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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  May 18, 2019 8:00am-9:01am BST

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thank you for all of your comments this week, positive and negative. please do get in touch with your opinions about what you see on bbc tv news, online or on social media. you may even appear on the programme. you can e—mail us on newswatch@bbc.co.uk. or find us on twitter at bbc news watch. you can call us. and you can have a look at previous interviews on our website. that's all from us, we will be back to have your thoughts about bbc news coverage again next week. bye bye.
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good morning, welcome to breakfast. our headlines today: the brexit blame game — after cross— party talks colla pse, party leaders accuse each other for the failure. the duke of cambridge urges more of us to open up about grief. when you are bereaved at a very young age, any time really, but particularly at a young age, you feel pain like no other pain. australians are at the polls voting in one of the most tightly—fought elections in years. good morning from wembley on fa cup final day as manchester city try to become the first english men's team to the domestic treble, while watford hope there will be a sting in the tail from
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the underdog like there was in 2013. downpours are part of the weekend weather story, but not the whole story. there will be some warm sunshine as well. all the details coming up on breakfast. it's saturday, 18th of may. our top story: theresa may and jeremy corbyn are blaming divisions in each other‘s parties for the breakdown of talks aimed at ending the deadlock over brexit. mr corbyn said they collapsed because of "weakness and instability" within the government, whilst the prime minister blamed splits in the labour party, over another referendum. we can speak now to our political correspondent, jonathan blake. a lot of people thought these talks we re a lot of people thought these talks were doomed to fail, but now we have to deal with what happens because they have failed. they have, they are over, and now i think what we will see is may be talks of a
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different kind going on between the government and perhaps some opposition labour mps. theresa may is taking this leap of faith and bringing the withdrawal agreement bell, the bit of legislation which will put in place her brexit deal into uk law, in a couple of weeks‘ time. she faces a big uphill struggle to get mps to vote in favour of it. but she does have a chance, and the reason for that is because it not only provides the government with a way to go around the edges of that deal and built on added extras which could convince some labour mps that after all they may well be willing to vote for it, but also gives mps a chance to add things for themselves. the people who want perhaps a further referendum, or want the government to rule out and stop leaving the eu without a deal, see this as potentially the only way to achieve that. thank you. and in a few minutes, we‘ll be speaking to the conservative mp
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nigel evans — that‘s ataround 8:10am. the duke of cambridge has described feeling "pain like no other pain" following the death of his mother, princess diana, when he was 15. prince william made the comments in a bbc documentary in which he discussed mental health issues and pressures with former and present footballers. i have thought about this a lot, and iam i have thought about this a lot, and i am trying to understand why i feel like i do, but i think when you are bereaved at a very young age, any time really, but particularly at a very young age, you feel pain like no other pain. you know that in your life it is going to be very difficult to come across something thatis difficult to come across something that is even worse pain than that. but it also brings you so close to all those other people out there who have been bereaved. the united states and canada have agreed to drop aluminium and steel tariffs that were imposed a year ago. it follows lengthy negotiations and a telephone call on friday between president trump and the canadian prime minister, justin trudeau.
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it could pave the way for a new north american trade agreement. the governor of the us state of missouri, mike parson, says he will sign a bill which limits women‘s access to abortion. it would prevent almost all terminations after eight weeks of pregnancy. it comes just days after alabama introduced a near—total ban on abortion, prompting country wide protests from pro—choice supporters. the taxi app, uber, is giving its customers the option to avoid small—talk during theirjourney by selecting a "quiet preferred" option when they book. it‘s currently only available to users of the uber black service, which costs extra, but has already prompted lots of discussion on social media about the pros and cons of chatty taxi rides. let us know what you think. i think it depends what mood you are in. yes, and it also depends on the driver.
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perhaps an at them and say enough already. do let us know what you think. australians have begun voting in one of the most closely fought general elections in recent years. final opinion polls put the opposition labour party slightly ahead of the liberal—national coalition, who have held power since 2013. voting is compulsory in australia — and a record 16 and a half million voters will take part. our correspondent hywell griffith joins us now from sydney. good to see you. we can see the placards they‘re behind you, people trying to influence the dates. what is the feeling there today? australians follow the maxim that al capone gave, that early, vote often. every three years they come and do this, so there are traditions that people go through. the democracy sausage, people go through. the democracy sausage, cake stalls, charity stalls, and that creates something ofan ama stalls, and that creates something
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of an am a stay, but it is their civic duty. they tend to get the result relatively quickly. there is only an hour left for people to vote here in australia. there was another three hours in western australia. within five or six hours, we may know the actual outcome, and whether oi’ know the actual outcome, and whether or not australia is going to change its prime minister yet again. indeed, thank you. australia are also among the contestants in tonight ‘s eurovision song contest. the show is taking place tel aviv in israel this year, at a time of renewed political tension on the border with gaza. there is suspicion that politics could get involved with the music. although they have been in warned not to let that happen. acts from 26 countries, including the uk, will take to the stage in front of a global tv audience of around 200 million.
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0ur arts correspondent david sillito reports. welcome to the eurovision song contest 2019. israel, and the week—long eurovision party is now in full swing. live from tel aviv, israel. but remember, all this is happening against a background of considerable political tension on the border with gaza, which raises issues of security. will there be protests and also, will people turn up? as you can see, the crowds are here, but even among some of the entrants, there are questions. # svallid var homlulaust...# this is iceland‘s hatari, and they have qualms about israel, but have been told "no politics", on or off stage. we've been warned. we've been told we reached the limit of the ebu's tolerance regarding politics. but at the same time, we're told
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they can't change our views. eurovision bosses were today making their position more than clear. if a competitor staged a protest, what would you do? well, we would intervene immediately. we have very strict rules and policies. you‘d shut the performance down? yeah, for sure we‘d be shutting it down, and they would be punished afterwards. meanwhile, the first brief glimpse of madonna. after a week of doubts, one eurovision insider is now confident that she will perform. i have heard madonna's voice in that arena, and it wasn't a cd. you‘re confident, saturday night? i'm quietly confident. i'd put a shekel or two on it. i tell you what, if that voting is important, everyone is going to be
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watching. that neatly takes us onto brexit. can you take the politics out of brexit? 0f can you take the politics out of brexit? of course you can‘t. what is happening in the conservative party, what do they do next after these cross— party what do they do next after these cross—party talks with labour break this week? we can speak now to the conservative mp, nigel evans. thank you very much forjoining us. what do you make of how the papers are reporting? looking good for borisjohnson, not are reporting? looking good for boris johnson, not so are reporting? looking good for borisjohnson, not so good for eve ryo ne borisjohnson, not so good for everyone else, and depressing reading for theresa may and jeremy corbyn. when you back borisjohnson? i‘m going to be one of the six officers of the 22 he will be conducting the election campaign. officers of the 22 he will be conducting the election campaignm this is the backbenchers club of the conservative party. can you give us an honest sense of what it is like to be in that club at the moment? yes, it is historic in many ways
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because we are listening to the views of backbenchers and taking that to the prime minister, which is what we did this week. my suggestion was that the prime minister recognises that the leadership campaign has already begun. it is not just boris campaign has already begun. it is notjust boris and dominic and esther mcveigh outside of the cabinet, we have got cabinet ministers making speeches way outside their portfolio. jeremy hunt on defence. we have now got matt hancock parading around. isn't that because she was under a lot of pressure from the 1922 committee from backbenchers to give clarity about when she would go? that's right. my view was that the unofficial leadership campaign, which has already started, let‘s just make it official. it is going to ta ke just make it official. it is going to take 6—8 weeks for the party to choose a successor to theresa may. we have got to do our own bit within
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parliament. i counted about 12 mps that want to be leader of the party. we will whittle that down to two, so that will take a couple of weeks. and then to go to the membership of the party, and that means hustings around the country stop that will ta ke around the country stop that will take a while. and then the voting, waiting for that to come in. so why not start the process now? so make it official, is that code for the pie minister should say now, —— prime minister, say now i will be off. i am sorry, i didn't knowl prime minister, say now i will be off. i am sorry, i didn't know i was being so opaque. yes. i have had meeting with boris, dominic, chats with esther mcveigh, you are talking toa with esther mcveigh, you are talking to a lot of people. and they are already canvassing? of course. the leadership battle is in full throttle. is there any point in her
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bringing this deal back to parliament? you can watch the movie titanic ten times and i‘m afraid the ship still sense. —— sinks. even people who have voted each time say enough is enough. tom watson the deputy leader says the labour party is now a party of remain and reform. you can‘t have negotiations with a party that clearly has changed its view. so, the... let‘sjust move on. i think it is over. so you are saying you have got a labour party, a party of opposition which is not changing its position, and it feels as if the knives have been out within the party for theresa may for quite some time. with all the people you mentioned saying they are prepared to put themselves up for leadership and think they can do a
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betterjob. the eu has made it clear, there was no extension to the deadline beyond 0ctober clear, there was no extension to the deadline beyond october the 31st. the opposition is not compromising 01’ the opposition is not compromising or going your way. who can do any better? well, the eu have changed their date as often as we have changed our dates, and they went to 0ctober changed our dates, and they went to october 31. but it changes the dynamics. theresa may was round as leader of the tory party because andrea leadsom pulled out. that is a barbed comment. they will be endorsed by the party. the dynamics change because you have got a new commission coming into the eu as well. the only thing that has passed parliament is the compromise whereby we say we will leave the eu on a certain date, and then we go into the implementation period, which is like being in the customs union, but during that period we talk about the future trading relationship between ourselves and the eu. so let‘s just
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get on and do that. but that's what so get on and do that. but that's what so many people in the country are saying, just sort it out. doesn‘t changing the leader, beginning a leadership contest, maybe then having an election so that new leader can test themselves in front of the country, it does not sort it out, it just prolongs of the country, it does not sort it out, itjust prolongs it. no. well, it has because we have delayed our departure date. brexit has had more dates than a turkish food stall, and it has. but when i talk to the pie minister earlier this week and i said about the withdrawal agreement bill, she said we want to get this to say that the next leader hasn‘t got that problem to deal with. yet if we go down the route and it was discussed this morning, perhaps putting a withdrawal agreement bill through, and then there is a customs union in there and a single then quite frankly we are handing a toxic pattern to the next leader of the conservative party. it is not the brexit we said we would deliver. we said no to the customs union, noted
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the single market. and who is the biggest beneficiary? i said to the prime minister six months ago, whatever you do, do not breathe new life into nigel farage. she said she was more worried about the lib dems, and she has managed to breathe life into both of them, and that is a rare skill! now, we are on nine points going into the eu elections, and even in the north—west we have been told that we won‘t get a single mep, and the labour party are below the lib dems. if your party had backed her deal, it could all be over. you sound like theresa may! i‘m just putting the other side to you. if we had got the deal through, the dup said they would then withdraw support from the government. without the dup, we can‘t govern. they don‘t want to be trapped into a backstop for eternity, and that was the problem with the deal. we have spoken to many politicians as all these votes have been going through, and
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separating parts of the bell to get them through, and the speaker has put certain parts, no one agrees on anything. there is no 100% agreement. i genuinely don‘t know how all those mps in parliament are going to come together and on what issue. i genuinely don‘t know how one new leader is going to make that difference. you are spot on on analysing the fact that we have had lots of debate on customs union, referendums and all of that, but we did support graham brady ‘s amendment, which would have brought forward the compromise. you are right. but isn‘t it bizarre, your viewers are thinking hold on, didn‘t we have an election two years ago, and didn‘t the labour party and the conservatives they stand on a ma nifesto conservatives they stand on a manifesto of delivering brexit? 80% of the people voted for us, and we haven‘t done it. they have been speaking for six weeks and yet they couldn‘t do it. why? because tom watson once remain and reform, keir
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starmer once a confirmatory referendum, and jeremy corbyn wants to stay in the customs union and single market. and other mps and cabinet ministers cannot agree on what kind of brexit they want. the problem was when theresa may pivoted away from her lancaster house and red lines on controlling our own borders, and out of the single market, customs union, and they she suddenly went into this backstop and the checkers deal. she lost boris johnson, david davis and a string of other ministers. that was the problem. we have got a very small number of conservative mps who are not supporting it, like philip lee because he basically wants to stay in the eu. but you have got the full whack of the labour party against this. i could talk to you for ages, but we can‘t. can the uk when the eurovision song contest? it'll probably be a stalemate! nigel evans, thank you.
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here‘s ben with a look at this morning‘s weather. good morning. 0nce good morning. once you have seen this forecast, you will probably agree with me, i hope, that it is pretty mixed. yes, there are some showers in the forecast, some sunshine as well. some signs of things brightening up a little bit in gosport in hampshire for one of oui’ in gosport in hampshire for one of our weather watchers. warm in some sunshine this weekend, but it will be wet because some showers will be pretty heavy. the weather is dominated by low pressure across the continent. spending areas of cloud in our direction. 0ne continent. spending areas of cloud in our direction. one area of cloud in scotland has brought a lot of rain through the night. some quite heavy rain here, some of it now pushing into northern ireland. some bits of rain elsewhere, and certainly a lot of cloud. still some mist and merck around. england and wales will see the best of the sunshine, albeit with a scattering
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of heavy downpours. for northern ireland and scotland, the rain turning light and patchy, and a noticeable easterly breeze. 11 degrees in aberdeen. in northern ireland, cloud and patchy rain, the odd glimmer of brightness. some sunshine on the map for england and wales, showers hit and miss and also slow—moving. some thunder may be mixed in. iwould not slow—moving. some thunder may be mixed in. i would not want to rule out a shower at wembley, there could be one or two downpours. equally some sunshine, with highs of 18 celsius. this evening and tonight, many of the showers will fade away. we keep some across northern and western scotland, parts of northern ireland as well, and we will see some fog patches, especially across parts of yorkshire and down into east anglia, and what will be not a particularly cold night. low
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pressure in charge into tomorrow. the low centred across parts of europe. not many isobars on the chart, so the winds is wilful light. we start the day were some cloud, mixed and matched, some patchy fog. then spells of sunshine, a brighter day than today across scotland. northern ireland hanging on to cloud. if and where we see the sunshine, again there will be some showers, some thundery and slow—moving. the sunshine will feel warm. 16—20dc, and a similar day to come on monday. showers will be most plentiful in eastern and northern parts of the uk. again, temperatures not doing too badly. i have to say, it really is pretty mixed. then, thank you. i am going to give you 10p every time you say "next". —— mixed.
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all this week we have been talking to women about the challenges they face during the menopause, and your response has been incredible. later this morning we will talk to a gp and answering some of the questions most frequently asked. for thousands of women with down‘s syndrome, the problem can be getting the help they need as health professionals often overlook their symptoms. it is amazing what edges have been brought up this week. the down‘s syndrome association warns that emotional symptoms are sometimes written off as challenging behaviour caused by a learning disability. jayne mccubbin has been to find out more. right, ladies. what do you all know about menopause? it's the change. the change. it's something what men don't have to go through. there‘s a reason it‘s been women given to women, because we can cope. sorry, man in the room. this is the award—winning cafe leap in leeds. it‘s run for and by people with learning disabilities. but this session is to help women
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prepare and go through the change. feeling sad and tearful, depressed, forgetting things. you can get angry. i get quite tearful. you can get quite tearful sometimes. you‘ve got lots of support here. we‘re all sisters. should we do a group hug? it‘s something, susan, every woman sat on this table, is going to go through. my name is susan hanley and i'm 54 years old and i am going through the menopause. susan is the chair of cafe leap and has had a tough time coping with some of the worst of the symptoms. what do you fancy? but this is where she comes for advice and support and essential cake. a woman needs her cake. becky told me you were a bit scared at first. i was a bit scared.
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i wasn't sure what i was going through. you weren‘t sure what was happening. i could get really low but i try to pick up myself. that's all you can do, really. the down‘s syndrome society tell us too many women like susan get late diagnosis and delayed support because symptoms are too often missed by gps. women with down‘s syndrome, they tend to go through the menopause earlier than the majority so the majority tend to say, 50—plus whereas with down‘s syndrome, it can be in your early 405. and there is another reason symptoms can be missed as well. it‘s called diagnostic overshadowing. often that is when someone is classed as having challenging behaviour, for example, or they‘re having an emotional outburst. so gps or medical professionals will miss an underlying medical problem because theyjust haven‘t taken the time to see beyond the learning disability? yeah.
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for some reason, it never seems to get picked up as menopause. please, doctors, nurses, whatever, please help us. don't talkjargon. just keep going. getting over it, getting it all out of your system, you will feel great in yourself. one—third of women will fly through the menopause, one—third will manage the symptoms, but another third will find it hard and women with learning difficulties might need that bit extra help to make sense of what is happening. jayne mccubbin, bbc news. it has been quite a week. all kinds of stories. doctor reyes me is here in15 of stories. doctor reyes me is here in 15 minutes. if you have had any questions over the last few days or this has raised issues, maybe those questions will be put to her
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shortly. you‘re watching breakfast from bbc news. time now for a look at the papers. margaret doyle, a financial analyst with deloitte is here to tell us what‘s caught her eye. let‘s dive straight in. a story here in the times about features. this is going to worry all the parents out there who are giving their kids vintages, thinking that they are doing the right thing or doing the healthy thing. so parents are currently scanning the breakfast table. what do they need to think about? actually, naturalfruit juices are worse, according to this study, for health impacts. than fizzy drinks. we all know that sugary fizzy drinks are not good for us 01’ our sugary fizzy drinks are not good for us or our kids, but this is saying that actually, fruitjuices, which many of us thought have got vitamins
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and so on, they are not better because they have sugar in them, and the sugar has the same impact as if it were in a fizzy drink. fructose. i think we all thought because it is fruit, because it has other things in it like vitamins, it will be better for you, but the thing is that the sugar is the baddie here, and it is associated with increased mortality. in other words, you are more likely to die sooner because of having high sugar levels. apparently, smoothies are even worse for high sugar content. a lot of pa rents for high sugar content. a lot of parents think that smoothies are a palatable, easy way of giving their kids vitamins. exactly, fibre and everything. the lesson is, fruit is good, but eat the natural fruit, don‘t consume fruit drinks. the other thing is a lot of fruit in the
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drink meansa other thing is a lot of fruit in the drink means a lot of sugar. compared to eating an apple a day. do you ever feel that pressure when you are reciting about whether or not you have put the right stuff in the right bins? i‘m finding it more and more confusing. different local authorities will sometimes have different rules. and it evolves over time, you know, is it coated with wax, or not? this is a story about how green bends have been seized from recycling "offenders". this is a northern counsel, kirklees in west yorkshire, who had taken green bends away from people who have repeatedly failed to recycle properly. it sounds counterintuitive. apparently, they did warn people twice before taking away the green bins. they said a third of the green bins they removed were people who just use it
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as an extra bed, didn‘t make any extra effort at all. we know that we need to take care of the environment, and we do need to look at the naples and see if they can be recycled. it is so complicated. the different types of plastic... yes, but i think we all know that nappies cannot be recycled. one minute left. let‘s talk about the pre—nups. what is happening is the rate of divorce and the rate of amongst the over 65 is on the rise. wonderful news that people are finding love later in life, but if you are getting married later in life you might have children and grandchildren of your own because that complicates things. the basic rules on divorce start
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with a 50—50 split, but if you have got children or grandchildren, you may think that you don‘t want the husband i met in my 60s to get everything when i die, and maybe i wa nt to everything when i die, and maybe i want to leave things to my children 01’ want to leave things to my children or grandchildren. this is all about whether you should sign a prenup, or even a post—nuptial agreement. they don‘t have a statutory standing, but there has been a famous legal case from 2010 which gives them some sort of weight. before that they had no weight in uk law. the courts took the view that marriage is marriage. you do need to get independent legal advice and that has to be not on the eve of the wedding, signed under duress, you have to do it properly. it is one of those changes that an ageing society creates. margaret, thank you for now. headlines are
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coming up, we will see you soon. hello, this is breakfast withjon and naga munchetty. a summary of this morning‘s main news: theresa may and jeremy corbyn are blaming divisions in each other‘s parties for the breakdown of talks aimed at ending the deadlock over brexit. mr corbyn said they collapsed because of "weakness and instability" within
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the government, whilst the prime minister blamed splits in the labour party over another referendum. earlier on breakfast, the conservative mp nigel evans likened the prime minister‘s plans to bring back her deal to a sinking ship. well, it‘s a bit like it has failed three times and you can watch the movie titanic 100 times but i‘m afraid the sick ship sinks every time, so if you are going to bring back to steal, and it still has the backstop on it, then the dup aren‘t going to support it and i am increasing number of conservative mps, even those who voted for it the second and third time, are saying enough is enough. second and third time, are saying enough is enough. the duke of cambridge has described feeling "pain like no other pain" following the death of his mother, princess diana, when he was 15. prince william made the comments in a bbc documentary in which he discussed mental health issues and pressures with former and present footballers. i...i‘ve thought about this a lot and i‘ve tried to understand why i feel like i do, but i think when you are bereaved
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at a very young age, any time really, but particularly at a young age — i can resonate closely to that — you feel pain like no other pain and you know that in your life it‘s going to be very difficult to come across something that‘s going to be even worse pain than that, but it also brings you so close to all those other people out there. australians have begun voting in one of the most closely fought general elections in recent years. final opinion polls put the opposition labour party slightly ahead of the liberal—national coalition, who have held power since 2013. voting is compulsory in australia and a record 16.5 million voters will take part. the united states and canada have agreed to drop aluminium and steel tariffs that were imposed a year ago. it follows lengthy negotiations and a telephone call on friday between president trump and the canadian prime minister, justin trudeau. it could pave the way for a new north american trade agreement. the governor of the us state of missouri, mike parson, says he will sign a bill which limits women‘s
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access to abortion. it would prevent almost all terminations after eight weeks of pregnancy. it comes just days after alabama introduced a near—total ban on abortion, prompting country—wide protests from pro—choice supporters. the final preparations are underway for tonight‘s eurovision song contest final in tel aviv. acts from 26 countries, including the uk, will take to the stage in front of a global tv audience of around 200 million. all contestants have been warned to keep the competition politics free, at a time of renewed political tension on the border with gaza. the taxi app uber is giving its customers the option to avoid small talk during theirjourney by selecting a ‘quiet preferred‘ option when they book. it‘s currently only available to users of the ‘uber black service‘, which costs extra, but has already prompted lots of discussion on social media about the pros and cons of chatty taxi rides.
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some interesting insights, actually. one woman says, is a deaf woman, i really appreciate this. i said in the back and have never been able to understand the uber drivers. nick says, what happens if i get a quiet mode over and then the driver starts talking, can i get a full refund? nick is ahead of the game, looking for a free ride! somebody says that the driver should also have the option to stop the passengers talking. pixie says the quiet moods should make things less awkward because they don‘t feel they have to entertain you. but this person says
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quiet mode more awkward than just saying to the driver that you feel like a quietjourney. the piece we did this week about the iraqi refugee, that came from our cameraman talking to a taxi driver. it's cameraman talking to a taxi driver. it‘s good to talk! mike bushell is very lucky this morning, he is at wembley ahead of the fa cup final. i‘m glad to see you are taking note of the notices, please keep off the grass. i dare you, mike! new! idare you, mike! new! it
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i dare you, mike! new! it also says, players and match officials beyond this point only. this is where players enter and legends leave, it says, how about that for a motivational sign! the watford manager will be talking to his players, if you can hear themselves think, from here. pep guardiola here. i at pitch side. in the royal box, let me say hello to dan, who has the cup. looking good in that suit, as well. 108 steps. in a moment we will hear from john watson looking ahead to this incredible game. it‘s fa cup final day and manchester city are one game away from an unprecented treble. they‘ve already won the league cup and the premier league, and nowjust watford stand in their way of becoming the first men‘s team to win the domestic treble. john watson reports. serial winners, record—breakers — another slice of history
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could be city‘s today. with the premier league and league cup in the can, common sense suggests more‘s to come. the win is so addictive, so when you prove it and you taste it, you say, "i want more". it‘s something like, you know, you win, you go to take a shower, "i want to win the next one". but football rarely follows logic, as this competition so often proves. on the brink of a semi—final exit, from 2—0 down, watford bounced back to force extra time and knock out wolves. and 35 years after their last cup final appearance, some faces may have changed, they‘ll hope the result does too. they suffered defeat to everton back in 1984. oh, and sherwood didn‘t collect and the goal is given! they‘ll play the part of underdog in 2019. 35 years since the last time watford was in a final. we‘ve never won a cup, so it‘s a massive achievement, a, to get there, but, b, you‘re on the cusp of doing something unbelievable.
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city have won the game‘s oldest cup competition five times. this season, they‘ve been and their unstoppable best. but as the last few weeks have proved, in football, anything is possible. 105, 106, 105,106,107, 105, 106, 107, 108th! 105,106,107,108th! made it! let‘s run you through some of the morning‘s other sports stories. england have wrapped up the one—day series against pakistan with a game to spare. they were set 341 to win at trent bridge and looked to be heading to that total pretty easily as jason roy hit a quickfire century. they then had a slight wobble, losing four wickerts
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forjust 15 runs. but ben stokes steadied the ship with an unbeaten 71 to see england over the line and reiterate just why they‘re favourites to win this summer‘s world cup. brookes koepka got the lowest score after two rounds in major history at the us pga championships in new york. he‘s now seven shots ahead of the field. tiger woods, though, is out — he missed the cut. charlton athletic are through to the final of the league one play—offs. they beat doncaster rovers on penalties — tommy rowe the unfortunate man to miss. charlton will play sunderland for a place in the championship at wembley a week tomorrow. bianca walkden won a third world taekwondo title in controversial circumstances in manchester. she beat the olympic champion, shuyin zheng, from china in the final, but was booed after forcing her opponent into a series of penalties when well down on the scorecards. bradley sinden has become the first british man to win a world title.
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i‘m standing on a special box, the first time i‘ve ever been on a par with you! let‘s talk about a very special football focus. the fa cup final kicks off with five o‘clock here. it‘s going to be a really interesting game today. watford are in theirfirst finalfor interesting game today. watford are in their first final for 35 years and they are delirious to be here. the semifinal win over wolves was a great day in their footballing history. you have players like troy deeney who have never won a trophy asa deeney who have never won a trophy as a professional, so a massive day for him. lots of people think manchester city will walk this today, but i think watford have a
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good chance. they have a good record against big sides and they have played really well throughout the whole season. who knows what will happen today. on the programme we have lots to fit into day. jam—packed with guests. we will also hear from jam—packed with guests. we will also hearfrom andre gray, and pep guardiola. here is a little bit of both of them. the win is so addictive, so when you prove it and you taste it, you say, "i want more". it‘s something like, you know, you win, you go to take a shower, "i want to win the next one". of course i want to win it. it is city in the final, they have just w011 city in the final, they have just won the premier league, they are on for a treble, how do you beat them? that's the question everyone is
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trying to answer this season and they have struggled to find a solution. it isjust belief and desire to not give up. we will keep fighting. if you look back at this season, they have got closer to manchester city than they have in previous seasons. i found a dragonfly down there earlier in watford colours, so that could be an omen. the fa cup has thrown up so many upsets, so many magical moments over the years. watford fans are dreaming of something really special. a trophy for watford at the end of the season would be fantastic. manchester city, you have pep guardiola sent this week that every single player almost goes back to the drawing board for next season
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because he wants to make sure they are even stronger next season. they are even stronger next season. they are desperate to finish with the three domestic trophies. it is a bit of history for them, as well. also today we have live music from lewis capaldi, it is like a house band! we have a piece on lucy bronze, he is taking part in the champions league finalfor lyon this taking part in the champions league final for lyon this weekend. if manchester city win today, it will be the first time in the history of the fa cup that this decade will have finished with ten different runners up. the duke of cambridge will be handing out the trophy.
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runners up. the duke of cambridge will be handing out the trophym is mental health awareness week. we got together a cambridge united a few weeks ago. the duke of cambridge is talking about a few of the issues he has been through, dealing with bereavement and working for the air ambulance. we have gareth southgate, danny rose, t airey henri, jermaine jenas, peter crouch, and they are all talking about struggles they have had in the past with various mental health and mental fitness issues. it is 10:30pm tomorrow night on bbc one. the whole thing is just about getting men talking about mental health issues. it is about encouraging that to take place. i think that this is the bear, by the way. the live coverage starts at 3:55pm on bbc one. a shortjourney to wembley for the watford fans, around ten miles, so they‘ll be
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setting off later. much further though for the city fans — around 200 miles to travel, so an early start for them. our very own kyle walker — no, not manchester city‘s right—back — is at the etihad stadium. hello, mike. it is not that kyle walker, no! iam hello, mike. it is not that kyle walker, no! i am at the etihad stadium. all the manchester city fa ns stadium. all the manchester city fans are making their way over to wembley. what is special about this journey is on the coaches they have been provided by each of the manchester city players. they are putting on 26 coaches for all of our excited manchester city fans. i have managed to find some of the fans. taylor, how does it feel that some of your favourite players had taylor, how does it feel that some of yourfavourite players had put taylor, how does it feel that some of your favourite players had put on these coaches for you? of your favourite players had put on these coaches for you ?|j of your favourite players had put on these coaches for you? i think it's amazing. i think it shows how much
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they care about the fans and hopefully they will get the win today. i definitely think they will. your favourite player is david silva. what does it feel like that he has put on this coach for you?m feels amazing i am glad he is giving something back to the fans. he definitely is. it is all about giving back. you guys need to get on these coaches! make your way down to wembley, enjoy. back to you, mike. a safe journey to all the manchester city fans there. sir eltonjohn will be here to cheer on watford. his songs will be leaving out the watford team. we are speculating about how he may adapt to songs to reflect the results. if they lose
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heat to tip as have the manchester city and sang i guess that‘s where the colour the sky blues. it could be goodbye yellow and black route. as long as it‘s not saturday night is all right for fighting, that‘s all right. we will go to the other side of the stadium to talk to guy mowbray, the commentator. damn! i‘ve been told to look after that! i‘ve been told to look after that! dan was talking about mental health in football being a bit of it to be. —— a taboo.
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this week on breakfast we invited you to ‘wake up to the menopause‘ and we haven‘t been disappointed. thousands of you have been in touch to join in the conversation and our menopause week was even mentioned in parliament. in a moment, dr rosemary leonard will be here to answer some of your most asked questions on the subject, but first, here are some of the inspirational women we‘ve met over the last few days. i‘m never going to be able to have children. it... it shocks you so hard. it‘s unbelievable. i don't feel all the time like myself. i am going to ring my gp. this cannot go on any longer. it‘s something, susan, every woman sat on this table is going to go through, sweetheart. i‘m going to use the change to just make the most of my life. be more positive. to feel good about myself. women are considered terribly old if they reach menopause. 45 and 50 is not that old.
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and it does end — apparently! i'm not weak, i had a tough time, i took some time out to rebalance and, do you know what? it's the best thing i've ever done. we‘re joined now by gp dr rosemary leonard. have you been surprised by the level of debate and interest this has provoked? i get a lot of interest in my surgery, but what is good is that it has brought down to the open. women realise it it‘s ok to talk about menopause, and men have also had to realise that it is something that every woman have to go through. it is also attitude, as well. some
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women think that almost the purpose of me is finished, but it is not the end, at all. no, no. woman's life expectancy is well into the 80s now, there is a long life after the menopause. it does not mean you are an old woman, at all. so many people have been in touch this week. let‘s go through their questions. jackie sent us an e—mail. she said, please help me understand, i tick every box of menopause symptoms, i am 60, hrt wouldn‘t be appropriate in the circumstances. the menopause is defined as your last period, but you can get symptoms well after that. the blood test we do shows your ovarian function, so once your periods have finished, then your blood test will show you our
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post—menopausal is. blood test will show you our post-menopausal is. what is not being addressed is how long the process ca n being addressed is how long the process can last. this viewer says to her is started at 48 and is still going on. some women have no symptoms, others have flushes and sweats that go on for years and yea rs sweats that go on for years and years and years. a lot of older women say that their temperature tolerance changes. even though the flushes and sweats cool, if the two exercise, it is as though your thermostat completely alters at the menopause. at 64, i wouldn‘t say it was a definite no to starting a charity, but i would look at other things first. hrt has been a co nsta nt things first. hrt has been a constant theme and lots of people have been asking if it is suitable,
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is it safe? what can somebody like rachel do? rachel has had breast cancer. there are thousands of women like her. a lot of breast cancer is hormonal dependence, so you try to reduce hormone levels as much as possible. hrt boosts up hormone levels so we generally don‘t give it to woman who have that kind of breast cancer. the plan based oestrogens that we often say to women as an alternative, the thing about those is there a natural plant oestrogens. there is no
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research that has been done on plant oestrogens and breast cancer, but theoretically if they boost up oestrogen levels they could theoretically increase the risk. it is in red clover seeds, flax seeds, beans, pulses, so we are. we would say don‘t go overboard on those because, and it is only theoretical... research was done on women who had breast cancer, they went on antidepressants because they had low mood and it was find that they actually helped hot flushes and sweats. there is this misconception that antidepressants are addictive. they don‘t give you any form of hit. they don‘t give you any form of hit. the effect of antidepressants is very su btle the effect of antidepressants is very subtle and it does seem to have some effect on this temperature regulation centre in the brain, as well as on your mood. in terms of
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coming off them, and i know people have concerns about coming off antidepressants, it is no more difficult to come off and antidepressant as it is to come off hrt. with both of them you need to do it gradually. one of the things this week, louise, carol, sally and i sat down and had a chat. louise has been very open about her experience with the menopause. she began three years ago and she said i was just began three years ago and she said i wasjust spoken to began three years ago and she said i was just spoken to you guys earlier about this because we would have understood a lot of what we she was going through. the workplace, can be difficult to bring it up there. somebody on twitter said, one of the biggest things would be if employers we re biggest things would be if employers were aware and considerate with decent air conditioning, fans, windows that open. frequent toilet breaks, as well. you can turn the air conditioning time for everybody, but you could for menopausal women,
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give them a fan. in terms of the workplace, women themselves should wear layers and natural fibres. workplace, women themselves should wear layers and naturalfibres. the menopause is the time of your life when lycra is not a woman‘s best read by any means. just wear clothing that allows your skin to breathe. yes, have a fan. if your employer will give you a fan get a fan yourself. ask for the desk by the window where you can open and shut it as you require. we had a guest the other day, she was blind, she was talking about the challenges of being blind in the workplace. she said it was far more challenging to have the menopause in the workplace than to be blind, it was harderfor her employers to bear that in mind. a lot of men have had their eyes
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opened, as well. it is always good to talk to you. thank you so much. thank you so much. here‘s ben with a look at this morning‘s weather. a pretty mixed affair this weekend. a pretty mixed affair this weekend. a cloudy start for many of us. through the weekend, we will see a mixture of heavy showers but also some spells of sunshine. this is how things look at there at the moment. you don‘t need me to tell you there isa you don‘t need me to tell you there is a lot of cloud out there! some mist and fog as well. we have had some heavy bursts of rain across parts of scotland. the rain here will ease through the day but it will ease through the day but it will stay cloudy. a similar story for northern ireland. for england and wales will brighten up, we will see sunshine but also some heavy showers. so, for this afternoon, cloudy and damp in many parts of
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scotland. a noticeable easterly breeze. for northern ireland, cloudy, some bright glimpses, but also some rain. england on wheels, the showers will be hit and miss. there will be some heavy downpours. there will be some heavy downpours. there could be a shower close to wembley for the fa cup final, also some spells of sunshine. the temperature dropped to 17 or 18 degrees. the showers will fade through this evening and overnight. some will continue in the north—west of the uk. it will turn misty and murky in places with dense fog patches for parts of and lincolnshire. into tomorrow, low pressure is still in charge across the near continent. not many isobars on the charge, meaning it will not be very windy tomorrow. once again it is sunshine and showers today. if the showers do crop up world you are
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they will be slow—moving so they could be with you for some length of time. other places will stay dry. a brighter day across scotland, northern ireland is then quite loudly. for monday, again, a mixture of sunny spells and showers, the showers most frequent in northern and eastern parts of the uk. in the sunshine, it will feel warm, with highs 20 degrees. stay with us, headlines coming up.
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good morning, welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and jon kay. our headlines today: the brexit blame game — after cross—party talks collapse — party leaders accuse each other for the failure. the duke of cambridge urges more of us to open up about grief. up when you are bereaved at a very young age, any time really, but particularly at a young age, you feel pain like no other pain. australians are at the polls voting in one of the most tightly—fought elections in years. good morning from wembley on fa cup final day as manchester city try to become the first english men‘s team to the domestic treble, while watford hope there will be a sting in the tail from the underdog like there was in 2013.

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