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tv   BBC News at Five  BBC News  May 1, 2019 5:00pm-6:00pm BST

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today at five: a landmark ruling in sport that will force female athletes with unusually high levels of testosterone to take drugs to reduce it. double olympic gold medallist caster semenya says she has been targeted and she will not be slowed down. such discrimination is a necessary, reasonable, and proportionate means of achieving the iaaf‘s objective of preserving the integrity of female athletics. we'll talk to an expert witness for caster semenya and ask what the implications are for other competitors, including including trans—athletes. the other main stories on bbc news at five: theresa may answers questions on brexit negotiations and says she is willing to compromise and talks with labour have been "constructive and meaningful. "
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we are sitting down and talking with the official opposition about what both sides want to achieve, in relation to customs. obviously, issues around friction of trade at the border, and notjust about customs. 50 weeks in jail for the wikileaks founder, julian assange, for breaching his bail by hiding in the ecuadoran embassy for seven years after violent clashes in venezuela — the us says military action in the country is possible, if that's what's required and the nominations for the most prestigious prize in contemporary art are announced. the turner prize entries all have a political theme this year, and will be displayed in margate from september.
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it's five o'clock. our main story: the south african athlete caster semenya has lost a landmark case against new rules restricting the amount of testosterone in female runners. semenya, a double olympic gold medallist and world champion, has a condition which means she has unusually high levels of the hormone. it means she is classified as inter—sex or having dsd — differences in sexual development. the ruling from the governing body of world athletics, means she will now have to take drugs to lower her natural levels of testosterone, if she wants to continue to compete. here's our sports news correspondent, richard conway. commentator: here comes caster semenya past the... caster semenya has controlled 800m running over the past decade like no one else. but that dominance is now in doubt following this landmark verdict. athletics world governing body, the iaaf, believes women
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with what is known as "differences in sexual development," or dsd as it's also known, hold an unfair advantage over their competitors. caster semenya argued she simply has a genetic gift, was born and raised a woman and shouldn't be discriminated against. however, the court disagreed. they found that the dsd measures are discriminatory but the panel found that, on the basis of the evidence submitted by the parties in the procedure, such discrimination is a necessary, reasonable and proportionate means of achieving the iaaf objective of preserving the integrity of athletics. the hormones, genes and reproductive organs of women with dsd may often be a mix of male and female characteristics. the science and the impact of testosterone on performance was a key factor in the case. she has a condition which may lead to her to have a slightly
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higher testosterone levels than the average female. now, lots of women have conditions like this and there are various conditions that might lead to someone having high testosterone levels. the crux of this argument is whether those high oestrone levels that occur naturally in women confer the same advantage that they would if it was man versus woman, where we see a 10—12% difference. athletics chiefs fear that, if left unchecked, dsd athletes could dominate the sport, pointing to over 100 records that have already been set at national, continental and world level. the core value for the iaaf is the empowerment of girls and women through athletics. the regulations we are introducing are there to protect the sanctity of fair and open competition. meanwhile, the woman at the centre of this case was left initially bemused, before issuing a defiant statement saying...
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caster semenya now faces a crucial decision — if she is to defend her world title, she must start taking the necessary medication next week. however, she may yet opt to run a longer distance not subject to the regulations. the iaaf has welcomed the decision but given the split verdict and the highly contentious nature of the decision, the issue looks like it will run on for some time. richard conway, bbc news. joining me from salford is dr alun williams, he's a reader in sport and exercise genomics at manchester metropolitan university. and has been assisting caster semenya's legal team as an expert witness. thank you forjoining us. you must all be disappointed with the outcome today but what is their next move for winger? we are disappointed, not
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just caster, there some other athletes of these regulations affect as well. in terms of the next move, that's a decision for caster and her legal team. i understand that an appeal is being considered. you say other athletes are affected. she has said that this is personal, implied that it said that this is personal, implied thatitis said that this is personal, implied that it is some kind of vendetta by the authorities. how many other athletes will be affected? the authorities. how many other athletes will be affected ?|j the authorities. how many other athletes will be affected? i don't think it's a great number. part of the rationale for targeting very specific athletic events, from 400 metres through to one mile, is partly based on a bit of research published, and also challenge quite significantly. it is based, apparently, the fact that there are some other athletes that fit into
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the female dsd category that happened to compete in those particular events. are the implications for today's ruling for other transgender athletes?” implications for today's ruling for other transgender athletes? i think they're probably odd. they kept the two situations are different. the court... everybody involved in the case knew that they were separate issues. however, the fact that the regulation has been upheld for female dsd athletes, but i think will probably embolden the authorities in terms of what they will then seek to apply going forward for transgender athletes. going back to women like herself, you see an appeal may be considered. i suppose decisions have to be made very fast because this ruling effectively comes into play next week. if you want to compete in the
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world championships in september, she needs to start eating those dogs? you're quite right. -- start taking those drugs. they have to start taking the hormone altering drugs if they wish to compete in those events. the other option is to attempt to compete outside of that range of 400 metres to one mile but you are challenging any athlete to move out of the distance and time that it takes to run the event that they are most suited for hyping a challenge for any athlete.” they are most suited for hyping a challenge for any athlete. i suppose the decision on and taking drugs to reduce testosterone levels is also a very difficult decision?” reduce testosterone levels is also a very difficult decision? i think it's a strange situation we have ended up in, where the athletes affected by these regulations are
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being effectively advised by the authorities to take drugs, in order to limit their performance. while, equally, the same authorities are very keen to test all athletes to limit performance enhancement drugs. it isa limit performance enhancement drugs. it is a strange irony where we have ended up. theresa may has told mps the government has been making "concerted efforts" to find consensus behind a brexit deal. she said that the public want to see the parties working together to achieve an agreement. we can cross to westminster and speak to our chief political correspondent, vicki young. that has been a strange lull in parliamentary proceedings. for three weeks, virtually nothing is happening, mps wandering around the palance of westminster. some of them
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openly speculating on what they are doing there. and no sign of a pine from the government, they say. today, we had from the prime minister, taking questions from this committee. the usual sparring between yvette cooper, the chairwoman of the home affairs select committee, and theresa may. yvette cooper saying resilience is a strength, stubbornness is a weakness, and wondering when and the prime minister will compromise on her brexit deal. theresa may, really sticking to and defending her decision to engage in talks with labour, talking about a possible compromise. and answering the question whether she would consider a customs union, something labour is pushing for. we are sitting down and talking with the official opposition about what both sides want to achieve, in relation to customs. obviously, issues around friction of trade at the border, and notjust about customs. they are about regulatory
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issues as well. we are sitting down and talking about what is it that we both want to achieve, in relation to these issues? i think, actually, there is a greater commonality, in terms of some of the benefits of a customs union that we have already identified between ourselves and the official opposition. the political declaration makes clear about an independent trade policy. actually looking at the balance of these issues is part of the discussion. can we come to an agreement about that? i hope we will be able to but those discussions still continue. the prime minister thinks the public wa nts to the prime minister thinks the public wants to see the main parties working together to try and break this brexit deadlock. we are co nsta ntly this brexit deadlock. we are constantly told that these talks are constructive, everyone has entered them in good faith. i suppose the question is, how long will they let them continue? with local elections coming up tomorrow, i think it unlikely there will be a deal or either side will walk away. downing
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street suggesting that by the middle of next week, they need to be seen to be making some kind of progress. not everyone is happy about the idea of the government speaking to labour to find a compromise. there are many conservatives, particularly those that have held out and not supported theresa may's deal, hate the idea and there was a bit of a conversation between theresa may and one of them. under what conditions would you be prepared to set aside the pressures that you're under in order to deliver the referendum result and exercise your legal right to refuse an offer of a further extension under article 50 and, if necessary, to leave without a deal? well, i want us to leave the european union. i've been working for us to leave the european union. i have voted consistently in parliament for us to leave the european union. had everybody in parliament voted in the same way, we would no longer be a member of the european union. some irritation and frustration up there from a theresa may, the fact that she has not been able to get
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how deal through parliament. the big question is what happens next? what is plan b if these talks fail? what would they do then? theresa may reiterating that they will go to this indicative of its process, bringing a range of options, getting the house of commons debate on them. to see if they can for the first time get them to vote in favour of something. the wikilea ks founder julian assange has been sentenced to 50 weeks in jail for breaching his bail conditions. he was removed from the ecuadorian embassy in london last month after seven years. he took refuge there in 2012 to avoid extradition to sweden over sexual assault allegations, which he has denied. the former black cab driver, john worboys, has been charged with four offences against women. the 62—year—old, who changed his name to john radford, is alleged to have used drugs with the intent of carrying out sexual assaults in london
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between 2000 and 2008. our home affairs correspondent, tom symonds, is at scotland yard. these allegations were first made againstjohn worboys last year but they relate to that period between 2000 and 2008. he was questioned by police last year, and in september last year, if file were said to the crown prosecution service, a file of evidence. they have now announced that he will be charge, those charges are that he administered, "is charges are that he administered, "is typifying or over empowering drug, with the intent of sexually assaulting two women could end he is alleged to have carried out the same charge on to victims. john worboys who is in custody will be in court later this month to answer those charges.
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the headlines on bbc news: double olympic gold medallist caster semenya has lost her landmark appeal against rules restricting testosterone levels in female runners — and will have to take medication to reduce her naturally high testosterone if she's to continue competing. theresa may answers questions on brexit negotiations and says she is willing to compromise and talks with labour have been "constructive and meaningful. " 50 weeks in jail for the wikileaks founderjulian assange — for breaching his bail by hiding in the ecuadoran embassy for seven years. and in sport: two european giants collide as liverpool go in search of champions league glory, but the mighty messi and barcelona stand in their way. the legendary spainish goalkeeper, iker casillas, rushed to hospital with suspected heart problems at the training ground of his current club, porto. sir dave brailsford defends the new owners of team ineos, the rebranded cycling team, with protests expected on the opening day of the tour of yorkshire over the chemical companies practices.
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i'll be back with more on those stories later. us secretary of state, mike pompeo, has said that the united states is prepared to take military action to end the ongoing turmoil in venezuela. opposition leader, jaun guaido, has again called for people to take to the streets, promising the "largest demonstration" in the country's history. paul adams has the latest. was this a dress rehearsal or a failed uprising? yesterday's chaotic scenes in caracas never really looked like a regime in collapse. venezuela has had lots of this in recent years. but on the streets, some clearly believed this was a decisive moment. translation: the country is ours, we need to go out into the streets. guaido is the leader in charge, he has a plan.
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translation: the streets are a way out of this and with the armed forces taking action together with the political leadership in support of the people here, i think we can win. the opposition leader, juan guaido, began the day talking about a "final phase" in his effort to replace nicolas maduro. he seemed to have some support from elements of the national guard — soldiers wearing blue ribbons mingling with the crowds — but the army did not switch sides and, at the end of the day, mr guaido had this plea. translation: i am calling on the armed forces to continue their march in operation freedom, in the rescue of the dignity of our people, our families. this is the challenge. but mr maduro's supporters were also on the streets, answering a call to gather outside the presidential palace. and when their man finally appeared on camera, the pictures seemed designed to show a government and military holding firm. translation: with the truth as a sword, as a shield,
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we faced so many attacks and so many lies and, thanks to it, we have emerged victorious in every situation and will continue to emerge victorious in any difficulty that we face from now on. but was there a moment amid the chaos when mr maduro was losing his grip, preparing to flee his own country? the trump administration wants everyone to think so. he was ready to go, he had made a decision that we had been urging him to make for quite some time and then he was diverted from that action by the russians. we hope he'll reconsider and get back on that plane. russia says this is nonsense, but all eyes today will be on the streets. will the opposition feel emboldened by yesterday's scenes and come out in even bigger numbers? paul adams, bbc news. our south america correspondent, katy watson, is in sao paulo. we heard maduro talking about a
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victory over a deranged coup attempt today. do you think things aren't living in his direction?” today. do you think things aren't living in his direction? i think both leaders have claimed victory for what happened yesterday. we had nicolas maduro give a lengthy address on state television, in which he talks about dismantling the scope, blaming the us involvement in it. but juan scope, blaming the us involvement in it. butjuan guaido also put out a video, free minutes, much shorter, talking about the fact that they initiated the final phase of material's rain and people needed to continue to come out onto the streets as planned today, which is a public holiday in much of the region. i think the issue is that both men have come out of this possibly weaker than either of them had hoped for. juan guaido wanted to see regime change and was very positive at the beginning of the
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day. nicolas maduro is hanging on but never the less, is really showing how much opposition is against him. so neither leader can sit happily at the moment. what do we know about these two men who have come to play such a pivotal role in veneuzela's ongoing crisis? well, juan guido was relatively unknown until recently. back in 2011 he was elected to the national assembly. in 2017, he took part and was reportedly wounded during massive protests against mr maduro's government. but it was january this year when he was elected as leader of the opposition—held national assembly, and started gaining international support. mr guaido is now recognised as interim leader of venezuela by more than 50 countries, including the us, the uk and most in latin america. and what about the man guaido is trying to replace? nicolas maduro was first elected president of venezuela by a narrow
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margin in april 2013, following in the steps of hugo chavez. he was then elected for a second term in a disputed poll. since taking power, he has been accused of undermining democracy and violating human rights. but, mr maduro, backed by russia and china, has refused to cede leadership to his rival. joining me now from new york is eva golinger — attorney, author and advisor to former venezuelan president, hugo chavez. thank you forjoining us. how do you see events on the ground now in venezuela, particularly caracas? obviously there is a lot of uncertainty over how things will unravel over the next few hours or days. they could maintain the status quo for an indefinite period of time. looking back on the events of yesterday, it does is appear as though that wasn't just a
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spontaneous event, sort of testing the waters. it appears that it was either if failed attempt to try to oust maduro, garnering the support of the military that didn't come through. or, it was issuing to the us to say, look, we have tried everything, it is time for you to step in and intervene. i think is important to look at the statement out of the white house that mike pompeo has reaffirmed today. but they will take military action as necessary and the acting secretary of defence has cancelled a trip to europe to oversee the situation in venezuela. we could be looking at some type of military action, possibly. but it would be widely rejected. when you say that, widely rejected. when you say that, widely rejected by who? a majority of venezuelans. they rejected by who? a majority of venezuela ns. they may rejected by who? a majority of venezuelans. they may not necessarily want maduro to stay on
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how long term but certainly do not wa nt how long term but certainly do not want a military intervention by the us in their country, or an escalation of that armed conflict. i think the majority of latin american nations may not recognise maduro as legitimate, they have outwardly rejected any type of us military action in venezuela as a solution to the crisis. i think it will be an u nfortu nate the crisis. i think it will be an unfortunate development, where like to ta ke unfortunate development, where like to take place. but we are seeing an increasingly desperate opposition to achieve that goal, they haven't had much success so far. in terms of the actual government, the so—called government, depending on which side of the fence you stand out. the mid euro government, there are so many international governments opposing him in the region and further afield. isn't it time for nicolas maduro, after so many years in power, in the middle of a worsening economic crisis, is it time for him
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to step aside and let someone else have an attempt at sorting out his country's problems? in his vision and the 6 million plus venezuelans who voted for him in at the election last year, whether it is recognised as legitimate, they see no reason for him to step aside until his term is over. just because he isn't being recognised as legitimate, he is still the one in power of the state's constitutions and a company. he still has the backing of the armed forces but we are seeing fractures amongst the military, that will be definitive in terms of how long he can actually maintain power. i don't think what we would see would be an absolute shift to the opposition taking power. i think they would be some type of transition that would involve those from the ruling party that would have to be involved in any type of transition because they still represent the majority in the country. thank you forjoining us.
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let's have a look at some other stories making news today: campaigners trying to block a third runway at heathrow have lost a series of high court challenges against the expansion. a group including councils, residents and the mayor of london argued that the plans would have "severe" consequences for londoners, but their case was dismissed this morning. the department for transport has cancelled its no—deal brexit ferry contracts, at an estimated cost of £50 million to the taxpayer. the government had been buying space on ferries, in the event the uk left the european union without an agreement — in order to guarantee the supply of medicine and food into the uk. one of the founding members of 19805 pop group level 42 has died. boon gould who was the guitarist and saxophone player for the group was found dead at his home in dorset — he was 64. in a statement, the group's lead singer mark king paid tribute saying, "you are at peace now boon, no more pain mate. thank you for everything."
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police have fired tear gas to push back masked demonstrators in central paris, as thousands of people used an annual may day rally to protest against the policies of president emmanuel macron. our correspondent, hugh schofield, is in paris. tell us just what these protests look like? it was supposed to be a regular at me the first, union organised, demonstration. it started off like that but very quickly we could see the march had in its numbers many yellow vests, who have been protesting since november. among them were also what we have come to see and call, the black blocs, people dressed in black who
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have come to cause trouble. they are very small in number, they were able to cause a certain amount of havoc. foran houror to cause a certain amount of havoc. for an hour or more, there was competition between them and the police who were out in force because there was aerial fiat that this demonstration could turn into something very serious. there have been more problems, described as a low level street violence, at the end of the demonstration. it's still going on now but beginning to peter out. it not something that has about wrist getting out of control but it has been ugly in parts. once again, on the streets of paris, the doubly led police are used to seeing— but oui’ led police are used to seeing— but our cars, scooters, broken windows, broken bus shelters and so on. it is
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sad that this has become so normal. just briefly, it must be disappointing to the president because he has had its grand national conversation for weeks on end, and attempted to meet some of the demands of the protesters with economic concessions? he has indeed. ina way, economic concessions? he has indeed. in a way, it is sad and worrying for him. on the other hand, he might draw the conclusion today that it wasn't nearly as bad as it could have been. this was not a situation that got out of control, there was more the sort of regular street violence that we have seen so often. it was confined to pretty small numbers of people and police had it under control. it is true that he would very much like the whole gilets jaunes would very much like the whole giletsjaunes movement would very much like the whole gilets jaunes movement and would very much like the whole giletsjaunes movement and its extreme fringes to disappear— i don't think that will happen. i think, therefore, he will probably content himself by if the majority
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of the french belief that he has made the right moves and concessions, regardless of whether 01’ concessions, regardless of whether or not there are still some gilets jaunes and radical elements you continue to protest. i think any future, there will be more of gilets jaunes and black blocs on the streets. as long as they strictly a minority, then he will live with it. a two—year—old girl is in a serious condition after she was hit with an arrow from a crossbow. merseyside police were called to a house in liverpool yesterday after the toddler was struck in what is being described as an "isolated incident." the toddler was admitted to hospital with a head injury. the public inquiry into the contaminated blood scandal of the 19705 and 19805 has been hearing more harrowing evidence from victims. stephen nicholl5 was part of a group of haemophiliac teenagers who formed a pact that whoever survived would find out what was killing them.
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speaking at the inquiry, during emotional testimony, he explained he was the only one left out of his friends with the condition who could try and find the answers to how it happened. there's four, five of us in the room and we realised that this is serious and this is killing u5, or killing haemophiliacs. and we said, this is going to happen to us, we can see it. and they said, right, we've stuck together right through our childhood. i said, if it happens and it kicks off, we're going to rely on the person still alive to pursue it and find out why and what went wrong. and i'm the only one left. that's tough. i think about that every day. time for a look at the weather, with louise lear.
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we have seen some of the sunshine today. through the night tonight we will see a little bit of shouted when drifting its way to the midland across when drifting its way to the midland acro55 lincolnshire and east anglia behind it clear skies to stop the tempjust behind behind it clear skies to stop the temp just behind under the behind it clear skies to stop the tempjust behind under the clear skies will fall into single figures. so we start off tomorrow with some 5un5hine abound. it will give quite a pleasant but chilly start. a5 5un5hine abound. it will give quite a pleasant but chilly start. as we go through the day, we are expecting a few more showers are developing. some of those are quite heavy, possibly thundery a5 some of those are quite heavy, possibly thundery as well. widespread showers into the afternoon to stop temperatures in the sunnier moments maybe 15 or 16 degrees, but noticeably colder in the fire ea5t degrees, but noticeably colder in the fire east of scotland. that is because that's where the front is already starting to push its way through the south. once it does so it is introducing much colder air behind. that weather front will bring some rain, will be at night and patchy acro55 another england into the south—east corner. to the south of the flood, it still says are relatively mild. highs of 15 degrees. to the north of it,
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noticeably colder and the wind strengthening a5 noticeably colder and the wind strengthening as well to stop gu5ting in excess of 40 or 50 mph acro55 gu5ting in excess of 40 or 50 mph across the far north of scotland to stop that will make it feel really bitterly disappointing. a5 stop that will make it feel really bitterly disappointing. as we move ata bitterly disappointing. as we move at a friday, to the site of the banco do we can, it looks likely it was a pretty cold, dry for most with the wind 5lowly starting to ease. this is bbc news. the headlines... double olympic gold medallist ca5ter semenya has lost her landmark appeal against rules restricting testosterone levels in female runners. she says she has been targeted and will not be slowed down. theresa may answers questions on brexit negotiations and says she is willing to compromise and talks with labour have been ‘constructive and meaningful‘ 50 weeks in jail for the wikileak5 founderjulian assange for breaching his bail by hiding in the ecuadorian embassy for seven years. after violent clashes in venezuela,
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the us says military action in the country is possible if that's what's required. now for the sports news. good evening. it's the turn of liverpool tonight, the second engli5h side in this season's champions league semi finals, up against barcelona at the nou camp. hopeful of qualifying for the final for a second year in a row. andy swiss is in barcelona. and this is no easy task forjurgen klopp and his team. no, ithink no, i think that is a very understated way of putting it, john. i think it is about as tough as it gets. barcelona are the favourites to win the champions league title. they have a certain minor me55i who scored his 46th goal of the season at the weekend. —— lionel messi. he
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will very much be the key as far as barcelona are concerned. liverpool it should have bags of confidence because they are in terrific form. they have won their last ten matches. they are very much 5till battling out for the premier league title back on. they actually have a pretty decent record here in barcelona. over the years they have played for mac matches here and they have never lost. if they can maintain that record, here tonight, natalie them in pretty good stead going into the return fixture. —— that will leave them in pretty good stead. and there have been some unsightly scenes from fans out there. how has there behaviour been? we've been out here this afternoon and so far the mode has been pretty good—natured. and so far the mode has been pretty good—natu red. fans have and so far the mode has been pretty good—natured. fans have been out in the streets are mingling and there has been no problem at all. there have been incidents yesterday of people being pushed into fountains,
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which liverpool have condemned. there chief executive peter marr wa5 today message earlier on today 5aying, let's treat this beautiful city with the respect it deserves and actany city with the respect it deserves and act any manner that is befitting of liverpool football club. —— peter moore. the police say they are working with the club to identify who is responsible. they made today has been a good—natured stopjurgen klopp in his press conference said that he could not be more excited about tonight because ‘5 a match. fairto about tonight because ‘5 a match. fair to say, that most of the fans here are stating that sentiment. fair to say, that most of the fans here are stating that sentimentm i5 here are stating that sentimentm is going to be a good day to come. thank you very much. the former real madrid goalkeeper iker ca5illa5 has been taken to hospital after suffering heart problems at the training ground of current club porto. they say the 37—year—old is in a "stable condition" in hospital and remains under observation. ca5illa5 captained spain to world cup glory in 2010 and two years later to the european championship.
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sir dave brailsford, the head of the now rebranded team ineos cycling team, has defended new owner sirjim ratcliffe, with protests expected on the opening day of the tour de yorkshire over the companies practices. petrochemicals billionaiire sirjim ratcliffe has become the new prinicpal backer of the team, but has faced critcism from enviromental campaigners. speaking on the eve of the race, he added a zero tolerance policy over drug use will remain. we looked at all about. talked about it. we did our due diligence. for the record, i have absolutely no interest in cheating or drugs or anything like that. he day that any of that enters our world, we will be exiting that well. what is the point in winning a race if you cheat? there is no point in that really. i believe that if you've got the best athletes in the world, with the best training regimes, you know, you don't need any of those
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enhancements. the latest from the world snooker championship we are gary wilson is due to the finals. he won at the crucible finishing with his brilliant long red. wilson from tyneside as a qualifier and only has ever made it as far as the first round before this. david gilbert is also through. we'll have more for you in sportsday at 6:30pm. more now on our top story this afternoon. double olympic gold medallist caster semenya has lost a landmark case against new rules restricting the amount of testosterone in female runners. semenya has a condition that means she has unusually high levels of the hormone, and now the governing body of world athletics has brought in rules forcing athletes like her to take medication, in order to lower their testosterone. i can talk now to dr gemma witcomb, a sports psychologist from loughborough university. thank you very much for talking to
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us. thank you very much for talking to us. are you surprised by today? u nfortu nately i us. are you surprised by today? unfortunately i am not surprised by it. i think it is a sad thing. i think it is a sad thing for any women who are is an athlete who has a dsd that this ruling has been made. but i think that the iaaf had to do something and this is what they have chosen to do. what is another alternative? is there something else that like this has been going on for ten years, it is incredibly fraught and controversial issue. the athletes: different sides, medics all on different sides. the regulators and officials seem to fall on different sites. do think there is a better solution available? i think the fact that we had a lot of controversy and people to follow on both sides showed that it isa to follow on both sides showed that it is a very conjugated issue. not all of the signs are there to support what we should go. and sociologically, it is a really important issue for women's sport. i
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think... so... won't know you carry on. idid think... so... won't know you carry on. i did not return to rapture. i think the iaaf have to do something —— i did not mean to interact. think the iaaf have to do something —— i did not mean to interactm you look at the regulations, they have said how this is enforced if they have a reaction to medication that they are forcing them to take might mean this is not able to be placed or come into effect as easily as people think. so you think this is possibly a kind of temporary solution and the fight will go on by both sides? absolutely. if you look at the international olympic committee's regulations, may change for each olympics, so nothing is ever really that set in stone. that is because of research gets better and knowledge gets better and understanding of the body gets better. i think we'll learn more and we will look back at those in decades to come and think that this was a mistake. and caster semenya
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has said that she feels that this is targeted at her personally. do think thatis targeted at her personally. do think that is legitimate or something that it affects many different athletes? there are a multitude of different dsds and they can affect people in different ways. i am sure that a lot of athlete who have dsd that we do not know about. in castor‘s cased, she has been identified as having dsd -- she has been identified as having dsd —— in caster semenya case she had been dead eyed as having dsd... there had been by some that she has been —— she has been identified as having dsd stop. i tester and did not provide an advantage and she still won as a one view. just in terms of other athletes, there are
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transgender athletes who are not athletes with dsd, but there are other athletes for whom issues of sexuality and gender arise. do you think they will be affected by today's billing? absolutely. -- today's billing? absolutely. -- today ruling? that they cannot identify and may need to be taking hormone therapy and... in any case is you do want that hormone therapy. they did it come together, but these are different issues with different regulations. the transgender regulations. the transgender regulation will be informed of the back of this iaaf regulation for dsd. thank you very much. tomorrow voters will go to polls in elections for 248 councils across england,
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as well as every council in northern ireland. nearly 9,000 council seats are up for grabs in total. so what should we be looking out for? here's our political correspondent chris mason. after all the bluster and fluster of day—to—day politics, it all boils down to a polling station, a piece of paper and a little stubby pencil. so, a carnival of democracy across much but not all of the uk, starting in northern ireland, where every seat on all 11 councils is being contested, with just over 800 candidates competing for 462 seats. let's hop back across the irish sea to england, where 248 councils are holding elections, with some 8,500 seats to be won. so, let's take a look at who currently holds those seats. the conservatives have the largest number, 4,901. labour, the next biggest party, and then there's the liberal democrats, the uk independence party and the greens. so, even if the tories lost
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hundreds of councillors, they are still likely to win the most seats overall. now, the last time most of these seats were contested was back in 2015, and the reason the conservatives did so well last time is that they were six points ahead of labour in the national share of the vote in the local elections then. 35% against 29%. now, if that lead were to narrow, the tories are likely to lose seats to labour. also, if the tories' 24 point lead over the liberal democrats was to narrow, then theresa may's party may lose seats to vince cable's. so, what are the main parties hoping for on the night? the conservatives will be hoping that the worst predictions of the opinion polls will not be fulfilled, because not least nigel farage's brexit party is not on the ballot paper, and they therefore only suffer losses of a few hundred seats rather than let's say 500, 600, 700. the labour party, they will want to put in their first convincing
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local election performance since 2012, over 35% of the vote, and suggest that, actually, a future general election would be a good prospect for them. liberal democrats, they're defending their worst ever set of local election results. progress of some kind for them at least would seem to be essential. now, let's be honest. what is it about local elections? maybe they sometimes lack the capacity to grip, to enthuse. they don't exactly effervesce with energy in that big sense of a big moment in the way that general elections can. but this is the first time that people will have voted since the brexit deadline passed without, well, er, brexit actually happening. so they are a crucial test of support for the parties. and of course councils matter. they decide where houses get built, who runs the buses and whether a pub can get a late licence, as well as plenty of other stuff like bins,
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social care and much more. so, if you're going to stay up all night with huw edwards, and why wouldn't you want to, where should you be looking out for? let's take a look at swindon. the conservatives could lose control there, so that's one that is worth looking at. milton keynes, currently hung, under no overall control, but the conservatives defending the most seats. there is colchester in essex, where the conservatives are close to winning a majority. and winchester, where the conservatives could lose their majority and it will be interesting to see how the liberal democrats do. and a last one to look at, walsall and the west midlands, the conservatives could take control. they unexpectedly won the walsall north seat in the general election back in 2017. so, plenty to keep you going with huw in the dead of night, and more to follow throughout the day on friday. and if you're feeling just a tad left out, perhaps you're in scotland or wales or those parts of england where your council isn't holding elections this time, well, there's the european parliament elections. they're looking increasingly likely
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to happen all over the uk towards the end of this month. the ukip leader gerard batten has launched his party's campaign for the european elections. speaking to supporters in middlesbrough, he said ukip was the only party with a clear policy on how the uk will leave the european union. mr batten said he hoped the elections wouldn't take place, but inisted he was confident of success if they did. no second referendum. uk does not want these elections to ta ke uk does not want these elections to take place at all. but they are. and they opt for the 17.4 million neighbours to vote once again chilly. and as with any bass, you told them once, now tell them again does not ukip is the only political party that has a clear policy on how to leave the european union. the headlines on bbc news...
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double olympic gold medallist caster semenya has lost her landmark appeal against rules restricting testosterone levels in female runners, and will have to take medication if she's to continue competing. theresa may answers questions on brexit negotiations and says she is willing to compromise and talks with labour have been ‘constructive and meaningful‘. 50 weeks in jail for the wikileaks founderjulian assange — for breaching his bail by hiding in the ecuadorian embassy for seven years. an update on the market numbers for you — here‘s how london‘s and frankfurt ended the day. health experts claim there‘s been a significant reduction in obesity among pre—school children in leeds. they believe it‘s thanks to a project which shows parents how to encourage children to eat healthier meals and do more exercise.
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the improvements have been highest in the city among children from poorer backgrounds, a result that has been described as "astonishing" by researchers. our health correspondent sophie hutchinson reports. childhood obesity has proved extremely stubborn to shift. by the time children in england leave primary school, a third will be overweight or obese. one of the most difficult groups to help has been those from poorer backgrounds, but today‘s study from leeds seems to buck the trend. over a five—year period, the number of obese four—and five—year—olds has fallen by 6.4%. this what‘s particularly interesting is that the number of obese children from deprived backgrounds has dropped even more, by an average of 8.7%. three—year—old libbyjoy used to only eat beans, sausages and mashed potato, but she was helped to try lots of different food as part of a scheme to tackle obesity in leeds. her mum now says she is fantastically healthy. her absolute favourite is broccoli,
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and she can eat loads of it. cucumbers, bananas, mangoes, peaches, strawberries, sweetcorn, loads of things now. the city of leeds has concentrated its efforts on tackling obesity, particularly among younger children and in deprived areas. one of the schemes there is called henry, and it runs nutrition workshops, some in children‘s centres. the programmes that henry's running really recognises that parents want the very best for their children, but actually there is a big difference between knowing what children should be eating and making that happen in practice, and so what henry's doing is really building parents' confidence and skills to establish a healthy, happy family life. a handful of other places in england have also seen reductions in childhood obesity, and it‘s hoped the trend will begin to turn.
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but for older children, weight problems are still proving a huge challenge. sophie hutchinson, bbc news. the four artists competing for this year‘s turner prize have been announced with investigative art, works blurring fact and fiction and explorations of oppression dominating the shortlist. their works will go on show at the turner contemporary in margate from 28th september until january 2020. the winner will be announced on 3rd december. joining me now is oliver basciano art critic and international editor at artreview who was on the panel ofjudges for the 2018 turner prize. you can talk freely now because you‘re not on the panel this year. introduced the four artists. we have tai shani, her work looks at magic
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and fantasy and feminism. the work that she has been nominated for is imagining a city that has been made by women and populated by women, dc: semiramis. and then there is oscar murillo. he is probably the big name and probably the closest to painting. there is always a moan that the turner prize does not involve enough painting to stop he isa involve enough painting to stop he is a big character. he came on the scene very quickly after college. his work was selling for a lot of money. and then he went quite free that. and i think sort of... that does not look like painting to me... sorry interrupted. this is the story of his, he‘s gone from painting into sculpture. his show at kettles‘s ya rd sculpture. his show at kettles‘s yard in cambridge involves this a huge un—stretched canvases. yard in cambridge involves this a huge un-stretched canvases. which means? what is the difference
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between an stretched canvas and? means? what is the difference between an stretched canvas and ?m just a bit of cloth really. it looks a bit likea just a bit of cloth really. it looks a bit like a flag. he is from colombia and a lot of his work is about migration, the paintings often involve birds. this painting involves birds. birds are free to migrate, but perhaps we were coming from outside the ego or what have you are not so free to enter this country to stop is that is have the shortlist. what about the other two? we have helen cammock. she is probably the least known. she listened to testimonies of members of the public are rebuilding the troubles and whose voices were not held any official histories. does are representational, they may not be paintings on a stretched canvas,
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but some others are kind of 2d and the way that people would be familiar with any kind of turner context. oscar murillo? no, iwas talking about helen. she is perhaps best known for her sound works and her performances. she listens to script and she is almost like a, you reference investigative journalism. that brings us to lawrence abu hamdan who has worked with amnesty to produce... forensic architecture? forensic architecture were nominated last year and they are igloo that have worked with amnesty and various other groups, like bbc africa —— they are a group that have worked with amnesty... and lawrence abu hamdan also works and perhaps in that vein. those are the four candidates. those are fascinating,
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different, lots of depth in their work. but i can‘t literally without questions about the sponsor, stagecoach as it has been controversial? they are the local buster firm in margate and that‘s neck of the local bus firm in margate and perhaps brian souter has some unsavoury views, in my opinion, and this has raised some questions especially as at some of these artists raise social issues, queer issues, feminist issues because of it isa issues, feminist issues because of it is a tricky sale, a tricky manage. no doubt we will be talking about this again when the prize is announced. thank you. now, we have some breaking news from
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wesson to. the pi minister has sacked the defence secretary that might prime minister has sacked the defence secretary at gavin williamson in relation to the investigation into the leak of information for stop let‘s go to a chief political correspondent. we have been sent a letter from the pi minister to gavin williamson at the defence secretary. this event the enquiry into a leak. —— the prime minister. from the the group there was a leak to a newspaper and it was all about the chinese company huawei and some talk about the concerns that had that. it leak made its way into the papers and because it was a
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national security issue, there was an investigation. this is a paragraph that is most important from the letter from the prime minister to gavin williamson, she says, i was concerned by the manner in which you have engaged with this investigation. been carried out by the most senior civil servant in government. she says it has been conducted fairly, with the full cooperation of other attendees at the meeting, they have all answered the meeting, they have all answered the questions. your conduct has not been of at the same standard as others. in our meeting this evening, i put it to the latest information from the investigation which provides compelling suggesting your responsibility for the unauthorised disclosure. no other credible version of events to explain the sleek has been identified. —— this leak. she says that she has full confidence in the other member is in the cabinet. this, many people felt
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was of a different level because it involved national security. so the breaking news, in the last two —— any last breaking news, in the last two —— a ny last few breaking news, in the last two —— any last few minutes, the prime minister has sacked the defence secretary gavin williamson. another resignation... will actually sacking for the prime minister to deal with. have we heard anything from him at himself? no, this... thinki have we heard anything from him at himself? no, this... think i was being pointed at these cabinet ministers and the success of the kmart. jeremy hunt said, very clearly asked was it you or was it your team? and gavin williamson said it was not him either. there was some speculation that this investigation mightjust some speculation that this investigation might just be some speculation that this investigation mightjust be a whitewash and you would look through
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the phones of cabinet ministers and advisers and they speak to journalists all the time to stop you cannot really prove what they were talking about during those conversations. but, in this case, from what it says there, from the pen is later, she feels that there has been compelling evidence pointing the finger at gavin williamson and she clearly does not feel he has cooperated with this investigation any manner that she would have expected. and of course, there is a very heightened around leadership of the government and of the conservative party. he was not by some to be a possible candidate at the other possible candidates must be breathing a sigh of relief. some are saying that it was possibly being late to put someone in the frame. —— possibly being leaked. there were some that said possibly gavin williamson might have been a candidate, someone who was known to speak to jonas, of candidate, someone who was known to speak tojonas, of course they‘ll do. but it could be thought that he was someone do. but it could be thought that he was someone who might have done
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this. they did not have any evidence to support that, and people and gavin williamson‘s team would have said that people were just trying to frame him because of this leadership speculation that has been going on with various different camps up and running with their teams already to go and trying to get information and trying to get mp5 to come on side and support their person. but of course, gavin williamson did publicly say that it was not him. this has obviously been a difficult decision, presumably, by the pi minister. she has been taking questions in front of that liaison committee today. —— by the prime minister. she has held him in and asked him. for one of the first times i can remember, a leak investigation into something that has gone on has actually found the culprit. it seems. in this case, they have been sacked. thank you so much for all of that. and that is the letter from the prime minister to gavin williamson, the
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announcement of his resignation. the prime minister has sacked the defence secretary, gavin williamson, over lea ked defence secretary, gavin williamson, over leaked details of private meetings. downing street made the announcement in the last few minutes, following links to newspaper reports concerning chinese company huawei last week. days ago, the defence secretary denied he had anything to do with the league, but tonight he is out. the double olympic champion — caster semenya — loses her legal challenge against new rules which will force her to lower her body‘s testosterone levels it‘s a sad day for athletics, it‘s a sad day for sport, and it‘s a sad day for women‘s sport, and i emphasise women‘s sport, in the world.

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