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tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 23, 2018 11:00pm-11:31pm GMT

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any shots on black friday is been to any shots on black friday is i haven't been buying anything but i have been, of course, in brussels, negotiating. i think it is a very good deal, the right till the uk in terms of our brexit deal. i think it delivers on what people voted for. it brings an end to free movement, brings an end to sending vast annual sums annually to the eu. i think it delivers what people voted for and protect jobs. delivers what people voted for and protectjobs. i think that is what people looking for from the government. we will hear from them ina government. we will hear from them in a moment, but this morning we have had a woman say that she would like to give you a hug. we've had another woman said she would like to give you a shake. it seems that you have divided people with this deal. i think, first of all, i think in a sense there have been some really passionate arguments people have had about whether or not we should be in the european union. you saw that in the european union. you saw that in the referendum campaign back in 2016. but i think now is the point where the country — where the
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country can come together, let's get through— article most people they just want us to get on with it. they don't want to get on with a bad deal, though, don't they? butl think this is the right deal to the uk. it ends free movement, or the other things i have mentioned, and protect jobs and other things i have mentioned, and protectjobs and security. most people, if they want us to see our way through this and there were the things that mattered and in the day life, schools, hospitals, and what we can do for the future of the country. should we get to the calls? yes, i have just country. should we get to the calls? yes, i havejust put country. should we get to the calls? yes, i have just put my earpiece back in. i go to sarah and billing. what would you like to ask the prime minister? you think you will get your breath the plan through parliament, and if it is watered down to what is your plan be? thank you for your question. —— plan b.
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that is what a lot of people have been focusing on, the question of parliament. i think there are two conversations going on at the moment. in parliament errors a lot of focus on whether there will be a deal or not. —— in parliament there is. but people are now thinking let's get this on and get on delivering. i think this is the right dealfor the delivering. i think this is the right deal for the uk. delivering. i think this is the right dealfor the uk. myjob is to persuade people in parliament to... and i think in order more macs. when it comes to voting for this deal, directly say to themselves does it deliver? and secondly what we need to focus on for our constituents up and down the country. i believe people's jobs, futures, and down the country. i believe people'sjobs, futures, the future of their children, that should be at the forefront of people's minds. anything you want to say to that? thank you for the response. i had to
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get through parliament because i do wa nt get through parliament because i do want it to be certain in the country. i think every other option like no deal willjust cause chaos in the country, really. can give your call, sarah. iwouldjust in the country, really. can give your call, sarah. i would just pick up your call, sarah. i would just pick up on something sarah was driving at, and this is having a lot of people have been talking about, if i may, prime minister. what is the next that if you don't get through? no deal, or no brexit?” next that if you don't get through? no deal, or no brexit? i think there isa no deal, or no brexit? i think there is a risk — first of all, as is that myjob is to persuade people, and to get this through. there was a process in parliamentary terms. i think it is billed as a nursery what happens is we end up back at square one, i think, happens is we end up back at square one, ithink, as happens is we end up back at square one, i think, as there hasjust said. what we end up is with more uncertainty and division, frankly, so uncertainty and division, frankly, soi uncertainty and division, frankly, so i believe that if we were to go back to the european union and said, well, people didn't like that deal, can we have another one, we won't get, i don't think that they will
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come to us and say no deal. this is the deal but i think worse the uk. people don't understand what is plan b. well, we need to get through — ironwork of making sure that we get is voter in parliament. i think if we don't get the voter in parliament than what we will see is more division and more uncertainty and there are people in parliament on there are people in parliament on the other side — some who will argue that no deal, some who want to stop brexit, some who want to frustrate brexit. what i want to do is deliver brexit. what i want to do is deliver brexit and deliver it with a good deal. if we don't— my focus of the moment, all my focus, is getting— obviously, we have to finalise the deal on sunday with the european council. but beyond that it will be about getting the vote through. but how can mps know how to vote if they don't know what plan b is? you have said this week and some of your cabinet colleagues has had the same it is no deal or no brexit. what is plan b? because you cannot guarantee
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that you can get it through. the focus of the government at the moment is rightly on getting the deal through and on saying to people when you come to look—i think what mps need to focus on is is this a right dealfor the mps need to focus on is is this a right deal for the uk, mps need to focus on is is this a right dealfor the uk, it is this something that delivers on what people voted for? i think it does. yes, but what is plan b? what is top of the less? no deal are no brexit. this has come through on several messages, will can you answer that? to me, there is no question of no brexit go because the government needs to deliver on what people voted for in the referendum in 2016. as far as voted for in the referendum in 2016. as faras i'm voted for in the referendum in 2016. as far as i'm concerned, the uk is leading the —— the gays leaving the eu. there are voices in parliament that actually want to frustrate brexit and stop brexit. so i had to paraphrase us, because they have to get together, but it is no deal, not no brexit? i believe this is the
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right dealfor the no brexit? i believe this is the right deal for the uk. no brexit? i believe this is the right dealfor the uk. myjob is to deliver brexit for the country, because that is what people voted for. header in devon, welcome to the programme. for. header in devon, welcome to the ro ramme. you're for. header in devon, welcome to the programme. you're through to be premised, what is your question? how can we trust you now, if i would like to know. i'm sorry that you think that we have not been listening to the public over the last two years. what i have been— obviously the first thing to listen to as the boat that took place in the referendum in 2016. and i recognise that that was a 52% 48% vote in versus remain, but i think that parliament said to the public we wa nt that parliament said to the public we want you to make this choice and people chose to leave. i think it is about trust in politics that we deliver on that. what i've been working on is deliver in our boat but to do it in a way that does deliver a better future for everybody. so does recognise the concerns that some of people who
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voted to remain had about our future and protects jobs. had a? thank you. vigo. you have entered that question. read from hartlepool, what is your question? —— you have a nswered is your question? —— you have answered that question. —— there you go. it is a large amount of money that we will send to the eu. is the figure final, organic go up, because the report said that if we go past the report said that if we go past the transition period, they might put another 10 billion on it. that is the first question. is that at 39 billion what will pay? and how will we pay? in one billion what will pay? and how will 0, billion what will pay? and how will or billion what will pay? and how will we pay? in one go, orare billion what will pay? and how will we pay? in one go, or are few years, because the reason for asking that one is we don't know what type of deal we will get, will we start negotiating after the 31st of march? if we send the money over, we
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haven't got anything to negotiate with, have we ? haven't got anything to negotiate with, have we? to questions, there. first of all, brendan, the fed outbidding is what has been agreed between us and the european commission. this is a discussion, negotiation about what we legally oh the eu when we leave. you may have seen the time that we started these negotiations. it would look about 100 billion. we negotiated back down to 30 billion. the question about whether or not it is any more, be pa rt whether or not it is any more, be part of this kind there are legal obligations we got, but also part of this money enables us to have what is called the implementation period, which is not a cliff business, this is about protecting jobs in the uk as we leave the eu. you asked about whether it will be paid in one go. and some of it is to be paid upfront, and some paid over a period of time. so it is notjust one lump
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sum of £30 billion that is paid over to the european union. the other question you asked is if we extend that period, would that entail thanks all. the circumstances in which there has been all the discussion of extending that implementation period is if we have not got our future partnership with them, our future not got our future partnership with them, ourfuture relationship with them, ourfuture relationship with them, in december 2000 and 20. in that circumstance we could extend the ip. we could go into the northern ireland backstop to meet oui’ northern ireland backstop to meet our commitment to the people in northern ireland, or we could have alternative arrangements. if we went into the it, they would ask for more contribution, or into the backstop, none. be satisfied, brendan? will this be paid over the next 30 years, i read that somewhere, the 39
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billion. at 1,000,000,000—a—year. some of it is payment that is made immediately, some is about legal obligations that actually won't materialise until some years down the line. in relation to certain things like pattaya contributions. so there is a natural sort of timetable. so others will materialise in a few years time. crucially, we will no longer be obliged once we are outside, to send vast amount of money to the eu. then will be out to spend on our own priorities, like the nhs. several people have been in touch, prime minister, to ask if you don't get the deal through parliament, which people are worried about, and a lot of them want the end of uncertainty, and they would like his deal and would be on border that. but if you can't get it through, which you
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can't get it through, which you can't guara ntee— no can't get it through, which you can't guarantee— no politician can — will you resign? i focused on guaranteeing that we get the deal through. i believe that this is absolutely the right deal to the uk. and so— well, this is, this is not about me. is it not about you? can you explain why people like about his morning? i asked what was next in terms of the deal. in terms of leadership, people loathe uncertainty. you have staked your reputation on it. if it does not get through but this is the only question that only you can and so— are other colleagues have been asked and they cannot answer it. will you resign if the deal does go through? i don't — as i sit here, are not the about me, i am thinking about a deal for the country. that is what drives
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me and that is at the forefront of my mind. what i said that i will be focused over the next few weeks until the meaningful vote in parliament, giving up the group are you so well. i will be doing other things, too. iwill you so well. i will be doing other things, too. i will be explaining the deal to people up and down the country, because i believe this is important. this is notjust about mps in westminster, but about people across the country understanding what the deal is about. so that is my focus. cerner plans to resign? my focus is on getting the through. nidal, from tamworth, what is your question? —— so no plans to resign. cani question? —— so no plans to resign. can i stay firstly that they did vote remain an accepted the outcome of the result. to be totally honest, i think that you got the best with the card you are dealt. but my question is, when you are set around david cameron's cabinet table, what
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advice did you give to the prime ministerand given your advice did you give to the prime minister and given your present situation, world david cameron be receiving a christmas card this year? yes, he will be receiving a christmas card. and so will others that i worked with over the years. jacob rees—mogg? that i worked with over the years. jacob rees-mogg? all my conservative collea g u es jacob rees-mogg? all my conservative colleagues i sent christmas cards too. it is not as daniel christmas card. it is a christmas card design blade a child in my constituency. i much of the bbc will allow me to mention the maidenhead advertiser. we rana mention the maidenhead advertiser. we ran a condition in the local paper and there were three winners. so the christmas card will be designed by local child. with nigel‘s question, what advice did you give david cameron when you set around the cabinet table when he called a referendum?” around the cabinet table when he called a referendum? i thought that there were some key issues in the referendum. i thought immigration
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and ending — ending free movement was one of the issues about which people were very concerned. but i also spoke about — when david was to make you rather, it was doing his negotiation, brighter the referendum, raise the importance of security and some of the cooperation we have with europe on matters to do with terrorism and criminals. and of course that is one of the elements that we have got. a lot of people focus on things like the trade relationship in our deal. but there isa relationship in our deal. but there is a section on security which is really important, because it is about the corporation going. really important, because it is about the corporation goinglj really important, because it is about the corporation going. i would like to ask you, want a woman, very briefly, are you sick of men resigning and leaving you to clear up resigning and leaving you to clear up the mess— david davis, dominic raab, and others? i'm sorry when collea g u es raab, and others? i'm sorry when colleagues feel they need to resign. they've done their work in the cabinet and they've done their work in the cabinetand a they've done their work in the cabinet and a disappointed. my focus is always on what is the endpoint.
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do you go home and swear about it? it's other people's choice. they had a huge number of messages. people are sent me flowers, one little nine—year—old, gaby, baked cupcakes with my face on it. just your face? there was a message. her dad said, i'd had a tough week and she wanted to make me smile. and she seems like she has. we got a question from shelly here. scotla nd
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scotland and northern ireland voted to stay in, other parts voted to leave, different constituencies voted different ways. my constituency voted to remain but we joined the european union as the united kingdom and we will leave as the united kingdom and that's why it is right to take the view that came from across the whole of the country, the whole the united kingdom and that overall view was to leave the european union. matt on twitter has used the hashtag #bbcaskthis. he says, i noticed no brexit has crept into the pm's vocabulary over the last few weeks. why has that suddenly become one of the options? it is not one of my options. if you listen to the debates that take place, mps in the house of commons, who want to frustrate brexit and stop brexit. some people say it's like a threat.
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to me, i'm clear will believing the european union on the 29th of march next year. those who are trying to frustrate what people voted for i'd able to do so but i'm keen to leave ona able to do so but i'm keen to leave on a good dealfor the uk and that's what we've got for the european union andi what we've got for the european union and i will go back to brussels, european council on sunday, but this brings an end to free movement, the european court having jurisdiction in the uk, gives us having jurisdiction in the uk, gives us control of our borders and laws, not sending vast animal sums to the european union but enables us to come out of the common agricultural policy and fisheries policy which has not been working well for the uk. we will see what support you get again in the commons. laura has got in touch. good afternoon, prime minister. first of all, i fully support the brexit deal mini to get
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behind. thank you very much for that question. we are very clear about negotiating. in relation to living european union and the future, we do so in behalf of the whole uk family, including gibraltar. our position on gibraltar and its sovereignty has not changed and will not change and it's about the wish of the people of gibraltar. and what we've done in looking at this phase of the negotiations. we've been working with the government of gibraltar and with the government of gibraltar and with the government of gibraltar and with the government of spain. relating to gibraltar. we've worked
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very closely with gibraltar that our position on the sovereignty of gibraltar has not changed. let's bring in michael. you are live to the prime minister. good afternoon, prime minister. we all know that you voted to remain in the eu and you have now accepted the referendum result to leave. without any political waffle or convoluted answer, just between the two of us, what in your honest opinion is better for the uk? your deal or the deal we had to stay in the eu.” honestly believe that i'm getting what is a good dealfor the uk. i recognise that there were aspects of being in the european union that caused people real concern and free movement was one of those. i gave a
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speech at the beginning of the campaign where i explained i was voting for remain and i wasn't one of those who said, if we leave the european union, it will be really bad for the uk. i said, the sky would fall in, it will be a different world for us outside the european union but it will be a good one. and i believe we can really build on what we are doing. one of those examples is the trade we can do, trade partnerships we can develop around the rest of the world. i genuinely believe there is a bright future. as the prime minister answered your question? no. you've not answered his question. i appreciate what you are saying, but i would still like to know what you think, whether we would be better off if we had stayed in the eu or we will be better off with your deal. off if we had stayed in the eu or we will be better off with your deallj think we will be better off in a
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situation where we have control of all those things and are able to trade around the rest of the world. i was one of those people who said, asi i was one of those people who said, as ijust said, that it wasn't going to be the case that outside the european union, will don't have the sort of problems that some of the people said we would. it's different. you say are we better off? it's a different sort of environment. a different approach that we will be taking. what will make us better off is not so much about whether we are in the eu or not, it's about what we can do for our economy and our prosperity. our industrial strategy is a government, leading edge of developments. battery tech zero battery technology, these are the things that will make us better off. we wa nt that will make us better off. we want a good trade relationship with
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the eu and the rest of the world but it's what we do, our future is in our hands and that is what is important. can you say it's better than being in the eu?” important. can you say it's better than being in the eu? i thinki important. can you say it's better than being in the eu? i think i just did. the first thing is, is going to be different. i believe we can build a better future outside the european union. i want to get one more call—in. union. i want to get one more call-in. sarah, what's your question? good afternoon, prime minister. i question? good afternoon, prime minister. lam question? good afternoon, prime minister. i am a remainer myself but i accept the situation. my husband andi i accept the situation. my husband and i were imagining your days are pretty hectic so my question for you is, what time do you get to go to bed at the moment and you go to sleep dreaming of brexit? well, i certainly go —— i certainly don't go to sleep dreaming of brexit. last week i was in one of the prime infa nt
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week i was in one of the prime infant schools in my constituency andi infant schools in my constituency and i was asked that question and i said, iquite and i was asked that question and i said, i quite often don't get to bed until after midnight and i fear there are a lot of children who went home and said, mummy, can i stay up till midnight because the prime minister does? if you get this deal through, how you go to celebrate with philip? well, over the next few weeks, the first thing is getting the deal on sunday and getting meaningful vote through. prime minister, thank you very much. this isa minister, thank you very much. this is a special edition of the emma barnett show on radio 5 live and the bbc news channel. this cold weather from the yeast will have lasted about a week before the weather changes and it will change because there is a strengthening jetstream propagating across the atlantic. will that
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u nsettled across the atlantic. will that unsettled weather continued. the moment, have got the cold easterlies dragging ina moment, have got the cold easterlies dragging in a lot of cloud. across more southern parts of england. the odd shower further north —— further north. we have an easterly breeze. particularly north—west england and west wales. another chilly day. 7— nine degrees as with scene over the last day or so. during the evening or overnight, the frost is very limited. maybe something a bit wetter beginning to arrive in the near continent. temperatures typically around about 2— five degrees once again early sunday morning. let's take a look at a picture on sunday. a little bit
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drier in the south—west. again, western areas considered best of any sunshine. this time on sunday, it looks a bit chillier than saturday and feeling a bit colder. i pressure sitting to the north of the uk, beginning to extend its way essentially, the same weather pattern to the start of the week. that chilly easterly breeze, maybe more of a breeze on monday so again, cloudy skies the many parts of the country. the shower is migrating to wales and pushing away. those of the temperatures. we are struggling at six, seven, eight degrees for the start of the week and this nec said the wind dropping in mcleod breaking, it could turn quite chilly. as we move into tuesday, this is moving day. the high pressure is getting pushed away. for many eastern parts of the uk, we are
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in that cold air, a fair bit of cloud around. we start to see some weather fronts coming into cloud around. we start to see some weatherfronts coming into northern ireland and wales and the south—west. that means outbreaks of rain. the winds should be quite light and temperatures at six and seven. as we move into wednesday, the mild south—westerly winds sweeping across the whole of the country. moving quickly across the northern half of the uk. we change the wind direction this time. temperatures will be higher, widely into double figures so as we heading towards the later part of the week, we continue to see this succession of areas of low pressure coming in from the atlantic and it looks like they would fight their way to the north—west of the uk, pushing in these bands of rain followed by showers. the showers coming on this cooler air. the rain comes in on the milderair cooler air. the rain comes in on the milder air which tends to dominate and that's what we call tropical maritime. generally speaking, as we
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go into the end of the week. there will be showers or longer spells of rain, strong to gale force winds. mild air across the shores. that is it from me. we will look at tomorrow morning's paper injust we will look at tomorrow morning's paper in just a we will look at tomorrow morning's paper injust a moment but we will look at tomorrow morning's paper in just a moment but first, the headlines. theresa may says the d raft the headlines. theresa may says the draft brexit agreement is the right dealfor britain. if draft brexit agreement is the right deal for britain. if we were good to go back to the european union and say, people did not like that deal, i don't think they are going to come to us and say, we will get a better deal. police say knocking offenders off their mopeds is leading to a dramatic decrease in robberies.
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there is a warning that too many people suffering mental health crises are not giving —— are not getting enough help at a&e departments. and - surgeon crossing the channel. migrants crossing the channel. welcome to look ahead at what the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. welcome both to you. many of the front pages are already in. only a couple lead with brexit. one of thoseis couple lead with brexit. one of those is the daily telegraph, saying theresa may will announce a curb on low—skilled migration in an effort to get tory eurosceptics tobacco brexit deal. and the i thinks it's
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the calm before the storm. they had at that crucial vote in parliament. in other news, the times shows are still of a dramatic footage of a suspect sent sprawling after being knocked from his motorbike by police car, a controversial way to target muggers. also, a knockout blow to mopeds bugs. the guardian leads with its investigation into care homes, making a total profit of £113 million. the fall in oil prices leads the ft. the lowest level in more than a year, according to the paper. just to gps for 1.4 million patients, says the daily mail. two doctors responsible for almost eve ryo ne doctors responsible for almost everyone in kent in the early hours of sunday morning. and warangal in thejungle, of sunday morning. and warangal in the jungle, writes the of sunday morning. and warangal in thejungle, writes the daily of sunday morning. and warangal in the jungle, writes the daily star. of sunday morning. and warangal in
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thejungle, writes the daily star. i celebrity contestants are planning against the bossy noel edmonds. let's make a start with brexit. first of all, the daily telegraph, and i've lost my running order, but i know that's where we are starting, made to curb migration as brexit vote looms clearly appealing to people and politicians for whom immigration was a big issue. that is right. i think she is trying to appeal to people not politicians. as you mention, she was doing a public phone in earlier today on the bbc. this is part of a broader strategy to go over the heads of parliament and squabbling mps and deceit of the british people, you know, backley, and back ideal. and immigration been, and she has been clear from the start of the prime ministership, this has been the major element in the referendum, and this is designed to

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