had last time we were in birmingham which is really good news. i think you will see really good news. i think you will see conservative party members coming together because they are very clear about the fact they want to support the prime minister, outlined a really positive things we're doing and are going be announcing through the course of the week to take the country forward and deliver on the domestic agenda, or thoseissues deliver on the domestic agenda, or those issues that affect and matter to people in their lives every day and at the same time, the prime minister is focused on delivering a brexit that delivers on the referendum and in a way that is good for the economy and creating more jobs in the future. so the crux is the pm has to move on her brexit plan? the brexit plan outlined by the prime minister, what we agreed chequers and is in the white paper, what we put in the eu, delivers all theissues what we put in the eu, delivers all the issues people voted in in the referendum, making sure we get back control of our money, borders and laws and does so in a way which is good for the uk, having a really good for the uk, having a really good trading agreement, a free trade agreement with partners in european union which is good for the economy. i think it achieves the balance of everything we need to seek and i
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think it is important, as the prime minister herself said on friday busway, that the european union needs to come back to the british government with its response. needs to come back to the british government with its responselj needs to come back to the british government with its response. i have to leave that because we are short of time but i have to ask you one thing, borisjohnson this morning describes the prime minister's plans as deranged. is that an appropriate word to use? look, boris has his own style of using language. i think the party is focused around being behind the prime minister to deliver a good dealfor the eu as the prime minister to deliver a good deal for the eu as we leave it. the prime minister to deliver a good dealfor the eu as we leave it. —— for the uk as we leave the eu. you would have to ask boris what he things about the language he uses. but he won his chairman. and actually go my focus is on making sure members have a good conference and working with the prime minister to make sure we are delivering on the domestic agenda, to the issues that matter to people and making shaun brisley that we get a good dealfor the uk shaun brisley that we get a good deal for the uk which leaves us continuing to grow as an economy in the future. have you checked all the letters are stuck behind the board on theresa may would you make her speech, unlike last year? we are
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checking the stage and making sure it isa checking the stage and making sure it is a good stage for people to be to view, enjoy and have a really good conference while they are in the hall. brandon lewis, thank you. i hope she has got some cough sweets this year. and george have a ready supply. andrew marr listening to that with interest. you have got theresa may on this morning, haven't you? yes, foran yes, for an extended interview and tom watson, the deputy leader of the labour party, i couldn't u nfortu nately you wa nt labour party, i couldn't unfortunately you want brandon lewis was saying but the questions sounded very good! i tell you what, if andrew marr says that, i'm going to retire. that is my career done. andrew marr is on at 10am. here's ben with a look at this morning's weather. how is it looking. not too bad, last day of september, not how it is looking but out is feeling is the question, it feels pretty chilly but i suppose an autumn chill pretty chilly but i suppose an autumn chili is appropriate. a bit more cloud around in places than yesterday. that is how it looks in
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sheffield at the moment or at least how it looked a short time ago. quite cool and breezy today, and despite the cloud, some sunshine, and a few showers in the north west. the satellite picture shows us what is going on, this stripe of cloud the main weather feature to talk about, moving southwards. it is a cold front. it has the odd spot of rain on it but mostly it is just cloud and then behind the cold front, you start to pull in some cold airfrom front, you start to pull in some cold air from the north. front, you start to pull in some cold airfrom the north. we front, you start to pull in some cold air from the north. we will feel the effects of that. the frontal system continuing to journey southwards as we go through the morning, the band of cloud across parts of lincolnshire going to the midlands and parts of wales. to the north, some good spells of sunshine but any showers getting growing across the north west of scotland. this is 9am. temperatures in glasgow at9 this is 9am. temperatures in glasgow at 9 degrees. northern ireland mostly fine with sunny spells, a chance for sharon the north coast and much of northern england starting fine. to the south of the band of cloud, through the south—west and particularly the
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south—east and east anglia, some sunshine. some patches of mist at the moment and a touch of frost for some the moment and a touch of frost for some but in the south—east, areas that start of bright, cloud amounts increasing through the morning and generally for the midlands, wales and southern england, a bit more clout than yesterday. northern england should cheer up with sunny spells. northern ireland with sunny spells. northern ireland with sunny spells. scotland, sunshine and showers, showers across the north—west becoming quite frequent for a time north—west becoming quite frequent fora time and north—west becoming quite frequent for a time and quite windy and temperatures between 12 and perhaps 16 degrees at the very best. just a touch below where we would expect them to be at this time of year. this evening and overnight, most of the showers fade away and the cloud clears out as well and under those clear, starry skies, despite a keen breeze, it is going to turn chilly and you can see from the temperature profile where we will have the cold est profile where we will have the coldest weather car parts of northern england, central southern scotland, towns and cities down to two or three but in the countryside, some two or three but in the countryside, some spots will get down to freezing so some spots will get down to freezing so there could be a touch of frost. tomorrow, quite a cool start but bright, lots of sunshine. one thing
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you will notice is the northerly wind will ease as the day wears on but then the wind switches to a westerly which brings in more cloud to northern ireland and western scotland. rain here late in the day and temperatures 9—15. temperatures recovering a bit by the time we get into tuesday and wednesday, plenty of dry weather through the week, a bit of rain at times, particularly in the north—west. back to you. not too bad for the start of october. some people might quite like a october. some people might quite likea rainy october. some people might quite like a rainy forecast. what does it take to become a world champion vegetable grower? patience, tenacity, dedication? or is it simply down to having good soil and quality seeds? you were posting earlier that you grew. i wasn't boasting? i grew several giant courgettes but i think that is because we had a really hot summer. we have a couple of guests to talk about this now. paul rochester is the mastermind behind the world's largest leek and david thomas hasjust lost his world record for the heaviest red
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cabbage to his friend, which we will talk about as well but first, paul, how heavy is the leek? grand ragga 10.7 kilos. wow, how did you manage to grow it? tell us the secret. first of all, you start getting your soil tested, and then putting the right nutrients in, and then just putting the right nutrients in, and thenjust tender putting the right nutrients in, and then just tender love and care. in terms of monitoring it, do you have to give it a certain amount of water, is it a scientific process or is it just water, is it a scientific process or is itjust something that water, is it a scientific process or is it just something that you water, is it a scientific process or is itjust something that you know? what i've done over the years, i've got pictures recorded and i can go back to the certain date, and certain time, i can measure the leek and if it is down in circumference, i increased the water. if it is up, i reduce the water. is it a special
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kind of seed or could anybody do this? well, you don't grow from seed, because you could get a b cross pollinating it, so what you do, when the leek goes to seed, and the top opens up, you trim off the seed and then the leak thinks it is going into distinction, —— the leek thinks it is going into distinction so thinks it is going into distinction so it takes a grass out, then you put it in some water, and then you ta ke put it in some water, and then you take the grass which then interns cloned the parent plant. you just exposed my lack of knowledge about growing leeks! david, you had the record, 1925, the heaviest cabbage in the world, the previous record was set, the red cabbage, you broke it last year, didn't you, 23.3 kilograms and then what happened?
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that's right, two years ago, i broke it, sol that's right, two years ago, i broke it, so i shared seeds around the right variety and friend tim arrived at the show this year and beat my record! what did you say to him? well done! i was delighted for him, yes. so it's all very good-natured? how big was your red cabbage this year? 0h, how big was your red cabbage this year? oh, yes, it's all friendly. it isjust over 19 kilos. so a bit short of the record. and finally, david, what is the appeal of growing these enormous vegetables? do they have any flavour? can you eat them? why do you do it? some of them, you can eat, some of them are a bit tough. it is the challenge of dust growing something huge from a tiny seed or a leek pip. it is
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fascinating. i find seed or a leek pip. it is fascinating. ifind it seed or a leek pip. it is fascinating. i find it fascinating. something i'm sure we would all is by prydie. lovely to speak to you both. thank you forjoining us. david thomas from cornwall and paul rochester from county durham with his rather impressive leek. thank you both gentlemen, live from more than this morning. are you all right? shall i read on? we're saying goodbye to viewers on bbc one in a moment. but we're here on the bbc news channel until nine this morning. coming up... it is the most fiercely contested team tournament in golf with europe and usa facing off in the ryder cup. we'll ask whether the europeans are on course to take back the trophy... they have got a healthy lead going into the final day. more competitive even than giant vegetables! since he died more than 40 years ago lots of people have claimed to have spotted elvis presley. find out why it appears, at least, the spirit of the king is truly alive in south wales.
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we'll shed light on the hidden history of women's football with the help of the players of the unofficial england team from the 1971 world cup. they went to mexico unknown, and they were watched by crowds of up to 100,000 people. but unofficial because they were not there in an official capacity but of course they played their part. we're on the bbc news channel until nine. we say goodbye to viewers on bbc one for now. thank you for staying with us. are you all right now? i'm fine! is the giant vegetables! they tickled you! got to you a little bit... in fairness, it's a real skill, as the gentleman with the leak was saying,
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it showed my lack of knowledge... that is what you were saying —— leek. basic gardening expertise, that i was lacking! right, good morning if you are still with us on the bbc news channel, it's time for a look at the papers. music producer steve levine is here. i will speak to him in a moment... we will talk to you right now! we will go straight into what you have found inside the papers this morning... let's have a look. the first is on page 26 of the observer. a small piece, marking 50 years since the kinks last album as an original group was released. over the years, through music streaming and a new love of the album, it has become a cultural classic. the professional link in all of these stories is ray davies looking at the
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demise in parks and how things were changing. this album is almost like a concept album. the photographer, bill went all, took fantastic photos. there is a gallery in london that will show the pictures. it coincides with the rerelease of the album. fantastic. he loved hampstead and that area. he was brought up in muswell hill and went to the same school as me. they were leaving as i joined. i remember speaking at a re ce nt pa re nt joined. i remember speaking at a recent parent 's event, and i said when i was six you played in assembly, is that true? he said it was. it had been haunting me. assembly, is that true? he said it was. it had been haunting melj assembly, is that true? he said it was. it had been haunting me. i love the story that you have picked. it was in the times newspaper this morning. the king stories from world war ii are being released. fantastic. this is a fantastic headline. he is speaking to winston churchill. i love the fact. what has
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happened is you think that every story has been told but the kings own diaries have been released after many years. it's a first—hand account. they have just been released, you have a first—hand insight as to how the king initially, because of gallipoli, although history fans will know that churchill's overseeing of that was considered quite the disaster. he was very keen on edward and was concerned. it painted him as a sort of politician, in this area, and the king felt maybe he was not the right man for the job? then with the battle of britain, churchill stepped up battle of britain, churchill stepped up to the plate. they became strong friends. if you are into your second world war history, this is for you. the king invited the wartime premier
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for lunch every tuesday. a recent prime minister invited a audience with the monarch to lie on the couch with the monarch to lie on the couch with a psychiatrist after a long and busy day. it's from his own handwriting, his own words. it is fantastic. i highly recommend it. and there is a lovely picture. honestly, it's fine! seven people have tried to do that over the years... you are the first to succeed! and time for one more... this is to do with a film made about eltonjohn's this is to do with a film made about elton john's early life. i love this! the main thing is... the man out of the bodyguard. it's another role that is presumably very different. eltonjohn's role that is presumably very different. elton john's world, role that is presumably very different. eltonjohn's world, for those who do not know the history of ownjob when those who do not know the history of own job when he first started, the london scene, even before my time, i
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know it from when i first worked as a sound engineer, many worked on the sessions that elton did. he was a job for higher guy, he would come round the studios writing the film looks at that early time. that is richard madden, everyone. he looks like former labour cabinet minister, andy burnham. and underneath is an album that elton john's long—time lyricist is releasing, original lyrics on the right—hand side which are going to auction. sorry, i was right—hand side which are going to auction. sorry, iwas moving right—hand side which are going to auction. sorry, i was moving the newspaper, giving keith on the camera a terrible time. they look like eltonjohn's camera a terrible time. they look like elton john's original trousers. they are executives on the phone, i would imagine that they are making it as accurate as possible. keith, thank you very much indeed. stay with us, the headlines coming up.
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hello, this is breakfast with rogerjohnson and sally nugent. here's a summary of this morning's main news: strong aftershocks have continued to hit the indonesian island of sulawesi, where a major earthquake and tsunami killed at least 800 people. the death tour has been revised up while we have been on air this morning. rescue teams are still yet to reach
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some of the worst affected areas. the country's vice—president says he fears the number of dead could rise into thousands. theresa may is facing a public battle at the tory party conference with borisjohnson over her strategy for leaving the european union. in his first newspaper interview since stepping down as foreign secretary he has told the sunday times that her chequers plan is "deranged". mrs may says her opponents should stop playing politics with brexit. earlier on this programme the conservative chairman played down suggestions there was fresh divisions in the party over brexit. boris has his own style of using language. i think the party is focused on being behind the promised to deliver a good dealfor the united kingdom as we leave the eu. my united kingdom as we leave the eu. my focus is on making sure my members have a good conference and making sure the prime minister delivers on the agenda on brexit and make sure we get a good deal for the united kingdom and we continue to grow as an economy in future. a woman in the far east of russia
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has told the bbc she recognises one of the key suspects in the salisbury novichok attack as a russian military intelligent officer. the bellingcat investigative website this week published what it claims is the true identity of one of the suspects — colonel chepiga. yet he told russian state tv he was ruslan boshirov — a civilian. russia continues to deny any involvement in the poisoning. the fbi has approached the second woman to accuse us supreme court nominee brett kavanaugh of sexual misconduct as it begins a fresh inquiry into him. the judge is accused of exposing himself to deborah ramirez when they were students in the 1980s. mr kavanaugh denies any wrongdoing. it comes days after dr christine blasey ford testified to a senate panel, and president donald trump ordered a investigation by the fbi. he's a very high quality person. i would expect it's going to turn out very well for the judge. there's never been anybody that's been looked at likejudge kavanaugh.
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i think it's going to work out very well but the fbi, i believe, is doing a really good job. they have been all over it already. elon musk is to step down as chairman of the electric car—maker, tesla, as part of a deal with regulators in the us to settle charges of securities fraud. he will also pay a 15 million pound fine, but will remain as chief executive. he was accused of misleading investors by tweeting about financing for his apparent plan to take the firm private. a campaign aimed at reducing the risks of respiratory and lung conditions for construction workers is to be launched from tomorrow. the health and safety executive says it will use measures to ensure firms are doing enough to protect their employees. around 3,500 people die each year across the uk from cancers related to the building trade. those are the main stories this morning. there is one important bit of
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breaking news to bring you... the rapper kanye west has announced he's changing his name — to "ye". the star told his 28 million viewers last night via twitter. be aware the following footage contains flashing images. "the ‘being' formally known as kanye west. iam ye." presumably he could not be bothered to type the first "? kan. the musician has been nicknamed ye for some time, and used it as the title for his eighth album, released in june. of course, he's not the first star to change his name. prince famously changed his to an unpronounceable symbol in the early 90s, and sean coombs became ‘puff daddy‘ and ‘p. diddy‘ before this year announcing he preferred "love" and "brother love". idid not i did not know that! say you could both be le... —— ly. but he wants to
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be ye. i don't think he means it is in yay! holly's here with the sport... there is plenty to be said in the sport... based on their performances so sport... based on their performances so far in the four balls, it is the europeans to lose... you said it! it has been an incredible weekend all round. it isn't all over yet. we have the singles today... rory mcilroy will open against american justin thomas in today's 12 concluding singles matches with europe holding a 10—6 advantage and needing just another 4.5 points to regain the ryder cup. let's speak now to melissa reid winner of the solheim cup. shejoins us now from paris. good morning!
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it's been a truly impressive performance for team europe so far... what do you think has been key to that success? imean, i mean, look, i mean, took, these are the best players in the world. the american side are very strong and we have basically outplayed them. the golf course extremely tough. it is penalising in the rough. and basically there are more fairways and greens. i know that everyone is early celebrating but these americans will come out this morning andi americans will come out this morning and i think they are going to give everything they've got. i still think we've got a lotto everything they've got. i still think we've got a lot to do to win this right now. you mentioned we have some of the best players in the world on the european team, with tea m world on the european team, with team usa, on paper many said that this would be the usa's year once again. but where has it gone wrong in the last two days? why will the
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singles be different?” in the last two days? why will the singles be different? i think some of the pairings are questionable on the us team but i think the europeans do well in the ryder cup because of the, roderick between the team. in the solheim cup is important to be a team but we play the individual sport. you have to be a team to have a chance of winning. obviously, the calibre of this players, they have more emotion. we are not seeing as much emotion from the americans. it seems more businesslike for them. for me, that's the winning edge we have right now. we have tommy fleetwood and francesco molinari there, they will be a pairing that has worked in the last two days. i mean, how impressive have those two been? what a combination they will be. one of the most dominant in the ryder cup. iam very the most dominant in the ryder cup. i am very impressed with tommy fleetwood. it is his rookie year in a ryder cup. the crowd will be going
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nuts about him. he deserves every bit of it. he is playing so good, i cannot tell you how good he is playing as well. and on his debut year. rory mcilroy, so far he has been rather inconsistent. which rory will be getting the singles today?” think you will get bouncy rory, when he is there you are in trouble. i watch morning where he was struggling with his driver, he was paired with ian poulter and then got his bounce again. i think he's one of the most talented players in the world. it just of the most talented players in the world. itjust depends on whether he turns up mentally. i think today he will get the first point for europe, i think he will be impressive this morning. you are reservejudgment i think he will be impressive this morning. you are reserve judgment on what could happen today. 10—6 now, a comeback for the usa, it isn't impossible. it has been done at this stage before? this is the thing,
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they are such good players. they are a very strong team, extremely strong on paper. we still need 4.5 points. that is by thomas bjorn has put out, very strong for six players. you wa nt to very strong for six players. you want to go as quickly as possible and not give the americans a chance. hejust wants and not give the americans a chance. he just wants to get it done as quickly as possible. you've got players with justin quickly as possible. you've got players withjustin rose, and tommy fleetwood, and then ian poulter. the first six players, they are the strongest players. not want to go either. melissa, thank you for joining us. melissa reid in paris. if you want to follow the coverage and action on the ryder cup, followed bbc radio five live and online as well. there is a programme at half past seven on bbc two too if you can wait that long! liverpool's100% winning start to the season may be over — but they're still undefeated in the premier league,
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after daniel sturridge's spectacular late goal rescued a 1—1 draw at chelsea. the league's top scorer eden hazard took his tally to six, and chelsea held on to the lead until a minute from time, when sturridge let fly to ensurejurgen klopp's side came away with a point. outstanding finish. daniel had, three days ago, a similarfinish in the last game when he hit the crossbar and so obviously, he thought "when i'm next time in that position, i might do it a bit better" and he did. fantastic goal, and so deserved to him. it's such a good moment. it's really nice. champions manchester city have gone to the top of the table for the first time this season. they're above liverpool on goal difference after raheem sterling and sergio aguero gave them a 2—0 win at home to brighton. and the pressure just keeps building on jose mourinho. manchester united haven't had a worse start to a season for 29 years. their latest defeat
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came at west ham. they lost 3—1 to finish the day 10th in the table. when the moment is not the best, it looks like everything goes against you. even today, we could feel exactly that. it — one goal is an own goal. the first goal is the linesman mistake and second goal is the referee's mistake. obviously that — that you feel — that you feel that negativity. england captain harry kane scored twice as tottenham beat huddersfield. that took spurs up to fourth but huddersfield are still bottom and still without a win this season. arsenal are on a winning streak. their seventh—straight victory, but they left it late. two goals in the last nine minutes to beat watford, an own goal followed two minutes later by one from captain mesut ozil. hearts manager craig levein said his side came through a "test of character" to beat stjohnstone 2—1 and stay five points clear
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of hibernian at the top of the scottish premiership. and kilmarnock are up to third, after they came from a goal down to beat motherwell 3—1. greg stewart with the pick of their goals. killie are level on points with celtic, who beat aberdeen. lewis hamilton said his team—mate valtteri bottas "just did a better job", after he beat him to pole position for today's russian grand prix. bottas broke the track record at sochi, and hamilton might have gone even quicker but for a rare mistake. so the two mercedes share the front row, with sebastian vettel third on the grid. the weather's fantastic, we've got a great crowd and it was just — it was intense, naturally, as it always is. my last two laps were not special, so, but you can't always get it right and, you know, at least we're still in the fight for the race tomorrow, but the team are doing an amazing job. british number onejohanna konta has made another early exit from the latest tour event.
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after losing her opening match in wuhan on monday, she was knocked out in the first round of the china open by yulia georges. konta hasn't beaten a top 10 player since her victory over simona halep at wimbledon 14 months ago. in rugby league, london broncos have earned a place in next sunday's million pound game, so called because it's worth that much to the winners. they came from 12—0 down to beat halifax 23—16, and that left them fifth in the table. they'll take on the side that finishes fourth, either toronto or hull kr, for a place in the super league next season. in rugby union's pro14, glasgow warriors returned to the top of conference a with victory over the dragons. and munster enjoyed a record—breaking win over ulster. they beat them 64—7, that's munster‘s highest score in the league, their biggest winning margin and their greatest try haul. it was also ulster‘s biggest defeat in pro14 history. and liam williams scored a hat—trick for the premiership leaders
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saracens, as their perfect start to the season continued. they scored eight tries to beat bath 50—27 to stay a point ahead of exeter, who also won yesterday. and the all blacks beat argentina overnight in buenos aires, to succesfully defend their rugby championship crown with a round to spare. argentina have never beaten new zealand before and that run never looked under too much threat. winger rieko ioane scored two of the all blacks' five tries in a 35—17 win. northern ireland'sjonathan rea has become the first rider to win four successive world superbike championships. he's been totally dominant again this season, winning 13 of the 21 races, the latest at magny—cours. only carl fogarty has won as many titles. absolutely incredible.
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you know, i don't have many words. we just played our cards perfect this week and with one lap here and trying to be faster for the race, but ijust feel so blessed and lucky right now and the opportunities i have, you know? i was just a young kid with a dream from northern ireland and here i am, four times world champion, and it's beyond my wildest dreams. what an incredible season he is having, yet again! second year in a row with it, four successive championship winds. and from the same part of the country as you... i'm extremely proud for him! he does say that the best is still to come so we say that the best is still to come so we will see! what more can he do? a sixth successive win! you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the headlines: strong aftershocks are continuing to hit indonesia after the devastating earthquake and tsunami which have killed at least 832 people.
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there are fears the final death toll could be in the thousands. theresa may has accused her critics of "playing politics" with britain's future, on the opening day of the conservative party conference. we really need to know what is happening outside, the one person who can tell us is ben. good morning! good morning. it isn't looking too bad in the second half of the weekend. a chilly in the air, but it is a gorgeous start to the day. for these weather watchers on the scottish borders, if i can get my words out! through the day it will be cool, breezy, there will be sunshine but also some showers. chiefly across north—western parts of the uk. you can see this stripe of the uk. you can see this stripe of cloud, this weather front has
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been sinking its way southwards. the odd spot of rain but not too much wet weather. behind that front, that is where we see the cooler air, from quite a long way north. over the next few hours, this is how things are looking. this band of cloud moving south eastwards across england and wales. sunny spots behind, scattered showers. through the late morning and into the afternoon, these showers likely to become widespread across scotland. even by ten o'clock, 9 degrees in glasgow, a breeze as well. showers in northern parts of northern ireland. further south into the midlands, these spots of drizzle and into the south, some sunshine to come but parts of the south—east will be robbed of their blue skies, more cloud works its way in from the north—west. brighter skies in northern england, if the odd shower for northern ireland, as i
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mentioned, those showers becoming widespread in the north and the west of scotland, where we also see the strongest of the winds. as far as temperatures go, 10 degrees in stornoway. in belfast and 15 in cardiff and in plymouth. through the evening and overnight, those showers fade. clouds clearing out of the sky. starry skies ahead. despite a keen breeze, temperatures dip away. that breeze comes from a cold place. in northern england, out in the countryside, will we get close to freezing. even in towns and cities, around two or three degrees. on monday, a chilly start of the week but a brighter start. we see long spells of sunshine through the day. but one thing you notice is northerly winds ease a little bit. ina northerly winds ease a little bit. in a westerly direction, that serves to feed more cloud into northern ireland and western scotland. rain later in the day, temperatures up to
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9 degrees. deeper into the week, we bounce back, hitting 20 in parts of the south on tuesday. a lot of dry weather during the week ahead, outbreaks of rain, especially in the north and the west. as far as sunday goes, north and the west. as far as sunday o north and the west. as far as sunday goes, we do have some showers. some sunshine and a bit of a chilly in the air. that's all from me for now, i had you back to roger and sally. studio: ben, thank you. tonne for us to play elvis thing go. —— it's time for us to play elvis being go. visitors to a sleepy seaside town may have had ‘suspicious minds' this weekend when they heard that ‘the king' had been spotted in the welsh resort of porthcawl. more than 40,000 rock'n'roll fans from around the world have been ‘all shook up' at the prospect of attending europe's largest elvis presley festival. alex humphries joined them. a seaside town in wales might not be the most obvious place for an elvis festival, but for thousands of fans this weekend, porthcawl in south wales is the place to be. with 40,000 people expected
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to turn up here, it's no wonder it's the largest elvis festival in europe. i have come to the grand pavilion to find out what it's all about. i am not quite sure what to expect. let's go and have a look. take a look at this. # well, bless my soul, what's wrong with me...#. some say the king isn't dead. well, he's certainly pretty present in here. these guys are waiting to perform at the festival's main event, the search to find the best elvis tribute act. # be my little good luck charm. # you sweet divine...#. this is my first festival — performing. so my first time. really looking forward to it. my name's jeff herman and i'm from hickory, north carolina. i started in 1993. i have been a fan since i was about four. it wasjust something i decided i wanted to do. it's kind of a following yourdream thing. what is it about this festival that
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makes it so special? i believe it is one of the biggest in the world. to be part of that is overwhelming. i think it'sjust the genre of the songs. from country and western to rock and roll. it touches everybody. established back in 2004, the festival draws in elvis wannabes from around the world. the organiser peter phillips is very proud of that success. every year, i say it can't get any bigger, and every year it does. why is it so popular, do you think? the honest answer is, i don't know! i think it is probably because it is the most ridiculous place in the world to put an elvis festival. porthcawl has no connection to elvis. 40,000 people can hardly fit in the town. that is probably why it works. speaking to the elvis fans, they like the fact that elvis overwhelms the town. i think it is bonkers,
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but it is good fun. absolutely. we are down here a lot. we enjoy it. some of the singers are really good. some aren't, but some are really good. back in the pavilion the first heats are almost over. it is now or never for some. for others it will be heartbreak hotel. alex humphries, bbc news. heartbreak hotel! you have done it! and disappointed you didn't do your... uh-huh! the image of bobby moore lifting the 1966 world cup is ingrained in the mind of england fans young and old. but do you remember the unofficial england women's team that competed in the 1971 mexico world cup? if the answer is no, you probably aren't alone. in fact, the national football
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museum is appealing for people to share their memories and memorabilia in an attempt to uncover the hidden history of the women's game. kate turner from the national football museum joins us now — along with three of the players who travelled to mexico in 1971, leah, chris and gill. thank you all for coming in. leah, as you are done that end, when you look at the game now for the women, it is getting the platform it deserves, but when you started it was unknown? it was, and i think we played on ordinary park pitches, so yes, it was early days, and momentum since then has been amazing but the mexico world cup, in 1971, shows where it was at over there and where it could have been. gill, what was it could have been. gill, what was it like? amazing, it was surreal. you look back on it and at the time you could not really appreciate the
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enormity of what we were doing. for a 14—year—old, as i was then, to be plucked from playing football, i just started playing with the women's team, to go out into 110,000 stadium, that is the kind of crowd... full of people. you were 13? why were you all so young?” crowd... full of people. you were 13? why were you all so young? i was 15. it ranged 13 to about 26. what was it like to make thatjourney at that age? incredible, not one of us have been on an aeroplane or things like that before. we took it in our stride. yeah, it was like fame hit a straightaway. as soon as we got mexico, it was living the dream. how were you picked? there was no structure or anything like that. the manager, he toured the country and
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picked players from different areas. also, like anything, the right place and the right time. that sort of thing. kate, i guess what you're doing at the national football museum now is the gaps in history, that a lot of people don't know about. it isn't a well-documented history at all, it has been very nice to meet women like these and find out what was going on there from them and to hear their personal stories. it is not something we have a lot of. when we met with these women, they show us their photographs and scrapbooks, it is filling the gaps for us. shall we show everyone what it is. it is fantastic. i don't know if you can see... fantastic. i don't know if you can see... kate, tell us about who you wa nt to see... kate, tell us about who you want to hear from. see... kate, tell us about who you want to hearfrom. it is a broad ——
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a broad range. we are looking for those who played between 1945 and 1993. we have an event running today at the national football museum in manchester, we are inviting women from the period to come along and share their stories, bring in any objects they want to talk about and to help us celebrate the history of women's football. and a little point on this t—shirt, when i saw this i thought it was a souvenir that you bought back for a baby! that it is yours because you were 13? that's right. and kate, you talked about the event in manchester this afternoon, you want to hear from anyone from 1945 right up to the 19405, anyone from 1945 right up to the 1940s, for anyone who has a —— the 19905, 1940s, for anyone who has a —— the 1990s, for anyone who has a story to tell. we do have a twitter page, you can get to contact us using that would handle the football museum, we would handle the football museum, we would love to hear from any of us.
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and how did you get to the football world cup, leah? unfortunately we did not win the world cup but it became more than the games. it became more than the games. it became the crowds, the mexican people themselves, we were completely embraced. photos were taken, there was press every day, at everything. as a success, football was not particularly there, but it tells the story. the amount of press cove rage , tells the story. the amount of press coverage, etc, on television as well. and the mexican people took you to heart? yes, they did. they came to our hotel and we had a party and everything. how did the experience change your life? did it? i don't think... it did in that it is an incredible memory and it is
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very real but because it was not recognise the same when we came home, it is part of our memory and the squad's memory and now it is coming into fruition 47 years, that is fabulous. it has been a long time coming. and do you all still play? in my mind! we carried on playing. thank you to all of you for coming in. people will get in touch with you at the national football museum with their memories. that's all we've got time for this morning. breakfast is back tomorrow. we'll see you at six. bye— bye! this is bbc news. i'm chris rogers. the headlines at nine. on the opening day of the conservative conference, theresa may accuses opponents of her brexit plan of "playing politics" with britain's future. but she is facing a public
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battle with borisjohnson. this morning, the former foreign secretary calls the prime minister's brexit plan "deranged". party chairman brandon lewis says the conference will show party unity. my focus is on making sure our members have a good conference and working with the prime minister to ensure we are delivering on a domestic agenda, on the issues that matter to people and on brexit, making sure we get a good dealfor the uk. here in birmingham, theresa may will seek to fend off her critics by telling tory members to put party unity and the national interest first. this morning's other top stories.
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