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tv   BBC News  BBC News  September 30, 2018 10:00am-10:29am BST

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this is bbc news. i'm chris rogers. the headlines at ten. on the opening day of the conservative conference, theresa may accuses opponents of her brexit plan of "playing politics" with britain's future. but she is facing a public battle with borisjohnson. this morning, the former foreign secretary calls the prime minister's brexit plan "deranged". party chairman brandon lewis insists the conference will show party unity. my focus is on making sure our members have a good conference and working with the prime minister to ensure we are delivering on a domestic agenda, on the issues that matter to people and on brexit, making sure we get a good deal for the uk. here in birmingham, theresa may seats to fend off her critics by telling tory members, "but loyalty and the national interest bust". this morning's other top stories. devastation in indonesia — officials there say more than 800 people died in the quake and tsunami. rescue workers are searching for survivors in the debris of collapsed buildings,
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with fears the death toll could run into thousands. a russian woman tells the bbc she recognises one of the key suspects in the salisbury attack as a military intelligence officer. billionaire elon musk is fined $20 million, and told to step down as chairman of tesla, over a tweet that misled investors. after another great day for europe at the ryder cup, they take a 10—6 lead over the united states into the final day's singles. and in witness — a former british prisoner of war describes how he survived sickness, starvation and brutality as the japanese forced allied prisoners to build the bridge over the river kwai. good morning and welcome to bbc
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news. the conservative party conference opens this afternoon, and divisions are already evident amongst some of its biggest names. theresa may has accused critics of her chequers brexit plan of "playing politics" with britain's future. former foreign secretary boris johnson has continued his criticism of the strategy, branding parts of it as "preposterous" and "deranged". our assistant political editor norman smith joins us from birmingham where the conference is being held. things haven't even got started yet but it gives us some insight into what is ahead. but how serious is all of this for theresa may and her future as prime minister, as well as the future of the brexit plan?m future as prime minister, as well as the future of the brexit plan? it is life—threatening, it is that serious in terms of her political survival, why? because her future in terms of her political survival,
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why? because herfuture is now bound up why? because herfuture is now bound up with the chequers brexit plan and if that goes, it is very hard to see how she can carry on because she has pretty much said there is no alternative. this is it. this is the best planned there is. but she is under massive pressure now, notjust from figures like borisjohnson and david davies, but —— david davis, but many tory mps and ordinary party members who think chequers is unacceptable, it does not involve taking back control, in their view but mrs may on the other hand believes it is the only credible, workable, pragmatic plan, that the eu was going to accept and which she might come at a long shot, get through parliament but already, we have seen borisjohnson on the rampage this morning. he has been slowly cranking it up in recent days. he did a long, long article trying to take apart the chequers plan last week and then this morning, we have him describing the chequers plan as deranged. that was put to the party chairman, brandon
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la fell if he put to the party chairman, brandon lafell if he thought it was unacceptable way to describe the chequers plan. —— brandon lewis if he thought. boris has his own style of using language. the party is focused around being behind the prime minister to deliver a good deal for the uk as we leave the eu. but is it appropriate? you will have to ask boris what he thinks of the language he's using. you are his chairman. and my focus is on making sure members have a good conference and work with the prime minister to make sure we are delivering on a domestic agenda, on the issues that matter to people and on brexit, making sure we get a good deal for the uk that leads us continuing to grow as an economy in the future. so, despite being embattled recently, is it safe to say that borisjohnson is recently, is it safe to say that boris johnson is pitching recently, is it safe to say that borisjohnson is pitching himself for prime minister still?|i borisjohnson is pitching himself for prime minister still? i think so, yes, he has not explicitly said as much in recent days but nor has he really voiced support for mrs may, in effect saying she can carry on as long as the party is prepared for her to carry on. vista johnson,
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imean, he for her to carry on. vista johnson, i mean, he has always wanted to be leader. —— mrjohnson. but there are those that think his prospects are taking over have gone down, that he has overplayed his hand, in short, and his time is past and already this morning, we heard from the scottish tory leader, ruth davidson castigating mrjohnson, saying how he likes to talk about his time as mayor of london, not so much as foreign secretary, saying she was aware of what mrs may's chequers plan involved so why on earth wasn't borisjohnson plan involved so why on earth wasn't boris johnson aware? similarly, david davis suggested that relationships between him and boris johnson are not so harmonious, and mrjohnson‘s proposals have made good headlines but not such a serious plan. you get a sense of the tensions around boris johnson. plenty of people admire him, thinking he can broaden the tory appeal and there are plenty of people who are natalie lowe him. the sunday times interviews —— who
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utterly loathe him. the sunday times interview have him talking about a bridge to ireland instead of a high—speed rail link, theresa may wanting a festival of brexit in 2022. will we hear any talk about domestic policy at the conference today and in the coming days? well, we will hear an attempt to talk about domestic policies but in a way, as we saw with the labour conference, brexit is a gargantuan issue and will shape the country for generations to come so normal domestic politics gets totally overwhelmed and i'm sure that'll be even more the case at this conference. yes, on the fringes, there will be talk about the many other challenges we face as a country, whether it is dealing with social terror house—building and so on, but brexit is so enormous —— social care or house—building. but for many people at this conference, brexit is more important than the
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tory party and it is a fundamental cause for them. i suspect all the headlines and the rows and all of the fringes, or most of them, will inevitably gravitate back towards brexit. will we hear much from theresa may's supported this week as she tries to position the party for post—brexit as well? —— theresa may's supporters. the interesting thing this week will not so much be the noises from the likes of boris johnson and jacob rees—mogg and david davis. we know what they think and what they are going to say. more interesting are the people around mrs may still in cabinet, people like sajid javid, jeremy hunt. what to watch with them is if they miraculously don't start talking about chequers at all, if it becomes about chequers at all, if it becomes a word they cannot mention and they drop it from conversation and whether they begin to try and create a bit of space for mrs may to start shuffling away from it. we already
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know thatjeremy shuffling away from it. we already know that jeremy hunt shuffling away from it. we already know thatjeremy hunt in our interview before the conference did not rule out the possibility of a canada not rule out the possibility of a ca na da style not rule out the possibility of a canada style trade deal. what is interesting if you get more members of the cabinet beginning to give house room to an alternative to chequers, then you can begin to see them trying to shuffle mrs may away from this unbending commitment to chequers and i think that will be the real thing to watch at this conference rather than, if you like, some of the headline grabbing antics of borisjohnson some of the headline grabbing antics of boris johnson and some of the headline grabbing antics of borisjohnson and so on. some of the headline grabbing antics of boris johnson and so on. some real headline acts later so we will be hearing much more from you throughout the day. in fact, at lipm, tea m throughout the day. in fact, at lipm, team back into us because we will bring you the latest updates from the conference throughout the day, from the likes of norman smith but the foreign secretaryjeremy hunt, at lipm, we will bring you his speech live on the bbc news channel and also reaction to what he has to say
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as well, as the political drama continues. let's get the latest from indonesia now. the death toll is likely to go up now. the death toll is likely to go up from the earthquake and tsunami. it his the indonesian island of sulawesi. the death toll has risen to more 800 people, according to officials there. the president of indonesia — joko widodo — is heading to the city of palu — which was badly hit. indonesia's disaster agency says there've been reports of many people trapped in the rubble of buildings. the 7.5 magnitude earthquake struck on friday and triggered tsunami waves as high as six metres. caroline davies has the latest. from above, the true impact of this earthquake starts to become clear. this was a shopping centre, now crumpled. a bridge, collapsed and submerged. but the damage done beyond the city is not yet clear. the earthquake triggered a tsunami, bringing waves of ten foot high crashing into the city of palu.
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hundreds of people gathered here for a festival on the beach. filmed on a mobile phone, this shows the panic, the moment the water came in. there was a warning but there wasn't long to get to higher ground, not before a packed city was quickly inundated. with strong after—shocks, people have been urged to move away from their homes. outside the hospital, people are treated out in the open. it has been difficult to get aid to the places that most need it, although the airport has now reopened. as the death toll continues to rise, the president of indonesia left to visit the areas affected. more than 800 people are now known to have lost their lives. in the ruins, the search is now on for survivors. indonesia is used to earthquakes but with new information coming in all the time, it seems this is just the start of the devastation.
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caroline davies, bbc news. as you can imagine, getting access asa as you can imagine, getting access as a journalist to some of the worst hit areas is not easy. our indonesia editor, rebecca henschke is travelling to palu now and she sent us this update. rescue teams are working to try and free people trapped in the debris of collapsed homes, and teams from outside as well as personnel from the military are trying to get into the affected area. that's proving to be challenging, as we're finding out. we are heading into the area from poso and we're being told that many of the roads are blocked. fresh landslides occurred overnight and one of the main bridges into town has collapsed. the airport also remains closed to commercial flights and people are having to try and find alternative routes to get in. in the town of donggala and three other towns, communications and power is completely cut off. there's no news of the impact
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of these disasters there. vice presidentjusuf kalla is warning that the death toll could rise into the thousands. from the city of palu, we are hearing stories of local teams having to dig through the rubble with their bare hands. last night in one collapsed hotel, they managed to rescue 2a people but the owner of the hotel said he can still hear people trapped in the rubble, crying out for help, but they don't have heavy building equipment in order to rescue them. that just came thatjust came in from our indonesia editor. a woman in the far east of russia has told the bbc she recognises one of the key suspects in the salisbury novichok attack as a decorated military officer. the bellingcat investigative website this week published what it claims is the true identity of one of the suspects. russia continues to deny any involvement in the poisoning. here's our moscow correspondent sarah rainsford.
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in the far east of russia, along its border with china, we went searching for clues to the salisbury poisoning. thatjourney led to this tranquil village, almost 5,000 miles from moscow. it's where a russian military intelligence officer, anatoliy chepiga, grew up. this week, the investigative team at bellingcat suggested that colonel chepiga, seen here, is the true identity of a key suspect in the salisbury attack. british officials haven't disputed that. the suspect is now calling himself ruslan boshirov. so our team showed those pictures to residents in colonel chepiga's old village. some didn't know him. those who did were nervous of oui’ camera. we agreed they'd remain anonymous. translation: it's him, but much older. and this woman identified the man wanted by british police as anatoliy chepiga.
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i know where his parents used to live. he was a military man, an officer. he fought in war zones. then he was in moscow. and when i called the last phone number linked to his parents, the man who picked up said he was uzbek, and bought the sim card on the street. the line was then disconnected. just two weeks ago, president putin himself insisted both of the salisbury suspects were civilians. nothing suspicious, he said, nothing criminal. on friday, his spokesman said the kremlin won't discuss what he called "informal investigations into the poisoning" any further. but the questions over russia's explanations and the true identity of these men are only mounting. sarah rainsford, bbc news, moscow. the headlines on bbc news. 0n the opening day of
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the conservative conference, theresa may accuses opponents of her brexit plan of "playing politics" with britain's future. but she is facing a public battle with borisjohnson. this morning, the former foreign secretary calls the prime minister's brexit plan "preposterous". devastation in indonesia — more than 800 people have died because of the earthquake and tsunami. that is the still of the suspected intelligence officer in russia. but we are now hoping to see holly in the screen behind me. there she is, nothing to do with russia, but all the sport and the ryder cup. good morning. the ryder cup is europe's to lose. rory mcilroy will open against american justin thomas in today's i2 concluding singles matches with europe holding a 10—6 advantage.
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but can they extend their lead to regain the title? well let's go straight to le golf national and our reporterjohn watson. the sun is still shining and it looks absolutely fantastic but now can europe hold their nerve and regain the cup? that is the big question and i think they will feel confident about doing so in light of their four confident about doing so in light of theirfour point lead confident about doing so in light of their four point lead that they take into the final day. it is a big lead and one that, as you say, they hope to build on heading into the final singles matches today. rory mcilroy leads at the european team against justin thomas, an interesting matchup, mcilroy, it is fair to say, has had a mixed ryder cup so far but againstjustin thomas, who has been informed, playing alongside jordan spieth this week. he could be a very strong competitor to lead the american team out. some interesting matches, justin rose against webb
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simpson, jon rahm taking on tiger woods, that is in the fourth match out in the singles. neither of them have won a match so far. as you can see, ian poulter against dustin johnson, sergio garcia getting rickie fowler, and all eyes on francesco molinari against phil mickelson, molinari has been one of the standout performers alongside tommy fleetwood. and then in the anchor leg, alex noren against bryson dechambeau, they will be last out. of course, if it hasn't... if you have not won it by then, that could very well be a key matchup but i think europe and captain thomas bjorn will be hopeful that they will get the four and a half points they need to win back the ryder cup before the anchor leg. it won't be decided then. we are just losing you a little but we are seeing some of the singles... he came back and then he went again! hopefully europe can hold their nerve for the ryder cup later. thanks to john hold their nerve for the ryder cup later. thanks tojohn watson come alive from paris and you can watch
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all the action on fold and online and listen on bbc radio five live as well. not long until it starts. and don't forget the russian grand prix gets under way at 12.10 with valteri bottas starting on pole ahead of mercedes team—mate and championship leader lewis hamilton. ferrari's sebastian vettel — who's a0 points behind hamilton in the standings — will start third. you can follow all the action on radio 5 live sports extra. that's all the sport for now. back to the studio. holly, having as much fun as we are this morning. leading scientists are meeting in south korea this week to present their latest report to governments that examines the impacts of global warming of rising by more i.5c this century. the intergovernmental panel on climate change is the international body set up to provide a clear scientific view for governments on the causes of climate change, its impacts and possible solutions. this week, ipcc scientists and representatives from more
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than 150 governments willjointly agree a summary for policymakers, based on key findings from the main report. joining me now from south korea is professorjim skea, chair of sustainable energy at imperial college london's centre for environmental policy and the co—chair of the ipcc working group iii. thank you forjoining us. one wonders why a report like this, that shows us what will happen if temperatures rise by 1.5 celsius, why they didn't have that information before the paris climate agreement was agreed? yes, before the paris agreement, the aim that governments had was to keep temperatures below two degrees above preindustrial levels and paris actually shifted the dial because the ambition was to make it 1.5 degrees. what the report is doing,
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first, the government asked us to look at the impact of global warning of1.5 look at the impact of global warning of 1.5 degrees but it also asked us to look at the kind of pathways, the measures that would be required to reduce emissions of greenhouse gases so reduce emissions of greenhouse gases so that we could keep under that 1.5 degrees threshold. it is a far more ambitious level of production than anyone had ever contemplated before the paris agreement. is it possible —— level of reduction. could this have an impact on the paris agreement, that they might have to change their ways and do more? agreement, that they might have to change their ways and do more7m agreement, that they might have to change their ways and do more? it is very much the intention of the paris agreement that the report is going to bea agreement that the report is going to be a majorfactor. it was agreement that the report is going to be a major factor. it was the paris agreement that invited the ipcc to produce this report and once it is approved, we will be taking it along to the next big negotiators
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meeting which is taking place in poland in december, to present the results and the results of the report are really seem to be probably the most important input to the next set of negotiations towards the next set of negotiations towards the end of the year. can you give us the end of the year. can you give us the main headline from the report then? because it actually hasn't been finished yet, i unfortunately can't give you the headlines but just to repeat, the key issues it will address are, what are the impacts of warming going to be at 1.5 degrees? that is things like heatwaves, droughts, sea levels rising, etc but also, it is going to say what needs to be done globally if we are going to keep within that 1.5 limit. can you at least tell us if we are on track to save the planet and future generations? there are many reports out there already that say that countries are not doing enough. countries have had to make pledges under the paris
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agreement and you can benchmark these pledges against the kind of image and drag that we need to be on to keep global temperatures below 1.5 or even2 to keep global temperatures below 1.5 or even 2 degrees. there is a simple message that we would need to increase the ambition on the pledges. we are not up to speed at the moment. that is absolutely clear without the report. the report will be much more about what we need to do. what about president trump pulling out of the paris climate agreement? i say it was the president because i don't think many people in america were pleased about it. is that having an effect on the ipcc‘s work but also on beating climate change? surprisingly, perhaps, it really hasn't made much difference to the ipcc. the americans are still signed up and they are still sending scientifically trained officials along to the meetings and the american government delegates are still giving us an appropriate amount of challenge, in other words, amount of challenge, in other words, a bit ofa
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amount of challenge, in other words, a bit of a hard time, sometimes, because that is the right thing to do. and of course, american scientists are still part of the ipcc as well because some of the best science globally is being done in the us. from the ipcc perspective, it really has not made that much difference. where it has made a difference, perhaps, is when you get into the actual negotiations themselves because obviously, the americans have given notice of their intention to withdraw. they actually have to stay in for a while, they have to stay in for a while, they have to stay in for a while, they have to give a bit of notice before they pull out. and will other companies —— other companies and state governors have said they will continue their efforts which is welcome, i suppose. indeed, many cities, states and corporations, i thinkjust last week, in fact, exxon joined the global oil and gas climate initiative so that is a fine, i think, climate initiative so that is a fine, ithink, that climate initiative so that is a fine, i think, that the world is still moving on in terms of dealing with climate in the corporate world. we have to leave it there. thank you for joining we have to leave it there. thank you
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forjoining us. fascinating and we look forward to seeing the report. the billionaire entrepreneur, elon musk, has agreed to step down as chairman of the tesla electric car company, over a misleading tweet that said he was ready to take the firm private. he's been fined £15 million, as has the company. he'll remain tesla's chief executive, as lebo diseko now reports. he's known for pushing boundaries when it comes to tech innovation, leading the way on electric cars and space exploration. but now, it seems elon musk has pushed too far. in august, he tweeted, saying he would take tesla back into private ownership at a price of $420 a share. and, crucially, he said he had the funding secured. the stock market regulator said that was false and misleading and so they charged him. we allege that musk had arrived at the price of $420 by assuming a 20% premium of what tesla's then—existing share price, and then rounding up to $1120,
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because of the significance of that number in marijuana culture and his belief that his girlfriend would be amused by it. and as we have said before in connection with other matters, neither celebrity status nor reputation as a technological innovator provide an exemption from the federal securities laws. trailblazer or not, musk has tested shareholder patience recently with antics like smoking marijuana in an interview. and he's been sued for libel after making allegations against one of the thai cave rescuers. things could've been much worse for musk — the regulator had wanted to remove him as ceo as well. he'll now stay on in that position while stepping down as chairman. but with the company's image so closely linked to his own, investors may be wondering if that is a good thing. lebo diseko, bbc news. 0lympic diver tom daley says he grew up feeling inferior to everyone
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because of his sexuality, but that gave him the motivation to become a success. speaking on radio 4's desert island discs, he said he wanted to prove himself so that he did not disappoint everyone when they eventually found out about his sexuality. he also said he was speaking out about gay rights to give others "hope". you can hear that interview on my player as well. —— on polling stations have opened in macedonia where voters are deciding whether to change their country's name to north macedonia. this could possibly end a decades—old spat with greece. athens has always insisted that its northern neighbour's name implies a territorial claim on the greek region of macedonia. as guy de launey reports from the capital skopje, it's a particularly important vote for the country's young people. macedonia's spent much of the 21st—century looking to ancient history. it splurged a fortune on recasting its capital
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as the cradle of civilisation, appropriating greek heroes and infuriating its southern neighbour. but now it is out with the old and time to look the future, potentially, at least. sunday's referendum will see voters decide whether to rename the country north macedonia. "turn out for a european macedonia" is the message on this referendum billboard. it says, "on the 30th of september, we will make a historic decision", because changing its name would allow macedonia to end its long—running dispute with greece, and the government says that would allow this small landlocked country to look to the future. small country, small market, without stability, without guarantee for security and prosperity in the economy. it is really, every day it is a new damage of the country because of emigration, you go out. macedonia's young people struggle in one of europe's poorest countries. low wages, lack of opportunities
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and rampant corruption force many to leave. the organisers of this event say that has got to change. they are one of the largest marginalised groups in this country, at the same time struggling with a poor educational system, high unemployment, little opportunity for prosperity. they are desperate. we are desperate to see an advancement towards a better, more prosperous environment and a democratic society in this country. there have been strident protests against the agreement with greece. some feel the government is giving up macedonian identity. others are simply unhappy about a lack of consultation. the problem with the agreement is that it is not... it is pushed by foreign parties on to macedonia. it is not really something that the people have debated, accepted and agreed upon. but some things have already changed.
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skopje airport is no longer named after greek hero alexander the great. a yes vote on sunday would bring a new identity to the whole country. guy de launey, bbc news, skopje. now it's time for a look at the weather with ben rich. on the final day of september, it feels appropriate that there is a bit ofan feels appropriate that there is a bit of an autumnal chill in the air. there's also a bit more cloud in the sky than yesterday in many areas. despite that, we are still seeing some sunshine through the rest of the day. it will remain cool and breezy and there will be a scattering of showers across the north—west. on the satellite from

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