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tv   BBC News  BBC News  April 11, 2019 1:30pm-2:01pm BST

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of one of our moment, it speaks of one of our feelings in terms of the crisis, the political crisis with feeling. but it is also a very humid —— human image. it is about that nature is telling us that everything leads to death and we must confront that. and edward monk —— edvard munch talks about that, his beloved sister and mother died early and he kept on replaying those feelings again and again and again and using those as inspiration for his art. does it feel like a particularly fitting moment by him? yes, this is peak edward munch. if we are not feeling the scream now, we will never feel it. so, a study of despair and anxiety from more than 100 years ago. but one that feels very now. this, after all is an artwork with
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its own emoji. you don't get much more contemporary than that. david's sillitoe —— and david sillitoe, bbc news. time for a look at the weather. here's lucy martin. it was a cool start to the day, a touch of frost this morning. this was sent in by a weather watcher from 0xfordshire. a chilly start. 0ver from 0xfordshire. a chilly start. over the next few days we have high pressure in charge. so, it is a fairly settled picture and we are continuing to draw and that cool air from the north and east. it will feel fairly chilly. here is the satellite from earlier, more cloud for north—eastern scotland and eastern parts of england. you can see some cloud feeding into northern ireland from the west and that will continue to push east as we move through the afternoon, perhaps bringing one or two showers. 0ne through the afternoon, perhaps bringing one or two showers. one or two showers for the north—east of scotla nd two showers for the north—east of scotland as well. a bit more cloud for the east of england, but a fair amount of sunshine to come through the day. temperature is
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disappointing between nine and 11 celsius. through this evening and overnight we hold onto that cloud in the north—east of scotland will be could see one or two showers. across northern ireland, england and wales there could be some clear spells and under clear skies it will be a chilly night again. patchy frost possible. these are the temperatures in towns and cities, a touch cooler than that in rural areas. a cool start for some tomorrow, frosty for others, more cloud to come through the day tomorrow but still some sunny spells, the risk of one or two showers for the east of scotland, one 01’ showers for the east of scotland, one or two showers for the east of scotland, one 01’ two showers showers for the east of scotland, one or two showers feeding into the south—east of england, and more sunshine feeding into the east of england and into the afternoon, but fairly disappointing temperatures, between nine and 1a celsius the maximums tomorrow. that takes us into the weekend and it will bring more of the same really, chilly with a further dry weather for most and some sunshine around at times. the best of the sunshine to come on saturday, another cool start to the day. there will be areas of cloud,
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but also some sunny spells, fairly windy in the west. the risk of one or two sharp showers in south—east england, could be some hill mix than an temperatures disappointing for the time of year, between seven and 11 celsius, sitting below average for the time of year. here is how it looks as we go overnight into sunday. not a great gale of change with the pressure chart and the air mass, another cool and largely dry day to come. there will be further spells of sunshine, cloudy skies, however, for northern ireland and the south—west of england. here, the chance of one or two spots of rain and drizzle as we move through the day. temperatures again not particularly warm, between nine and 11 celsius. thank you for that, lucy martin. that's all from us now it's time for the news where you are. good afternoon.
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it's 1:30pm and here's your latest sports news. rugby australia says it intends to sack one of its star players — israel folau — over a social media post which said that hell awaits gay people. the winger is a devout christian and made similar comments last year. here's our rugby union correspondent chris jones. in his latest post that was put out on his social media channels yesterday, israel folau said that hell awaits all gay people. he puts these homophobic beliefs down to his religious views and a year ago the rugby australia authorities disciplined in. now they have come back and said they have made repeated efforts to contact israel folau. he has not returned their calls and in the absence of any mitigating factors he will get the sack. it is a huge development. he is one of australia's top players. but rugby australia are putting the values of the game above his playing
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ability. so unless he can come up with an explanation, and remember he was disciplined for this a year ago, thenit was disciplined for this a year ago, then it is looking like israel folau has played his last game of rugby union, possibly for australia and certainly he won't be going to the rugby world cup at the end of the year. 0le gunnar solskjaer says there's no reason why his manchester united side can't win at the nou camp next week, and qualify for the semi finals of the champions league. united lost the first leg against barcelona at old trafford last night, the only goal of the game coming when a headerfrom luis suarez was deflected in for an own goal by luke shaw — awarded by var. barcelona missed several big chances to add to the score but the game ended 1—0 so united have it all to do when they head to the nou camp on tuesday. away from home we beatjuventus, we beat psg, we have to go to barcelona win that one so we note that we have
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possibilities in this tie. now is not the time to think about our own performances because now we have got to look forward to tuesday. in the night's other quarter final, cristiano ronaldo scored his 125th champions league goal against ajax. the dutch side equalised to set up a fascinating decider in turin next week. straight to the comments on the prime minister. he has also been arrested as part of an exhibition request from united states authorities. it is now a legal matter before the courts. my honourable friend the home secretary will make a statement on this but i would like to thank the metropolitan police for carrying out their duties with great professionalism and to welcome the co—operation of the ecuadorian government in bringing this matter to resolution. as the speaker, this goes to show that in the united kingdom no one is above the united kingdom no one is above the law. turning to the council, my
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priority is to deliver brexit and to do so in an orderly way that does not disrupt people's lives. so i continue to believe we need to leave the european union with a deal as soon as the european union with a deal as soon as possible. and of course this house has voted repeatedly to avoid ano house has voted repeatedly to avoid a no deal. yet despite the efforts of members on all sides we have not yet been able to vote for a deal. so ahead of the council i wrote to president tusk to seek a short extension to the article 50 period to the end ofjune. critically i also requested that any extension should be determinable so that whenever this house agrees a deal and ratifies the withdrawal agreement we can get on and leave. and i did this not merely to avoid a further delay to the ratification of the withdrawal agreement but specifically to retain our ability to leave the eu without having to hold european parliamentary elections on the 23rd of may. mr speaker, the discussions of the council were difficult and unsurprisingly many of our european
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partners share the deep frustration that i know so many of us feel in this house over the current impasse. there was a range of views about the length of an extension with a large number of member states preferring a longer extension to the end of this year and even into the next. in the end what was agreed with the uk and the eu 27 was a compromise. an extension lasting until the end of 0ctober. extension lasting until the end of october. the council also agreed that we would update on our progress at the next meeting injune. critically, as i requested, the council agreed that this extension could be terminated when the withdrawal agreement has been ratified. so for example if we were to pass a deal by the 22nd of may we would not have to take part in european elections and when the eu has also ratified we will be able to leave at 11 bm on the 31st of may. in short, the day of our departure from the eu and our participation in the european parliamentary elections remains a decision for this house. as president tusk said last night, during this time the course of
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action will be entirely in the uk's hands. in agreeing this extension there was some discussion in the council about whether stringent conditions should be imposed on the ukfor conditions should be imposed on the uk for its eu membership during this period. but i argued against this. i put the case that there is only a single tier of eu membership with no conditionality attached beyond existing treaty obligations. the council conclusions are clear that during the course of the extension the uk will continue to hold full membership rights. in turn, i assured my fellow members that the uk will continue to be bound as part of all our on going obligations. the united kingdom plays a responsible and constructive role on the world stage and we always will. that is the kind of country we are. the choices we face are stark and the timetable is clear. i believe we must now press on at pace with our
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effo rts must now press on at pace with our efforts to reach a consensus on a deal that is in the national interest. i welcome the discussions that have taken place with the opposition in recent days and the further talks which are resuming today. this is not the normal way of british politics and it is uncomfortable for many in both government and opposition parties. reaching an agreement will not be easy because to be successful it will require both sides to make compromises. but challenging it may be politically i profoundly believe that in this unique situation where the house is deadlocked, it is incumbent on both front benches to seek to work together to deliver what the british people voted for. and i think that the british people expect their politicians to do just that when the national interest demands it. i hope that we can reach an agreement on a single unified approach that we can put to the house for approval. but if we cannot do so soon then we will seek to
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agree a small number of options for the future relationship that we will put the house in a series of votes to determine which course to pursue. and as i have made clear before, the government stands ready to abide by the decision of the house but to make this process work the opposition would need to agree to this too. with the house's consent we would also bring forward the withdrawal agreement bill which is a necessary agreement of any deal whichever course we take. this bill will take time to pass through both houses so if you want to get on with leaving we need to start this process soon. leaving we need to start this process soon. and it could also provide a useful forum to resolve some of the outstanding issues in the future relationship. crucially, mr speaker, any agreement on the future relationship may involve a number of additions and clarifications to the political declaration. so i'm a pleased that at this council all 27 member states responded to my doctor by agreeing that european council is prepared to
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agree the on accordance with the principles in its guidelines on statements. the council also reiterated that the withdrawal agreement itself could not be reopened. mr speaker, i know the whole country is intensely frustrated that this process to leave the european union has not still been completed. i never wanted to seek this extension and i deeply regret that we have not yet been able to secure agreement in this house for a deal that would allow us to leave in a smooth and orderly way. i know too that this whole debate is putting members on all sides of the house under immense pressure and causing uncertainty across the country. and we need to resolve this. so let's use the opportunity of the recess to reflect on the decisions that will need to be made swiftly on our return after easter and that is then resolved to find a way through this impasse so that we can leave the european union with a deal as soon as possible so that we can avoid having to hold those european parliamentary elections and above all so that we can fulfil the democratic decision
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of the referendum, deliver brexit and move our country forward. this is our national duty as elected members of this house and nothing todayis members of this house and nothing today is more pressing or more vital andi today is more pressing or more vital and i commend this statement to the house. thank you, mr speaker. i would like to thank the prime minister for would like to thank the prime ministerforan would like to thank the prime minister for an advance copy of her statement. mr speaker, yesterday eu leaders agreed to grant an extension to the article 50 until the 315t october. this means britain will have to start the process of holding european elections in the extraordinary situation of not knowing whether new mps will, meps rather will take their seats for how long. this has come just three weeks after the prime minister told the house she was not prepared to delay brexit any longer than the 30th of june. the second extension in the space of a fortnight represents not only a diplomatic failure but is another milestone in the
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government's mishandling of the entire brexit process. a measure of this could be seen in this house on monday when one third of her party voted against her own policy to request a short delay and four of her cabinet request a short delay and four of hercabinet members request a short delay and four of her cabinet members abstained. and can the prime minister also confirm that the request by the leader of the on tuesday for the eu to reopen the on tuesday for the eu to reopen the withdrawal agreement has also been rebuffed? the withdrawal agreement has also been rebuffed ? the the withdrawal agreement has also been rebuffed? the prime minister stuck rigidly to a flawed plan and now the clock has run down. leaving britain in limbo and adding to the deep uncertainty of business, workers and people all across this country. mr speaker, iwelcome workers and people all across this country. mr speaker, i welcome that the prime minister finally decided to reach out to the opposition last week and opened talks to try and find a breakthrough. the fact that the invitation didn't even come at the invitation didn't even come at the 11th hour but at five past midnight three days after the prime minister had mist her own brexit
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deadline of the 29th of march is a reflection of the government's fundamental error in not proceeding by consensus. however, mr speaker, i can report the house the talks now taking place between the opposition and the government are serious, detailed and ongoing and i welcome the constructive engagement that we have had. although this view may not be universally shared by many on the conservative benches, ialso be universally shared by many on the conservative benches, i also welcome the indications from the government they may be willing to move in the key areas that have prevented the prime minister's deal from been supported on this side of the house. if these talks are to be a success, resulting in an agreement that will bring our country back together, the government will have to compromise. that is why it is with disappointment that i read the secretary of state for international trade's letter this week in what seem trade's letter this week in what seem to be an attempt to scupper meaningful talks by all but ruling out labour's customs union
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proposals. a proposal i might add which is supported by business and industry bodies as well as by all leading trade unions in this country. it is a proposal that european union leaders and the irish taoiseachjust european union leaders and the irish taoiseach just yesterday have said is both credible and negotiable. labour will continue to engage constructively in talks because we respect the result of the referendum and we are committed to defending jobs, industry and living standards by delivering a close economic relationship with the european union and securing frictionless trade with improved rights and standards. if thatis improved rights and standards. if that is not possible, we believe all options should remain on the table, including the option of a public vote. and, mr speaker, we see no advantage, no advantage in the proposals of the secretary of state for international trade to create distance and divergence in our
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trading relationship with our largest trading partner. this house must also bear in mind that after a deal is passed, the current prime minister has said she will step down. we have no idea who may succeed her, so with that in mind we have two entrench any agreement because some of those already throwing their hats into the ring have said they would scrap the human rights act, they would rip up regulation, or would even prefer to leave without any deal at all. some on the conservative benches want nothing more than to use brexit to create a race to the bottom. opening up create a race to the bottom. opening up our economy to us big pharma companies in our national national health service, hormone treated beef on our plates, slash workers' rights and consumer standards. and to have
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the uk become a virtual tax haven on the uk become a virtual tax haven on the shores of europe. let me be clear to the prime minister and to the country, labour will not support any deal that would leave us open to such a dystopian vision for the future of this country. it is incumbent on all of us now to find a way forward. we must continue to talk to each other and if the government is serious the red lines must move and we must see a real compromise. i look forward to the discussions in the coming days and even at this late stage to work to find a deal that can command not only the support of this house but perhaps more importantly the support of the public across this country too. thank you, mr speaker. can i say to the leader of the opposition that the talks between the
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government of the opposition have indeed been serious, they are detailed and have been taken forward ina detailed and have been taken forward in a constructive and positive fashion. we did of course offer talks at an earlier stage than very recently but i'm pleased that we are now able to sit down in this way. he raised the issue about the european parliamentary elections. of course, had members in this house voted with the majority to agree the withdrawal agreement on the 29th of march we would have guaranteed leaving on the 27th of may and not holding european parliamentary elections. at the time receive the right honourable gentleman didn't feel able to support a deal to us not to holders european parliamentary elections. it is still possible to do so and we will continue to work on that. he talked about the need for us to protect jobs, industry and talked about the need for us to protectjobs, industry and living standards and indeed that is what we have been able to do with the deal that we agreed with the european union. but not just that we agreed with the european union. but notjust in relation to the deal with european union
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actually it is this government that has presided over record levels of people in employment. it is this government that has seen people's, helping people with their living standards with tax cuts for 32 million people. he talked about the future relationship and the need for us future relationship and the need for us to entrench aspects of the future relationship. of course, the government did on the 29th of march say that we would accept the amendment that was put down on the order paper by the honourable member for stoke—on—trent central, which would require parliament to have that role in looking at the future relationship and negotiating objectives for the future. and what that clearly makes the case is that any government, as it is going through those negotiations, will of course have to ensure that they are taking parliament with them in agreeing that future relationship. and on the issue of coming together in an agreement, the point is very simple, iam
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in an agreement, the point is very simple, i am not prepared just to accept labour's policies. the labour party isn't just happy accept labour's policies. the labour party isn'tjust happy to accept our policies. as the honourable gentleman for holborn and st pancras has said, it takes compromise on both sides and that is what we're doing, sitting down seriously and finding a way that this house to ensure that there is a deal that commands a majority so that we can leave the european union, fulfilled the vote of the british people in 2016 in the referendum and do so in a way that does indeed protectjobs and living standards and industry. may i urge my write on more friend the prime minister to stick to her commitment to lead the country through to the conclusion of the brexit process and to ignore some of the vicious attacks being made upon her by her more extreme right—wing colleagues. can i also asked her, given that she rightly points out in the national interest that the next obvious step is to reach a
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settlement between the government and the principal opposition party on the best way forward, can she indicate that it is clear that the minimum that requires is some sort of customs arrangement and sufficient regulatory alignment, at least to keep our trade as open and free as it has been across the channel and in the republic of ireland? and can she negotiate that so ireland? and can she negotiate that so it does actually bind any successor government in future negotiations? my right honourable and learned friend is right that of course as we looked at future relationship we are looking at the customs arrangement that would be in place and that future relationship. we have already indicated, as is reflected in fact in the political declaration, that we want to retain the benefits of a customs union of no no quotas, no rules of origin checks and that is provided for in
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the political decoration as it stands. of course, what we do see is we haven't been able to enshrine that in legal text because it is not possible for the european union to negotiate that treaty with us until we are a third country and we are out of the european union. so any commitments that are made here will be about the negotiating objectives that we take through into that process. but there will still be negotiations to be had with the european union. but in terms of adding to and clarify what is in that political declaration and the position of the uk government, obviously as i have indicated, the eu council have said that they would be willing to look at additions and clarifications that political declaration. can i thank the prime minister for the statement. mr speaker, what i am told the fiasco the last few months and years have been open under the shambolic tory
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government. the uk did not leave the eu in march and thankfully thanks to the efforts of snp politicians and others in this place on the goodwill of the european union, we will not crash out of the eu on friday. what an irony that it is the european union that has got the uk out of this mess. let that be a lesson for members in this place. it is the eu that has put the interest of our citizens in the uk first, our businesses, our farmers and our fishermen. could she not be land massed in the eu we should be thanking them. with the european union agreeing to a further extension to article 50, the prime minister must use this time to hold a second eu referendum with the option of remaining on the ballot paper. it is now a very real possibility that we can remain in the european union. mr speaker, there were a total of 133 days between the 1997 general election
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and the debt solution referendum in scotland. as of today, there are 204 days —— scotland. as of today, there are 204 days — — devolution scotland. as of today, there are 204 days —— devolution referendum in scotland. will the prime minister now remove the ridiculous excuse that there is not enough time to hold a second referendum with remain on the ballot paper? scotland did not vote for brexit and should not be forced to accept any brexit deal that will harm our interest. the only way forward is to put the decision back to the people. scotland will not support a brexit deal cooked up by the brexit supporting labour and tory parties. so, mrspeaker, supporting labour and tory parties. so, mr speaker, let me ask this, prime minister, yesterday you ducked and dived my question so a simple yes or no will suffice. has your government offered a second eu referendum in talks with the labour party, yes or no? has the labour party, yes or no? has the labour party requested a second eu referendum in the talks, yes or no?
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is the labour party cosying up to the tories, asking to end freedom of movement as a price for their support for a tory deal, yes or no? and finally, mr speaker, will the prime minister recognise she cannot fix this mess, stop ignoring the people of scotland. opening up meaningful discussions with civic society. start by listening, prime minister, and please get her head out of the sand. can i say to the right honourable gentleman the government has not offered a second referendum and our biz position, i said to him yesterday and pm cues that that our position had not been changed, of course as legislation, when legislation goes through, once we have agreed a deal and legislation is going through for the bill that puts in place i'm sure there will be mamas of this house,
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because there are members who supported —— there will be members of this house who support a second referendum. i continue to believe it is important for us to deliver on the first referendum that took place in 2016 on the result of that. can i just say to the right honourable gentleman, if he is so interested in referenda, the question is will he now abide by the decision of the 2014 scottish referendum, yes or no? thank you, mr speaker. does my right honourable friend the prime minister appreciate the anger that her abject surrender last night has generated across the country have been broken promises 100 times not to extend the time? she knows what i'm saying, she has done that. does she also accept that this withdrawal agreement undermines our democracy, the
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constitutional status of northern ireland, our right to govern ourselves, control over our laws and undermines our national interest? will she resign? i think you know the answer to that. can i say to my honourable friend, first of all i do not recognise the description of the withdrawal agreement that he is put before this house. i believe we have negotiated a good dealfor the united kingdom. he references the fa ct united kingdom. he references the fact that i have, he is absently right, on many, many occasions in this house and he and other members of my honourable friends have been keeping count, i have said i wanted to leave the european union on the 29th of march and indeed i did. i voted for the uk to leave the european union on the 29th of march. i wanted us to set in train that guaranteed living on the 22nd of may. i voted to leave on the 22nd of
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may. i voted to leave on the 22nd of may. sadly, not sufficient number of members across this house voted to leave the european union on those dates and hence the extension has been requested to enable us to come toa been requested to enable us to come to a position where this house can agree a majority, on a majority, on agree a majority, on a majority, on a deal that we can then deliver on leaving the european union. thank you, mr speaker. leaving the european union. thank you, mrspeaker. can leaving the european union. thank you, mr speaker. can i thank the prime minister for putting the national interest above her party's interest in rejecting no deal, applying for and agreeing to an extension to article 50? we may now have more time but our businesses face more uncertainty, so may i encourage her during the easter recess to take her own advice and to reflect on the decisions that need to be made, and decide to put her deal to the british people so that they can decide whether they still wish to leave now we know the actual
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choices that brexit involves, or remain so that we can finally bring this crisis facing our country to a conclusion? asi as i indicated to... studio: it is two o'clock, you are watching afternoon live from bbc news. we are staying with this debate, theresa may updating leaders on brexit after granting a six month extension. she hopes an agreement can be reached between talks between the conservatives and labour. in the last few moments jeremy corbyn the conservatives and labour. in the last few momentsjeremy corbyn said the government will have to compromise. we will stay with this debate and bring it some more news a little later. if you do that in time we can leave the european union without holding the european union without holding the european union without holding the european parliamentary elections. in my region already there are car factories in a forced shut down because of the brexit
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uncertainty so could i

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