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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  January 18, 2019 11:00am-12:59pm GMT

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you're watching bbc newsroom live — it's 11 am and these are the main stories this morning: more details emerge about the duke of edinburgh's car crash near sandringham yesterday, police say there was a baby in the back of the other vehicle and one woman suffered a broken wrist in the collision. an eyewitness described the scene i helped him move his legs which we re i helped him move his legs which were a bit trapped. and then i saw his face. patients complain of delays in getting painkillers and anti—depressants as pharmacists warn of shortages of common medicines. as efforts to break the brexit deadlock continue today, staying in a permanent customs arrangement with the eu. we would have too polite european trade law without having a say in how it's made. we would also have to apply the common external tariff
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which would restrict our ability to make agreements outside european union's ability to do so. it would not be in my view delivering brexit's. borisjohnson is set to make a speech in staffordshire shortly in which he's expected to say that now is the time to use brexit to unite the country. one of north korea's top negotiators is in washington for talks ahead of a possible second summit between kim jong—un and president trump. and in tennis — defending champion caroline wozniacki is knocked out of the australian open by five—time grand slam winner maria sharapova. welcome to bbc newsreem livg norfolk police have given more details about yesterday's camccidenlinvthingl with another car and overturned.
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the duke was uninjured, but the driver of the other car, a 28—year old woman, suffered cuts to her knee and her passenger, a 45—year—old woman, sustained a broken wrist. both casualties were discharged from hospital last night. police also confirmed that a nine—month—old baby boy was in the second car at the time of the incident but was uninjured. it's thought prince philip was pulling out onto a main road when the accident happened. he is now back at the queen's sandringham estate. the speed limit on the stretch of road where the crash happened is expected to be reduced at a council meeting later. norfolk county council was already due to discuss safety issues on the road before the crash took place. we've been speaking to one of the first people who stopped at the scene after that accident. i saw the royal car turning across
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the road. i didn't know it was the royal car. be careful. and there was another, with a baby in the back and that was my main concern. with another passer—by we got the baby out and then i went to the other car, which was on its side and there was an elderly gentleman enver. otherwise known as the duke of edinburgh. i helped him to get out of the car. did you realise immediately it was him?” of the car. did you realise immediately it was him? i had no idea, because i couldn't see his face but i helped him move his legs which were a bit trapped, it was all a bit crushed and then i saw his face and i realised who it was. did he seem at that point is to be in
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pain orwas he he seem at that point is to be in pain or was hejust he seem at that point is to be in pain or was he just concerned about his legs being trapped? he didn't seems to be in pain i think he was wasn't too concerned but very shocked in the circumstance. it was a horrendous accident and it's just amazing that people were seriously injured. how did you manage to get him out of the vehicle? we have seen the picture with the driver's door down against the ground. the picture with the driver's door down against the groundlj down against the ground. i told him to move one of his legs and that freed from for the other leg and then i put my hands under his arms and helps ease him out. and then i saw his face. our correspondent helena lee is at sandringham. what police saying? we have had a statement in the last half an hour
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just giving a 50 more details about the injuries suffered by the two women who work in that other car that collided with the duke of edinburgh's land rover just that collided with the duke of edinburgh's land roverjust before three o'clock yesterday afternoon. in that statement they said the driver of the other car was a 28—year—old woman, she suffered cuts to her knee while the other passenger, another woman, 45 years old, and she sustained a broken wrist. both of them were taken to a nearby hospital. they were treated there for their injuries and they we re there for their injuries and they were discharged last night. we have also, as you mentioned for the first time, at that confirmation that there was a nine—month—old baby boy in the back of that car as well but he was not injured. the police are also saying there was a matter of course because there were injuries involved in this accident here yesterday that they will be investigating as they are not going to regulate at this stage as to the
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cause of the accident. ijust to regulate at this stage as to the cause of the accident. i just want to show you a bit close up of what is left behind - that crash, is left behind from that crash, yesterday. you can probe the make of 5:5"; glass, out some of the smashed glass, from possibly of the duke the windscreen possibly of the duke of edinburgh's car and a part of the wing mirror that we also think has come from the duke's car. the duke himself, he is resting, recovering from that accident. he is at the estate which is pretty close by, he slept overnight there, he and the queen have been here since before christmas. they normally stay here the end of - month, but he ”eu $252? $33 531511343151 euil‘i resting ”3111112? £33 111511313111 9417111 resting incredibly, if has been resting incredibly, if you look at that picture of his upturned on the side land rover that he managed to escape that accident without any injuries whatsoever. he will no doubt be wondering, though, whether he will want to consider the
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mac continue driving. but that the moment, i suspect he will be trying to wrest from recovery of what was a shocking incident. so as more about the council meeting to look at safety and that's very stretch of road, which by another strange residents was already due to ta ke strange residents was already due to take place today. yes, coincidence. the road is behind us and that is the row is the duke of an abrupt, we believe was trying to cross from one side to the other in the land rover. it is the a149. it is one of the main routes to the norfolk coast. the maximum speed limit on the road is 60 miles an hour, the cars going past us are going pretty fast but there is a council meeting. it started at ten o'clock this morning. ice but to the council, they said what it is is a general meeting but
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what it is is a general meeting but what will come up at that meeting is the speed on this road. local residents, we know have been concerned about the speed. there have been a number of accidents on the stretch of road, and i think what they are going to do is consider whether they will decrease the maximum speed limit to bring down from 60 to 50 miles an hour and also consider putting speed cameras on this road as well. that is up for discussion at that county council meeting in norfolk this morning the moment. edmund king is the president of the aa. he told us over 75s can be seen as more of a risk by insurance companies. well, we've got something like five million drivers who are over the age of 70. we've got more than 250 drivers who are over the age of 100, and there are a couple of drivers who are actually 107. so i don't think you canjust put an arbitrary age and say you shouldn't drive beyond that age, because it depends on the individual.
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often, if you actually look at the stats, it is young men in their late teens who are more likely to have a crash than older drivers. having said that, the risk profile from insurance companies shows that over the age of 75, the risk profile does actually increase. so i think the solution is... one of the things we would like to see is mandatory eye tests. currently, when you are 70, you have to renew your licence and tick a few boxes. we would like to see — this was backed by the older drivers task force — that you also have to show evidence that you've had an eye test, that your eyes are suitable for driving. because that tends to be the thing that goes first. so if that's done, that would be an indicator. and other things — gps have guidelines on whether they should tell their patients to hang up their keys and stop driving. there are also guidelines about when they should inform
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the dvla about them. so the combination of those things, and family pressure, is perhaps the way to do it. let's cross to the jcb headquarters in staffordshire — the former forest foreign secretary borisjohnson is the former forest foreign secretary boris johnson is speaking, borisjohnson is speaking, urging the country to unite. to recruit candidates for the next elections to the european parliament. simply because they haven't got on with leaving the eu. and, i think the public would have the strong and altogether justified public would have the strong and altogetherjustified impression public would have the strong and altogether justified impression of an elite conspiracy to thwart brexit. to extend article 50 now, would do nothing but a road trust in politics. as for the suggestion that
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parliament might veto what some are 110w parliament might veto what some are now calling the risk of the catastrophe of no deal, that entailed a logical absurdity of trying to stop something from not happening, but i think it's a releva nt, happening, but i think it's a relevant, because overwhelmingly likely that we will get a deal. a good deal. wejust won't likely that we will get a deal. a good deal. we just won't get this deal. we went to leave with this one and the best way forward now, as has been outlined by friends and collea g u es been outlined by friends and colleagues on all sides of parliament and i think of the two former brexit‘s secretaries, everybody agrees with it, is basically to keep what is good in this agreement, especially the protections for the 3.2 million users and in this country and for the clarity and compassion for their
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families which are unilaterally but those commitments to them. we should agree on all sides that there will be no hard border in northern ireland but, we should take the irish backstop out and use the transition period with a mutual commitment to maintain the status quo, commitment to maintain the status quo, zero commitment to maintain the status quo, zero tariffs, several quarters, there are regulatory checks just as there are regulatory checks just as there are regulatory checks just as there are now and use that period to negotiate a new free trade deal and a new partnership, not based on a backstop as is currently proposed but on the panellist apartment vision of... by the way, to put a tiger in the tank, to incentivise oui’ tiger in the tank, to incentivise our friends, tiger in the tank, to incentivise ourfriends, we should our friends, we should withhold at least half of that £39 billion until that deal is concluded. this time, if we mean at, and if we are determined and if we make it clear
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that this is our best and final offer, i will be utterly amazed if we can't get an agreement on these terms and even if the eu site was so obdurate and self—destructive as to turn us down, and to insist on ta riffs turn us down, and to insist on tariffs and checks even if they decided to punish to punish the uk, as we approach that deadline of the end of march, we are finding now that even in that eventuality, bureaucratic and logistical problems that were previously seemed melting in the face of insoluble art melting in the face of human creativity. it's notjust the chairman president of the port of calais... the trucks will continue to flow over the borderjust calais... the trucks will continue to flow over the border just as they do today, listen to what eurotunnel are now saying, oi’ do today, listen to what eurotunnel are now saying, or indeed to the
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clarion court who wrote last week that he relishes the prospect of a clea n that he relishes the prospect of a clean double brexit and trading on wto terms as i have been discovering 70% of your exports already go out on those times. i'm not going to pretend, there won't be challenges, not going to pretend that there would be changes that we have to deal with, of course there will be. but i say to everybody who believes in the democratic freedoms of this country, we are more than up to it. we have got so far, we are nearly there and we must not give up now. because, if we hold our nerve, i believe we can deliver not a pseudo— brexit‘s, a fake brexit in which we leave the eu but end up being run by
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the eu but the brexit‘s people voted for with all the potential advantages and opportunities and if we get it right, and we have some courage, we can forestall the years of wrangling and uncertainty that i'm afraid will be the legacy of this deal and we can stop going on miserably about the whole process of brexit which i think people have had enough of an start talking about what brexit can do for the people of this country and bring this country together. and the best way, to unite this country is to actually address theissues this country is to actually address the issues that drove us to leave. yes, it was about democracy and a desire to run ourselves, i remember the campaign. a feeling that the project of political union, eu political union was not right for the uk. but, that vote was also triggered by a feeling that in some ways, the people of this country had been drifting too far apart from each other and there were areas we needed to come together. we all know
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the story of what's been happening to border and... the huge expansion in the gap between the ftse 100 in the gap between the ftse100 chiefs, and the average workers and theirfunds. we chiefs, and the average workers and their funds. we know the way big corporations who have held wages down... a strong campaigning speech on behalf of holding the uk's mouth in the face of as he described it from europe, saying obstacles are knotting in the face of creativity, talking of the risk of an elite and there is the two thwart brexit. we will go back and listen to the questions shortly. the headlines on bbc news: more details emerge about the duke of edinburgh's car crash near sandringham yesterday, police say there was a baby in the back of the other vehicle and one woman suffered a broken wrist in the collision. patients complain of delays in getting painkillers
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and anti—depressants as pharmacists warn of shortages of common medicines. efforts to break the brexit deadlock continue today — with more cross party talks expected ahead of monday's return to the commons. and in sports, the defending champion is not out of the australian open as caroline wozniacki is beaten by sharp over in straight sets. rafael nadal is last of the last 16,, also in straight sets. she may no longer be an upright as an athlete, she is relishing the challenge of trying to make the tokyo 2020 olympic team. be back with more on those just after half past. pharmacists in england believe stockpiling in case of a no—deal brexit could be among the causes of a shortage of several common drugs. the royal pharmaceutical society
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says patients are having to wait for some common painkillers and anti—depressants. ministers say most medicines are not in short supply. here's more from our health correspondent catherine burns. this is partly a question of supply and demand. when supply goes down, demand goes up and prices can increase, too. when this happens to vital medicines, the government agrees to pay a premium for them. the list of these temporary prices is published every month, and the bbc has analysed that data over the last three years. in england, there's been a sixfold increase in the number of medicines on the monthly list. in january 2015, there were 12 on it. the numbers started to climb in 2017, when it peaked at over 90. at the end of last year, there was a surge from 45 to 80. another worry is that many of these drugs are very common, everything from anti—inflammatories and epilepsy drugs to blood pressure medication and antidepressants.
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for patients, obviously it's concerning if the medicine isn't available, and certainly, we'd advise patients to order the medicines in advance if they can do, so in case there are any problems, it gives the pharmacist more time to deal with it. there are many possible factors explaining this, from an increased global demand to problems with raw materials. the national pharmacy association says brexit appears to be a significant factor, because of what it calls "unconscious stockpiling" — everyone along the chain holding onto extra medicines in case of a no—deal brexit. the department of health and social care says 2 million prescription items are successfully dispensed in england every day. catherine burns, bbc news. us democratic politicians say they will investigate allegations that president trump directed his long—time personal lawyer to lie to congress. a buzzfeed news report alleges mr trump directed michael cohen to lie about plans to build a trump tower in moscow. cohen has already admitted
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to lying about when the business project ended. mr trump has not yet responded directly to the report's allegations — but he has previously denied ever directing his former lawyer to break the law. the man suspected of masterminding tuesday's attack in nairobi has been arrested. 21 people died when jihadists stormed an office and hotel complex. local media have identified him as ali salim. initial reports had placed him at the scene of the attack and he had been originally presumed dead at the end of the operation. to improve the nhs announced last week could be threatened by growing waiting lists and staff shortages. the national audit office also says it will be difficult to make the nhs sustainable without a long—term funding settlement for social care. the government's financial watchdog has warned that the long term plan the mother of one of the four
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londoners who are suspected of being behind a string of islamic state execution—style murders in syria has lost a legal attempt to prevent the uk sharing el shafee elsheikh is currently being held by us—backed kurdish forces in syria — but he and another londoner, alexanda kotey, cannot be brought to trial in the uk because of legal problems. mr elsheikh could receive the death penalty in america if he's found to be guilty. forecasters in eastern australia are warning an extreme heatwave is yet to reach its peak after nearly a week of blistering conditions. some areas of new south wales have already seen record temperatures of 48 degrees celsius, causing roads to melt in the heat. many parts of the country have been hit by unseasonably high temperatures in recent weeks. phil mercer sent this report from sydney. even in a land well used to
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nature's extremes, this heatwave is punishing. the roasting conditions are affecting much of eastern australia but new south wales is feeling it most. 2018 was australia's third warmest year on record and 2019 has got off to a scorching start. residents in white cliffs, 1000 kilometres from sydney have endured heat of 48.2 celsius. temperature reeereegr= thebeach and a soothind seal relief for many, as australians do what they can to stay cool. heatwaves australia's deadliest natural hazard and there are dangers not only for people, but also for animals. frozen treats and ice cubes have helped echidnas and sea lions at sydney's zoo while others have headed straight to the pool. there was also relief for a distressed
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animal found abandoned with a sort lake in the new south wales outback. it was rescued by a police officer and allowed to recover in an air—conditioned patrol car. tv and movie streaming giant netflix ended 2018 with a surge in subscribers — adding nearly 9 million new members in the three months to december. netflix said the growth reflected the success of its original programmes. the streaming service now has 140 million customers around the world. a senior north korean negotiator has arrived in the united states as the two sides try to arrange a second summit between kim jong—un and donald trump. south korean reports say kim young chul is carrying a letter from the north korean leader to mr trump — he's expected to meet the us secretary of state and the president later today. our correspondent in seoul laura
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bicker gave us this update. we understand kim yong—chol, who is thought to be kim jong—un's right—hand man, will meet with the us secretary of state, mike pompeo, when washington, dc wakes up. he is there, we understand, with a message from kim jong—un. you might remember last time, just before the singapore summit, kim yong—chol went to washington, dc with this huge letter from kim jong—un, so we are wondering exactly what he has been dispatched with this time. but certainly, sending a messenger of the calibre of kim yong—chol would suggest that north korea is serious about a second summit. we also understand that talks are taking place in sweden between north korea and the united states. it may well be that all of these meetings are to try to lay the groundwork for a second summit. when it comes to the details of the proposed second summit, we are hearing from our reuters colleagues in vietnam that kim jong—un is planning a state visit there. that may give us a clue as to
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the location of a second summit. as to the details of what the two leaders may talk about, well, certainly, when it comes to north korea, they have been demanding sanctions, really, for some kind of concessions from the us. the us, on the other hand says, "look, we're not going to do anything until north korea shows concrete signs of giving up its nuclear weapons". it may well be that both sides have decided to take a step towards one another. that is certainly the hope here in seoul. president moon has asked both sides to consider their position and make bold moves, and perhaps this is the time they are prepared to do it. time will tell. we've got the whole weekend ahead of us in washington. we've got that big meeting where kim yong—chol will meet the us secretary of state, and perhaps, we don't know, will go to the white house and that is when we will perhaps more details. the world—famous glasgow school
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of art suffered two devastating fires in the space of four years. lastjune, the iconic building — designed by the architect charles rennie mackintosh was gutted — while it was still being rebuilt after a blaze in 2014. now, new virtual reality images have been released showing what the restoration will look like. our reporter lorna gordon has been speaking to the new director about her vision for the art school's future. it was a building that was distinctive and defining to glasgow, butjust over six months ago, the mackintosh building at the glasgow school of art was engulfed in fire for a second time. now, shrouded in scaffolding, this is what remains. you can see part of it from here, and it's much more extensive than last time, of course, that's true. a large part of the internal structures are gone. these pictures taken shortly after the second fire show the extent of the damage — hints of the world—renowned building, now just a hollowed—out shell.
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the investigation into what caused this fire is still ongoing, but within the next few weeks the hope is to start scooping out the debris from the bowels of what remains of the mack, so experts can start sifting through it and salvage what they can. this was a charles rennie mackintosh masterpiece, with its curves and angles, its shadows and light, the distinctive wooden panelling, wooden furniture, unique as a working art school and a work of art. now, though, a chance to experience at least part of it, if not in the real world, the virtual one instead. i am in a studio at the mack. i know it doesn't exist any more, but through this headset, it's like i'm there. this, a three—dimensional rendering of one of the studios, and the plaster casts like this one, the laocoon, which are traditionally used to teach drawing, that it contained. this virtual, augmented reality
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created using scans, archive images and film. genuinely, i think it's amazing, what you can do with vr technology and digital technology, especially obviously because of what happened with the art school fire. what kind of reaction have you had? it's actually very poignant. the people from archives were some of the first people to see it, and they were moved to tears, because they were seeing a studio space in the mack building that didn't actually exist anymore. some have been critical of the way the institution handled the aftermath of the fire. the new director of the school said communication could have been better. looking forward, she wants a rebuilt mack to stay faithful to the original, and for the community to play a part. we feel we have an absolute duty and responsibility, for educational purposes, but also for the world, for glasgow and for the world, to bring that building back. this is the building
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that was designed to be here, and this is the building that will stay. determined that the mackintosh building will one day take its place on glasgow's skyline again. we can go back to staffordshire where the former foreign secretary borisjohnson is where the former foreign secretary boris johnson is taking where the former foreign secretary borisjohnson is taking questions from the audience on his vision for brexit at this moment. from the audience on his vision for brexit at this momentlj from the audience on his vision for brexit at this moment. i was happy to support leave. i happen to think immigration can be a wonderful thing for our country but as i said time and again, it has to be controlled and again, it has to be controlled and weak... the crucial thing is people have to have a sense of who is running it, who is managing it. the difficulty with the current situation is the control does not
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lie with uk politicians, it lies in brussels. i remember the outrage of other ministers around the table in brussels. i used to go there, and then being told by the eu commission what numbers of immigrants they had to receive at a qualified majority vote. i to receive at a qualified majority vote. lam pro—immigration, i to receive at a qualified majority vote. lam pro—immigration, lam to receive at a qualified majority vote. i am pro—immigration, i am a beneficiary, my family descended from immigrants, it is a fantastic thing, but it should be a matter for national discretion. people should understand who in their country is responsible. that was the point to be made and that was why the slogan, which i continue to support, take back control, that was what it was about. itv news. you are standing in front of a giant digger. would it be
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more appropriate if you were standing in front of... i am sure... is it standing in front of... i am sure... isita standing in front of... i am sure... is it a bit rich suggesting theresa may has not tried to negotiate with brussels when you resigned as foreign secretary? fair question. i think i will try to answer in my —— i think i've tried to answer it in my speech. this is the moment and i do not think we have gone in with sufficient to drive and jcbs style gumption to get this. you have not even tried. i tried about a year. this is internal political... i did try very hard to get the right vision of leaving the eu and i think there were many people who follow those struggles, they will know we had stink —— ding—dong arguments. we had stink —— ding—dong arguments. we had a meeting at chequers at which i
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advocate is what i think of as global brexit, giving us the opportunity to do free trade deals, to allow companies to innovate, which ever way they choose within the bounds of uk law, getting on with all sorts of opportunities that otherwise would not exist. that was not successful. and... what we need to do now is recognise that the roots, the route to the government, the prime minister chose, to answer your question, libby, which was to say let's stay effectively in the customs union, locked into the single market, let's have a situation in which the uk is governed by the eu even though we are outside, that approach has been rejected by parliament by 432 votes
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to 232. i'm sorry, 200, i should say. that is an opportunity now for the government to recognise that she has a mandate, the prime minister. she can go back to brussels and she should go back to brussels, and she should go back to brussels, and she should say that the british house of commons does not accept the democratic consequences of the arrangement that you have imposed in the form of the backstop. it has got to come out. if we mean it and we are determined, i think we can achieve that. you are not determined to stay in the cabinet.|j achieve that. you are not determined to stay in the cabinet. i think i have answered that question, thank you. we are in a moment of national crisis and here you are in front of a digger making a naked leadership pitch. theresa may has won a
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confidence vote, why not get behind her and stop undermining her? what i am offering... you are right, the prime minister has won the confidence vote and that's terrific, i voted for her, of course. but... but she has not succeeded, emphatically not succeeded in getting her deal through parliament. it has gone down by a majority of 230, unprecedented. it cannot come back. it is an ex—deal. what i'm trying to do is offer a way forward. we need to get through this and we can only do it if we have conviction and determination and follow the logic of what brexit was about. it isa logic of what brexit was about. it is a massive opportunity, she needs to go to brussels and remove the backstop, the most pernicious elements of the backstop, the way it
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locks us in and if she can do that and if she means it this time, then we can make progress. on that matter of supporting, would you back theresa may as tory leader if she does decide to call a snap election to break the impasse over brexit?|j think most people in this country feel they have had enough elections andl feel they have had enough elections and i certainly do. what they voted for was to leave the european union and take advantage of opportunities of brexit. that is what we should be supporting. so you would not support her? to be clear, because she said she would not contest another election, she promised the 1922 committee she would not contest another election as tory leader but if she calls a snap election...” think it highly unlikely. a snap election is not the right way through. why call a snap election
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when you can just through. why call a snap election when you canjust go back through. why call a snap election when you can just go back to brussels and make the point this deal is not acceptable. it is overwhelmingly in their interests to do better and they can. that is where we should be focusing. yes? bbc news. you set out your opposition to many potential options on the table, is it true the parliamentary arithmetic is against you? and even if by some miracle they were able to get rid of the backstop, surely a permanent customs union would be a more pragmatic way forward ? union would be a more pragmatic way forward? i do not think there is any support. the last time i saw a customs union debated in parliament it was voted down. as you will remember, it was something expressly ruled out, notjust at remember, it was something expressly ruled out, not just at the referendum, but at the general election, where everybody campaigned ona election, where everybody campaigned
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on a manifesto, 82% of mps campaigned ona on a manifesto, 82% of mps campaigned on a manifesto to come out of the customs union and single market. you cannot now stay in the customs union. it is not true we have run out of options. there is a great way ahead in what is needed now is simply to adjust the withdrawal agreement so as to take out the backstop and the way it restricts britain's freedom. you would not get that through parliament? on the contrary, what parliament? on the contrary, what parliament has voted for is to come out of the eu on march the 29th. a huge number of out of the eu on march the 29th. a huge numberof mps out of the eu on march the 29th. a huge number of mps voted to trigger article 50. that cannot be superseded, except by another act of parliament, another government—sponsored piece of legislation. it is not going to be, the prime minister has ruled it out.
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i think rescinding article 50 and telling the british public after this who hard, we have abandoned the project of leaving the european union would be so utterly pathetic, ido union would be so utterly pathetic, i do think it would not only caused wide spread international dismay but also it would reinforce people's view that there is some kind of plot going on at westminster, to stop this thing. people have voted for it, parliament voted for it and on march the 29th it is going to happen. how many questions are you going to have, i don't mind, keep going. if the prime minister were able to get this deal through on the back of labour votes, could she stay in thejob? back of labour votes, could she stay in the job? ham and eggs, if we had some ham... i think rather than exhausting ourselves with these hypotheses about what might or might not happen, if you were paying attention to the first 1500 words of
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my speech, it was mainly about why we should not waste time pointing the back load a one—way where we wanted to turn around the other way and remove the obstacles in brussels rather than trying to sort out what was going on in parliament. that was the thrust of what i was trying to say. yes, sir, i will come the thrust of what i was trying to say. yes, sir, iwill come to... richard vernon, press association. can we do one question each, by the way? there might be members of the audience who want to ask a question. jcb is a highly productive company. you will notice the factory... the production line, the assembly line has been temporarily halted. production line, the assembly line has been temporarily haltedm production line, the assembly line has been temporarily halted. it is all your fault, has been temporarily halted. it is all yourfault, boris! iwant has been temporarily halted. it is all yourfault, boris! i want to pick you up on something you said when you said what we need now is to
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offer a way forward. you stood in front of the jcb, the offer a way forward. you stood in front of thejcb, the production line has halted. i know it is not your constituency. why not tell the prime minister yourself, rather than get everybody here and tell us, as it were? it is a very fair question. i have told the prime minister many times, asi i have told the prime minister many times, as i was saying to libby. i thought perhaps it was a good idea to try to tell as many people as possible, since so far i have not been successful in persuading her but i think she will come round. yes? mrjohnson, to offer another hypothesis about what might happen in parliament, jacob rees—mogg said if he were forced to choose between mrs may's deal and staying in the
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eu, he would choose mrs may's deal. would you make the same choice? is it never, never, never? what, to which? to her deal. it is not a choice i wish to have. it is very... one... there are ways in which i'm afraid the deal on offer is worse than being in the eu. forthe reason i gave. normally speaking ifjcb comes up i gave. normally speaking ifjcb comes up with a brilliant idea and you want to protect yourself from people in brussels who may want to have... to throttle that idea, you have... to throttle that idea, you have british civil servants in brussels or ministers who can speak up brussels or ministers who can speak up foryou. we brussels or ministers who can speak up for you. we are coming out but under these proposals we would still be run by the eu. that is a defect and the same goes for the trade
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policy and everything else. i don't wa nt policy and everything else. i don't want to face that choice. we should be going for the clean global brexit i have advocated. the trade terms on whichjcb does well i have advocated. the trade terms on which jcb does well around the world, by the way. you with a microphone. lynn davidson from the sun newspaper. you talk about uniting the country, could you be the man to unite your party and the dup have suggested or indicated they may accept a customs union if the dreaded backstop was removed. would you? i dreaded backstop was removed. would you ? i would dreaded backstop was removed. would you? i would have to see what the dup have said. i saw a report about that. the difficulty with staying in the customs union without assay is asi the customs union without assay is aslsaid,— the customs union without assay is as i said,— —— which, as i say, you are losing influence and not gaining very much. i don't like that option
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but i will study carefully what the dup have to say and on the first question, or i am doing is try to show the way forward. the times newspaper. alan duncan said you have recklessly divided the conservative party and created an historic crisis in the uk. he was your deputy as foreign secretary, he clearly does not think you fit for a leadership role, why should anyone here? with respect to alan duncan and anybody else, all i am trying to do is bring people together on what i think is the most sensible way forward. i genuinely think this is the answer. it isa genuinely think this is the answer. it is a great shame we have gone down the wrong track and there are various down the wrong track and there are various reasons down the wrong track and there are various reasons why that happened. after the referendum result, we had a moment when perhaps it could have gone right at lancaster house. we had an election that did not go according to plan. we are where we
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are. ithink according to plan. we are where we are. i think however we should be confident and optimistic and that we can still get a great deal, if we try. yes? the guardian. what happens if parliament rules out a no deal, soa if parliament rules out a no deal, so a majority parliament against it. would that force you to support her if theresa may cannot get rid of the backstop? how do you rule out no deal except by having a deal. it is a logically difficult thing to do. i think there will be a deal. britain, the eu, run by highly intelligent, sensitive people who understand democracy and who responds to the needs of their constituents. particularly businesses. they are not going to want to exit with a bristling palisade of sharpened
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sta kes bristling palisade of sharpened stakes in the form of tariffs on either side of the channel. that is not going to happen. when people talk about that kind of no deal, i do not think it is remotely credible. what could happen is you could have the kind of agreement that i described. you could have a standstill, a period in which you agree to keep things frozen as they are now until such time you have negotiated a free—trade deal, which isa negotiated a free—trade deal, which is a live possibility that is the we should go. so, we will leave boris johnson in staffordshire taking questions on his vision of how the uk should proceed and listening to thatis uk should proceed and listening to that is our political correspondent ian watson. what did you make of it? he went beyond talking about brexit,
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talking how people wanted cheaper food, a pay rise, better housing, andi food, a pay rise, better housing, and i think that is why some in the audience and in the media was saying was this a thinly veiled leadership bid. he said he wasjust was this a thinly veiled leadership bid. he said he was just trying to help out. it seemed to be the thrust of his argument that while the prime minister is meeting people from parliament, what she should be doing isa parliament, what she should be doing is a lot more banging the table in brussels, going back to brussels as he said, being serious this time, more determined and demanding the backstop is removed or that we would unilaterally have the right to come out of it, in other words out of the arrangements that would keep as close to the eu rules that would avoid a hard border and he believed there was not enough determination that has got the prime minister to where she was at the moment and if she puts pressure on again, she will find the european union would become more flexible. he had criticism for
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those in his party and other parties who are saying because the clock is ticking, what the prime minister should be doing is extending article 15, which means delaying our departure from the eu. he denounced this as pseudo— brexit. and upped the ante by suggesting voters would see this as an elite conspiracy. that is the populist line that has been used many times and by many others. he was making it clear he would be robustly trying to oppose that attempt by others, such as nick boles, nicholas soames, and other conservatives who think that might be the only way of avoiding a no deal scenario. he was bullish about the prospects of a no deal scenario because he said some deal would come about. what was interesting also, in the meetings the prime minister had
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yesterday, some of her conservative collea g u es yesterday, some of her conservative colleagues including a current and former minister, suggested perhaps she goes down the road of norway plus, staying close to eu rules but outside the eu and in a customs union with the eu. borisjohnson was critical of that idea of forming a permanent customs union. what is also interesting, there is resista nce also interesting, there is resistance to that inside the cabinet and earlier, the international trade secretary liam fox's tout his opposition.” international trade secretary liam fox's tout his opposition. i don't believe we independent trade policy if we stayed in the customs union. ina if we stayed in the customs union. in a customs union we would have to apply european trade law without a say in how it is made and we would have to apply the common external tariff that would restrict our ability to make agreements outside the eu's ability to do so. this is the eu's ability to do so. this is
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the difficulty summed up for theresa may. if she wants to get the deal through parliament, labour say adopt a permanent customs union and we may come on—board. some of her own cabinet are saying unless you do something like that to avoid no deal, we will resign but if she does that, others like liam fox, perhaps penny mordaunt, andrea leadsom, they will say that is not brexit and they might potentially walk. it seems when she moves from listening mode to activity mode and has to take decisions, it will be difficult to ta ke decisions, it will be difficult to take the whole cabinet, never mind the whole party, with her. thanks. some breaking news from norfolk. we mentioned a county council meeting this morning coincidently to look at road safety which was scheduled before the accident in which the duke of edinburgh, his carflipped overin duke of edinburgh, his carflipped over ina duke of edinburgh, his carflipped over in a collision. the county
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council meeting this morning on road safety has approved a scheme for that stretch of road where prince philip had his car crash. speed cameras will be installed, which will apply an average speed check on that road. currently the speed limit is 60 mph but there is talk of reducing it to 50. speed camera certainly coming for that stretch of road. ina certainly coming for that stretch of road. in a moment, the business. first, the headlines. more details emerge about the duke of edinburgh's car crash near sandringham yesterday — police say there was a baby in the back of the other vehicle and one woman suffered a broken wrist in the collision. as efforts continue to break the brexit deadlock, former foreign secretary borisjohnson says he believes the eu will show flexibility if the uk goes back to brussels to seek concessions over the withdrawal agreement. patients complain of delays
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in getting painkillers and anti—depressants as pharmacists warn of shortages i'm maryam moshiri. uk retail sales fell by more than expected in december shopping to november. more ifi—a=fierefi-+eat.= lower—than—expected air fares. the airline's chief executive, michael o'leary, said there was too much capacity on short—haul routes in europe this winter. fares are expected to fall 7% this winter. electric car—maker tesla has said it will cutjobs by 7% after the "most challenging" year in its history. founder elon musk said that while growth at the firm had been strong, its cars were still "too expensive for most people". friday's data from the ons chimes with other signs that consumer spending is cooling.
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sales volumes fell by 0.9% in december, more than the 0.8% forecast by economists. in the three months to december, sales growth was 2.9%, slightly lower than the 3% growth seen in the three months to november. a number of retailers — such as halfords, marks and spencer, debenhams and mothercare — have reported a fall in sales over the christmas period. though the story has been very different for big online names like boohoo and discounters like aldi and lidl. let's talk to catherine shuttleworth, retail analyst, savvy marketing. what do you make of the difference we seeing between online and the rest? what the ons statistics show is how shopping has changed with online sales up about 14% which
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means one in every £5 is spent online and we have seen that in some of the retailers‘ results. businesses such as boo—hoo, whose results have been stellar. we spennymoor online then at traditional retailers we have grown up traditional retailers we have grown up such as marks & spencer. and also whether you discounted over black friday seems to have made a difference? it made a difference with profits. we see profits from some of the retailers, some private ones have not shown figures, but we have seen a mixed picture of activity but a lot of retailers have done well. those who held the nerve during christmas in discounting terms of don well. next is dom. toy businesses like the entertainer have done well. the biggest —— next has done well. the biggest —— next has done well. the biggest —— next has done well. department stores such as
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john lewis have had a tricky time trying to get people into their stores because when pricing yo—yos, we are never sure when to buy. is a magic formula makes small retailers —— some retailers more successful than others? having the right price and offers is the maxim. some smaller businesses seem to have had a successful year because if they have interesting products. we have a tra nsfer have interesting products. we have a transfer personalisation at the moment. smaller retailers tend to cope with that. they now have more places to sell in terms of online and through social media shopping. there is a formula. it is about having the right thing to sell at the right price. if you look at the entire year of 2018, 2.7% growth, that compared to the 4.8% growth we saw in 2016, or 4.6%, it is still
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lower. how worrying is the trend? concerning because consumer confidence is falling apart and we are seeing a softening of people‘s spending. we spent this christmas but not at the same growth rate retailers are used to have some of the big retailers need positive and big growth to keep growing. that is why we see some of them reporting difficulty. we have ended up with an oversupply of retail stores as more and more shop online. as we go into and more shop online. as we go into a period of uncertainty in the economy, retailers are concerned about what 2019 will bring and it will probably be a different conversation next january. thank you. some other stories in the news today. shows including bird box starring sandra bullock helped netflix end 2018 with more than 139 million subscribers — adding almost 9 million members in the last three months of the year. the streaming giant said the growth reflected the success of its original programmes. germany is considering ways to block
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huawei from its next generation 5g mobile phone network, according to reports. the chinese company, one of the world‘s biggest producers some other stories in the news today. germany is considering ways to block huawei from its next generation 5g mobile phone network, according to reports. the chinese company, one of the world‘s biggest producers of telecoms equipment, has faced resistance from foreign governments over the risk that its technology could be used for espionage. huawei has denied claims it poses a spying risk. nissan and mitsubishi have said former chairman carlos ghosn received "improper payments" totalling just under seven million pounds from a joint venture between the car—makers. mr ghosn has been detained since november on charges involving financial crimes. he denies any wrongdoing. a good story for the ftse100 with shares up. the us is considering removing ta riffs up. the us is considering removing tariffs on chinese goods. the us government denied that but it has not stopped investors liking big
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news. airline stocks down after ryanair‘s news. airline stocks down after rya nair‘s disappointing profits. news. airline stocks down after ryanair‘s disappointing profits. we can go back to the top story. we have some footage recorded just after the accident yesterday afternoon with prince philip. we can listen in. that‘s not good. they are still trying to get them out. that was taken by a gentleman who was passing on his way home from work. and recorded it as he went past. he said... you can see the vehicle, the duke of edinburgh‘s land rover. the footage was taken quite shortly after the accident happened. and another snippet to look at. princess anne was asked
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about the duke‘s health as she arrived at edge hill university in lancashire — but she didn‘t have much to say. how is the duke of edinburgh this morning? you know where i am? the same places you. so a tight—lipped princess royal. more of that coming up. now the weather. we have cold air in place across the uk with widespread frost this morning and rain, sleet and snow moving into western areas. the white in the imagery is snow falling across the higher ground of wales and down to low levels in north—eastern wales, around merseyside, chester, snow down to low levels, as well. continuing to move eastwards. we will continue with snow over mainly
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higher ground of northern england, through western scotland, but even at low levels, snow here and there. eastern areas staying dry and fairly bright. still cold today with temperatures 3—6. tonight more cloudy. not as cold. we will not see a frost except perhaps in the far north of scotland. into the weekend it will remain cloudy. there will be rain, sleet for time. brighter skies especially on sunday and remaining cold. goodbye. you‘re watching bbc newsroom live. these are today‘s main stories: more details emerge about the duke
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of edinburgh‘s car crash near sandringham yesterday, police say there was a baby in the back of the other vehicle and one woman suffered a broken wrist in the collision. an eyewitness described the scene i helped him move his legs which we re i helped him move his legs which were a bit strapped. it was all a bit crushed and then i saw his face and i realised who it was. the former foreign secretary boris johnson has warned against delaying britain‘s exit from the eu and says the eu will compromise over the controversial issue of the irish border. if you follow the way the eu works, i can tell you it's only in the last few days and weeks of negotiation that the big concessions are really made. it comes as the international trade secretary liam fox says the uk must avoid staying in a permanent customs arrangement with the eu we would have two apply european
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trade law without having a say in how it‘s made and we would also have to apply what‘s called the common external tariff which would restrict our ability to make agreements outside european union‘s ability to do so. it would not be in my view delivering brexit. patients complain of delays in getting painkillers and anti—depressants as pharmacists warn of shortages of common medicines. one of north korea‘s top negotiators is in washington for talks ahead of a possible second summit between kim jong—un and president trump. and in tennis — defending champion caroline wozniacki is knocked out of the australian open by five—time grand slam winner maria sharapova. welcome to bbc newsroom live. new footage has emerged
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of the moments after the car accident involving the duke of edinburgh yesterday. the video, taken from a car passing the scene of the accident, shows police cars at the side of the road, and emergency workers gathered around the duke‘s upturned car. prince phillip, who‘s ninety seven, was driving near the grounds of the norfolk estate when his land rover collided with another car. the duke was uninjured, but the driver of the other car, a 28—year old woman, suffered cuts to her knee and her passenger, a 45—year—old woman, sustained a broken wrist. both were discharged from hospital last night. a nine—month—old baby boy was also in the second car at the time of the incident but was unhurt. this morning, in a scheduled meeting, norfolk county council cut the speed limit on that stretch of road from 60 miles per hour to 50. we‘ve been speaking to one of the first people who stopped at the scene after the accident. i saw the royal car turning across the road.
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did you realise immediately it was him? i had no idea, because i couldn‘t see his face but i helped him he didn‘t seems to be in pain
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i think he was wasn‘t too concerned but very shocked in the circumstance. it was a horrendous accident and it‘s just amazing that people weren‘t seriously injured. how did you manage to get him out of the vehicle? we have seen the picture with the driver‘s door down against the ground. i told him to move one of his legs fiz— his arms and helped ease him out. and then i saw his face. a little earlier, princess anne was asked about the duke‘s health as she arrived at edge hill university in lancashire — but she didn‘t have much to say. your royal highness, how is the duke of edinburgh this morning? do you know where i am?
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same place as you. our correspondent helena lee is at sandringham. right on the spot where this took place. yes, we know that the duke of edinburgh is fairly close by to where we are, the sandringham estate, where he spent the night recovering, even he wasn‘t injured in what was a very traumatic crash. if you look at the photograph of the aftermath of the crash, we dig of edinburgh‘s land rover flipped aftermath of the crash, we dig of edinburgh‘s land roverflipped onto its side, the drivers side closest to the road itself. an incredible, really wasn‘t injured. we understand, you still recovering. he would have been in shock after that incident but no further update from buckingham palace. we wouldn‘t expect them to get any kind of running commentary but we think he is resting and recovering. you
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co mforta bly is resting and recovering. you comfortably see some of the glass comfortably see some ei theglest a flit... a think those are from the developer‘s car, the land rover that he was driving at the time. as you further details, as you mentioned, from the police in a statement in the last i or so giving further details about the two women who were in the other car that were in a collision with the duke‘s land rover. they were taken to hospital yesterday. one of them had cut to her knee and the other one had a broken wrist. they we re other one had a broken wrist. they were both treated in hospital and discharged last night. and you also have confirmation that a nine—month—old baby boy was in that car as well, but he was uninjured. so, the duke resting close by here and an investigation by the police
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into exactly what caused that crashed yesterday. what will the shape of that investigation be? other providing any more details? they are not, but what happens after the crash, the police have told us and we know, they breathalysed both the duke of edinburgh and the driver of that other car. that is a matter of that other car. that is a matter of routine when they are called to a collision, both of those readings came back as negative. but the police will oversee be wanting to speak to any witnesses and some of whom we have spoken to on bbc news whom we have spoken to on bbc news who have described what they saw, they‘ll be trying to collect information to see what happens. they may be collecting dust comfort edge from people were driving in the area, which before after that crash happened. they‘ll be trying to get their information examined what
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happens. they want to speak to the duke of an upper himself and the driver of that other car. they may have done that already. what the one thing we do know is that the norfolk cou nty thing we do know is that the norfolk county council have met this morning and they are going to implement a speed camera policy on this stretch of road. yes. just by coincidence, the norfolk county council committee was meeting today to discuss the safety on this road. it is a very busy road, the maximum speed limit has been 60 miles an hour on this road. but as you say, a meeting has taken place, road. but as you say, a meeting has ta ken place, they road. but as you say, a meeting has taken place, they have approved reducing that speed limits down to 50 miles an hour and we also know that there are going to make junction improvements around this area and also, in—store average speed cameras. this is all after concerns from local residents that this has been a fairly dangerous
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road in terms of the speeds of some of the cars that have been going along this road. confirmation now, approved that speed limit on this row is where the critic place yesterday involving the duke of edinburgh is now going to be reduced from 60 miles an hour to 50 miles an hour. we can speak now to nick freeman, who‘s the owner of the legal practice freeman & co, and specialises in traffic and speeding offences. you may also know him as "mr loophole", famous for representing celebrity clients such as david beckham. good morning. good afternoon. there‘s an investigation, underlings are there‘s an investigation, underlings a re really there‘s an investigation, underlings are really to be careful to tread warily around this but what you think of some of the issues of this incident that it raises? the blues are what an account for witnesses and from the duke and of course from the driver of the other car. that‘s what will be part of their
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investigation. one of the things that immediately springs to mind is the duke‘s age and history of health. i am the duke‘s age and history of health. iam bound the duke‘s age and history of health. i am bound to say those issues may be total red herring. we don‘t know at this stage his eight had anything —— any impact on the accident. in terms of reaction, visibility. it sounds wrong as we have this is an almost accident blackspot and it sounds as he shall bejunction, 1‘s blackspot and it sounds as he shall be junction, 1‘s visibility is fairly limited. these are all sorts of things that shall be looked at. all members of... all drivers have a duty to refer any relevant medical issues to dvla, that is an ongoing duty. as do their doctors. it is very easy to put two and two together and come up with five and assume that because the duke is 97 yea rs assume that because the duke is 97 years old, that is some way relevant and is causation or in terms of the accident and his age and his state of health might not —— might be red
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herrings. it might be that there is very limited visibility, it might be that the other car was travelling at an excessive speed. with impedance now and it would be wrong to jump to conclusions, but of course what eve ryo ne conclusions, but of course what everyone will be considering is the age of people driving and there are more people driving you are older and at the moment, the current law is inadequate because it only requires people over 70 years of age to revive their medical check every few years and that probably isn‘t enough. bearing in mind now we have a massive number of people over 70 on our roads. as you mentioned, it puts the onus on the driver having that medical check to actually alert dvla, if they have any issues rather than there being any kind of screening to check that drivers are confident or their vision is competent. even if it is not a medical issue, if it‘s something
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like, there were seven heads of medical issues, pretty extensive and then there is a gateshead which stills of miscellaneous things. it literally covers every aspect of your health. but as one gets older, and 1‘s eyesight deteriorates, 1‘s reaction time deteriorates and if you feel that your reaction time is slightly slow, you do have a positive duty to notify dvla and the consequences of you failing to do that, if that is found to be releva nt of a ny that, if that is found to be relevant of any cause in terms of those actions, your insurance policy beavers are rated and it can can cause problems. obviously, as he said, there is a whole host of other factors. including just said, there is a whole host of other factors. includingjusta factors. including just a low winter sun. we all know that whatever age we are out of condition, you can easily be dazzled by low sun in winter. you can. that was a 48 offence but however, as i understand
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it, the duke was emerging from the minor road into a major road and if he was temporarily blinded by the sun, andi he was temporarily blinded by the sun, and i understand it was a very bright day, it has the bright day over most of the country, then the law required him not to merge into the four carriage way, he would have to wait until he can see. that is a different situation from driving along a road where you have priority and he was suddenly blinded by the sun and there is nothing you can do about it. he was stationary, he came into a road which has priority over his road and if he was blinded by the sun, then the law might not assist him to the extent that he should have waited where he was. we arejumping to should have waited where he was. we are jumping to conclusions should have waited where he was. we arejumping to conclusions but should have waited where he was. we are jumping to conclusions but one of the things that the police will look at it who is at fault. even if they are satisfied there is more than a 50% chance of conviction, they then have to consider the second aspect of the crown prosecution service and that is, is it in the public interest to prosecute? i would have thought in this case, without pointing any
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fingers that the probable conclusions that it will not be in the public interest to prosecute if things are dealt with properly, if of course is the duke‘s fault and it may well not be. thank you very much. more on today‘s main stories coming up on newsroom live here on the bbc news channel, but now we say goodbye to viewers on bbc two. borisjohnson has called on the government to focus on the issues that caused people to vote for leaving the european union. speaking at the headquarters ofjcb in staffordshire, the former foreign secretary said action needed to be taken to address the pay gap and immigration. meanwhile, the international trade secretary liam fox has said that staying in a permanent customs arrangement with the eu would "not be delivering brexit". our political correspondent iain watsonjoins us from westminster this morning.
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let‘s do with borisjohnson fast. it was a typical performance, bullish, talking about a jcb digger, but what of concrete significance was in that speech? there are several things, first of all, some of the people listening to that speech characterised it as some kind of leadership pitch, because he did range so widely over a whole area of policy, talking about the need for britain to have a pay rise, better housing and so on but i think in terms of substance of the brexit issue, there are two things you mentioned in particular. one was that his analysis was this, while the minister was bending a lot of time meeting was of her own party and occasionally, members of the opposition, what she should really be doing it going back to brussels, to ban the table and tell them that she was really determined that they have to do something about the irish
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backs, the arrangements to avoid hardbody backs, the arrangements to avoid ha rdbody island and backs, the arrangements to avoid hardbody island and he believes she showed enough determination then they would turn out to be much more flexible than it first appears. the second thing is at the moment, there are members of her own party and the opposition who say the clock is ticking on brexit and because of that, if you are going to try to get a deal, you might have to extend article 15. in other words, the process of leaving the eu, would be delayed and borisjohnson had a very clear message on that. it would be shameful at this late stage to change that totemic date, marty 29th, the one fact to which the public has been able to cling with absolute certainty in this sea of political confusion. all this vacuous talk of extending article 50, is only, is dishonest but it's
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also weakening our negotiating position once again. he's very clear that the brexit day, the 29th of march should not be extended, the power minister has not said she will extend it but she will be under pressure to do so in the coming weeks from former conservative ministers that say if it doesn‘t relish is going to get a deal, she ought to be doing that and if she attem pts ought to be doing that and if she atte m pts to ought to be doing that and if she attempts to effectively head that of and say we‘re going to vote down any attempt to extend article 50, then asi attempt to extend article 50, then as i understand it, it will be very significant ministerial resignations, but that is not our only problem. because, she is going to find a separate solution, she could also be facing different ministerial resignations. some people including a party up in trying to push her to signing up to permanent customs union, sobbing very close to the labour policy in
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order to get a deal through, and in order to get a deal through, and in order to get a deal through, and in order to leave the european union. so far, she has resisted that and liam fox, today made it very clear that he was very resistant also.” don't believe we can have an independent trade policy if we stay ina independent trade policy if we stay in a customs union. the reason for thatis in a customs union. the reason for that is a customs union with the european union would have to apply european union would have to apply european trade law without having a say in how it's made. would also have to apply an external tariff which would restrict our ability to make agreements outside the european union's ability to do so. it would not be in my view, delivering brexit. so quite strong words. it wouldn‘t be delivering brexit if there was a compromise on a customs union to try to get opposition politicians on board. i think, she will she was seen politicians all day yesterday. but today, as i understand it, she is going to be
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meeting her own cabinet in little groups. that can tell you that if nothing else, that we don‘t necessarily have a united top team on the way forward. they may have got behind her, finding out where she goes, what the next at proved to be is very difficult. we heard that from the trade secretary,... the problem in getting any kind of certainty about a free—trade agreement. at the moment, because we are part of the eu, we take part in the 40 or so agreements the eu has countries around the world. south korea, canada, mexico amongst many others. doctor fox who we just saw that, in 2017 said very confidently that, in 2017 said very confidently that one minute after brexit, those
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40 trade deals will be rolled over and the uk was that have advantage of them, but in that interview today, he said, none of that has happened yet, not a single one of those has been signed and also that he is dependent basically on the kindness of strangers. he is ready to go. it‘s depending on the willingness of those other countries to get their acts together and start negotiating. so with two months ago, we haven‘t got those rolled over trade agreement he was confident about just two years trade agreement he was confident aboutjust two years ago. how much ofa aboutjust two years ago. how much of a problem is that, we actually had borisjohnson tackle this question or a related version earlier at thejcb question or a related version earlier at the jcb branch, question or a related version earlier at thejcb branch, he said, wto arrangements, everything will be fine. if we don‘t have those 43 trade agreements, we can go back to wto towns - there‘s wto tones are wto towns but there‘s wto tones are worse than the free—trade agreement. it's worse than the free—trade agreement. it‘s better than the basic wto terms, that‘s why they‘re so difficult to negotiate, that‘s why
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they take such a long time. but they are very important. if you look at the south korean won site if you do go to the eu and south korea, our exports to south korea have boomed asa exports to south korea have boomed as a result of that deal, and if we leave without it being rolled over, we won‘t have any of those advantages. there were lots more of this later but they using much. we start with the main upset today at the australian open and defending champion caroline wozniacki has been knocked out, by the five—time grand slam winner maria sharapova sharapova, who returned from a doping ban in april 2017, provided a reminder of her ability with a three—set win. i thought it was as usual, as expected a physical match. it didn‘t have to be but if i like even in the longer rallies i did a greatjob of winning those. i put a lot of
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pressure on her and those of the rallies i think many years ago that she used to win. i thought i did a greatjob of getting a higher privileges of wins on those. 2009 champion rafael nadal is through to the last 16, though there was lots of support for his opponent — 19—year—old australian alex de minaur, who‘s one to watch for the future. despite the backing of the home crowd, nadal won in straight sets. he‘ll play tomas berdych on sunday. defending champion roger federer is also through to the fourth round, beating american taylor fritz. afterwards he addressed the issue of players having to play in the early hour of the morning — after britain‘s johanna konta, is it ideal? know. sometimes what can you do? if you schedule a match at a specially immense match before and that thing goes for five hours.
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it can happen as we saw. they played a great match. i don't know what other choices you have. you could move them to an outside court but the atmosphere might be quite sad. britain‘sjo pavey has said she‘s ta rgetting a record—equalling sixth olympics at tokyo 2020 — at the age of 46. the only other british track and field athlete to compete at that many olympic games, is javelin thrower tessa sanderson. realistically, i want to try and get in the team and if i did achieve that, i'd in the team and if i did achieve that, i‘d give it my absolute best, of course probably at this stage where my fastest times are sort of looked behind me but it still realistic goal. if i was lucky enough to be selected, i would put everything into its to perform the best that i could, because you just feel such an honour to represent your country. that‘s all the sport for now. i‘ll have more for you in the next hour. the government‘s financial watchdog has warned that the long term plan to improve the nhs announced last week could be
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threatened by growing waiting lists and staff shortages. the national audit office also says it will be difficult to make the nhs sustainable without a long—term funding settlement for social care. the department of health said it was working hard to put the nhs on a viable footing. i‘m joined now by deborah ward — she is a senior analyst at the kings fund — a think tank that focuses on health and social care policy. thank you for coming in this morning. eu at the king's fund agree with the national audit office analysis. i do is a very robust piece of analysis by the national audit office. they have looked at the current financial sustainability of the nhs, where we were at the end of the nhs, where we were at the end of 2017 18, and they have looked at this additional... this £25 billion
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coming in in future years. have you that the pull together a picture of where the nhs is now and i think it‘s not surprising that we are in a fairly challenging financial position. i think they also recognise that 20.5 billion is a really significant investment in the nhs and we do have this new long—term plan which set that all ambitions. but those are positives that setting in direction of travel. because they got the funding into the future, they know what they‘re working with? gas. what they are together quite well is that the spending settlement is only for the nhs in england, that doesn‘t cover all spending. we‘re awaiting full final decisions, public health, services provided by public councils. information on training for doctors and nurses and for capital spending, how all of these are freely big impact on how the nhs can perform and how what they can use the extra funding. why are we waiting? so, the different funding
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streams for how these things come through, those additional questions we are waiting for the spending review for later this year. so, is there a specific outcome of that spending review that people at the national audit office and you in the king‘s fund, is as everything is something everyone sees the same way? there is a good consensus that we have the additional support for the nhs, but in orderfor that to be capitalised on, we need to see that same level of support for these other services as well. if we still... that‘s money that is designed to curb of transforming energy services can be pulled back into compensating for those other areas as well. so there's a report ca rd areas as well. so there's a report card that says goes try, but more effort is needed. yes. right direction of travel but we‘re a bit concerned about how we are going to get there. thank you. tv and movie streaming
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giant netflix ended 2018 with a surge in subscribers — adding nearly 9 million new members in the three months to december. netflix said the growth reflected the success of its original programmes. the streaming service now has 140 million customers around the world. thank you, good afternoon. it feels like windsor has at long last arrived today. some of us have even had the chance to see a little but of snow. we have had a frontal system putting in from the most brilliant mind was on the leading edge, that france popping into cold air producing some snow, especially over high ground of wales, into the midlands, north west england, west of scotla nd midlands, north west england, west of scotland but also a little for a time. generally, martha from the west to the west of today. the night. a lot of cloud, some
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outbreaks of patchy rain, from sleaziness over high ground but many others holding just above freezing. tomorrow looks uninspiring, a lot of cloud, spits and spots of rain and drizzle, maybe the odd lick of something which we over high ground, best chance of sunshine northern scotland, eyes of the temperatures on the south—west of england. cloudy and chilly feeling day, i‘m hopeful that... some patchy rain across the northwest. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines. more details emerge about the duke of edinburgh‘s car crash near sandringham yesterday. police say there was a baby in the back of the other vehicle and one woman suffered a broken wrist in the collision. an eyewitness described the scene i helped him move his legs, which were a bit trapped. it was all a bit crushed. and then i saw his face and i realised who it was. the former foreign secretary boris johnson has warned against delaying britain‘s exit from the eu and says
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the eu will compromise over the controversial issue of the irish border it comes as the international trade secretary liam fox says the uk must avoid staying in a permanent customs arrangement with the eu. patients complain of delays in getting painkillers and anti—depressants as pharmacists warn of shortages of common medicines. one of north korea‘s top negotiators is in washington for talks ahead of a possible second summit between kim jong—un and president trump. the department of health has insisted that the vast majority of drugs are not in short supply after some pharmacists in england complained of a shortage of several common medicines. the national pharmacy association said it was having to pay vastly higher prices for drugs, including painkillers and anti—depressants.
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it said stockpiling in case of no—deal brexit was among the possible reasons. here‘s more from our health correspondent catherine burns. this is partly a question of supply and demand. when supply goes down, demand goes up and prices can increase, too. when this happens to vital medicines, the government agrees to pay a premium for them. the list of these temporary prices is published every month, and the bbc has analysed that data over the last three years. in england, there‘s been a sixfold increase in the number of medicines on the monthly list. in january 2015, there were 12 on it. the numbers started to climb in 2017, when it peaked at over 90. at the end of last year, there was a surge from 45 to 80. another worry is that many of these drugs are very common, everything from anti—inflammatories and epilepsy drugs to blood pressure medication and antidepressants. for patients, obviously it‘s concerning if the medicine isn‘t available, and certainly,
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we‘d advise patients to order the medicines in advance if they can do, so in case there are any problems, it gives the pharmacist more time to deal with it. from an increased global demand to problems with raw materials. the national pharmacy association says brexit appears to be a significant factor, because of what it calls "unconscious stockpiling" — everyone along the chain holding onto extra medicines in case of a no—deal brexit. the department of health and social care says 2 million prescription items are successfully dispensed in england every day. catherine burns, bbc news. let‘s return to our top story — the duke of edinburgh‘s car accident near sandringham yesterday. we‘ve been speaking to roy warne, who was one of the first people who stopped at the scene after the accident. let‘s have a listen to a bit more of that interview, as mr warne describes moment he pulled the duke from overturned land rover.
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i cannot remember the words, but it was for the person who was obviously in some shock. one of the royal a wipe, it was much. people gave me a wipe, it was much. how did you get him out? the door was underneath. what i thought was door was the roof. it was 90 degrees, so i‘m not sure whether it was from the corner of the windscreen or the sunroof. the windscreen or the sunroof. the windscreen was totally smashed? windscreen or the sunroof. the windscreen was totally smashed7m was badly splintered but it was still in place - prised i from was badly splintered but it was stil corner e - prised i from was badly splintered but it was stil corner e i free rised i from was badly splintered but it was stil corner e i free debt i from you lee, bee press e press tag of 2 press flag of the read in the press that both of the drivers were tested g they were
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results. see no, esults. see no,edid 5. see no, a did not. - see no, a did not. how see lady? ‘ her la two ‘ her la two women ‘ her la two women in ‘ her la two women in there - her la two women in there andl her la two women in there and my r was the other was i lot i smoke 5.555; 55 15555 2565 51.51 5.1 5e5j55 5.555; 55 155.55 55555 51.51 5.1 5e5j55 it 555555 55 155.55 55555 51551 551 5e55'555 it and 55555 55 155.55 55555 5151 51 5e5'555 itandi 55555 55 155.55 55555 5151 51 5e5'555 itandl§ 55555 55 155.55 55555 5151 51 5e5'555 itand i§it 55555 55 155.55 55555 5151 51 5e5'555 it and i% it might around it and i thought it might go up around it and i thought it might go up or something. whatever the other car was. the one with the baby in? you win there first? yes. your first thing was to open the door and get the baby out? the windows were down. and there was another chap. we got the baby out. the baby boy or girl? boy, ten months old. can you rememberthe names? boy, ten months old. can you remember the names?” boy, ten months old. can you remember the names? i don't. did the duke say anything? he spoke to my
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wife and asked how everyone was and if anyone was hurt. he seemed relieved... ? yes, but if anyone was hurt. he seemed relieved...? yes, but he is a very old man and he was obviously shaken up old man and he was obviously shaken up and he responded as you would imagine him to respond. the mother of one of the four londoners suspected of being behind a string of islamic state murders in syria has lost a legal attempt to prevent the uk sharing intelligence with the us, without first receiving assurances that he will not face the death penalty. el shafee elsheikh and another londoner, alexanda kotey, are being held by us—backed kurdish forces in syria. the government says the pair have been stripped of their british citizenship, and ministers want them to stand trial in the us. if found guilty, they could face the death penalty. the man suspected of masterminding tuesday‘s attack in nairobi has been arrested. 21 people died when jihadists stormed an office and hotel complex. local media have identified him.
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initial reports had placed him at the scene of the attack, and he was presumed dead at the end of the operation. and found a cache of arms . three and a half thousand reserve troops could be called up as part of government plans for a no—deal brexit. reservists have military training, but also hold down civilian jobs and can be deployed anywhere in the world. the call—up order was made in a statement on thursday and comes into effect from next month. a senior north korean negotiator has arrived in the united states as the two sides try to arrange a second summit between kim jong—un and donald trump. south korean reports say kim yong—chul is carrying a letter from the north korean leader to mr trump. he‘s expected to meet the us secretary of state and the president later today. our correspondent in seoul laura bicker gave us this update. we understand kim yong—chol, who is thought to be
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kim jong—un‘s right—hand man, will meet with the us secretary of state, mike pompeo, when washington, dc, wakes up. he is there, we understand, with a message from kim jong—un. you might remember, last time, just before the singapore summit, kim yong—chol went to washington, dc, with this huge letter from kim jong—un, so we are wondering exactly what he has been dispatched with this time. but, certainly, sending a messenger of the calibre of kim yong—chol would suggest that north korea is serious about a second summit. we also understand that talks are taking place in sweden between north korea and the united states. it may well be that all of these meetings are to try to lay the groundwork for a second summit. when it comes to the details of the proposed second summit, we are hearing from our reuters colleagues in vietnam that kim jong—un is planning a state visit there. that may give us a clue as to
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the location of a second summit. as to the details of what the two leaders may talk about, well, certainly, when it comes to north korea, they have been demanding sanctions, really, for some kind of concessions from the us. the us, on the other hand says, "look, we‘re not going to do anything until north korea shows concrete signs of giving up its nuclear weapons". it may well be that both sides have decided to take a step towards one another. that is certainly the hope here in seoul. president moon has asked both sides to consider their position and make bold moves, and perhaps this is the time they are prepared to do it. time will tell. we‘ve got the whole weekend ahead of us in washington. we‘ve got that big meeting where kim yong—chol will meet the us secretary of state, and perhaps, we don‘t know, will go to the white house and that is when we will perhaps more details. us democratic politicians say
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they will investigate allegations that president trump directed his long—time personal lawyer to lie to congress. a buzzfeed news report alleges mr trump directed michael cohen to lie about plans to build a trump tower in moscow. cohen has already admitted to lying about when the , 5 5 , the new allegations — but he has previously denied ever directing his former lawyefltrbreairthflavr of the sudanese capital khartoum, demanding the resignation of president omar al—bashir. there are reports of two people — a child and a doctor — being killed. protests have been going on for a month, but on monday the president insisted they would not lead to a change in government. bill hayton reports. the heavy hand of sudan‘s security forces. tear gas and bullets fired to break up an angry crowd. there were casualties and, elsewhere, heavy beatings for those caught by police.
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sudan‘s middle classes have had enough. he survived international sanctions and the splitting of his country in half, with the loss of most of its oil revenue. and he wants to change the constitution to stay in power. but, on the streets, the protesters demand freedom and an end to the bashir‘s rule. to bashir‘s rule. human—rights groups say 40 people have been killed in the past month. security forces still seem in control, but at
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an increasingly heavy cost. japanese officials are trying to work out whether they were paid a visit by the street artist banksy, without even realising it. the graffiti has been found at a monorail station in tokyo, and is similar to a famous banksy painting — umbrella rat. it‘s not clear when this version was painted but officials said they had known about it for a long time. they realised it could be a banksy after being contacted by residents. it‘s sprayed on a door, which has now been removed and placed in storage to prevent any damage to it. officials say they‘re still trying to verify whether it really is a banksy. if you are a passenger on northern rail, you are likely to have faced delays, disruption and ticket price hikes and nearly two years of strikes. tomorrow marks the 45th day of action by the rmt union. jayne mccubbin has been finding out what impact the action has been having on rail users and businesses.
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morning! morning. we are setting off with the mad ramblers. mad by name and by nature. yes, we are the mad walkers. the manchester and district 20s we have had real trouble getting out tg ggbiking onsaturda¥s55= because the trains don‘t run? precisely. we can‘t get there. the group is half as big as it used to be. it has been that way since northern‘s saturday strikes began last september. ijust want them to be over. edale train station, usually full of weekend walkers, is empty today. walk. up intb the briskeir555 5 55 5 5 5 5 their impact is far—reaching. train there, not
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a passenger one, obviously. obviously. where do you normally start, ollie? manchester piccadilly, or picket—dilly. picket—dilly? yeah. we have worked around it an awful lot with car shares and what have you, but it is not ideal. we are rambling on, as it were. they are able to ramble on. good luck with the walk! but businesses in the area are limping on. it has had a really bad effect on us. how bad? thousands of pounds bad. we get a lot of ale trails, hen nights and stag nights, all doing the ale trail. they stop off at each village, have a couple of beers and then get on the train and go on again. we have missed all that this autumn. a lot of local businesses like the cafes and fish and chips are suffering because of the lack of people coming on the train on saturdays. but this strike dates back much further than last autumn. these pickets have been going on for almost two years now. this is the post at the centre of the strike. unions want to protect
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safety critical guards. northern say this post needs modernising. we will still have a driver on every service and a second member of staff on every service in the future, the same as we do today. what we are looking to do is change how we use them so we have more time with the customers for that person who is there in addition to the driver. northern say half of all journeys in the country operate under this system. the rmt believe they‘re being dishonest, saying this is about spending more time with customers, when instead, with customers, instead. they say it is about cutting costs. it's quite clear that the government are in cahoots with the train operating companies and they want a completely de—staffed railway. they don't want guards on services. they don't want staff on stations. talks have stalled. strikes will continue until at least the end of the month. northern have applied to the government to have the cost of these strikes reimbursed. these businesses, though, have no hope of recouping what they‘ve lost. like commuters, they just hope it ends soon.
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jayne mccubbin, bbc news. the headlines on bbc news: more details emerge about the duke of edinburgh‘s car crash near sandringham yesterday. police say there was a baby in the back of the other vehicle patients complain of delays in getting painkillers of common medicines. against delaying britain‘s exit from the eu and says the eu will compromise over the controversial issue of the irish border. devastating—fires5155tb5555,3555 5. . . 5 . 5,5 of four years. lastjune, the iconic building — designed by the architect charles rennie mackintosh —
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was gutted while it was still being rebuilt after a blaze in 2014. now, new virtual reality images have been released showing what the restoration will look like. our reporter lorna gordon has been speaking to the new director about her vision for the art school‘s future. it was a building that was distinctive and defining to glasgow, attherglasdow school of art ! for a second time. you can see part of it from here, and it‘s much more extensive than last time, of course, that‘s true. a large part of the internal structures are gone. these pictures taken shortly after the second fire show the extent of the damage — hints of the world—renowned building, now just a hollowed—out shell. the investigation into what caused this fire is still ongoing, but within the next few weeks, the hope is to start scooping out
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the debris from the bowels of what remains of the mack, so experts can start sifting through it and salvage what they can. this was a charles rennie mackintosh masterpiece, with its curves and angles, its shadows and light, the distinctive wooden panelling, wooden furniture, unique as a working art school and a work of art. now, though, a chance to experience at least part of it, if not in the real world, the virtual one instead. i am in a studio at the mack. i know it doesn‘t exist any more, but through this headset, it‘s like i‘m there. this, a three—dimensional rendering of one of the studios, and the plaster casts like this one, the laocoon, which are traditionally used to teach drawing, that it contained. this virtual, augmented reality created using scans, archive images and film. genuinely, i think it‘s amazing, what you can do with vr
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technology and digital technology, especially obviously because of what happened with the art school fire. what kind of reaction have you had? it‘s actually very poignant. the people from archives were some of the first people to see it, and they were moved to tears, because they were seeing a studio space in the mack building that didn‘t actually exist any more. some have been critical of the way the institution handled the aftermath of the fire. the new direeter ef the “heel 5 55 55 have been better. looking forward, she wants a rebuilt mack to stay faithful to the original, and for the community to play a part. we feel we have an absolute duty and responsibility, for educational purposes, but also for the world, for glasgow and for the world, to bring that building back. this is the building that was designed to be here, and this is the building that will stay. determined that the mackintosh building will one day take its place on glasgow‘s skyline again.
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lorna gordon, bbc news, glasgow. now, for a new generation of entrepreneurs. the one‘s doing a so—called side hustle. these are people who undertake ‘side projects‘ alongside their main job. a new study says 37% of 25—37 year olds have them. here‘s one of them. iama i am a senior housing officerfrom notting hill housing, genesis. i manage 160 properties across islington and in hackney. my side hustle is being a dj. i became a dj about two years ago now. it is something that i had always put off for the longest time and i finallyjust bit the bullet and thought, do you know what, i‘m going to take a leap, before the day comes up i can‘t do we
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and going to parties myself and it gets to a point you go to so many and it‘s like, actually, i can play this music, i can do better than these djs. i‘m going to go up there and i‘m going to show everyone that i can be just as great. when i started djing i didn‘t actually have in mind what to charge people. it was taking that leap from there to saying actually if you want to book me these are my rates, this is what i charge now. i think at first when i got into it i didn‘t quite know what i was in for to be able to take on djing and managing i was djing in the eveflrngs-l
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555555555555555 5 55 ' being able 133535 "w and being able 133535 ”71 and have great people skills in my work has helped me to be a dj. you do not think you are performing in a room full of strangers and there is nothing to prepare you for that. it sta rts nothing to prepare you for that. it starts off in the bedroom, practising and suddenly you are in a clu b practising and suddenly you are in a club that is dark and being in a role here where i get to meet so many people and even just my collea g u es many people and even just my colleagues has helped me to bring me out of my shelves. i want to become a master of deejaying and i feel once i have reached the pinnacle of that, building myself as a brand, i would like to teach others to dj. new research appears to have settled a long—running debate over the age of the rings of saturn. scientists have confirmed the planet‘s iconic rings are very young — no more than 100 million years old — and may have been formed during a time when dinosaurs still roamed the earth. the insight comes from the final
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measurements acquired by nasa‘s cassini probe, just before it drove itself to destruction in saturn‘s atmosphere in 2017. a baby given five weeks to live now has just two days to find a new heart. carter cookson, who was born on boxing day, has suffered three cardiac arrests and is on a life—support machine. doctors at newcastle‘s freeman hospital have advised the family a new organ must be found in the next 48 hours. carter‘s father, chris cookson, stepped away from his son‘s bedside a little earlier to appeal to other parents to think about organ donation. by by ten o‘clock at night everything went downhill. around his heart, he was ventilated, he was rushed to the freeman hospital and when he was in the freeman, he had three cardiac arrests. for any parent it is devastating. they put a pacemaker
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into his heart because his heart was racing from zero to 300. when the surgeon went into his heart, the left ventricle was dead tissue, which means his heart cannot pump blood around his body. i am appealing to anybody out there who is in appealing to anybody out there who isina appealing to anybody out there who is in a horrible, horrible situation, and the consultants, doctors have been told that there is no chance of life. there son or daughter is not going to get better. it isa daughter is not going to get better. it is a plea tojoin organ daughter is not going to get better. it is a plea to join organ donation and there is a chance their heart may keep my son alive. i hope somebody watching this... if they are in the position, to make the greatest sacrifice to put their child on the organ donation list, or get in touch with a consultant,
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somebody to say, "i want to step forward. " somebody to say, "i want to step forward." if i do not win this fight to get my son heart, i will be doing the same. if they asked me would i donate carter‘s organs, because we have come to the end and there is nothing else we can do and there is nothing else we can do and there is no chance of a heart, i will make that decision. if the last thing carter can do in the 20 days he been alive is to save small babies‘ lives, his name would go on. i hope somebody who is in the same situation, that has the opportunity to do it, because if no heart comes forward , to do it, because if no heart comes forward, iam not to do it, because if no heart comes forward, i am not going to be taking my son home. our thoughts go out to him in that desperately difficult time as they try to save the life of
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their son. forecasters in eastern australia are warning an extreme heatwave is yet to reach its peak after nearly a week of blistering conditions. some areas of new south wales have already seen record temperatures of 48 celsius, causing roads to melt. many parts of the country have been hit by unseasonably high temperatures in recent weeks. phil mercer sent this report from sydney. even in a land well used to nature‘s extremes, this heatwave is punishing. the roasting conditions are affecting much of eastern australia, but new south wales is feeling it most. 2018 was australia‘s third warmest year on record, and 2019 has got off to a scorching start. residents in whitecliffs, 1000 kilometres from sydney, have endured heat of 48.2 celsius. other parts of australia‘s most populous state have also set new temperature records.
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5’ ‘teae 15557557“ 555 while others have headed etreight te the beet55= there was also relief for a distressed sheep found abandoned with a sore leg in the new south wales outback. it was rescued by a police officer and allowed to recover in an air—conditioned patrol car. phil mercer, bbc news, sydney. in a moment, it‘s time for the one o‘clock news with kate silverton, but first it‘s time for a look at the weather with ben rich. good afternoon, it feels like winter has finally arrived. some have seen
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a little bit of snow today. this is how it looked earlier in shropshire. we started today on a cold note and got as low as —11 in scotland and into the cold air we brought a weather front with rain and on the leading edge, some snowfall across wales, west midlands, north—west england and western scotland. into the late afternoon and early evening, this dying brand of cloud, rain and sleet and snow staggers eastwards. a lot of the snow falling on high ground but even low levels there could be snow in the central belt of scotland and certainly over the pennines. in wales, southwest and northern ireland, wintry weather tending to turn back to rain because things are turning milder from the west. through this evening and overnight, further eastwards it will
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not be as cold as last night, particularly down towards the far south—west. going into tomorrow, a grey and disappointing day for many. patchy rain on and off at times. for many, temperatures will struggle in single digits that something milder across the far south—west, 10 degrees in plymouth. subtle changes as we get into sunday. the weather front bringing cloud and rain. we pick up more of an easterly wind which will bring drier air and the skies will tend to gear. sunday i think will bring more sunshine. the better day of the weekend. but this band of cloud and some rain and hill snow in the north will sync across north—western areas and the temperature is still low, 5—8. as we go into next week, do not take anything you see on this chart literally. frontal systems pushing
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in from the west. we will have cold weather as we switch the wind direction around the east, north east. looking colt into next week and some likely to see some snow. the duke of edinburgh‘s recovering at sandringham after the dramatic car crash which has left him shaken but physically unhurt. police say there was a baby in the back of the other vehicle and two women required hospital treatment. an eyewitness described the moment he pulled the duke to safety. i helped him move his legs which were a bit trapped. it was all a bit crushed. and then i saw his face and i realised who it was. after a number of fatal crashes on this stretch of road, the local council today approved a cut in the speed limit and the introduction of speed cameras. the princess royal, at a royal engagement today, was asked about her father‘s welfare. no idea.
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do you know where i am? the same place as you. also this lunchtime: liam fox, the international trade secretary, says staying
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