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tv   BBC Business Live  BBC News  April 9, 2019 8:30am-9:01am BST

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you're watching bbc news at nine with me annita mcveigh — the headlines: theresa may will travel to berlin and then to paris to urge the german and french leaders to agree this is business live from bbc news with maryam moshiri and ben thompson. to a delay in brexit. coming out fighting. talks continue between government former nissan chair — carlos ghosn speaks out — comdemning the charges and labour ministers in an attempt against him as a conspiracy. live from london, that's our top story on tuesday the 9th of april. to find a brexit deal acceptable to a majority of mps. what we are trying to do is ensure that we arrive at a deal which, first of all, protects jobs and the economy, we don't think theresa may's deal does that. and we are discussing the issue that apparently it seems she's raised in cabinet as well, about going back to the people as well. couples in england and wales will be allowed to split more quickly without blaming each other under carlos ghosn — who's now back in jail delivers a video message — major changes to divorce laws. saying he's worried about the future of the world's biggest israelis are going to the polls — automotive alliance. also in the programme... america proposes fresh sanctions on european wine and cheese — over airbus subsidies the us says has cost its economy $11bn.
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and it's the start of the earnings season and it's the start of the earnings season in the united states. another big week for brexit. we'll explain what you to know. and there's a tech theme to the rest of the show. we'll get the inside track on fitness apps — that track your every move — when you're out for a run. they've helped motivate more people off the sofa connecting runners and cyclists around the world. we'll speak to the boss of strava. and as retail giant walmart rolls out more robots to scan shelves and scrub floors to keep staff costs down — we want to know — do you worry that yourjob could be replaced by a machine? and do you trust the rise of the robots? let us know — just use the hashtag bbcbizlive hello and welcome to business live. toa man to a man who has already tweeted in
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suggesting that both of us could be replaced by robots, good morning to you! the embattled former boss of nissan carlos ghosn has accused former executives at the firm of "backstabbing" and says he is innocent of all charges against him. he delivered a video message at a news conference in toyko — he was due to address the media in person but is not back under arrest. —— he is now back under arrest. as a result the bbc was unable to interview and this video released by his team remains untested. take a listen. i am innocent of all charges brought against me and am also innocent of all the accusations that came around these charges. that are all biased, taken out of context, twisted in a way to paint ana context, twisted in a way to paint an a person out of greed and
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ruper wingfield—hayes joins us now from tokyo tell us more about the press conference and what happened. this was classic carlos ghosn. strange to see him in this situation, dark jacket, plain white shirt, making this deal statement. rather than being here in person, near where i am standing today. he was supposed to be coming here this week to hold a press conference in person but instead, when his lawyer and ten found out he was probably going to be rea rrested found out he was probably going to be rearrested he recorded this video message and it was a cambered passionate address. he talked about how much he loved japan, nissan, and you know, as she said in that clip, he absolutely went for it about the conspiracy against him, pointing the finger directly at senior executives inside nissan, saying they have conspired against him, that this is a plot, and that they have twisted
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the stories to make him look like a greedy dictator that he said it's got nothing to do with greed or dictatorship, it is about leadership. and that he actually went on to question the current leadership of nissan, saying the company is not in a good state, that it is declining shareholder value and that there doesn't seem to be any vision for the future of how the alliance and the company that he build over 20 years is going to be led ina build over 20 years is going to be led in a time that is very challenging for the car industry. and of course, rupert, as all of this place at the charges against him are still there. rearrested, still injail. him are still there. rearrested, still in jail. what happens next? that's right. the court in tokyo has given approvalfor that's right. the court in tokyo has given approval for him to that's right. the court in tokyo has given approvalfor him to be held for ten days with further questioning. at that point which will be next week, the prosecutors can apply to hold him for another ten days, which i think it's likely they will do. and so it looks like he will be back in detention for at least 20 days but his lawyer today said that this rearrest was
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extremely unusual and completely unjustified and tomorrow, he is going to go to the supreme court of japan and file a petition to have that arrest judged to japan and file a petition to have that arrestjudged to see whether it is legal or not and to try and have it overturned and have carlos ghosn released from prison. rupert, thank you. you may see a bit of that interview around today. just to be really clear, because carl ghosn is backin really clear, because carl ghosn is back in custody we cannot check or make the usual verifications, we are not able to do the actual interview ourselves, just be aware that has come from their side but nonetheless i think it's important we hear what he has to say and as we suggested at the start of the programme, really coming out fighting against those allegations against him, allegations of course that he denies. let's take a look at some of the other stories making the news the eu and china are meeting in a few hours' time to talk trade — and there will be hopes for closer economic ties. they're two of the world's
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biggest trading partners — averaging over $1.1 billion in commerce a day. the eu is keen to go further by negotiating an investment treaty with china. theresa may goes to berlin this morning, and then on to paris — to urge the german and french leaders to agree to delay brexit. this ahead of a crunch summit on wednesday at which eu leaders will decide on a further extension of the brexit process. twitter is to cut the number of accounts that can be followed in a day from 1000 to 400 — in a bid to reduce spam and fake followers. it's hoped the move will limit malicious software programmes — called bots — that can act aggressively towards some users — in violation of twitter‘s rules. the us is considering imposing tariffs on about $iibn, £8.1ibn worth of goods from the european union in response to subsidies that support airbus. products which could be affected range from large commercial aircraft and parts to dairy products and wine. andrew walkerjoins us now with an update.
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andrew, this is the latest in a series of battles but it all revolves around the coast to the us economy is booming and the us government see it? is, basically the us government wants to be able to impose tariffs on european union goods to compensate, if you like, the american economy and going for the american economy and going for the damage they say has been done by the damage they say has been done by the subsidies provided by four national governments, essentially in europe, spain, germany, france and the uk. ithink europe, spain, germany, france and the uk. i think it's worth adding one additional point here. i mean, a lot of the arguments about us trade policy over the last couple of years have been about whether the us is riding a little bit rough shod over the wto procedures, doing things without going through wto mechanisms for resolving disputes. this, i think, is not one of those cases because what the us is doing, is they've already got a ruling from they've already got a ruling from the wto that the european union and
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eu governments failed to comply with a ruling that they should withdraw the subsidies concerned and for the us is doing is saying look, we got these items we are proposing to put tariffs on we want to be ready to go as sooi'i as we tariffs on we want to be ready to go as soon as we get authorisation from the wto panel. yes, that battle continues. andrew, thank you for explaining all of that. let me show you what's happening on the numbers. the nikki in tokyo edging up in what was a pretty volatile session. take the machinery share is doing really well. one of the winners in tokyo after reports that the us hedge fund is building up its stake in the company. the idea that we believe, is to push through some pretty major changes at the tech firm. remember, also an important week for europe. not on the earnings season in the united states, of course, but central bank action as well. the european central bank meeting tomorrow. we'll also get the latest federal reserve minutes and its higher oil prices that are really on
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the minds of investors right now. concerns about weaker demand there isa concerns about weaker demand there is a slowing global economy and what that could mean for all of us. we'll talk about some of that in more detail and crucially another big week for brexit and what that could bring but samir has the details in the us about what to expect on wall street. us plane-maker boeing will report their delivery numbers for the month of march as well as the entire first quarter of 2019. unsurprisingly, deliveries are expected to fall, hurt by the worldwide grounding of its bestselling 737 max jets following the deadly crashes in a span of less than six months. investors will look for the impact of the groundings on boeing ‘s overall orders. and levi strauss will report its first quarterly earnings report after its return to the stock market in march. wall street will be keen to see if levi's sales and profit are benefiting enough for the resurgent popularity of denim to really
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justify the optimism that surrounded its initial public offering. jane said in anjoins us now. talk is behind the rise in crude. it's been a rise of 30%, partly to do with tensions in venezuela, in iraq and obviously more recently libya which can constrain supply of oil. but on the one hand it's good for the opec producers, some of whom have very high costs in production so they are losing money even at this oil price. but it's obviously bad for some of the more efficient producers and consumers like the united states who have very low cost and production and obviously you consume a lot of oil and so people are never very happy if they have to pay more at the petrol pump when they are consuming. quick word on brexit, we said it was another big week. yesterday was relatively quiet, there wasn't much that came out of
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westminster, what are we expecting for the rest of the week? obviously we will get a sense of whether there will be an extension. sterling has been amazingly stable considering the situation but i think it'sjust because investors cannot work out what is going on. it looks as though it will be extended and that's really what markets are expecting at the moment. looking to the united states, jane, the beginning of the corporate earnings season. states, jane, the beginning of the corporate earnings season. are we feeling optimistic? probably a little bit less than last quarter. it appears there is a bit of a slowdown going on, some of those numbers may be a little bit disappointing and that may affect market sentiment. we will have to see what happens but generally, probably less positive than last time. jane, for now, thank you, good to see you as always. jane will return and we will talk about some of the newspaper stories including walmart which has hired a load of robots to do some of the jobs humans do not want to do. that will be
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soon. someone has said that already! that's so deep. let's move on, swiftly! we'll get the inside track on fitness apps — that track your every move — when you're out for a run. they've helped motivate more people off the sofa connecting runners and cyclists around the world. we'll speak to the boss of strava. you're with business live from bbc news. as streaming music becomes increasingly popular, one uk company is cashing in on the trend. 0ne media ip has a string of artists from the fifties to the eighties in its catalogue and every time one of its songs is played, the firm gets paid. i love 80s music. it's my favourite! and it's a lucrative business. the firm's latest results this morning show a 94% rose in profits. the company's chief executive
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michael infante is with us. good morning. lovely to see you. we simplified it but explain how it works. it's big business. yes, it is. good morning. the music industry has changed dramatically over the la st has changed dramatically over the last period of time, especially the la st last period of time, especially the last few years, streaming is the dominant force of a physical product and indeed, downloading is becoming slowly more mode as everyone teens in to their various subscriptions whether it's spot of amazon or apple music. so we are seeing a fantastic rise in the way music is consumed by all age groups and all genres of music by monthly subscription and virtually unlimited streaming to populate playlists for every generation. essentially, just explain this. you are the middleman. ifi explain this. you are the middleman. if i use something like apple music are one of the streaming services, they take a cut, you take a cut and they take a cut, you take a cut and the rest goes to the artist? there isa the rest goes to the artist? there is a division of income and it depends. there is no one fixed rule.
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it depends who is the ultimate owner. we we specialise in acquiring music whether it's publishing under a music rights which is the performances. at some stage or another during the process everybody is getting their percentage based on contractual obligations. you specialise in 50s music, 80s music. what is the kind of age group at the typical person who uses your services? i think, as typical person who uses your services? ithink, as time typical person who uses your services? i think, as time moves on, that age group is widening. used to call it years ago the middle—of—the—road. call it years ago the middle-of-the-road. that's a nice way of putting it. we are not a front line music company in terms of new releases, we don't put out chart related product. we capitalise our acquisition programme on buying back catalogue of music whether it's publishing under master rights. 0ne would also add there are many, many independent record labels, we are probably one of the only few listed ones. michael, so lovely to talk to you stop thanks so much. there you
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are, middle—of—the—road. you stop thanks so much. there you are, middle-of-the-road. more like him, not me. stay with us here on bbc news. your're watching business live — our top story — former nissan boss karl is going accuses former executives at the firm or backstabbing. he says he is innocent of all charges against him. ina innocent of all charges against him. in a pre—recorded video release at a news conference held by his legal tea m news conference held by his legal team he says he is a victim of a conspiracy and wanted a fair trial. now if you're trying to motivate yourself to do more exercise the idea of training alone might put many people off. but how about making that lonelyjog into an online, interactive experience. well, there are a number of apps that allow you to share and discuss your workout and route with others, often motivating you to go further or faster. the global health and fitness industry generates around $80bn a year and has grown sharply over the past decade. the us is the world's biggest market,
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generating $32bn a year. and one company cashing in, is strava. it's got 39 million users in 195 countries — connecting online to share their workout experiences. james quorls, is the chief executive of strava. hejoins us now. thank you he joins us now. thank you for joining us. firstly, explain to us how this app works. you download, it's a free app from the app store, you can click to started and record a run, a ride, a swim. you can also connect, many people have a fitbit oran connect, many people have a fitbit or an apple watch, takes the data, when you have finished, you look at your results, how you performed, have a community that follows you and encourages you. what sort of stuff will tell me? i'd like to run. i have a habitual run i do on the weekend, it will tell me how this current run compared to the prior time. ican current run compared to the prior time. i can also look at some of the splits, if i am doing integral training, iwant
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splits, if i am doing integral training, i want to see my heart rate because that data is also useful for fitness and then some people use it as a tool to tell others if you are running or riding someplace unfamiliar, you want to give them your location you can do that as well. it's that competitive element, not only competing with yourself about what you did previously but other people and i suppose that's the bit we talked about getting people off the sofa. it shames you into doing it. an essential explain to someone why you didn't run. i think for as much technology has been thrown at the problem of getting people healthy, we think people keep people active and it is, as she said, the competition, the accountability in declaring a goal and that support and encouragement that helps people stay fit. it's hard to wake up early when it's cold and dark outside and to go ad and do a run under tight —— nice to have a community behind you. it's not always good, sometimes you feel possibly you are comparing yourself to other people on the they should feel bad about yourself, not getting out there enough, running
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for long enough. is that the case for long enough. is that the case for some? i think there are instances, this is a broader social media trend, feeling this fear of missing out. but in our world, frankly, we find, we did a study with glasgow caledonian, people said 82% of them believe we keep it to that motivated, 69% said the app makes them happier. he would like that, you are very competitive. for as more “— that, you are very competitive. for as more “ as that, you are very competitive. for as more —— as much that, you are very competitive. for as more “ as much as more that, you are very competitive. for as more —— as much as more people are being sedentary and staring at their screen, we are being sedentary and staring at theirscreen, we are are being sedentary and staring at their screen, we are an alternative choice. you can put on your phone, be active, we are proud that the impact we have in our community. like many tech firms it's the data that's so important. you can filter of quite a lot of data and you can monetise it and sell it elsewhere forfour monetise it and sell it elsewhere for four people run, monetise it and sell it elsewhere forfour people run, cycle monetise it and sell it elsewhere for four people run, cycle and that's really valuable. we don't sell data, our business is a subscription business, people pay for additional analysis but we do
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partner with local authorities of transport for london is a big customer of ours for a business cold metro and we aggregate the cycling and the running community, there's lots of running community in london and help the city plan safer infrastructure where buses and taxis are with people. that's another business. what about concerns, you are putting things out there and you have a community, different people, even a global community if you want to login and how they live, what about concerns over privacy? privacy is important to us, since we founded the abbey have one of the best controls in the industry. you can set your privacy to be entirely private, just for you or you can be in public and do some of the resources where we can compete in the same segment. what is your average speed? how fast do you run per kilometre? i don't know, i probably run a seven minute 45 mile. i literally have no idea. i need to get the app and work it out. but you
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raise a good point about privacy. you hit the headlines a couple of yea rs you hit the headlines a couple of years ago about the so—called heat maps, for anyone who doesn't know, it's a sense of fair is really popular, for other people are running, around military bases, that was a problem. it was in the news, a big new story about this time last year. the heat map is a great resource , year. the heat map is a great resource, hundreds of thousands of people is it travelling or in the home community, it was important for us to use that coverage to explain how the privacy settings work and also help people understand we are committed to this community, we are going to continue to bring out tools for people. but, you know, you have the option, as i said, to control your own settings. although soldiers running around those bases should have turned it off. they are members of our community and it's important they stay safe but they should respect guidelines as far as using gps tracking devices are concerned. amazing publicity per year. it was a good year, it's been a good year for us. we have lots of community
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members here in the uk. james, great to have your own. after the programme, get your watch and trainers on, stop big race outside. i will film it and put it on twitter. james, good to see you. smartphones have changed the way we do just about everything — and now they're having a major impact on how political parties reach voters. indians prepare to go to the polls this week and social media has become a key battle ground to win over hearts, minds, and those all important votes. devina gupta has more from delhi. bablu singh is fighting to win. this is his first road show as a candidate for a regional party, called the aam aadmi in delhi. but to reach the voters a rally is not enough. his supporters are simultaneously shooting videos and taking pictures to create a buzz online. this is how political parties have been campaigning. but with the
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country with over 300 million smartphones, it's being used by political leaders to use their boaters and reach their voters. if 2014 was india's first social media election, 2019 is on another level. political party advertisements like this have been made specifically for social media. this election has become all about trending hashtags and dedicated apps that do things like live stream political speeches. parties are pumping money into this, aimed at targeting voters in social media. social media can be a legitimising factor. we use a lot of images and text. but now it has shifted very heavily in the favour of videos. but this element of the elections comes with its own set of problems.
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fake accounts and fake news. in an effort to combat this whatsapp has launched a service in india that allows users to report messages and forwards that look fake. for some voters the political buzz online can get confusing and tiring. and so social media influencers try to help them understand complex election issues through satirical videos. we get around thousand shares in the first hour. 0n videos. we get around thousand shares in the first hour. on youtube for example in the first 48 hours, we usually get around 150,000 views. 0n whatsapp it always organically gets spread. as india prepares for the world's largest democratic exercise it's not clear whether social media is helping or hindering voters from the political noise but with 460 million people online at certainly adding another element to an already colourful election.
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what other business stories has the media been taking an interest in? janejoins us jane joins us again. welcome janejoins us again. welcome back. this is an interesting one. we asked viewers for an interest in their comment, whether they fear their job might be replaced by a robot. walmart rolling out robots and stores to do a lot. so many parts of business right now under threat from automation including years. including me. 85% of all the trade that goes to the london stock exchange is automated, only another 1596 exchange is automated, only another 15% to go and i will not be needed. what's interesting about walmart, we can talk about automating behind—the—scenes things, the processes , behind—the—scenes things, the processes, the factories, warehouses, but this is about automating stores, cleaning, checking stock. it's different, caddo is all about that. as you say automating behind—the—scenes. to be checking shells, cleaning floors,
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unloading trucks. it's a different model and it will be interesting to see how that works. we had a tweet about this. 0ld—fashioned comedy. staff always direct me to self—service science, i say you are throwing away theirjob. and they say, no sir. another view is is to be honest, there's quite some space from the stage of robots replacing regularjobs. if someone was born out they'd probably be in their 20s when its more standard. you might have robot dance shows and much more. i'm not worried yet. and it's going so quickly, that change, isn't it and yet i think we will see this increasingly so, even though we are on the cusp right now.|j increasingly so, even though we are on the cusp right now. i think what's interesting is walmart are saying, they are automating some jobs in order to make otherjobs more interesting. i guess there's that trade—off. more interesting. i guess there's that trade-off. jane, lovely to see you. hopefully you will be back
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soon. thanks for all your messages. we will be back the same time tomorrow. goodbye. good morning. yesterday we had quite a bit of sunshine, temperatures reaching 20 celsius. but it wasn't like that everywhere. quite a bit of cloud and restricted temperatures in some places. but in the next few days, aircoming in some places. but in the next few days, air coming in from scandinavia it will turn much colder and today we start to see the colder air on the east or north—east wind. in east anglia today, temperatures at best around 13 perhaps 14 degrees. across southern parts of wales, through southern parts of wales, through southern england and into the south—east, quite a bit of cloud, some showery outbreaks of rain. some showers in the far south—west of england, some sunny spells. the best of the sunshine across north wales,
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into the north midlands, east anglia, northern england, scotland, northern ireland. here, temperatures about 7—9d. elsewhere, temperatures ten, 13, possibly 14 or 15 degrees, the highest temperatures likely across west wales. through tonight, this area of cloud and rain continued to spread into the south—west. clear skies behind it. turning quite cold and frosty across scotla nd turning quite cold and frosty across scotland and northern parts of england. elsewhere, temperatures are staying between 2—6d. throughout wednesday, high—pressure starting to dominate things, coming in from scandinavia, based over scandinavia, that wind coming from the north—east. going to be another chilly day. lots of sunshine on wednesday, we may see the return of some cloud in the northern isles, north—east of scotland, north—east england, cloud drifting its way in across eastern england and the
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midlands. 0therwise, across eastern england and the midlands. otherwise, it should be right for most of us, another dry day, temperatures reaching 9—13d. feeling on the chilly side again. this area of high pressure firmly established over the next few days, blocking of these weather fronts coming from the west and keeping things largely settled. so for thursday, friday, into the start of the weekend, looking dry, not much to say. some cloud at times. but also some sunny spells. always quite chilly along north sea coast, higher temperatures the further west you are, typical values at 9—13d. goodbye.
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