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tv   Victoria Derbyshire  BBC News  March 20, 2019 10:00am-11:01am GMT

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hello, it's wednesday, it's ten o'clock, i'm victoria derbyshire. physicalviolence, manipulation, sexual violence and now abuse via technology — a leading charity tells us that 95% of the domestic abuse cases they deal with daily involve some kind of tech abuse. from the tv, from the settings that he has put in, he can actually watch and spy and see what i'm doing. he can watch me in the kitche... because the ipad was linked to the telly in the kitchen? was linked to the telly. we've also been told about ex—partners sewing gps trackers into their children's teddy bears and emails being hacked to find out their whereabouts. has this happened to you? do let me know this morning.
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the trans twitter row that's ended up as a police investigation. but did a trans activist make a complaint to the police because someone on twitter misgendered her daughter? that's what the subject of the complaint suggests. we'll bring you the story in the next half hour. as itv promises to do more to look after its contestants on love island, a former star from channel 4's gogglebox says that it's an industry—wide problem and that he was hung out to dry when he left the show. we'll talk to chris ashby—steed before 11. hello, welcome to the programme. we're live until 11 this morning. what is going on with brexit? a question we may have asked every day for the last two years.
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the prime minister is going to ask the eu for a delay to the date we leave, but she confirmed this morning that it won't be a long one. downing street said she shared the public‘s frustration at parliament's failure to take a decision. do you agree? are you frustrated? are you frustrated with parliament orare are you frustrated with parliament or are there other reasons you are frustrated? first annita mcveigh has the news. funerals are taking place in christchurch, for some of the 50 people killed last friday when a gunman attacked two mosques. new zealand police say they hope to have completed the formal identification of all 50 victims by the end of wednesday, and would then be able to release the bodies to the families. the prime minister of new zealand, jacinda ardern, has been speaking exclusively to the bbc. she told us there needs to be a global fight to root out racist right—wing ideology. we absolutely have to learn the lessons from both what gave rise to the ugly ideology of this individual and what environments allow that to grow
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and potentially spread. theresa may is to ask the european union if brexit can be postponed for up to three months. any delay beyond the uk's scheduled departure date of march 29th will need the approval of the leaders of all 27 remaining eu states. they'll meet mrs may at a summit in brussels tomorrow. technology is increasingly being used by domestic abusers to trap, control, or hunt down their victims, this programme has found. the charity refuge has told us exclusively that of the 6,500 people they support each day, 95% of those cases now involve some form of tech abuse. that can mean an ex sewing location trackers into their children's toys or coats, spying through a smart tv, or hacking an email account to find out her whereabouts. and we'll have that exclusive report in full, just after this news summary. zimbabwe says it's struggling to cope with the full impact of cyclone idai which has left
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thousands of people homeless. medicines are said to be running out and resources are stretched to breaking point, with rescuers in a race against time to reach survivors. 100 people are known to have died in zimbabwe, while in mozambique, the number of dead stands at more than 200. the uk's main inflation rate rose slightly last month, but it stayed close to january's two—year low, despite the uncertainties of brexit. consumer prices rose an average of 1.9% in february. but core inflation — which strips out food and energy prices — edged down. house prices injanuary rose by an annual 1.7% across the united kingdom as a whole — the smallest increase sincejune 2013. a danish mp has spoken out after being told to remove her baby from the parliament's chamber. mette abildgaard said it was the first time she had brought her five—month—old daughter
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to work, as the father could not step in to take care of her. the scandinavian country is often held up as a champion of gender equality and women's rights, and as a child and family—centred nation with generous parental leave. one in ten cases of psychosis could be linked to smoking high—potency cannabis, according to a major study. researchers from king's college london studied drug—users in europe and brazil and found that people who smoke strong forms of the drug are at a much greater risk of suffering from serious mental illnesses. that has a summary of the main news. back to you, victoria. we will speak more about the research on super strong cannabis later on in the programme. domestic abuse can involve, amongst other things, control, manipulation, physical violence, sexual violence and now, alarmingly, technology. the charity refuge has told us exclusively that of the 6,500 people they support each day, 95% of those cases now involve
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some form of tech abuse. that can mean an ex sewing gps trackers into their children's teddy bears, spying on someone through a smart tv, or hacking emails to find out an individual‘s whereabouts. i'm not safe. you're always gonna be there watching. a new form of control. it's a bit like being raped, really. what you thought was secure wasn't. technology is increasingly becoming an instrument of domestic abuse. we've heard three women's stories, three ways they were trapped by tech, controlled and even hunted down. personally, i would say run, because they don't change. throughout the entire relationship, things would kick off. he would yell at me in the supermarket, he would like to humiliate me in front of people.
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ellen was married for more than 20 years. for every one of them subjected to coercive control until she reached breaking point. i would sit on the toilet and i'djust go... i'd just silently scream grab my fists and just to try to get that tension because it would just be so horrible. why did you scream silently? i didn't want the kids to hear. i didn't want him to hear. it was just 20—odd years ofjust this horrible realisation of what hell i was living. ellen left and was staying in a secure refuge. her husband was repentant at first but then used the family computer to track ellen down. i'd moved to a completely new town, miles away. i'd no connection to that place. there was no way he could've
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known i was there. i'd phone my friend and agree to meet her. and i'd just put in my gmail diary, meet claire at 1pm. and i didn't put a location. i was heading toward her and i could see my friend's face like smiles as she saw me. and then her face just dropped. and then he justjumped out on me, like, suddenly, he was just there in my face and it scared the life out of me. i was so shocked and horrified. and he said what words to you? just, found you, got you. ellen and her friend managed to get away. her ex—husband is no longer tracking her. later, i found out that he'd got into my gmail account. and he'd got into my diary. and that's the only way he could have found out i was meeting that friend at that particular time. itjust made me feel sick
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to the pit of my stomach. it's like i'm not gonna be able to break free from this relationship fully. modern life is bringing new challenges for domestic abuse support workers. every day, the charity refuge support 6500 women and they have identified 95% of all cases involve techie peace. this specialist team gives advice to clients on how to protect devices and information from its partners. we are on our way to go and see a lady who has concerns that she has raised with us about being monitored. loads of women are coming to us saying people think i am
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crazy, something out of a thriller, crime novel, he keeps turning up. perhaps we need to be looking into the possibility there was some sort of location tracker if you are being followed. in terms of password security, it can be really good to have very long passwords, phrases. sometimes with words that we would not necessarily think together. the advices is often eye—opening and the abuse can get very sinister. with people even using gps trackers to monitor wax partners. the kids would come back from having gone to see the parent and location trackers might have been sold into their coats, lining of teddy bears —— ex partners. it is happening and we cannot pretend it is not happening and react after the fact. but technological abuse often starts
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when relationships are still ongoing. we have the smart tv, that was his idea, i was a white with the tv we had. 0ne was his idea, i was a white with the tv we had. one of the app prima loading onto the tv, he would skype. the tv would ring and he would a nswer the tv would ring and he would answer it with the remote. but on this particular occasion, we had an argument, idid this particular occasion, we had an argument, i did not answerthe this particular occasion, we had an argument, i did not answer the call. when he came in, he said, i was skype calling you, didn't you hear the television? i said, no, skype calling you, didn't you hear the television? isaid, no, i skype calling you, didn't you hear the television? i said, no, iwas not in the room. he said, are you sure? yes, you did. sitting on the settee. was he right? i was and i chose not to answer. he knew from the tv. the settings he had put in, he can watch and spy and see what i am doing. he could watch me in the
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kitchen on the ipad. that ipad was linked to the tally in the kitchen? almost nowhere in your home you could go where you had total privacy. not really. she was physically abused too. her partner of ten years was eventually sent to prison for attacking her. it is a pattern refuge has identified. very disturbingly, what we are seeing is the victim is experiencing tech abuse are at some of the highest risk of serious physical harm or or even killed. of the 1780 cases the tech abuse team dealt with last year are most also involved physical violence. he basically said he would cut a smile across my face. her relationship was short and very violent. he started going around
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facebook wanting passwords, i could not have a pass code on my phone because otherwise i would be hiding something. if i wanted a pass code, i had to let him know what it was. 0ne i had to let him know what it was. one saturday, she was at work and her boyfriend was looking at pornography and one of the images looked familiar. he believed it was me. he started sending me loads of messages, he would not believe me at all. when i got home from work, he was very drunk. he fell asleep on the sofa and i put my child to bed. when he woke up, i was talking to one of my friends and he saw me on my phone so he smashed my phone against the wall and heat through the glass at the wall. my child woke up. he was hurt as well. he cut his foot badly on the broken glass, her
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son. herfrightened foot badly on the broken glass, her son. her frightened were you? very frightened. at one point. i don't ca re frightened. at one point. i don't care about our argument can help me, my child is hurt. i was holding my child. —— my child is hurt. i was holding my child. -- i my child is hurt. i was holding my child. —— i don't care about our argument, help me. they all successfully escaped their relationships. it is one thing to recognise the signs of tech abuse but another to stop it.|j recognise the signs of tech abuse but another to stop it. i only really figured out about the cycle of abuse when i ended up in the refuge, a women's refuge. and then came the journey to my new life. i would never ever say to someone that they should live like that. they should have their freedom. the phone is that personal thing, their privacy. no one should invade that. to this day, my tv now has masking
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tape over the camera. still? yeah. i don't need a camera on the tv. let's speak now to jane keeper, who's director of operations at the domestic abuse charity refuge. how alarming is this? this is extremely alarming. refuge is working with victims of domestic abuse, stalking, harassment, honour —based violence, and in recent yea rs, —based violence, and in recent years, what hundreds of staff around the country have started to pick up and talk about is that perpetrators instead of standing outside a woman's new home to stoke, tracked her down, suddenly, they are making use of technology —— stalk. 0ur staff initially had a big learning
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gap, how can we get this woman plasma smartphone secure? what do we do about her laptop? —— this woman's smartphone secure. we have formed a partnership with google, i do not know how we would have done it without the support of google, to innovate services and protect victims. you said those experiencing tech abuse are at higher risk of experiencing physical abuse, why is there a link? if we think about it, specialists in the field know that when victims... it is about control. there was great legislation now around coercive control. victims at the highest risk of homicide and serious harm being most controls. tech abuse is what coercive control is all about in the 21st century. what can being the subject of tech
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abuse meaningful a woman? usually a woman, not always. -- mean for a woman? for the victims we are working about every day they talk to us working about every day they talk to us about no matter where they flee to, no matter what four walls they are sitting in, just like he is there. we talk about gas lighting, like the old film gaslight, there are victims who people previously thought must be mentally ill because of the experiences they are describing. you think, am i going mad? that describing. you think, am i going mad ? that is describing. you think, am i going mad? that is the kind of reaction. that is exactly it. what we have had to do is make it so that whichever one of our domestic violence and other violent services the victim goes to, it is imperative that all of the support workers are tech savvy and instead of waiting for avec to tell us about one of these
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problems, to say, i am getting the feeling he knows where i am, it is vital the professionals are saying, let us check your accounts. —— instead of waiting for a victim to tell us. gps trackers in toys, is it rare? no, it is not rare. it is imperative all of us start getting very concerned about our privacy, oui’ very concerned about our privacy, our security. we have the right to be safe and have our privacy and to think, who has got our passwords? to be fairto think, who has got our passwords? to be fair to anybody watching, you would not really think about unpicking your kid's soft toy to look for a gps tracker. exactly. in terms of personal information, you had a case where a woman in a refuge, who had escaped from a violent acts, to go to a place of safety, found through a failed mot
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on her car. a great example of what we are having to deal with. the woman was tracked by the man and we had to help her escape and get safe again. we started looking into what had gone and we discovered that a year or had gone and we discovered that a year 01’ so ago, had gone and we discovered that a year or so ago, the dvla were routinely putting up addresses online when you have you not done. the exact location. —— mot. the exact location of the garage was going routinely on the government website to anyone who cares to look. this is an example of what the tech abuse project at refuge working with government and dvla were horrified and have worked incredibly helpfully with us, we are about to put out a joint statement about changes they have made. this is an issue with
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government and digital first doctor waiting for the domestic abuse built —— and digitalfirst... waiting for the domestic abuse built -- and digitalfirst... waiting waiting for the domestic abuse built -- and digital first. .. waiting for the domestic abuse bill, what do you want? we already working with government and civil servants talking about tech abuse, we are delighted they have now recognised theissue delighted they have now recognised the issue of tech abuse in the bill and we are going to be working with and we are going to be working with and to shake that over the next period of time. what we need to see is that for example the new domestic abuse protection orders address online forms of abuse —— shape that over the next period of time. not just physical things we all recognise but it can be continued online. and coercive control is so often carried out through technology. let me read this e-mail from someone who does not wish their name to be used today. this has happened to be. my ex hacked my
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e—mailand happened to be. my ex hacked my e—mail and made all of my e—mail be forwarded to his. i discovered it by accident when i went through something to change my settings. he hacked my facebook account, made fa ke hacked my facebook account, made fake accounts, copied my messenger chat logs and sent them to friends and family, he hacked other social media as well. he found my new boyfriendnumber and started to message him with things i had done in my past i am not particularly proud of, is a seven years ago and to this day i still keep my social media, phones and e—mails under lock and key. you need a generated code from another device to login to any social media accounts. good advice. finally, advice to anyone watching who needs to protect their data, personal information, accounts? what would you say? all of the obvious things we are always told, think about your passwords, you have a right to privacy. we are quick to accept privacy settings, be curious,
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get tech savvy, look at the information, the is fantastic information, the is fantastic information we have put up on refuge's website today. the sensitive information about how to get tech savvy. we do not want women getting off—line, they have every right to be online, enjoying their lives, but empower yourself. right to be online, enjoying their lives, but empoweryourself. learn it all. thank you very much, thank you for coming on programme, director of operations at refuge. surrey police say they are carrying out an investigation into an alleged hate crime against the founder of the trans rights charity mermaids. it all began when susie green from mermaids and catholic commentator caroline farrow appeared on good morning britain together last year. it was only when the leaders raised concerns and said, this is ellie safeguarding this. most parents would be unhappy. two other points
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—— this is a safeguarding risk. it excludes people of faith, and it also excludes importantly girls who may have been subject to sexual abuse and need safeguarding. that was caroline farrow. that heated conversation carried on on twitter afterwards, and some tweets were directed at susie green and her daughter, jackie, who transitioned as a teenager. these are some of the tweets caroline farrow wrote which have now been deleted. "what she did to her own son is illegal. she mutilated him by having him castrated and rendered sterile while still a child. susie green may feel that giving her son off—label illegal medication aged 11 and drastic surgery was the path of least harm in her circumstances, but she shouldn't project and impose it on other vulnerable kids as best practice. when you criticise susie green
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for castrating her 16—year—old son, she writes pages of can't describing her journey and reporting you to the police for hurting her feelings. those were all posted on october 11th last year. susie green then contacted the police. let's talk to susie green, from mermaids now. tell us why you contacted the police. every day, my daughter is misgendered online. this is not something that is uncommon. what was uncommon about this was it was a journalist who had a public platform who used that to send very deliberately malicious and nasty m essa g es deliberately malicious and nasty messages and it is notjust the misgendered comments, it is the context, she calls me a child abuser. mermaids‘ stance, we stand
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for trans rights, and we will say that they should report these as hate incidents. i did not feel as the ceo of a charity that supports transgender children and young people that it was right that i did not do the same when i was subject to that. did you contact the police because caroline farrow had misgendered your daughter? no. no? did you contact the police because among other tweets, we read them up, she was accusing you of child abuse? yeah, and also the stuff around mutilation, castration, and the fact she constantly refers to my daughter asa she constantly refers to my daughter as a boy, but that is not the key issue, it was the really damaging thing she said about me and my actions that made me decide this was an appropriate course of action. as i say, we tell people to report hate incidents and hate crime online.
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these things are endemic. for me not to do so in my position would have seemed to me to be a bit of a copout. we invited caroline farrow onto the programme and she declined. she said she could not talk to us because she promised an exclusive to a sunday newspaper. she did tell us, i got a sunday newspaper. she did tell us, igota a sunday newspaper. she did tell us, i got a call from police on monday night saying i had misgendered susie green‘s daughter. i was referring to her daughter as a son in the past tense before she had her gender reassignment. if you are yet to have your testicles removed, you are a boy. it was a freudian slip. the sepia say i have to do an interview under caution. she said she found my tweets spiteful which was not my intention, but even if it was, should it be a crime? i do not know when the interview will take place, it is in the hands of the lawyers. how do you really react? and intervention slip does not cover the thing she has had in the tweets. —— an inadvertent slip. it appears to
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be disingenuous, especially since she has removed and so no one can actually reference and to see what was said. jackie before surgery should be referred to as male, that is completely and totally wrong and goes against the equality act 2010. that may be true, sorry to interrupt, but is it a police matter? it is wasting their time, critics argue, what do you say? matter? it is wasting their time, critics argue, what do you sawm is up to the police to decide. i reported this and i asked them what they thought and they said they would look into it. the one thing the police officer i spoke to said, what do you want to achieve? all i said was, i want it to stop. is it true you with through your complaint yesterday? i did. why? because ifi had continued the complaint, caroline farrow would have had the
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platform to continue to spread misinformation about what actually happened on this occasion because, obviously, being involved in an investigation would mean i could not talk about what had been put online bya talk about what had been put online by a journalist with the social media platform, iwould not by a journalist with the social media platform, i would not have been able to discuss it because it could have gone against any possible court case. but also, ifind could have gone against any possible court case. but also, i find that the constant referencing of herself asa the constant referencing of herself as a victim when in actual fact she has used her platform to deliberately go after myself and my daughter, i could not let that stand. therefore, my view was, ok, maybe this should not be a police matter because she is basically making it a platform that is now being seen all over the media and across including the bbc.” being seen all over the media and across including the bbc. i am going to come back to the police point and it is what people say all of the time, they are stretched, with knife crime and other reasons, what you might describe as urgent,
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life—and—death matters, is this, and agitate crime, urgent life and death matter? a young person a few weeks ago killed herself because of online hate directed at her —— and urgent crime. what you are saying is, if it is not something life or death either make an immediate, we should ignore this and let hate stand, i do not agree with that under any circumstances. i do not think any hate should stand and i also think the damage done by online communications is absolutely immense and to say it is not as important as other things, well, the police need to make those decisions, the cps, i don‘t. what i did was follow through because i found something deeply upsetting, i know my daughter sees these things and fines than deeply upsetting and as an organisation that stands up for a minority that is constantly targeted by this kind of abuse, i felt i is constantly targeted by this kind of abuse, ifelt i had is constantly targeted by this kind of abuse, i felt i had to do something. thank you very much for
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talking to us. susie green, ceo of mermaids. surrey police a doctor —— surrey police say... "we received an allegation on 15th october 2018 in relation to a number of tweets which were posted in october 2018. a thorough investigation is being carried out to establish whether any criminal offences have taken place. a 44—year—old woman has been asked to attend a voluntary interview in relation to the allegation as part of our ongoing investigation." still to come... new evidence that if you smoke powerful cannabis or skunk you are five times more likely to develop psychosis. we speak to the lead researcher behind the biggest study of its kind who says if skunk was taken off the streets of london, new cases of psychosis would drop by a third. and after the awful death of love island‘s mike thalassitis atjust 26 years old, the former gogglebox star chris ashby—steed tells us how badly he struggled with anxiety after leaving the reality tv show and says a lack of aftercare
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is an industry wide failing. smoking cannibis every day can triple the chances of developing psychosis, according to a new big study published today in the lancet psychiatryjournal. and stronger strains of the drug, like skunk, can increase the risk even more. in cities where super—strength cannabis is widely available, like london and amsterdam, a significant proportion of new cases of psychosis are associated with daily use and high—potency cannabis. psychosis is a mental health problem that causes people to perceive or interpret things differently from those around them. let‘s speak to marta di forti, a leading expert on psychosis and cannabis, and lead author of this study today from kings college london. and ad gridley, who is currently on three different anti—psychotics, has suffered with schizophrenia and has tried to take his own life. he believes his psychosis
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is down to cannabis use. he no longer smokes but thinks the effects are permanent. thank you both for coming in. how much did you used to smoke and how often and over what period? over about ten or 12 years i would smoke about ten or 12 years i would smoke about an eighth a week. what does that mean? there were one or two joints a day. there were times when i went without, usually when i was in hospital. what effect did that regular smoking of cannabis have on you? i didn't see a realworld as such. the psychosis that took hold i suppose it just made such. the psychosis that took hold i suppose itjust made everything surreal and supernatural. so i couldn‘t focus on everyday tasks, so it took over everything for me. why did you smoke it to start with? to
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make friends initially. if i turned up make friends initially. if i turned up to party and had some weed or skunk with me, people would sit down cross—legged on the floor and have a chat and pass the drinks around and it was a bonding thing. 0utside chat and pass the drinks around and it was a bonding thing. outside of those sessions i have nothing in common with these people. then i started smoking it alone and it went south from there. how would you describe the effect on your mental health to our audience? catastrophic, i could not function, i was catastrophic, i could not function, iwas in catastrophic, i could not function, i was in and out of hospital ten times in those years. i got to know the staff in the hospital really well. i was not doing anything meaningful with my life. let well. i was not doing anything meaningfulwith my life. let me bring it in, the last time you are on this programme is a fellow guest told you there was no evidence that cannabis causes psychosis. what is your evidence today suggest? the evidence today suggests that the first of all, if you use, as you
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mention, cannabis on a daily basis, and this is independent of the potency, you can increase your risk of developing a psychotic disorder, which is pretty much what adam has shared with us. we are talking about people who come to the attention of mental health services. we are not talking about transient distress during intoxication. what is important about this study as it is the first one able outside london across europe to link the use of cannabis daily and of that potent variety of cannabis with a number of new cases of psychosis. there has been this misconception that cannabis could not be a risk factor for psychotic disorder because there was 110 for psychotic disorder because there was no evidence of the effects on the numberof was no evidence of the effects on the number of new cases. the reason is because there were not studies looking at the number of new cases of disease consistently and robustly. this is the first study of
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this proportion across europe that has looked at how the number of new cases of psychosis vary across london, amsterdam, paris, spain and in italy, and has been able to link the variation in the number of new cases can be partially explained about how available high potency cannabis is. partially? we are not talking about one disease. cannabis and the daily use of it is a contributing factor. by all means it is not the sole cause of psychotic disorder. described it as a bonding thing and you sat around cross—legged, and people argue that cannabis is relatively benign and you will not go into town on a friday night and smashed up a pub when you have been smoking cannabis in the way people get aggressive when they drink alcohol. what do you both say? smoking for me made me
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relax and slowed things down, but everything would be hyper meaningful. so i would be thinking all these things but i would not be doing anything, i had no ambition. maybe some people when they drink they get violent and run around and tear things they get violent and run around and tearthings up, they get violent and run around and tear things up, but it does subdue you, it makes you less likely to... is it dangerous? you are a danger to yourself. it depends how you measure danger. if you use the analogy with alcohol, it is true that if people are highly intoxicated they can become violent, but not everybody when they are drunk i violent or dangerous. there are people using cannabis recreationally and socially and coming to no harm, but we know with alcohol that if you drink heavily every day for a long period of time you come to home as well.
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adam, you are going to say it was dangerous because it led to psychosis and that has led to attempting to take your own life. yes. if i was not on cannabis i would not even have thought of it. janet says please could you ask mitre if this is not a pre—existing vulnerability which cannabis brings to the surface? this question has been addressed not necessarily by our study, but by other research and there is a large study from finland that looked out over 6000 individuals where they have analysed the association between using cannabis and psychosis. the subject either had a family history, or those who had started using cannabis after they were already experiencing some kind of psychotic symptoms. despite controlling for the two
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groups, there still was an effect of cannabis on the risk of psychosis which went from a sixfold increased to 3.5 increase, which is still a remarkable effect. indeed, there are people who are more vulnerable. but we are not yet able to identify these people. the message is if you use potent strains of cannabis and you do it daily, you can increase your chances of developing psychosis. if you make the choice to use cannabis recreationally, look for the symptoms of psychosis and seek help if you are beginning to think your perception of the environment and reality is changing. my environment and reality is changing. my son became schizophrenic after smoking skunk in his late teens. he was arrested and sectioned. i know of another 20—year—old who took his own life after suffering mental health problems. it is damaging the minds of young people and if they do not become psychotic, they are
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depressed with no ambition. skunk needs to be cast as a class a drug and give those lengthy sentences by selling it. thank you both for coming in. thank you both for coming in. mps have blasted the bbc over the multi—million—pound project to rebuild the eastenders set. the new albert square set won‘t be ready until 2023, five years later than planned, and will cost nearly £30 million more than budgeted. the group of mps have accused the bbc of complacency, saying its plans were flawed from the start. let‘s take a look at the old set still in action on the programme. ian mckellen, it is laura, i wanted to make sure you were 0k ian mckellen, it is laura, i wanted to make sure you were ok after yesterday. please call. bloomer there you go, angel. all right, how
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doi there you go, angel. all right, how do i not cause an embarrassing scene? can't we draw a line yesterday? can‘t we draw a line yesterday? 0ur media and arts correspondent david sillito joins me on set now. what are the mps are saying. there was a national audit report a few months ago and they say the bbc has been complacent, they had poor project management skills and they have handled this badly. the bbc disputes this. the whole point about this is albert square is one of the few bits of the east and that has not been transformed over the last 30 years and they want to expand the show and have new storylines and it is amazing when you go around the set and you realise the level of detail. it does not need the amount of money. this is the old set and it is not good enough for modern cameras and there are cracks and it has to be transformed. they have to rebuild it completely and they have had arguments for weeks about
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getting the exact victorian bricks that will match what they had before. all this has led to the delay. they need to be able to build new sets in which they can have new characters so they can do something with the show and reflect the moderator is the background.“ with the show and reflect the moderator is the background. is it coming in nearly £30 million over budget? it is notjust inflation, is it? the bbc says there has been problems with asbestos, it is a brownfield site with obstructions in the ground. but there have been changes as they have gone along and thatis changes as they have gone along and that is the project management issue. people are making decisions and they have said, we will do this and they have said, we will do this and that and there have been differences. there is a 26 month delay which is now almost a five year delay. the bbc says they strongly reject the idea that there has been complacency, there have been challenges along the way,
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including the construction market issues. it is such a bespoke project and they have had trouble finding a build in the first place and they have had problems doing something which is essentially replicating something exactly brick by brick building something new on a different site. when will it be ready? 2023 is the date they have at the moment and the public accounts committee says the bbc will have to report to them every year to make sure that they hit that deadline. thank you very much. david sillitoe, our media and arts correspondent. theresa may will write to the president of the european council, donald tusk, today to formally ask for brexit to be postponed. it‘s understood she‘ll request only a short extension. any delay beyond the uk‘s scheduled departure date of march the 29th will need the approval of the leaders of all 27 remaining eu states.
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norman smith is at westminster for us, how long will she ask for? every day is just another extraordinary twist in the whole brexit saga. it is like a roller—coaster and you have no idea what is happening. 2a hours ago we we re what is happening. 2a hours ago we were told post—cabinet that the prime minister will go for a short delay, but she would keep open the option of a much longer delay. last week we had theresa may and her deputy saying, if we do not get a deal, they will have to be potentially a long delay. this morning we wake up to be told by number ten, no long delay, we will have a short extension untiljune to 30th. what is going on? the short a nswer 30th. what is going on? the short answer is theresa may has buckled in the face of another brexiteer revolt against her. it was clear that the
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brexiteers in the cabinet and on the back benches were up in arms at the idea of a delay possibly going on for two years because they would regard it as a betrayal of brexit. they have pretty much said as much to theresa may. the pm has backed off in the face of that. but it has pleased no one as far as i can gather. the brexiteers i pleased she has taken a long delay of the table, but they are now saying, that is fine, but we want you to go to brussels and get a renegotiation of the backstop. the remainers i saying, hang on, it means we are heading to no deal onjune to 30th. in short, we have had a u—turn and no one has ended up happier. theresa may has managed to avoid the immediate threat of a rebel against her. when is the next vote going to be on which deal and how different
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will it be from the last deal that she put before the house? we are in mystic meg land. i would need a crystal ball to work that out because things change so quickly with brexit. no one really knows what is going to happen next. i suppose the most likely scenario is the eu does possibly agree to some short delay, although that is not a given. they are talking about putting off their meeting tomorrow until next week. we are meant to leave the eu on friday next week. in terms of votes here, it is possible we could have a vote on monday. there will be a brexit vote on monday that could morph into the brexit vote on monday. personally, i do not think it will because theresa may still has not got the numbers to get it through, no sign of the dup coming on board. it was suggested to me today that maybe there would not
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be another meaningful vote next week. in other ways, be another meaningful vote next week. in otherways, it be another meaningful vote next week. in other ways, it could drift off into this extension period. in other words, we go on and on with no real clarity about when a meaningful vote is going to be. all this asking for a delay, it means the cliff edge of the prime minister and the end of her premiership is pushed back as well? a lot of people think that pa rt well? a lot of people think that part of what happened overnight is a basic short—term survival manoeuvres by the prime minister. there was a real threat. i know theresa may has had plenty of revels in her time, but this idea of a long delay was so incendiary on the tory benches, you have iain duncan smith predicting 90% of tory mps voted against her. no tory leader can survive that.
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there are clear signs of real cabinet unhappiness. we know some cabinet unhappiness. we know some cabinet ministers are seeing theresa may this morning. i imagine from her point of view there was a sense everything was closing in and she had to do something to buy more time. the way she has done that is a rule along delay to brexit and hope that that gives her more survival space and breathing time. thank you, norman, for guiding our viewers through it on a daily basis. itv has pledged to do more to look after contestants on love island after the deaths of two former contestants, mike thalassitis and sophie gradon. in a letter to the sun it says therapy will be offered to "all islanders, not only those that reach out to us". they will also be offered social media training and financial advice. mike thalassitis, who was on the show in 2017, was found dead in a north london park on saturday.
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police are not treating it as suspicious. sophie gradon died last year and an inquest into her death was recently postponed. love island isn‘t the only show to be criticised though. former gogglebox star chris ashby—steed says a lack of after—care in some tv shows is an "industry wide failing". he says he felt he was hung out to dry by the channel 4 show after he finished on it. here he is om googlebox. mariahring it, isn‘t she? yeah, babes, tone it down for mariah. yeah. turn it down to a bit of saleen. we can handle saleen, but the mariah, no. let‘s talk to former gogglebox chris ashby—steed. thank you for coming in. thank you for having me. what was it like when you left? it was hard. why? yeah, i
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was on the show for five years. i love a bit of a whirlwind. 0ne minute i was doing somebody‘s here and next minute i was doing a speech at the ntas to of people. it was very surreal. all of a sudden when i left gogglebox, it stopped. all of the offers of work that you get when you are on the show and you are up there and people want you is great. it all dries up. what impact did that have on you? i mean financially? it makes you feel like a failure. when people go into these shows they think it will be paved in gold for them, they will have all of these opportunities chucked at them and they can pick and choose what they want. that is just so for some of it. but unfortunately there is
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a lwa ys of it. but unfortunately there is always going to be someone younger, someone prettier, someone a lot better looking, someone with a lot more charisma and you will be replaced. and that is hard to take. but you are an adult, we know how it works. absolutely. with my situation nothing ever prepared me for how popular gogglebox was going to be. when i was involved when i was first filmed for it, it was like this is a pilot, it will probably not go anywhere, be prepared. iwas pilot, it will probably not go anywhere, be prepared. i was like, 0k, fine. it was channel 4‘s biggest programme for five years, and that says something. i went from being not known one day to being on the biggest show on channel 4. you say there is a lack of care is industrywide and is across television and it is notjust after—care, but before care which should be brought in. like i said,
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nothing prepares you for it. social media training would be great. again, we did not know how big the show was going to be. unfortunately, i suppose they were not prepared for it. but love island is one of the biggest shows on a tv and they know they will get the viewing figures. they need to prepare these people for what is going to come because it will change their lives. 0vernight they will become tv stars. channel fours state you never went to them with your complaint, there was a breakdown in the friendship and that is why you ended up leaving. breakdown in the friendship and that is why you ended up leavinglj breakdown in the friendship and that is why you ended up leaving. i did, idid is why you ended up leaving. i did, i did approach them. did you go to the channel or the independent production company?” the channel or the independent production company? i went to the actual studio and spoke to them and tell them how i felt i was being treated. none of it was noticed. what did they say? you need to sort
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it out yourself. and that is what it was all down to. i felt the pressures i was going through, i felt that i gave the best of myself for five years and i was left with scraps at the end of it because i have no energy, i was tired. that is why i felt like that. what did you wa nt why i felt like that. what did you want at the end? what did he want? therapist? they would have liked support. what does that mean? support as in going from the overnight star, celebrity i had become in some people‘s eyes to regressing back to a normal person. being a hairdresser again? being a hairdresser. i am thankful throughout my time on gogglebox i maintained being a hairdresser. that was my dayjob. these young, naive people give up their careers and theirjobs. they think
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people give up their careers and their jobs. they think tinseltown people give up their careers and theirjobs. they think tinseltown is there them and they will be amazing stars. finally, how do you react to the deaths of these young people?” think it is absolutely tragic. i would look at somebody like him and say he has got it all. he has got the looks, he is young, he has got his whole life ahead of him. it is tragic. this is a man‘s life that has now gone and for what? when itv say they will now offer therapy to all contested, not just the say they will now offer therapy to all contested, notjust the ones who ask for it, they will offer social media training and financial management advice, what do you think of that? it is definite. people need to have the training. they have got to have the training. they have got to understand that their lives will not change. it may change for a very short time, but it will change
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overnight. thank you very much. thank you so much. a gogglebox spokesperson said: "chris has not contacted us since he made the decision to leave the show. duty of care of is of paramount importance and psychological support is available to all gogglebox contributors before, during and after appearing on the show should they wish to take this up." we had an incredible reaction from you to our programme yesterday where 12 mums spoke in devastating terms about the loss of their sons to knife crime. among them was kay green—stewart. her son lamar worked in an nhs hospital. in 2017, he was murdered in east london aged 21. she told us the impact his death has had on herfamily. we are broken, we are torn, we are ripped, we are broken. i have his twin sister who is ripped apart. i have my other children, my two older boys are just functioning.
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his sister, the older sister, just like this lady, i go to her house, he is like a shrine, he is everywhere. she has an 18—month—old baby that calls his name every day. lamar represented love, that is all he did, he just loved everyone. everybody, anybody that met him will tell you that he loved you. he didn‘t deserve it. and he was just killed, stabbed to death in his back. they ripped through his ribs, the viciousness of the attack was awful. we are just a broken family. a broken, broken family. so many of you got in touch, and continue to, about the remarkable courage of these women and here are some more messages. gill wrote: my heart goes out to these mothers. my son alex was murdered in april 2015 for no reason and i know how they feel. the heartache never goes but life
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gets easier with time." beverley emailed to say: i have a 17—year—old and every day he says "mum, i don t care what is happening, i am not going out because i dont want to be killed. i feel isolated but its better than being killed". ignacio wrote this: i am a dad of three kids and i can t remember the last time i cried but watching these suffering ladies made me cry. my heart goes out to them. well, someone who might be able to relate to clare‘s tweet is — abu shaw ? who was so moved by our programme yestersay that he contacted the programme. his son was stabbed four times in croydon when he was 13. abu was so worried about his son 5 safety he sent his son mohamed to the gambia when he was 15. thank you for talking to us. good morning. we have not got much time it is my fault, but incredibly your son survived after being stabbed multiple times. tell us about this
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decision you made to send him to gambia to protect his life. it was very difficult because we never had help from the others, like the police. we played very hard and went to churches and mosques and god a nswered to churches and mosques and god answered our prayers and we were able to convince him to go to gambia and luckily he is doing very well there at the moment. it was really difficult for the family. he has been living out there for five years away from you in order to protect his life. do you think mohammed will come back to the uk? no, not know. he is scared to come back and even the family is not happy for him to come back because it is still not safe here. it is difficult because
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we wa nted safe here. it is difficult because we wanted him to grow up here, the opportunities are here, but to protect his life and to also help the family, we decided he should be in gambia for now. i am grateful you got in touch with us and thank you for talking to us. we appreciate your time for talking to us. we appreciate yourtime andi for talking to us. we appreciate your time and i am sorry i did not give you more time, that is my fault. bbc newsroom live is next. thank you for your comments today. good morning. we have got a bit of sunshine breaking through the club so far, mainly across parts of wales and the north midlands and parts of northern england. that is the scene at the moment in cheshire. further south across england there is a bit more cloud and cloud in northern
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ireland and much of scotland. in the north—east of scotland there are sunny spells. patchy rain in the north and north—west of scotland this afternoon with a and south—westerly wind. it is still mired at their comic temperature is about 13—15, with sunny spells that could go up to 17. this evening and overnight there will be some clear spells, but turning kobe for many of us spells, but turning kobe for many of us with persistent rain in the far north—west. 0vernight temperatures north—west. 0vernight temperatures no lower than about 7—11. a mild start to thursday which will be cloudy. maximum temperature is getting up to about 14—16dc. still on the warm side.
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you re watching bbc newsroom live. it‘s 11am and these are the main stories this morning... number ten says theresa may will not be asking the european union for a long delay when she formally requests that brexit is postponed. the prime minister i know would like to do it as quickly as possible, the delay after the 29th of march should be as short as possible, and that is something i share. european commission president jean—claude juncker says he‘s hoping for clarity, but that agreement on an extension to article 50 might not be reached this week. as the first funerals take place for the victims of the christchurch mosque shootings, new zealand‘s prime minister calls for a global fight against racist far right ideology. we absolutely have to learn the lessons from both what gave rise

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