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tv   BBC News  BBC News  January 13, 2019 5:00pm-6:00pm GMT

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this is bbc news. the headlines at five. theresa may warns mps — a failure to deliver brexit would be "a catastrophic and unforgivable breach of trust in our democracy." the leader of the opposition, jeremy corbyn, spells out what labour will do if theresa may loses the vote on tuesday. we will table a motion of no—confidence in the government at a time of our choosing, but it will be soon. don't worry about that. a bbc investigation reveals gambling addicts were able to sign back into existing online accounts by just making minor changes to their personal details. greater manchester police continue to their investigation into a hit—and—run accident, in which an 11—year—old boy died last night. emergency services continue to battle the snow in europe — with a number of ski resorts and mountain villages having to be evacuated. the prime minister has pleaded
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with mps to back her brexit deal in this week's crucial commons vote — warning that a failure to deliver brexit would be a catastrophic and unforgivable breach of trust. it comes as downing street expressed concern that mps could thwart brexit by changing parliamentary rules — to dicate the next steps in the process — if tuesday's vote is lost. our political correspodnent susana mendonca reports. it's crunch week for theresa may's brexit deal. the vote which she put off last month to buy her more time will happen in just two days, and with her government again heading for a defeat, the prime minister has been trying to win over her back benchers. writing in the sunday express, she urged mps to back her deal, warning that if parliament stopped brexit it would be a catastrophic
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and unforgivable breach of trust in our democracy. rumours have been brewing about plots by backbenchers to seize control of parliamentary business, if the government loses the vote. the brexit secretary told the andrew marr show that he was surprised that the speaker of the house had allowed mps to change the parliamentary timetable last week and warned that could be a sign of things to come. the uncertainty, in terms of what will happen in the house, has increased and so those on the brexiteer side seeking ideological purity with a deal, are risking brexit because there is a growing risk that events could unfold in ways, so they are leaving the door ajar to ways that could increase the risk. at an anti—austerity protest in london yesterday there were calls for another general election. the labour leader has been pushing for that but he has remained somewhat cryptic on what his party would do on brexit if they were in power and on when they might try to topple the government.
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we will table a motion of no confidence in the government at a time of our choosing but it is going to be soon, don't worry about that. barry gardiner has used the word immediately. i'm getting overexcited perhaps but i'm assuming you would do it very quickly? andrew, don't get too excited about it. there is only two days to wait until the vote. i know it is yourjob but it's two days to wait for the vote. we will have the vote and then we will see. so you're not promising to put down a vote of no confidence on tuesday night or wednesday morning? you will see what happens. many labour members want another referendum and campaigners for a so—called people's vote were out in force in sheffield this weekend. the liberal democrat leader, who supports another referendum, said that backbenchers would assert themselves if the government loses this week's vote. parliament will take control of this process, will insist that we persue the option of no brexit. it can happen in one of two ways. it can happen simply by cancelling article 50 which i think would be resented by lots of people, or it can happen by parliament
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saying actually we go back to the public to have the final say. the prime minister and her team have admitted they face a challenging week as they try to win the vote, and if they don't win it is clear they will face even more challenges. well a little earlier i spoke to susana mendonca — i started by asking her how challenging this week is going to be, for the prime minister. it goes beyond challenging. when it comes down to it theresa may was going to lose this vote in december, when she chose to delay it to give herself more time to actually speak to mps and get them on side. here we are two days away from this vote and all the indications are that she is unlikely to have the numbers to get it through. the question is by how much does she lose it? there is talk that there is potentially more than a hundred tory mps voting against their own government. if she can bring that number down today, in terms of the article she has written today, this is all about trying to persuade those who have been wavering, bring that number down,
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that would be a plus for her. you mentioned the article, the message is broadly the same. the tone perhaps a little more alarming? yes, this is a sense this is a prime minister who is trying desperately to win as many of her mps to her side as possible. the whole thing that brexit might not happen at all is to win over those brexiteers in the party who are not happy with the deal she has got, but perhaps are more worried about the idea of no brexit at all. then, also that talk about potentially having a no—deal brexit and that is something that parliament has indicated there is no majority for that, but there is no clarity on what there is a majority for, and that is the point that theresa may makes. mps are likely to vote against it on tuesday but then we're expecting the government to come back, they have three working days, to come back with an alternative. we are not clear on what that will
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be either and what their plan b, or if they even have a plan b. we are not clear on any of that. and we think there will be a motion of no confidence from labour if the government loses, but we do not know when? exactly. jeremy corbyn has been asked about this time and time again. he was asked again today. he's been quite cagey about the timing of it. i think the key problem for labour is they do not want to call a no confidence vote that they are not going to win. and if the tory mps and the dup vote with their own government which is what you would expect, it is still a big mountain for them to climb. jeremy corbyn saying he would go for a motion of no confidence, no clarity yet on exactly when, if you read between the lines on the interview he did earlier, it seems sooner rather than later. i know you reflected on it briefly with the piece we just saw, what the sunday times have been running with this morning, the suggestion of some sort of british coup. that parliament runs things rather than the executive do. yes, this is about parliament asserting itself, we have heard a lot over the last couple of years about parliament wanting to assert
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itself, and here we have, probably because of what we saw last week with the speakerjohn bercow giving mps the opportunity to change the timetable, the government is worried that that's set a precedent and those types of things might happen again. they are concerned, in particular, what they call a plot, a move, by some mps to perhaps try to take control of government business so that backbenchers have the precedence over the government business. that would be very difficult for the government because it will potentially take the power out of their hands. concerns about britain's post—brexit agreements with switzerland and up to 70 other non—eu countries have been raised by the chairman of the commons international trade committee. last month, the international trade secretary, dr liam fox, announced that the uk had approved an interim trade deal with the swiss — but the snp mp, angus macneil,
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said greater clarity was needed. our business correspondent joe miller, reports. being in the eu doesn'tjust allow you to trade freely with 27 other member states. because over the years, brussels has negotiated agreements with dozens of countries around the world, including south korea and mexico, and those agreements bring down tariffs, they reduce regulation, and effectively make it easier to move goods and services across borders. last year the international trade secretary, dr liam fox, told the bbc he hopes all a0 of those agreements will be rolled over after brexit, and that 70 countries had already agreed to do so in principle. last december, he told parliament of his first triumph. of course, we have now actually initialled the first of those
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major trade agreements, which is with switzerland. which is responsible for almost one fifth of the total trade within those agreements. others will follow. but the snp mp angus macneil, who chairs the international trade committee, which oversees dr fox's department, has written a letter to the secretary of state, in which he expresses concern about details of this accord. he says there has not been sufficient information about it and even raises the prospect that the freedom of movement of people, which is currently a condition of the deal between the eu and switzerland, would have to be accepted by the uk. a government spokesperson said the arrangement with switzerland replicates the existing one as far as possible, and we know that more details will be forthcoming. but if these 39 odd agreements are to pass through parliament in time for a possible no—deal brexit, thatjust leaves 11 weeks to avoid disruption
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with many trade partners. greater manchester police are continuing their investigation into a hit—and—run accident, in which an 11—year—old boy died last night. the child was treated by paramedics at the scene but died of his injuries in hospital. a 31—year—old man was arrested in connection with the crash and remains in custody. fiona trott gave us this update. people here in beswick in greater manchester say they are absolutely devastated by what happened last night. you can see that people have been coming out of their homes here to lay flowers this afternoon. everyone in this neighbourhood says they are extremely upset by what happened. they think the boy was out on his bike last night. it happened at around six o'clock. as you say he was treated at the scene, taken to hospital but died a short time later and what greater manchester police have told us is that they believe a volkswagon golf, a gray volkswagon golf, was abandoned nearby. they are asking anybody who may have seen the driver of that car
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to get in touch with them, or if they have any footage, any dash cam footage, to hand that to the police as well. they say they are passing their condolences onto the family at this unimaginably difficult time. three men have been killed in an avalanche near the austiran ski resort of lech — as heavy snowfall continues to bring parts of central europe to a standstill. austria has seen record snowfall, with more forecast for the weekend. soldiers, firefighters, and volunteers have been battling to clear blocked roads and rooftops during breaks in the weather. kathryn stanczysyzn reports. this part of the world is no stranger to snow. but emergency services here in southern germany, and in neighbouring austria, are having to work extra hard after days of unusually extreme weather. more snow fell overnight across the bavarian alps where people are already
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experiencing disaster conditions. last night in lech, three skiers were killed in an avalanche after the group ventured to a route that had been closed off because of the risk. a fourth person is still missing. translation: at 7.50pm last night a relative filed a missing persons report in lech. the mountain rescue team went into action suddenly with approximately 20 men. after passing difficult conditions they reached the accident site. further avalanches are now a major worry and it's an uphill struggle to keep roads and buildings safe. the lower bavaria police and fire services dealt with 150 incidents overnight, mostly due to the treacherous roads. the army has been brought in to help clear them. in places, normal life has come to a standstill, with railway lines, shops and schools shut. other parts of europe have also experienced severe weather
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in the past few days. even algeria has been affected. these roads in the northern provinces rendered impassable. in the alps, there's no respite as the authorities try to keep on top of this dramatic situation. the forecast tomorrow is for temperatures to drop again, which could bring more than a metre of fresh snow. kathryn stanczyszyn, bbc news. two employees at a sky resort in the french alps have died after the avalanche—control devices they were trying to set, accidentally went off. mountain rescue officials say the accident happened at a ski resort near chamonix as the pair were trying to set a controlled explosion to prevent the risk of larger avalanches. forecasters have warned of a high risk of avalanches in the area after heavy snowfalls this weekend. at least five people have died in heavy snowstorms, in the midwest of the united states. the storm hit kansas and missouri on friday and pummeled those states again on saturday as it extended into several other states, including iowa, illinois, indiana and ohio.
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in the state of missouri, a foot—and—a—half of snow fell, and more than eight—hundred road accidents were reported. dozens of flights were also cancelled. more snow is expected today, with the storm now moving east towards washington dc. it expected to cover an estimated 1800—mile stretch of the united states in total. and injapan, a group of skiers who became stranded on a mountain in the iwate prefecture of northern japan had to be rescued by helicopter. four children were in the group of six who had to be airlifted to safety. the headlines on bbc news... theresa may has warned mps, preparing to vote on her eu withdrawal deal, that a failure to deliver brexit would be "a catastrophic and unforgivable breach of trust in our democracy." greater manchester police are continuing their investigation into a hit—and—run accident, in which an 11—year—old boy died last night.
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the head of a scheme designed to help problem gamblers says she is "deeply concerned" after an investigation found people were able to cheat the system. scotland's first minister nicola sturgeon has referred herself to a standards panel over her actions during an investigation into alex salmond. nicola sturgeon made phone calls and took meetings with her predecessor as first minister — mr salmond — while claims of sexual harassment — which he denies — were being investigated. she said it was in the interest of the complainants that she should be examined under the ministerial code. however, she also said she "acted appropriately and in good faith." the gambling commission has told the bbc it plans to close a loophole that allows problem gamblers to continue betting online — even after they've signed up to a self—exclusion scheme. five live investigates has seen evidence that those who self—exclude
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can easily sign back in to accounts. gamstop says it has helped more than 50,000 people self—exclude but now the gambling commssion says it plans to ask betting firms to build in enhanced identity verification to prevent customers gambling using incorrect details to access their accounts. earlier i spoke to liz karter — a therapist who specialises in treating gambling addictions. what i know from my 18 years of experience that what drives a gambling addiction, certainly for anyone i have treated, is some degree of emotional and mental difficulty. so, typically, stress, depression or anxiety drive a desire to emotionally medicate by whichever form of gambling that person is choosing. in simple terms, whether they are gambling for what might be described
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as a buzz or a high or a rush, from fast moving forms of gambling such as casino tables or sports betting which creates a high or whether, which is increasingly common, as 98% of the woman i work with discover, that staring at a computer screen or a slot machine creates a sense of numbing or complete absorption. it shuts out other problems. it shuts out other problems but because it is gambling, very, very sadly and often in a very devastating way for many people they start to lose track, not only of their problems but of how much money they are spending, and online that is very easy because there is no cash to hand over. we can all relate to that, how easy it is to pay a bill online because we are not handing over cash. often people don't realise how much they've spent until there is no money left and that of course, makes it very, very difficult
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for that person to stop because they are emotionally driven to gamble. their cravings are every bit as real and strong as someone addicted to class a drugs. it makes it difficult for the industry to be able to have a meaningful conversation with that person. and at that low point people are desperate to win or more desperate than they were because of their financial plight, so they'll carry on? absolutely. they have double the trouble at that stage. they have the problems they were maybe escaping from in the first place, to give typical sorts of problems, maybe it's a divorce or a bereavement or redundancy, struggling bringing up kids alone. they have lost all their money, they have double the trouble, so it drives the cravings to continue by escapism. they hope that if they win the money back they can turn the clock back and it is as if it has never
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happened, so they feel stuck in a horrible trap. thoughts on what five live investigates has uncovered and now what the gambling comission is saying about closing that particular loophole? the industry has a difficultjob. it is difficult for them to stop somebody in active addiction because it is very difficult for that person to stop themselves. so i think, for one thing, let's acknowledge and congratulate the industry. there are some super responsible companies that i talk to who really do want to know how to help but they need to know how to help. they need to have an essential understanding of what is driving the customer. so let's acknowledge that is happening but there is obviously some work to be done. i would like to see meaningful education.
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as a society we all need to better understand that when gambling becomes an addiction it is about so much more than money. the obsession with money is the end consequence once there isn't any. the real hook in is that emotional medication effect and that people need to understand that if they are regularly gambling when they are feeling stressed, or depressed or anxious, they are at real risk of developing an addiction to gambling, in the same way as alcohol or recreational drugs, or a digital addiction. the development with regards to the hit—and—run accident in manchester which we have reported. the ii—year—old which we have reported. the 11—year—old who has died in this collision has now been named, ii—year—old taylor schofield did in
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this collision and the city and his family pay tribute to him, the incident occurred yesterday evening where police were called to reports ofa vw where police were called to reports of a vw golf and collided with a pedestrian in besic and the car left the scene, the pedestrian now we know was treated at the scene by paramedics but sadly died as a result of his injuries. 831—year—old man later attended police station and was arrested on suspicion of causing death by dangerous driving. he remains in custody for questioning. but taylor schofield, the name of the 11—year—old who has died in that incident. almost a fifth of councils in england have introduced a ban on begging, yet only ten of 244 fines issued have been paid. a new system that allows people to donate to the homeless via a contactless payment in the street is being piloted in peterborough to try and deter beggers. jo taylor reports. 28—year—old max says he has been
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homeless for two years, and has no choice but to beg. he is standing metres away from a sign saying he is not allowed to beg. the amount of money he makes varies from day to day. how much? £7.90. it's notjust money people donate. while filming, a passer—by gave him a jumper and food. that looks warm. yeah, a big woollyjumper. around the corner i meet andy, not his real name, who says he is homeless. due to his circumstances, we have protected his identity. i got sacked injanuary because of the pressure of the job. my mental health went downhill. across england, 5a out of 302 councils told the bbc they have introduced a public spaces protection order prohibiting begging. but only 244 fines have been issued over four years, and only ten of those have been paid. some spare change, please, ma'am?
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home office advice is to only use the powerfor genuine anti—social behaviour, and not target the vulnerable. peterborough council banned begging last year, but have not issued a single fine, as they want to give those that beg the opportunity to get off the street first. now they are trying something new. a contactless donation point. you just put your card up to the screen and it will immediately take £3, which goes into a charitable donation. right. we want to make sure the money goes to the right place so we can provide support to get them off the streets, so they don't have to beg in the first place. the money goes into this and it will fund a number of different initiatives. is it actually going to work in stopping people holding their hand out? this is about making inroads. it will still go on, but it's about to what extent. over three months, almost £1000 has been donated through the contactless point. that is helping to fund a new day centre which offers homeless people services.
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the main aim is to get people off the streets for good. jo taylor, bbc news, peterborough. and you can find out what happed to max and others begging in peterborough — on inside out, tomorrow at 7.30pm on bbc one in the east of england — and then afterwards across the uk on the iplayer. the us secretary of state, mike pompeo says he is optimistic that washington and turkey can agree on a way to protect america's kurdish allies in syria after its troops leave the country. mr pompeo was speaking in the united arab emirates during a middle east tour aimed at reassuring allies after president trump abruptly announced his decision to withdraw us troops. our correspondent barbara plett usher is in riyadh and has been following his tour. he was notably short on details, just saying he thought there could possibly be an agreement that would address turkey's legitimate concerns about legitimate terror threats but also at the same
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time protect those kurdish allies that are fighting alongside the united states against islamic state group who he said were not terrorists. we know the turks do regard them as a serious security threat — they see them as an extension of turkish kurdish groups that have been fighting an insurgency against the turkish government for many decades. we do know mr pompeo said that his special envoy, jamesjeffrey, had been in north—eastern syria, presumably to meet the kurds, and he would be going to turkey again so that is active mediation and diplomacy going on. they have been rumours about possibly a deal with regard to border security, perhaps a border force that is acceptable to both sides but again, these are rumours and mr pompeo himself has not confirmed any sort of detail as to what makes them so optimistic that an agreement can be reached. a 33—year—old man in taiwan has been fined more than 2000 pounds for sending a cat that he no longer wanted, in the post.
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according to a taiwanese news agency, the sender was traced after the sealed cardboard box with the cat inside arrived at the local animal shelter. luckily the pet survived the journey and authorities say he's in good health and looking for a new, loving home. in india, a two day camel festival has begun in the town of bikaner in rajasthan, attended by thousands of people. the opening day saw a procession from junagarh fort and activities includuing camel fur cutting and camel decoration. the two day festival is popular with locals and tourists alike. in a moment, the national news bulletin with mishal hussein — now it's time for a look at the weather with susan powell. hello. we're definitely seeing more in the way of sunshine across the uk today than yesterday, but as the skies cleared, we've also
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imported some chillier air, so it has felt pressure, despite the brighter weather. the reason it's turned a little chilly is a cold front has sunk its way south across the uk, not producing much in the way of rain but allowing some relatively cold air in. behind this band of showers working its way south and there is cooler air still. we have had a windy day, those winds will gradually ease through the night, the weather feature kind of fizzles out in terms of bringing many showers as it makes its way south, certainly the cold air does feed in behind it, a frosty start for scotland on monday. further south lows of 4—5d, typically frost free apart from one or two isolated spots. for monday the story is of a fresher day for most of us, but then temperatures will bounce back up for tuesday, then towards the end of the week they will tail back down to below average values again, so a fluctuating story in the next five days.
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monday, largely under the influence of high pressure, the tail end of that weather feature in the east on monday may be giving us isolated showers, a warm front trying to come into the west. essentially a dry day, a pretty bright day for many, but with a fresher feel, just four degrees in aberdeen. but remember this area of cloud and drizzly rain, as i said, it is a warm front which will run across us into tuesday, so back into milder atlantic air, a different feel for tuesday, because it will feel rather like the weekend, certainly on the mild side. for many, some sunshine, the better chances further south and east. scotland, this weather front will grind to a halt through tuesday and wednesday, somebody persistent rain here, totals in one or two spots up to 100 millimetres, but typically 30—40 where the rain lingers across the islands.
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by the middle of the week, we will start to see those weather feature slipping away south once again, clearer skies, dry up for thursday and friday, turning noticeably colder. 48 hours to the big parliamentary vote, the prime minister says failing to deliver brexit would be a catatstrophic breach of trust. but with theresa may not expected to win the support of mps on tuesday, how will labour respond? we will table a motion of no—confidence in the government at a time our choosing that it will be soon, don't worry about that. the 11—year—old killed in a hit and run in manchester. police are questioning a suspect. an avalanche kills three people in the austrian alps, as resorts across the region battle intense conditions. he is going to seize the
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opportunity. and exeter chiefs keep their european rugby union hopes alive with victory over the french champions. good afternoon. theresa may and her ministers are making last minute appeals for mps to support the eu deal that'll be put to the vote in the house of commons on tuesday. the prime minister warned today that the trust of voters in the democratic process is at stake if brexit is not delivered, while jeremy corbyn says labour will table a vote of no confidence in the government "soon" after any defeat. the deal being put to mps is on the terms the government has agreed with the eu for the uk's exit in 11 weeks' time and an outline of the future relationship. our political correspondent, vicki young, reports. she bought herself more time by delaying this crucial brexit vote
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but theresa may has just two days to persuade mps to back her deal. so far there is little sign of growing support but the prime minister continues to make her case. writing in the sunday express she warned mps that if parliament stopped brexit it would be... the government is hoping for more reassurances from the eu on the terms of the uk's departure. the brexit secretary admitted the government faces a challenge to get its deal through. we're working hard with colleagues, we're working hard with eu leaders. the prime minister has been speaking to them in terms of the specific concerns we've heard, particularly on the issue of the backstop. after losing crucial votes in the commons, downing street now says it is worried that opponents of brexit could find a way to take control of parliamentary business. mr barclay said that should focus the minds of brexiteers. the uncertainty in terms of what will happen in the house has increased and so those
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on the brexiteer side seeking ideological purity with a deal are risking brexit. last week speakerjohn bercow made it clear that he has allowed mps to have their say on brexit, so an unpredictable political situation is now even more uncertain. even if mps can seize control of what is going on there in the house of commons, can they agree on an alternative to theresa may's plan? some want to stop a no—deal brexit, others want a different kind of deal or another referendum. will you win a confidence vote? so, what does the labour leader want? jeremy corbyn is against theresa may's deal and wants a general election. many in his party want another referendum. he though sounds reluctant. my own view is that i would rather get a negotiated deal now if we can to stop the danger of a no deal exit from the eu on the 29th of march, which would be catastrophic for industry, catastrophic for trade, and the long—term effects of that would be huge.
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we will do everything we can to prevent a no deal exit. the people's vote campaign group were out in force in sheffield this weekend — insisting support for another referendum is increasing. the liberal democrat leader thinks mps will assert themselves if the government loses on tuesday. parliament will take control of this process, will insist that we pursue the option of no brexit. it can happen in one of two ways. it can happen simply by cancelling article 50, which i think would be resented by lots of people, or it can happen by parliament saying actually we go back to the public to have the final say. it's hard to find anyone in westminster who thinks theresa may will win the vote. everyone is talking about plan b but there is no agreement about what that is. vicki joins me now. only 48—hour is to go before the
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vote. if anything is shifting in favour of the government? it does not feel like it, given that theresa may delayed the vote before christmas to buy herself time. there has not been a shift of mps to come over to her thinking. it feels like it isa over to her thinking. it feels like it is a momentous time. this week is so it is a momentous time. this week is so unpredictable. theresa may is trying to put through a controversial idea without a majority and that has been the problem from the beginning. talking to people in westminster it is almost impossible to find anyone who thinks she will win on tuesday. the government will try to get more reassurance from the eu but i do not think it will be enough. it might peel off a few conservative mps but it will not be enough. it is about damage limitation at the moment for that the idea of plan b, some want another referendum although a very interesting intervention from jeremy corbyn making it clear he does not wa nt corbyn making it clear he does not want that. he is looking much more
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ata want that. he is looking much more at a negotiated deal which could be closer to what labour wants, a closer to what labour wants, a closer arrangement with the eu. others say the legal default position is no deal but we know that parliament has made it pretty clear they will not accept that. then those who want to stay in the european economic area but they cannot all be right. at the end of it someone will have to compromise it someone will have to compromise it is possible that theresa may could go back to europe to try get more from them and try again with her deal. thank you. the family of an 11—year—old boy who was killed in a hit and run accident in manchester yesterday have paid tribute to him, saying he was a cheeky, handsome lad. taylor schofield was treated by paramedics at the scene but died of his injuries in hospital. police are questioning a suspect, as fiona trott reports. he was an 11—year—old boy, out playing on his bike. taylor schofield was treated at the scene but died a short time later. it happened here on albert street in beswickjust after 6pm yesterday.
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greater manchester police said they are trying to establish the full details of what happened. a grey volkswagen golf was abandoned nearby. they're asking anybody with information to come forward. today, people living in this close community came out to lay flowers, including members of taylor's family. friends and neighbours say they are devastated. it's heartbreaking, it's absolutely awful what's happened, it's absolutely devastating. my thoughts are with his family and obviously all the close friends and stuff that have been affected by it. it's absolutely devastating. the police investigation into what's happened here is still ongoing but people in the neighbourhood say this has been a dangerous road for years. how many lives have got to be taken before they step... ? they need bumps on this road to stop it. it's disgusting. something needs to be done. some of the children coming to pay their respects have been very young. a member of staff says taylor's school is making plans to support the pupils tomorrow. fiona trott, bbc news,
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greater manchester. scotland's first minister has referred herself to a standards panel over meetings she had with her predecessor — alex salmond — while he was being investigated over claims of sexual harassment. he denies the allegations. let's go live to katie hunter in glasgow. why has nicola sturgeon taken this step? nicola sturgeon says it is in the interests of the two women who made the complaint is that the police investigation be allowed to continue without risk of prejudice. nicola sturgeon has said she met alex salmond three times as big to him on the phone twice after the allegations were made to the scottish government in 2018. on tuesday the highest civil court in scotla nd tuesday the highest civil court in scotland ruled the scottish government's handling of the allegations was unlawful. nicola sturgeon has said she acted in good
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faith and appropriately throughout in adherence with the ministerial code. she said she understands it is important that parliament and the public he reassured that. alex salmond still faces a police investigation. he strenuously denies the allegations made against him. a fourth person has died as a result of a massive gas explosion in paris. rescuers pulled the body of a woman from the rubble of a bakery in the centre of the city. two firefighters and a tourist from spain were also killed yesterday with dozens injured and nearby apartments badly damaged. the partial shutdown of the us government over president trump's demands forfunding to build a wall along the mexican border has entered its 23rd day. more than 800,000 workers haven't been paid and today the president tweeted it was all the democrats' fault. david willis reports. as the politicians wrangle, the tangible effects of the longest government shutdown in us
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history are on display. this, a food bank for some of the hundreds of thousands of government workers who are working for not being paid. —— but not being paid. most of all the shutdown is affecting me emotionally. i mean, we did not ask for this. i'm a veteran. i have served my country as well as working at the state department for over 35 years. pressure is building on president trump, as the latest opinion polls show more americans blame him and his party for the shutdown than the democrats. for his part, the president is making much of the fact that whilst he is here in washington, ready and willing to negotiate, democrat leaders are in puerto rico for a winter retreat and a fundraising performance at the musical, hamilton. early this morning, he tweeted... the president has toyed with declaring a national emergency
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in order to get funding for his wall. but some senior republicans are urging caution. i would urge him to open up the government for a short period of time, like three weeks, before he pulls the plug, see if we can get a deal. the trickle—down effects of this dispute are being felt at places like this. miami international airport has been forced to partly close one of its terminals because of a shortage of staff. with air traffic controllers also caught up in the dispute, union officials are warning that the longer it goes on, the greater the chance that passenger safety could be compromised. three people have been killed — and a fourth is missing — after an avalanche near the austrian ski resort of lech. austria has been hit by record snowfall in the past week and there have been more than 20 weather—related deaths across parts of the alps this month. our correspondent bethany bell is in kleinzell, central austria.
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the weather conditions have been causing havoc here in austria and across the alps in recent days. it has been extremely difficult for the authorities to cope with the task of clearing away all the snow got in some places the risk of avalanches is at it's very highest level. there have been several confirmed deaths this weekend including three skiers in the ski resort of lech in austria. mountain regions in austria are used to snow but this is extreme. days of heavy snowfall are taking their toll. last night three skiers from germany were killed in an avalanche in lech. their bodies were found on a ski route that had been closed off because of the danger of avalanches. a fourth person is still missing. translation: yesterday evening
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we decided to cancel the search because it had become too dangerous. we know how the weather will develop so we can probably initiate the search again on wednesday. the risk of more avalanches is very high. some ski resorts and mountain villages have had to be evacuated. other areas are snowed in. these firefighters near the town of kleinzell in central austria are working round the clock to clear snow from homes and buildings. the snow is very heavy and there is a real risk this roof could cave in. translation: it is quite dangerous work. as you can see all the men are harnessed because you could easily slip off while coming down. the risk is relatively high. driving conditions are treacherous. it is a struggle to keep the streets clear. underneath this white blanket is a tarmac road. this area has not seen this much
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snow in well over a decade. in neighbouring germany, the army has been brought in to help clear the roads. and people here are bracing themselves for more. heavy snow is forecast over the next few days. bethany bell, bbc news, near kleinzell in the austrian alps. with all the sport now, here's karthi gna nasegaram at the bbc sport centre. good evening. it is a pivotal weekend in rugby union's european champions cup competition. exeter had a crucial six—try 34 points to 12 victory over french champions castres, to keep their quarter final hopes alive. glasgow are also still in contention after defeating cardiff blues. while saracens, who have already qualified, beat lyon. patrick gearey reports. it isa
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it is a rugby mystery. the curious case of exeter in europe. one of englandbacks to the east side strangely struggling continental competition. this single man has been out since november four ofjust under three minutes into his return from injury he did this or that good timing for him ahead of the six nations. welcome back and see you later. the first clue as to their problems followed soon afterwards. all too easy four castres to draw level. this try was created forjo simmons. johnny hill followed him over. now that she's looked like the side at the top of the premiership for that this one was guided down the runway and a bonus point in the baggage. i read hard for the castres prop. how exeter must wish they had solved this riddle sooner. —— a red
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card. everton won the midtable battle in the premier league with victory over bournemouth. two second half goals including this one from dominc calvert—lewin in stoppage time at goodison park secured the win for everton and moves them into the top—half of the table. and tottenham could move up to second place if they beat manchester united. but it is currently 1—0 to united at wembley, marcus rashford with a first half goal. there are around 30 minutes left to play. the first grand slam of the tennis season gets underway overnight with seven british players in action on day one. but the focus will be on andy murray who may be playing his last ever match leading to glowing tributes from two of the sport's all time greats, roger federer and novak djokovic. joe wilson reports. in melbourne, andy murray warns us he has very little left. well, that's ok because he's given everything. he shared every emotion on court with some of the greatest men's players who've ever lived. the fiercest rivals can also be close friends. that is the essence of sport and that is why
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murray will be missed. it is sad notjust for me but for all the sport because andy is a very respected and likeable guy around the locker room. he is a great champion. he is a legend of the sport without a doubt. murray's decision to stop is also a reality check. an era when the best male players seemed ageless can't go on forever. i was disappointed and sad — a little bit shocked, you know, to know now that we're going to lose him at some point but we're going to lose everybody at some point, so it's just that now it's definite. well, andy murray's lived in pain so long he's had time to imagine the end but, until the last ball is struck in anger, he admits he has zero motivation to do anything different. joe wilson, bbc news. there's more on the bbc sport website including coverage
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of england's netballers who face new zealand in their 2019 quad series. that's all from us. we're back with the late news at 10. now on bbc one it's time for the news where you are. goodbye. let's make one nation, one destination, that is the statement the former mayorjulian castro launched his bid to become the first hispanic resident of the united states. and his announcement in his hometown of san antonio, he spoke about a variety of issues, including the environment, health care, and immigration. in time when the us is locked in debate about immigration on the southern border, he slams president trump's immigration policy. he is very passionately about his old mexican heritage, in particular his grandfather who migrated to the us hello. this is bbc news. the gambling commission has told the bbc it plans to close a loophole that allows problem gamblers to continue betting online — even after they've signed up to a self—exclusion scheme. five live investigates has seen evidence that those who self—exclude can easily sign back in to accounts. gamstop says it has helped more than 50,000 people self—exclude, but now the gambling commssion says it plans to ask betting firms to build in enhanced identity
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verification to prevent customers gambling using incorrect details to access their accounts. the labour mp carolyn harris, who chairs a cross—party group of mps on gambling, says what the investigation has found — doesn't shock her. iam not i am not at all so prized. it is not fit for purpose. no further own in identifying what they need at all to be ineffective service. they are exploiting vulnerable people. in my opinion as well. we have to be slightly protectionist and it it takes more than tricking a
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system to make it work. they need to go back to the drawing board. it needs to be able to bed than individual, and needs to be able to band the actual results that people use, and they also need to be able to work and the banks to stop credit and debit cards to be used for gambling when someone has a problem. if someone has a drug problem and you put the drug dealer in prison, it is not going to stop the problem. this is what this is, this is a really serious problem, it has to be a robust system. it is not fit for purpose. we have some really good treatment centres but they are very few and not really acknowledging this is supposed who have an interest in it, as being a dangerous addiction. we have to accept that we have people out there'll vulnerable to gambling and they are being exploited by an industry which only ca res exploited by an industry which only cares about profit, certainly not people. in the us, a tent city in the west
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texas desert set up to hold immigrant children has shut down, ending more than half a year of controversial operation. the facility, in the border city of tornillo, sprang up injune when the trump administration put into place its "zero tolerance" policy that called for separating parents from children after families crossed the border from mexico illegally. it was reported to hold more than 2,500 migrants at one point, including between 400 and 800 children. officials say the children have been moved to other shelters. there's less than two years to go until the next presidential election in the us. candidates have already started to launch their bids for the role ahead of the marathon campaigns to come. the latest is the texan hoolyan castro who launched his bid on saturday. rebecca hartmann reports. "one nation, one destination." that is the slogan with which the former mayor julian castro launched his bid to become the first
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hispanic president of the united states. in his announcement in his hometown of san antonio, he spoke about a variety of issues, including the environment, health care, and immigration. at a time when the us is locked in debate about immigration at the southern border, mr castro slams president trump's immigration policy. he spoke passionately about his own mexican heritage, in particular his grandmother who immigrated to the us in 1922. when my grandmother got here almost 100 years ago, i am sure she never could have imagined thatjust two generations later, one of her grandsons will be serving as a member of the united states congress and the other will be standing with you here today to say these words... i am a candidate for the president of the united states of america. the 44—year—old has long been viewed a rising star
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in the democratic party, serving as the mayor of san antonio for five years from 2009 two 2014. --2009-2014. he then went on to serve as secretary of housing of urban development as the youngest member of president obama's cabinet. castro is the second democratic candidate to formally launch a presidential campaign. former us representative john delaney has been running for more than a year, but it is expected to be a crowded field. us senator elizabeth warren has formed an exploratory committee, and other political heavyweights such as former vice presidentjoe biden are expected to put his hat in the ring. though he may not be a favourite in the race, castro's interest in the race makes him the only declared latino in the democratic field, something that may be useful as the party tries to engage the latino population in the us. rebecca hartmann, bbc news. time for a look at the weather.
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we're seeing more %. some chillier airso it has we're seeing more %. some chillier air so it has felt pressure despite the rights or whether. the reason it isa the rights or whether. the reason it is a little chillier it is because ofa is a little chillier it is because of a cold front. not producing much until way of rain but providing cooler air, cold air sitting further north in the showers will work its way south overnight. we had a windy day in those ones will gradually ease through the night. i weather feature kind of fizzled out as terms of bringing many showers down south. the cold air doesn't be behind it and with light winds, it will be a frosty start for scotland on monday. lows of around four or 5 degrees, frost free at one or two isolated spots. for monday, the story is the
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fresher day, then, temperatures are going to bounce back up for tuesday. towards the end of the week, they will tell back on to a below average values again. it is a fluctuating story should we say for the next five days. monday, we are under the influence of high pressure. the tail of that feature on the east on monday, giving isolated showers. a warm front tried to come in to the west, bringing an more cloud may get hazy. some relate to the day. monday, essentially a dry day, a bright day for many but with a fresher feel, 4 degrees bright day for many but with a fresherfeel, 4 degrees in bright day for many but with a fresher feel, 4 degrees in aberdeen. this area of clouds and drizzle rain, it is a warm front, that will bring us across overnight monday and tuesday. we are back in to some milder atlantic air. we will get a feel for tuesday because it will get more like the weekend, like the mild side. the further south east you
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are, scotland, the weatherfront will grind to a halt on tuesday and wednesday some pretty persistent rain. we are typically looking at about 40 mm with their brain leaders across the highlands. then by the middle of the week, we will start the seat all of those weather features slipping south once again. clear skies spread thursday and friday and returning multiply colder. this is bbc news. the headlines at six. theresa may warns mps — a failure to deliver brexit would be "a catastrophic and unforgivable breach of trust in our democracy." the leader of the opposition, jeremy corbyn, spells out what labour will do if theresa may loses the vote on tuesday. we will table a motion of no—confidence in the government at a time of our choosing, but it will be soon. don't worry about that. tributes are paid after an 11—year—old boy playing on his bike is killed in a hit and run accident in beswick
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in greater manchester. pressure on donald trump as the partial shutdown of the us government become the longest in history with no end in sight to the political stand off. three people have been killed — and a fourth is missing — after an avalanche near the austrian ski resort of lech.
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