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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  May 20, 2019 2:00pm-5:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. our latest headlines: google blocks huawei from using some of its mobile services, in a major blow to the chinese telecoms firm. the inquest into the london bridge hello, you're watching attacks has been hearing how spanish afternoon live. i'm simon mccoy. banker ignacio echeverria died trying to fight off the attackers by hitting them today at 2. we are in middlesbrough as the bbc focuses on this town's with just his skateboard. past, present and future — the council's chief executive president trump has warned iran will describe ambitious plans it will be "destroyed" for middlesbrough‘s future. the main news headlines: google blocks some of its services from wah—way, the world's second biggest maker of smartphones, after the us the leader of the brexit party has government blacklisted been doused with a milkshake while the chinese company. the man who died trying to fight off the london bridge attackers with his skateboard. and the duchess of cambridge puts donald trump warns iran it will be finishing touches to the garden she destroyed if it picks has designed for this year's chelsea a fight with the united states. flower show, accompanied by her children. coming up on afternoon live sport now on afternoon all the sport with azi. live with azi farni. brooks koepka has won
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brooks koepka survived a huge scare the usapga championship, to win the us pga championship for the second year in a row. he had led by seven shots yes, but he didn't make it easy for going into the final round at bethpage black in new york, himself. he had a seven shot lead before his fellow—american dustin johnson closed going into the final round, a record to within a single shot. but koepka hung on to win after 5a holes, and pretty much had his fourth major title it in the bag on saturday night. but in his last eight starts. he had an almost disastrous final round that saw his lead cut to just one shot at one point. koepka said and of course we have the weather. a he could hear the fans turning against him and supporting his changeable day, some sunshine and nearest rival dustinjohnson, and that spurred him to recompose, which some heavy showers as well. thunder she did, going on to win by two possible, that the show was a surge shots. he is the first person to ease, a dry and reasonably warm day successfully defend the us pga championship in the us open, and it makes it four major titles out of ahead. eight. phenomenal. i think that's a good word. i mean, it's been a helluva also coming up, playing in miami's run. i garden, gorge, charlotte and louis word. i mean, it's been a helluva run. lam word. i mean, it's been a helluva run. i am trying not to let it stop, enjoy the garden designed by the it has been fun. it's super duchess of cambridge. enjoyable, and just trying to ride that momentum. victoria is a rancour has spoken to the bbc about her return to tennis
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after the birth of her son as part of our change the game season. along with other players, she has successfully campaigned for the introduction of more ranking protection for new mothers on the hello, and welcome to afternoon live from middlesbrough. all this week, the bbc‘s tour, and told us that her surprise "we are middlesbrough" series is focusing on stories, pregnancy in 2016 made herfear her finding out what matters to people here and bringing those issues career was over. to a wider audience. in my mind, my first thought was, oh the stories will be reported across bbc television and radio — my god, my career is over, i will and on digital. this afternoon amongst the many local issues we'll be investigating, never play tennis again, and i don't we'll be finding out more about attitudes here to leaving know what to do. it was panic. the eu with our chief political correspondent vicki young. join me shortly for more. but then, it was all about, i know but first... i'm going to come back, and i know when i'm going to come back, because google is blocking some of its services from the chinese i thought that is a blessing for me, technology giant huawei. it comes after the white house you know? it's a blessing, but i blacklisted the chinese firm still want to have my own dreams and because of fears wah—way could be used to spy on american my own career. data networks. huawei is the world's second biggest manufacturer of smartphones, fullback israel folau has decided but insists it is not not to appeal against his sacking by a security threat. google‘s decision comes rugby australia for homophobic amid an escalating trade war comments he posted on social media. between the united states and china. he said it did not mean he accepted here's our technology
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the findings of the panel which upheld his dismissal, but was correspondent, rory cellan—jones. it was the brand few had heard considering all potential avenues. he could still take his case to the of and fewer could pronounce, high court in australia. now huawei is number two in global mobile phone sales, billy monger said he was over the with its latest p30 handset moon after losing garwood winning a getting rave reviews. race for the first time since losing google‘s move to stop future huawei both his legs two years ago. he is phones getting access to its apps competing in the euro formula open series and posted this picture on and to updates of its android software could have a major impact, social media after winning the power grand prix. in it, he says, i didn't making shoppers think twice, even if they like what think two years on, i would be the chinese firm offers. winning races. he spoke to bbc sport the cameras are great on huawei a short while ago about how motor phones, they absolutely wipe racing has helped his recovery. the floor with everything else at the moment on the market. but it means they won't get all the google when i wasn't racing, i felt i was services that so many of us missing out on so many of the things rely on for every day. so that is maps, gmail, that i enjoyed doing before, and youtube and all of those things we use so much every day. getting back racing, i think, that i enjoyed doing before, and getting back racing, ithink, gave me the extra motivation in other it was president trump's areas to get back walking in my order stopping day—to—day life and stuff like that. american firms doing business with huawei itjust spurred me on, and i don't over security concerns which forced google to act. look at my disability as a negative but for the mobile phone industry, there could thing. i look at it as a challenge be wider consequences. that i've got to overcome, and there at the moment phone buyers only have a choice
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between two mobile operating are more challenges racing as an amputee than i had when i was racing systems, apple's ios and google‘s android. with both my legs beforehand. it is but if huawei is shut out of android, it could lead a something i enjoy doing, and something i enjoy doing, and something that isjust part of me, i revolution, starting its own rival phone software. guess. and jamie chadwick, one of britain's huawei is working on its own operating system which could leading female racing drivers, has provide users with an alternative joined the williams formula 1 team way of getting what google offers. asa joined the williams formula 1 team as a development driver. she is the it may be that paradoxically it is only woman to win a british formula google that ends up more harmed 3 race and is currently leading the standings and the all—female w because huawei is absolutely huge in developing countries and among young users. series afterfinishing standings and the all—female w series after finishing first and the united states has been pressing second at the opening races. the uk to shut huawei out chadwick will attend three grand of the new 5g mobile phone networks. prix for williams this year, starting with the british grand prix the government is apparently minded injuly. and that is all the sport for now. to avoid a total ban but today thanks, simon. the home secretary said no final thanks, simon. thank you very much. decision had been made. it is something we are as we know, voters in looking very closely at. the uk head to the polls it is being discussed in government, in the european parliament elections this week. there's a number of today, snp leader nicola sturgeon has been visiting aberdeen, telling voters to use thursday's departments involved. elections to show that scotland i share some of the concerns is open for business, of our allies and warning of what she called the "catastrophic" impact and at this point, i think of leaving the single market. it is important to take all of that let's speak to our scotland
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into account to remember, correspondent lorna gordon, these are some who's in aberdeen this afternoon. of the closest intelligence relationships we have in the world. look at the evidence and then come to a final decision. tell us more of what she has been huawei has always denied it poses a security risk, saying, lorna. in aberdeen this but is now at the centre of a trade battle between america and china morning, there was a bit of a sea and phone shoppers haar rolling in from the north sea, are caught in the crossfire. but unlike that, which reduce the visibility, the snp‘s message in this campaign, they would argue, has been entirely clear and entirely joining me now is a representative consistent, and that is that brexit is bad for business here in in the uk. this is a huge blow, scotland, and that they want people isn't it? it's not helpful, the to send a strong message in this announcement was made last week. it has 150 days to be implemented. as vote on thursday. brexit will be disastrous for the an industry we are seeking to understand the full implications of scottish economy, and aberdeen, where i am right now, will be the it. hardest hit parts of scotland if what are the implications, what are brexit goes ahead. i am here at a you doing to overcome them? fish processor, and the fish 0ur you doing to overcome them? processing sector employs about 4500 our primary focus is to support our customers, our existing and future people, but is also heavily reliant
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customers. the announcement made last week, and the support we are on eu nationals in its workforce. so there is a whole variety of reasons getting from google, confirmed that why brexit will be a disaster for existing customers will have their scotland, and that's why we should ta ke scotland, and that's why we should take the opportunity if we can to access to google and google protect and security tools available to stop it happening, so people do have that opportunity to make very clear on thursday that they want to stop them. so we are looking at what it brexit, keep scotland at the heart of europe, and to send that message might mean over the next few weeks ina very of europe, and to send that message in a very united way. and months, but we've had something so, nicola sturgeon, the leader of in place. because this is, the snp, strong words there when she was visiting this fish processor u nfortu nately for in place. because this is, unfortunately for the company because we are a football in the middle of a massive play of ball this morning on the edge of the between the usa and china. we harbour in aberdeen. interestingly, i talked to the owner of the business here, who was very worried operate in 170 countries globally, about what happens going forward. in and huawei want to continue to his opinion, brexit has been a support the android operating shambles. they export a small amount system, which is our preferred of niche product like monkfish to choice, but if that's not possible france and germany, about 100 boxes a week, and they say it is we have a standby, a plan b up and inevitable that if brexit goes running. but it's notjust about ahead, he will see his business contract, so nicola sturgeon's trade, is it, this is about trust. message really aimed at people like
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him, and others who she says, president trump doesn't trust you, the british intelligence system don't trust you, why should perhaps their business would be affected by brexit going ahead. the customers? snp would argue that they are the the timing of this executive order clearest, most consistent anti brexit party in this campaign, and is time to have deliberate, maximum those who want to stay in europe impact on the trade negotiations should vote snp on thursday here in scotla nd should vote snp on thursday here in scotland if they want to send a will stop this is a trade issue. on strong message that scotland wants to stay in the eu. the point of trust, as a chinese lorna gordon in aberdeen, thank you owned company we are owned by our very much. nearly 170,000 people are expected employees, 90,000 of the 180,000 to attend this year's employees, 90,000 of the 180,000 chelsea flower show, employees are the owners of huawei, which opens its doors this week. many of the gardens on display and we operate in 170 countries will focus on the theme of health and well—being. one of the exhibits has been worldwide. every country, every co—designed by the duchess market in which we play, we have to of cambridge, and our royal correspondent, daniela relph, earn and build their trust. we are has been there. struggling with the us right now, checking over mum's handiwork, three but getting great support from other young royals. george, charlotte and louis testing out the garden the countries, european countries duchess helped design, even if louis elsewhere. also, our customers as well. we've sold 200 million seemed a little distracted. earlier smartphones last year. that made us in the year, the children collected twigs, leaves and moss that are now
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number two on the globe. people buy pa rt twigs, leaves and moss that are now oui’ number two on the globe. people buy part of this back to nature garden. our phones because they trust the barefoot and carefree, it's a brand. but you know better than i what the project that fittingly promotes the importance of family. suspicion is, and that is that in the duchess has worked alongside a this country if huawei is buying the tea m the duchess has worked alongside a team of landscape architects for sg this country if huawei is buying the 5g network, you are beholden, one months, heavily involved in every way or another to the chinese stage of the project. government, and if they want access to something then they will get it. the water will flow under that bridge? that's not the case. in this yes. country, we already have very last week, she helped install the garden at chelsea. it is inspired by sophisticated mechanisms in place to many of her own childhood memories, ensure that isn't the case. the uk including jumping over boulders in government security agencies have the lake district. this has been a said that they have not identified very personal project for the duchess of cambridge. she is rarely interviewed, but on this, she wanted any chinese state interference with to speak out. so much we can learn huawei technology. we've been here for eight years, we published a from environments like this. kids report last week, which identified can learn life skills, anything from that we create £1.7 billion a year, learning empathy for watching plants and give it to the uk gdp. and we grow to physical activities and climbing onto trees, or onto are an influence on employment of boulders and hills. it helps balance 26,000 people. we have research and
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development in this country and are and coordination. it is really sort fully committed to this country, and ofan and coordination. it is really sort of an open playground for them. it's we bought £900 million worth of a natural space, a really exciting space for kiddies and adults alike to share and explore, and hopefully technology from uk technology suppliers. there is trust, for sure. we continue to work and earn that that's what this garden does. as ever, chelsea is a mix of the new trust. the rumour is that you've been and the more traditional. this stockpiling chips in readiness for a garden marked 75 years since d—day. we have lots of things within the decision like this, how many chips have you got? garden, sculpture, slate, planting, the unpredictable nature of the us and we have these stone plinths, which is really trying to recreate administration, it's probably on the risk register of every company the experience of 75 years ago, and to keep the memory alive. worldwide who trades with the us. much of the attention here this week and, sure, we have got a buffer will be on the duchess' garden. she showed two groups of local stock so that we can satisfy our schoolchildren around this morning. customers here in the uk, and they seemed impressed. but perhaps elsewhere around the world. how the seal of approval of her own three children matters most, and they liked this piece of many? i wouldn't. .. i'm old—fashioned outdoor they liked this piece of old —fashioned outdoor family elsewhere around the world. how many? iwouldn't... i'm sure elsewhere around the world. how many? i wouldn't... i'm sure you don't expect me to tell you adventure. precisely how many, but it's going to last into months and years, not royal mail has announced plans for the uk's first
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weeks. the executive order really ever parcel postboxes. the company said 1,400 has 150 days to be implemented, and of the new postboxes would be installed across the country in more than 30 locations. we suspect that the trade war customers will be able to post parcels in the same way that they currently post a letter, provided that postage between china and the usa will be has been pre—paid. resolved in that time. we certainly hope that is the case. jeremy all this week, the bbc‘s ‘we are middlesbrough‘ series is focusing on untold stories thomson, thank you very much for from the north eastern town. your time. but for the town focused on increasing its digital industries, funding cuts have made a real impact on young people — that's according to hemlington linx, the cabinet will begin a charity which provides youth discussions tomorrow on what downing street says will be services across middlesbrough. a new brexit deal to put before mps next month. and to help us tell these the prime minister has talked of making a ‘bold' move to try to get her withdrawal agreement through the commons. stories, i'm joined by 0ur political correspondent iain watson is in westminster. iain — what might the plan contain? sara mirasalehi from what is this plan? they will be hemlington linx, who is involved. i mentioned the word cuts, and there stressing that this is a new deal, isa i mentioned the word cuts, and there is a perception middlesbrough has been hit harder than most. how are not to be confused with the old deal you coping? it is very difficult. that has been rejected three times you say it yourself. austerity and before. effectively, what she will funding cuts happen across the country, but it seems they happen before. effectively, what she will be saying is it has some new more in middlesbrough. we have had elements in it, it's designed to
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cuts on our front line policing appeal across the house of commons. the truth of the pudding will be in services, within youth services a few years back, and our youth the eating, certainly the fear that services were affected by the cuts, she is serving up includes going further than before in protecting because they are not statutory workers' rights and the environment services, so the council had to after brexit, to appeal to european decide on what services have more mps. she will try to do as much as priority, and they came with the fa ct priority, and they came with the fact that we don't need to continue she can to avoid the northern irish with our open access youth or other backstop, the arrangements for youth provisions. that is not to say avoiding a in ireland coming into they don't see a value in it, but force. she's not been able to take when you have to prioritise, you that out of a deal entirely, so obviously have to make difficult she'll still face a very challenging decisions. across the board, we have time to convince people in her own had private businesses close, the party and opposition mps, to get coal pits closing down, so yes, it behind it. just to underline the happens across the country, but it fa ct behind it. just to underline the fact that her time in downing street seems that as a town that is already is limited, all sorts of manoeuvring dealing with poverty, we get it a is limited, all sorts of manoeuvring is going on about replacing her. lot more. soa lot more. so a tough environment. how do you tonight the one nation conserved is, help young people who firstly want one nation caucus, will set out its to stay here, and make their lives stall to influence the result of and theirjobs that leadership election. people to stay here, and make their lives and their jobs here? very good question. we work very like amber rudd, damian green and ha rd to have very good question. we work very hard to have a team are out every nicky morgan who voted remain in the
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referendum, and at lunch time a day talking to big corporates trying to secure funding for our group called the blue collar conservatives launched effectively, organisation to run what we do. of course, we are a charity and we rely and of the leading voice in that is on grants and funding. we esther mcveigh who resigned from one thing we have in middlesbrough cabinet over brexit. she is a isa staunch brexiteers, and she said the one thing we have in middlesbrough is a passionate people who care about the community and young party wasn't doing enough to win people, and what is happening in the over working—class voters who backed leaving the referendum. town, so people, and what is happening in the town, so everyone people, and what is happening in the town, so everyone really works as we aren't winning their support, ha rd town, so everyone really works as hard as they can together to make when actually we ought to. i don't sure that we continue with our need to tell anybody the reasons services. why, we know. the majority of these we realise that one organisation voted voted to leave the eu, and on doesn't have the answer and we don't have enough money, which brings this, we have broken their trust. to eve ryo ne have enough money, which brings everyone together to work more closely to make sure that young people in middlesbrough receive the win their trust back, we must only best service. you moved to the uk in notjust deliver 2003, i think? that is correct. and win their trust back, we must only not just deliver what we promise, but we must be prepared to have thatis 2003, i think? that is correct. and that is very much a sense of articles conservative agenda is to middlesbrough, the diverse nature of show that we are on the site. it. of course. and that is a she said that the mix of the positive future for this town. yes, you mentioned i came in 2003. i was conservative party had to be. —— the welcomed in the north—east, next leader of the conservative especially where there is a very party had to be one of the
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friendly bunch of people. i was in a brexiteers. it's a crowded field and she was asked if she was in favour conference not so friendly bunch of people. i was in a conference not so long ago when ofa she was asked if she was in favour people said, why middlesbrough? what of a pact with the brexit party, she is positive about middlesbrough? and said, look, if you deliver brexit you don't need a brexit party. i isaid, is positive about middlesbrough? and i said, actually, is positive about middlesbrough? and isaid, actually, i is positive about middlesbrough? and i said, actually, i chose to live in middlesbrough, so it is the suppose, in its own way, 32—year—old difference between being born and bred here. that was my decision, man has been arrested in newcastle because i saw community spirit here, today, and he was expressing his and people who care about each views about the brexit party in no other, and i think that is a great value to have, and here i am, 16 uncertain terms, because nigel farage, leader of the party had a yea rs value to have, and here i am, 16 years down the line, trying to give milkshake thrown over him, he didn't something back to the communities look desperately pleased about it. that welcomed me. what in ten years' so he was going to a campaign rally, time do you think will be the strengths of this town? we have a local reporter suggested that, already heard about the digital perhaps, he saw this as a failure of enterprise that is under way here, security, but it led to a rather young people getting involved with that sort of industry. given the undignified look to his suit. it history of this town, steeped in used to be the thing to egg steel and oil, and now needing to find something new, is the digital politicians, now it's shaking politicians, now it's shaking politicians, milking politicians, future? for sure, that could be one it's becoming a bit of a thing because tommy robinson, the person aspect of it, but i think it is seen as a because tommy robinson, the person seen as a far right campaigner also important to stay fresh, to look at had a milkshake thrown at him during the course of the european election opportunities. i think what we need
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to do is to look at businesses who campaign as well. and in a tweet can come in here to invest, because nigel farage has commented on this, there are many opportunities, not just in the digital sector, but in and somewhat generalised, he has said, sadly, some remain as have become radicalised to the extent many others. we have beautiful surrounding areas where you could that normal campaigning has become impassable. for a civilised build and have people access what else is around us. i think digital democracy to work you need to losers consent. is one aspect, but i'm sure there are other things that we could look at in order to make sure. he was quick to turn adversity to middlesbrough is prosperous. there his advantage and attack his opponents. what police are saying at isa the moment is that a 32—year—old man middlesbrough is prosperous. there is a buzz here. yes, for sure. it is great to meet you. thank you very has been arrested on suspicion of much for having a word coming on. causing assault, he remains in police custody. ian watson in westminster, thank you very much. all this week the bbc‘s now, business news. but first, the we are middlesbrough sees is focusing on untold stories in the north—east. in 2016 middlesbrough headlines. was named the worst place for a girl to grow up. we will be hearing from the chinese firm huawei has been told by google they will not be
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steph mcgovern later. tony parkinson providing it with its latest is the chief executive of programming. middlesbrough council. it's good to see you. it's all very well for the inquest into the london people to come into middlesbrough, outsiders, and have a view, what bridge attacks has been defines this town? hearing how spanish victim ignacio echeverria tried to fight off the attackers by hitting them middlesbrough carries the reputation with just his skateboard. of being a good place to come on a he later received a victoria cross. bad news day. but that belies the fa cts . bad news day. but that belies the facts. as someone born and bred in the area, its geography is very president trump has taken to twitter to warn iran that it will be natural. there are very few places destroyed if it decides to take on in the world where you can't live the united states. within ten minutes drive of the here's your business coast, and surfing, within ten headlines on afternoon live. minutes drive of international thomas cook has been reassuring customers who have contacted airports, good rail links, natural the firm with concerns about holiday beauty, natural trust parks. the trips, after its share price crashed falling to just 10 pence today. time was born in the 1800s and is the first growing town of its time. it was born when i or was discovered it says its "business as usual", but added that it was looking to in the western hills, and ironworks strengthen its financial position. we re in the western hills, and ironworks were situated in the town. it was ryanair‘s profits fell by nearly a third last year to £880 million born out of immigration and spirit, as fuel costs rose and fares fell.
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and resilience, and ingenuity. and europe's biggest discount airline added that profits could be lower those qualities still exist in the this year as fares continue to fall. town today. the people of more in a moment. middlesbrough, and from the first tata motors, india's biggest industrial revolution, we are now at carmaker and the owner the forefront of the digital of jaguar land rover, has reported a 47% drop revolution. in quarterly profits, in the late 19705, i remember the and a full year pre—tax loss 5teelworks, the oil refineries, this of £3.6 billion. was a thriving place. then it went through a difficult period. the group is struggling to sell is it coming out of it? absolutely. the luxury cars in key markets such as china. we've seen over the last year a however, jlr returned whole host of investments in the town. in the last 18 months we've to profit in the fourth quarter had something like £206 million of following a cost—cutting drive. investment in the town, on the back of that we've created over 1000 jobs. a5 of that we've created over 1000 jobs. as an example, we are now building and advanced manufacturing yes, it has been reported that american intelligence services are plant, we have real high—valuejobs, briefing silicon valley tech we've secured the first two tenants executives about possible dangers of on that site, and created more doing business in china. this is according to a report on the around our fantastic university. financial times. the briefings include warnings about the threat of cyber attacks and the theft of
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how important are transport links to intellectual property. the meetings fix? they are critical if you want people are the latest example of the us to come and live here, to do bu5ine55 government's increasingly combative to come and live here, to do business and invest here. you've got sta nce government's increasingly combative stance towards china. google's to have good road and rail and air action against huawei, banning it link5. you've got an international from some of its services, comes airport which we have announced flights from. we have h s two links, after the trump administration adds huawei to a list of companies that american firms can't tried —— trade rail links, and our structure is went without a licence. second to none with easy access to the 866 and the a19. you are leader of the council. i don't need to tell i want to talk about this with our you about austerity in the affected correspondent. we have had the vice 5ide, how have you tackled that president of welli on here in the year? the council have had to make last half an hour, and he said the fa ct last half an hour, and he said the fact that google was banning well 5aving5 year? the council have had to make savings of someone in the region of away from some of its services was partly to do with this ongoing trade £99 million since 2010. there are war between the and china. do you two options. you cut 5ervices, think there is some truth in that? £99 million since 2010. there are two options. you cut services, or you grow. the councilmy critic has it is difficult to see the us with been to grow income. we put money regards to huawei without into new business. people wanted to considering the trade dispute between the united states and china. come and live here, and that creates
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new income streams and reduces the remember that the president of the united states has increased the need to spend on services. that's ta riffs united states has increased the tariffs that have been imposed on chinese goods coming into the united central to our financial demand5. thi5 central to our financial demand5. this morning, are you one of those states. china has also retaliated, who believes that middlesbrough get5 and there are many people who a bad rap? i'm from the area, so believe that a part of what seeing with huawei has in fact to do with absolutely i do. i'm unashamedly that trade dispute. so basically, proud. we are really good at what you are saying, by preventing american tech companies from doing defending our5elve5 when people are having a go. we aren't so good about business with huawei, it really is cutting out while away from being 5houting about what's fantastic able to access this google about the area. that's we to do. we technology which has been in all of will be launching our brand, their devices. so it is really middlesbrough. thi5 pretty significant, and there are will be launching our brand, middlesbrough. this weekend not a lot of people that would everything is happening? exactly. and we are going to flood the world probably disagree. do you know about these talks or briefings which have rele ntlessly with and we are going to flood the world relentle55ly with positive stories. been taking place between us spy if we do that we will have success. chiefs and tech execs in silicon we started to do this about a year valley? that's right, so these are ago, last year, the financial times being organised by us lawmakers, and named middlesbrough one of the top interestingly, this is a bipartisan ten small cities in europe, which effort, so you are seeing them meant we were showcased. you want a arranged by both republicans and democrats. what they are saying is,
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city though, are you? i know you've tried. think tanks like centre for look, there is not enough knowledge in terms of people in silicon valley, understanding the kinds of cities class middlesbrough a5 a dangers or potential dangers that city. economically it's a city. it could exist if you do business with doesn't have the royal title but huawei, and so these tech execs have economically middlesbrough i5 doesn't have the royal title but economically middlesbrough is a city been given access to some with all the attributes you'd expect confidential information to try and give them a sense ofjust what the ina with all the attributes you'd expect in a city. universities, high—profile incidents and professional football clubs. we are intelligence is and why it is that american officials are worried. a city, and all but name. is the thank you, samaria, and many thanks for that update. we will keep across future something that is kicking off that developing story. here, the technology? walking around now let's take a quick look at the here, the technology? walking around here, the technology? walking around here, the number of young people, it financial markets. thomas cook's has a vibrancy. middlesbrough has share prices hovering around the 10p got the fifth highest digital economy and the whole of the mark. it fell earlier to just under country. not a lot of people know ten p. this comes after analysts at citigroup on friday said that the that. the two most popular games on travel firm's shares were worthless playstation were invented in the after a travel firm's shares were worthless aftera 1.5 travel firm's shares were worthless town. we work with google, and after a 1.5 thousand pounds loss on friday. the firm said, we do have apple, and companies like that. we the support of our lending banks and arejust apple, and companies like that. we are just about to launch a new £20 major shareholders. also foxtons million expansion of our digital shares are down quite significantly
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de5ign, million expansion of our digital design, which will see us grow by at today after that fall in sales revenue, and warnings of a very lea5t design, which will see us grow by at least another 1000 jobs. we've got a challenging market. that is all the business news from me for now. much more in the next fantastic university, the got to hour. back to simon. keep them here doing fantastic susanna, thank you very much. things. it's good to talk to you, thank you very much. plenty more after 8 seasons, one of the most talked about tv from middlesbrough, not only talking shows, has come to an end. but some game of thrones fans have about the problems here but looking complained about plot lines at 5olution5, plenty of those here in the last series — but that's unlikely to stop it as well. you can find out more about from being a ratingsjuggernaut. the town by going to the website. 0ur los angeles correspondent, sophie long, has been at a watch party where the 80 minute finale aired — and don't worry, if you haven't seen it yet, all the details are there. you are there are no spoilers in this report. watching afternoon life. our headlines this afternoon. google this goes beyond loyalty. there's no question blocks huawei from some of the that the cultural phenomenon that is game of thrones mobile services it uses in a major has been a ratings hit. blow to the chinese telecom firm. and resulted in big business for some. as fans prepared for viewing parties, this bakery sold around the inquest into the london bridge 30,000 limited edition cupcakes, attacks has been hearing how a man breaking its previous record set tried to fight off attackers by by last year's royal wedding. hitting them with his skateboard. this has been our all—time best selling limited edition cupcake and president champ has warned iran in the history of sprinkles.
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it will be destroyed if they conflict breaks out between the two it's our biggest innovation yet. at a viewing party near countrie5. —— president trump. and venice beach, heated debate about how it was all going to end. it 5cared on the final round, what about a babyjon snow? that's a possibility. winning the championship for the yeah, if she's pregnant, second year in a row, his third to he's not going to kill her. fourth major title. israel flower there was an atmosphere of great anticipation. some hoping for relief. hasn't decided not to appeal his 0thers, an end to a 5acking for homophobic comments. he disappointing season. could still take the case to the i felt the writing was kind of sloppy. high court in australia. and one of it didn't make any sense with britain's are leading female racing the character arcs and all that. drivers has joined the britain's are leading female racing drivers hasjoined the formula 1 just a big release, i guess, tea m drivers hasjoined the formula 1 team as a development driver. she will attend pre—grand prix i5 from the anxiety that we have today. team as a development driver. she will attend pre—grand prix is for the team, starting at the british intense. grand prix injuly. i will have more like, so many emotions, like, on the story shortly. anticipation that's fulfilled and never seeing it again. and then it was time. cheering. you are watching afternoon live. the a whole pub completely absorbed. inquest into the london bridge attacks has been hearing how one of the victims used to skateboard to fight off the killers. the spanish the debate over the quality of series eight will continue,
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banker working in london died after but in the united states trying to help others who had been the credits have rolled. winter is no longer coming. stabbed. he was posthumously awarded wow! the george medalfor stabbed. he was posthumously awarded the george medal for bravery. 0ur correspondent reports. ignacio echeverria had been up with friends skateboarding on the south bank. staying in america... the court heard that as they were cycling and a road straight four hundred students in the american city of atlanta into the london bridge attacks. have had a very pleasant surprise. the statement was read out in court from one of ignacio echeverria's friends, guillermo sanchez—montisi, he said that on seeing a woman being attacked and stabbed they were at their graduation near london bridge, ignacio echeverria didn't think ceremony, when dr robert f smith, about it, he reacted immediately, he was paying off all their student loans pulling his skateboard a former student at morehouse from his back, dropping his bike college and a billionaire, announced and started hitting the assailants he was paying off all with his skateboard, but he fell to the ground their student loans and try to parry the blows this is my class, 2019. in my family of the attacker with his board, is making a pledge to eliminate all and he, too, was fatally stabbed. their student loans. as the attacks continued, guillermo sanchez—montisi told the court that he had to run, cheering or he would have died too. doctor robert smith, cheering up, he said one of the attackers looked like the devil. he said he would never forget i'll say! that year's graduation. that is in the feeling of impotence, of not being able to help his reign.
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last year ignacio echeverria's atla nta. that year's graduation. that is in atlanta. all the headlines in a moment, but first, time for a look family were at buckingham palace, at the weather. here in where the 39—year—old who put middlesbrough, a nice start, but... the lives of others before his own, was awarded the george medal that is to tell you to go to the website if you want more details. that is all on our website. the for bravery by the queen. weather is built, and sarah has that for us. all rights over here. what is happening for everybody else? sweden has filed a formal request welcome assignment, the weather is for the arrest of wikileaks founder looking right over many parts of julian assange she was accused of country actually. rape. he denies the allegations. the lots of blue sky and sunshine out there, but if you hit and miss heavy warrant would be the first step showers. you might hit one in towards dealing with the extradition middlesbrough and many eastern parts towards dealing with the extradition to britain where he is currently serving a prison sentence for breaching bail. he is also wanted in of england for today. also cloud across other parts of the uk as the united states. we return to well. this is the picture in hertfordshire. blue sky, fair events in middlesbrough as part of weather cumulus cloud around there, but we see that cloud thickening, that we are middlesbrough series and giving some heavy showers, and with focus on this time, the future, and all that active weather around out also the past. with me now is there, one of our weather watchers this morning spotted this funnel martin, who is a local historian and cloud of the skies of the north
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member of the teesside local history society. it's good to see you. just yorkshire. through the rest of this moment, their heavy showers we have explain, because middlesbrough, as got through this week will ease away, so they will be longer spells we have heard already, in the 18005 of warm sunshine over the next few became hugely important. days, and fairly light winds as it did. it has a long history, 900 well. back to the picture out there this afternoon, and you can see where we yea rs, it did. it has a long history, 900 years, but in the 18005 it took up have some showers dotted around, particularly across eastern england, off like explosion. in 1900 they but some showery rain for scotland, northern ireland, and a few rogue showers for northern ireland in the we re off like explosion. in 1900 they south of england as well. in were 90,000 people here. basically, that came about because of the between, lots of dry weather, discovery of iron ore in the hills. feeling quite pleasant in the sunshine, with temperatures between 14 in aberdeen to 21 in london. into the evening, hit and miss showers we they happened to be from all over have got ten to ease away, said things become largely drive through the country what are the challenges tonight. clearing skies, still quite that history has dealt this time? cloudy for much of scotland, patchy rain in the north and east. when you have a history rooted in temperatures in towns and cities manufacturing, in hard engineering falling to about 10 degrees, cooler in the countryside with the odd how do you cope in the 21st—century, misty patch around. any mist clears when companies go all over the away fairly quickly, and it looks
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like a decent day tomorrow how much of the country. lots of sunshine and world. this is rising to the blue sky around. still lots of sunshine with patchy rain from northern and eastern scotland, and the odd row shower down the east coast of england as well. in the challenge we've seen lots of young sunshine, probably a degree or two warmer than today, highs of around entrepreneurs. we sometimes think of 14-21 warmer than today, highs of around 14—21 on tuesday. a similar day on wednesday, no big changes. a ridge this as old petroleum lead, but they of high pressure keeps things mostly dry and settled. so the chance of a we re this as old petroleum lead, but they were so many this as old petroleum lead, but they were so many industries, that's what we've got now. the difference is bit more cloud and showers towards northern and north—eastern parts of that they are now across the whole the uk. further south and south—west, it should stay dry through the day and temperatures are world. they do work all over the reasonably warm between about 14—20 on wednesday. then of course, a bank world. there is a pride in this time, which holiday weekend looms. how are people outside it don't get. and things looking towards the end of they aren't particularly interested the week you make this is the jet in wanting to know about.|j stream, and we see a kink developing that over the atlantic, pushing closer to the uk. things could be they aren't particularly interested in wanting to know about. i think there's a pride, people are more unsettled towards the end of the week. not a right. i pressure still close by. mostly warm and dry in the next few days. the chances of
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realising that this creativity here. rain mostly in the north and north—west towards the bank holiday people we've forgotten about, great weekend. females came from this town. the first female mp for the town, she had red hair, and a red dress. we need more of that in the house of commons, don't we? in the 705 and 805, and the decline of iron and steel industry here, has has the gap been filled? not yet but it is being filled. we've got an advanced manufacturing park. people think of it as dirty and grimy, but it's the future. we've also got digital media, creative media. 0ne
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we've also got digital media, creative media. one of my favourite stories is that a local firm uses cgi imagery, you can hardly see it. but in this town. the geography of middlesbrough, for people who don't even know where it is, that's been hugely important in history, yes? critical. it started off as port darlington. it was the port for the town of darlington. they needed someone town of darlington. they needed someone to export coal to the coalfield. stockton was a major port. up in the north—east of england, between durham and yorkshire, the boat struggled to get off. they thought let's go straight
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down, and build a porch. they called it port darlington. that was middlesbrough and a whole new industry. a whole new culture. it's a town built on immigration. people came from east anglia, scotland, in 1817 90% of the population were irish. we recognise the importance and embrace the importance of immigration. and this is a brexit town. it's weird, because the town recognises diversity and celebrates it, but looking to the future we are wondering a lot of our trading hello, you're watching partners aren't there. afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy. it's good to see you. thank you. today at 3. we are in middlesbrough as the bbc plenty more from middlesbrough focuses on this town's past, present and future — throughout the afternoon. we are the council's chief executive middlesbrough week. if you've got will tell us about ambitious
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plans for the town. the main news headlines: any questions, or are in the area donald trump warns iran it will be treated me and the number on screen. destroyed if it picks a fight with the united states. all the details of what we are up to iran dismisses this threat. and why we are here are building up to the big weekend on radio one. google blocks some of its services from huawei, the world's second biggest maker of smartphones, after the us there's more to come from here, but government blacklisted let's get a wear update. the chinese company. sarah has the latest. it's one of the inquest into the london bridge attacks is told those days, sunglasses one minute how this man tried to fight off the attackers by hitting them and burleson x. some blue sky and with just his skateboard. sunshine around, but equally hit and miss heavy showers too. most of them coming up on afternoon live all the sport with azi. are along the east coast of england, brooks koepka survived a huge scare to win the us pga championship one or two along the south coast. wales, northern ireland having a few showers. scotland is cloudy with victoria azarenka has told the bbc patchy rain. in between showers she thought her tennis temperatures reach around 21 career was over when she found out she was pregnant in 2016. degrees. as we move on into the along with other leading players, she's successfully campaigned for the introduction of more ranking evening, most of those are heavy and protection for new thundery, they fade away and become mothers on the tour. we'll have more from her generally dry for most parts of the
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at half past three. country. cloud and patchy rain for northern and eastern scotland. and sarah has the weather. mixed temperatures fall to six or 10 fortu nes and sarah has the weather. mixed fortunes today, some of us seeing degrees, that clears quickly. most some snow moving heavy showers. i'll places have a dry day tomorrow, blue bring you all the details before the skies and sunshine on offer. cloudy 30 pm. for parts of north and west also coming up, playing in mummy‘s garden — scotland. the chance of a few george, charlotte and louis enjoy showers. the south and the west sea 00:30:26,250 --> 4294966103:13:29,430 temperatures around 15 to 20. the woodland wilderness designed by the duchess of cambridge. hello, everyone, i'm simon mccoy. hello and welcome to afternoon live from middlesbrough. all this week, the bbc‘s "we are middlesbrough" series is focusing on stories, finding out what matters to people here and bringing those issues to a wider audience. the stories will be reported across bbc
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television and radio — and on digital. this afternoon amongst the many local issues we'll be investigating, we'll be finding out more about attitudes here to leaving the eu with our chief political correspondent vicki young. stay with us for more. but first... our main news story today. google is blocking some of its services from the chinese technology giant huawei. it comes after the white house blacklisted the chinese firm because of fears huawei could be used to spy on american data networks. huawei is the world's second biggest manufacturer of smartphones, but insists it is not a security threat. google's decision comes amid an escalating trade war between the united states and china. here's our technology correspondent, rory cellan—jones. it was the brand few had heard of and fewer could pronounce, now huawei is number two in global mobile phone sales, with its latest p30 handset getting rave reviews. google's move to stop future huawei phones getting access to its apps and to updates of its android software could have a major impact,
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making shoppers think twice, even if they like what the chinese firm offers. the cameras are great on huawei phones, they absolutely wipe the floor with everything else at the moment on the market. but it means they won't get all the google services that so many of us rely on for every day. so that is maps, gmail, youtube and all of those things we use so much every day. it was president trump's order stopping american firms doing business with huawei over security concerns which forced google to act. but for the mobile phone industry, there could be wider consequences. at the moment phone buyers only have a choice between two mobile operating systems, apple's i0s and google's android. but if huawei is shut out of android, it could lead a revolution, starting its own rival phone software. huawei is working on its own operating system which could provide users with an alternative way of getting what google offers. it may be that paradoxically it is
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google that ends up more harmed because huawei is absolutely huge in developing countries and among young users. the united states has been pressing the uk to shut huawei out of the new 5g mobile phone networks. the government is apparently minded to avoid a total ban but today the home secretary said no final decision had been made. it is something we are looking very closely at. it is being discussed in government, there's a number of departments involved. i share some of the concerns of our allies and at this point, i think it is important to take all of that into account to remember, these are some of the closest intelligence relationships we have in the world. look at the evidence and then come to a final decision. huawei has always denied it poses a security risk, but is now at the centre of a trade battle between america and china and phone shoppers are caught in the crossfire.
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earlier, i spoke tojeremy thompson, the executive vice—president of huawei uk. he says they can be trusted. the timing of this executive order is timed to have delivered maximum impact on the trade negotiations. make no mistake, this is a trade issue. in terms of trust, as a chinese owned company we are owned by our employees, 90,000 of the employees own this company. we operate in 170 countries worldwide. every country, every market, we have to earn and build that trust. we are struggling with the us right now but getting great support from other countries, european countries, and elsewhere.
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and also our customers, we sold 200 million smartphones last year. that made us number two in the globe. people buy our phones because they trust the brand. president trump has issued a stern warning to iran, saying that if it wants to fight, then that would be the ‘end' of the country. he told the iranian government never to threaten the united states again. in the last few days, there's been growing tension between the two nations, with the us deploying additional warships and planes to the gulf. iran's foreign minister has accused donald trump of making genocidal chance and warned him not to threaten the country. the american aircraft carrier, the us abraham lincoln, on exercise in the arabian sea. the latest move in a dangerous game of brinkmanship that could tip this region into war. american officials last week blamed tehran for the serious attacks
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on oil tankers in the gulf that sent tensions soaring. even so, donald trump insists he doesn't want a war. i just don't want them to have nuclear weapons. and they can't be threatening us. with all of everything that's going on, and i'm not one that believes, i am not somebody that wants to go into war, because war hurts economies, war kills people, most importantly. but with neither side willing to back down, the fear is a miscalculation could spark a conflict. and last night, a rocket exploded in baghdad's green zone, close to the us embassy. in a tweet after the attack, donald trump warned that... the us has troops stationed in iraq while iran backs militias in the country. iraq now fears it could be
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the battle ground for a war not of its own making. iraq has been living through hell for the last four decades and certainly, iraqis do not want to see this country yet again turn into a zone of proxy conflict. we are telling everybody, cool it. this is not the place to have your battles on. for now, america and iran are testing each other‘s limits. but that carries huge risks in such a volatile region. martin patience, bbc news, baghdad. the inquests into the london bridge attacks has been hearing how one of the victims tried to use his skateboard to fight off the killers. ignacio echeverria, a spanish banker working in london, died after trying to help others who had been stabbed. he was posthumously awarded the george medal for bravery. 0ur correspondent, jon donnison reports.
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ignacio echeverria had been up with friends skateboarding on the south bank. the court heard that as they were cycling and a road straight into the london bridge attacks. the statement was read out in court from one of ignacio echeverria's friends, guillermo sanchez—montisi, he said that on seeing a woman being attacked and stabbed near london bridge, ignacio echeverria didn't think about it, he reacted immediately, pulling his skateboard from his bag, dropping his bike and started hitting the assailants with his skateboard, but he fell to the ground and try to parry the blows of the attacker with his board, and he, too, was fatally stabbed. as the attacks continued, guillermo sanchez—montisi told the court that he had to run, or he would have died too. he said one of the attackers looked like the devil. he said he would never forget the feeling of impotence, of not being able to help his friend. last year ignacio echeverria's family were at buckingham palace, where the 39—year—old who put
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the lives of others before his own, was awarded the george medal for bravery by the queen. 0ur correspondentjon donnison. hejoins me now he joins me now from hejoins me now from the old bailey. stories of heroism, and one of an off duty doctor, john? yes, doctor jonathan moses as a junior doctor who graduated a year—and—a—half before the attacks. he had been working on amd for about four or five months. he was out for dinner ata five months. he was out for dinner at a restaurant the other side of london bridge. he could see injured people on the streets, who had been stabbed. he ran down stairs, into the ground floor of the restaurant, and he went to the door, there was a bouncer who wasn't letting anyone out. the restaurant was under lockdown. he said, you have to let
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me out, i cannotjust watch these people die. eventually, the bouncer let him get out into the streets, and doctor moses proceeded to treat and doctor moses proceeded to treat a number of casualties including ignacio echeverria. he tried to administer cpr to him, for a good pa rt administer cpr to him, for a good part of 40 minutes, the court was told today, he then helped carry him all the way across london bridge, to an ambulance. unfortunately, in the 39—year—old'5 spanish bank up is michael case it was too late for him, and the court heard today that doctor moses did help save the lives of several other people. that was john donnison at the old bailey. we returned to our main stories, and the decision by google to restrict access to its technology to the chinese firm huawei. we can speak now to ingrid lunden
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is news editor at tech crunch. shejoins me now. who will this hurt more? huawei google? that's an interesting question. from a company like google who rely on huawei or a lot, with dozens of other huge headset maker is to disseminate its operating system, and all of the services on top of it, which are monetised in terms of advertising. google will be impacted by huawei is losing a major hardware by not being able to import into the us, it's going to make a major issue, not just in terms of smartphones, but networking equipment. it doesn't look like donald trump is happy to compromise on this, at least for now. there are those saying that, actually, huawei has a plan b, it would have its own operating system, is that a way out of this?|j would have its own operating system, is that a way out of this? i don't know, actually. we've seen a lot of
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headset makers dabble in making operating systems, nokia failed spectacularly, they completely fell apart asa spectacularly, they completely fell apart as a result of them trying to keep their own eco system going. i think it would be very challenging for them. it requires a lot of buy in from literally millions of different app makers, and so on, to do that. that would be a big long—term step. i don't think it's necessarily a bad one, i think only two platforms and smartphones, apple is only on iphone, it's a pretty limited state of affairs, so it's not such a bad idea, but i don't know if it would be short—term or medium—term solution. know if it would be short—term or medium-term solution. another big chinese firm has been hit by this before, how did that play out? funnily enough they have been slightly let off the hook for now. i
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don't know why, that's just one of the many? we've got right now. there hasn't been transparency on the part of the us government in terms of determining who is on the watchlist and why. the other chinese company is currently not in as much hot water is huawei, so the impact is uncertain. they may, you know, they may hone in on them once more. at the heart of this is intellectual property, and who owns what? yes. that's true. i mean, they're saying is that we've been in a very interesting imbalance, iwould is that we've been in a very interesting imbalance, i would say, with china, for years now, where they've not only been at the heart of manufacturing, and consumer electronics, building things that are much cheaper and much more efficient, and really, technically, huge, every major consumer electronics maker needs china in
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their eco system. that has resulted ina their eco system. that has resulted in a major push forward on the other hand. lots of development, early—stage introduction, it's happening all around the world, and in this case, we are looking, particularly, at the us. 0ne in this case, we are looking, particularly, at the us. one of the long—standing accusations which has been going on for years now, this is not a new thing, is that these companies are stealing, and using it not only for their own development, but potentially cracking it, hacking it, for national security purposes. tapping into national security. so on that front we do have a big issue, and, again, i'm not sure that this will be the total resolution. this is about the usa putting its foot down and saying it's time for us to start to take a stand. whether
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or not this will play out exactly how they want is another question. you have to consider the economic aspects of this, which are probably the ones motivating in a lot of cases. ingrid, thank you so much. thank you forjoining us. you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines. person trump has warned iran it will be destroyed if conflict breaks out. and huawei has been blocked by google from using its new system from later this year. iran has dismissed the thoughts in the us president, he said he will destroy iran if it decides to be defiant to the united states. steve clarke has been confirmed as
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scotland's new head coach after a three—year deal replacing alex mcleish after leaving kilmarnock. 0ne mcleish after leaving kilmarnock. one of turner's's are big stars has been speaking to the bbc about how motherhood has impacted her career. she says she thought she wouldn't play again after a surprise pregnancy in 2016. and one of britain's a leading female racing drivers has joined the williams formula 1 team, as a development driver. she will attend three grand prix competitions, starting in the british grand prix injuly. more on those stories after her first. an increasing number of vulnerable children with learning disabilities and autism, are being held in hospitals when they don't need to be there, according to a new report. the children's commissioner for england, anne longfield, says children are being restrained, sedated and kept long distances from home. she wants a national strategy to tackle what she calls an "unacceptable situation".
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here's our social affairs correspondent, alison holt. scandals such as the exclusion by the bbc panorama programme close this private hospital near bristol. it highlights the vulnerability of people with learning disabilities and autism. that was eight years ago. despite promises that the system is changing, today's report shows vulnerable children being taken to institutions miles from home and spending months there. the children's commissioner says the number of children held in mental health hospitals has risen from 110 in february 2015 to 250 this february. concerns are also raised about the overuse of restraint, medication, and the seclusion way some children are kept isolated from other patients. i've heard of children who are in a single room with a movable furniture
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for months on end. shocking stories of children being fed to hatches. none of that is right for anyone, but for the most vulnerable children it's something which is absolutely unthinkable. the government says it is determined to reduce the number of people with learning disabilities and autism in hospitals. significant investment is being put into providing more high quality support in the community. two groups of conservative mp5 are launching campaign groups aimed at shaping the future direction of their party, as the unofficial contest to replace theresa may is already up and running. former cabinet minister esther mcvey has launched blue collar conservatism, aiming to target "working people". work and pensions secretary amber rudd is among those backing one nation conservative caucus, a group opposing a no—deal brexit. nigel farage had milkshake thrown
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at him during a campaign walkabout. the brexit party leader had just given a short speech in newcastle as part of a tour of the country ahead of the european elections. a man was dragged away by a police community support officer and later seen in handcuffs. police say a 32—year—old man has been arrested on suspicion of common assault and remains in police custody. gordon brown says an investigation lots to talk about in middlesbrough as part of though we are middlesbrough week on bbc television, radio and digital. 0ne of the big issues in this town is brexit. it's a big brexit town. and it had the highest percentage of brexit voters. they keep young joins me nowjust down the road. she's
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been finding out how people feel about topics like that. middlesbrough and the referendum both at 65% to leave overall. 0f course, there are many people here wondering what's happened to that vote, and three years on the fact that we haven't yet left the european union. many of those i spoke to feel pretty frustrated about all of that. they think politicians in westminster have spent the best part of that time arguing amongst themselves, rather than listening to what voters demand. trying to find out whether they play any particular party is not always easy. —— blame any particular party. both of the major parties are concerned about the european elections on thursday, because they fear it will be a plague on both your houses, and actually, what will happen, is that the brexit party could be the big
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winner by taking votes from, particularly the conservatives, but in places like this, labour voters as well. and the greens and liberal democrats may be the beneficiaries. i spoke to a few people earlier to gauge their reaction to what's been going on. we wa nted going on. we wanted to be out, we should be out, that's it. and who do you blame? well, the government. the government. we voted for it, that's it as far as i'm concerned. if there was another referendum what would you do? the same. i may vote liberal democrat. because you want to stay in the eu? know, yeah, i voted to stay in, yeah we both did. they are shouting at each other like babies. the whole political situation is in turmoil. the conservatives, the
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labour party, god knows, you know what i mean. this place was all labour at one stage, now everybody isjust going for labour at one stage, now everybody is just going for whoever, labour at one stage, now everybody isjust going for whoever, or not even bothering. one woman said to me that she felt that politicians were simply sweeping the views of those who voted for brexit under the carpet. i think with these european elections, quite often in the past they haven't been about issues to do with the european union, much more focused on domestic policy on what's going on in national politics. that may well be very different this time, it's certainly the case that people are focusing on the issue of the eu, and, of course, and brexit. you just wonder whether this becomes more about trust in politicians, and delivery of policies, and voters feeling ignored in parts of the country. it's more thanjust feeling ignored in parts of the
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country. it's more than just brexit. this is a much broader theme and certainly there are many politicians who are pretty fearful about all of that, because they know, even though they had been involved in westminster that it hasn't reflected well on them. that's vicky and just down the road in middlesbrough. i'm joined now by a representative from the middlesbrough modern art, and was part of the city of culture in 25 plan. whenever you have a big project like that it brings people together, you look at what you've got, the amazing things you've got and get new things. you get a plan together and change things for the better. there is a consultation process under way, i think and you want to find out what people want from that, what are people saying to you? they are saying all sorts of things, they are saying all sorts of things, they
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are saying all sorts of things, they are saying that community matters, place matters, the sounds of their past matter, but what they want for their future, past matter, but what they want for theirfuture, and past matter, but what they want for their future, and their children's their future, and their children's the future. people want to bring up families here, and have everything that any city has an offer for their children. uniquely, you've got a school of art that is attracting young people not just school of art that is attracting young people notjust thinking about art, but former steelworkers, you've got one who is 72 years old. yes, people want a creative life. this is one of the ways they get it. we have an article based inside a museum, we are an article based inside a museum, we a re pretty an article based inside a museum, we are pretty unique. we create this special environment for people to come together and think about, you know, the ideas, stuff they thought about but haven't had a way to pull into something. how do you sell middlesbrough, because it doesn't shout about itself, perhaps the church? middlesbrough is a hidden
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treasure. it's got this amazing river, parks, people, fantastic resources , river, parks, people, fantastic resources, a brilliant university. most of all, i think it's a really fantastic community, a creative community where people support each other and get behind each other. and a diverse community. that makes it fascinating. the bbc is here this week looking at some of the problems. you don't have to look far to see that there are issues. this isa to see that there are issues. this is a term that relied on industries that aren't here anymore, how do you harness that, after a period of pretty grim couple of decades, how do you assess what the future holds, is it going to be a digitalfuture, art? i know you want to play a part in it. there is a knowledge economy here. the university have gone great guns over the last decade and it's really exciting now. you have this fantastic digital community. if you spend time with the digital
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companies year you make really smart people doing really smart things and connecting with businesses across the world. that's clearly part of our future. the creative agenda is definitely there. every place has to think about this now, we are very connected because of the internet. it means you can be global and local at the same time. lots of places are thinking how they do that for the 21st—century, and in middlesbrough we are ahead of the game in some issues. and taking on companies elsewhere in the uk? someone was mentioning highly what is now reliant on cgi work done in this pa rt reliant on cgi work done in this part of the world. but we don't seem to hear much about success stories. teesside university has one of the best games and digital schools for a very long time. we have digital gamers and designers across the globe in differing companies as well as companies that are coming here. how you shout about it, you know, that's one thing, but getting on and
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doing it is a good way of making connections, and making communities. you've got a museum, an art school, how do you persuade people, i might go to middlesbrough, but there are plenty of other opportunities, what is here that isn't there? well, i would say people travel all across the north to come and see us. but they also travel, we had the british museum, museum of london, international galleries, come to see what we're doing, because we are rethinking what a museum looks like for the 21st—century. if you come on a thursday you will be surrounded by communities of the town having lunch together, talking about what they wa nt together, talking about what they want for the future of their town. we are thinking about what museums do and what civic life looks like. by do and what civic life looks like. by just do and what civic life looks like. byjust being do and what civic life looks like. by just being brilliant, do and what civic life looks like. byjust being brilliant, people want to come and see, find out and be pa rt to come and see, find out and be part of what we're doing. 2025, if you get at what we did change, what
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would it do for middlesbrough? are some of it is about telling your story. i spent a decade of my career in liverpool, working through the european capital of culture, and i watched a city transform. some of that was about telling our story in liverpool, and across the tees valley we have this amazing story to tell, which is part of industry, pa rt tell, which is part of industry, part of nature, part of the landscape and people, and i think that 2025 would give us that opportunity to reshape and retell a story that matters. it matters to a huge volume of people. good luck with that. thank you, laura sellers. don't forget, you can let us know what you think, particularly if you are watching in middlesbrough. the details are on the screen. those are all the ways to get in touch with us. we are middlesbrough goes on all week, and culminates in the big weekend on radio one. now, let's get
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a look at the weather with sarah. hi, simon. 0ne a look at the weather with sarah. hi, simon. one of those days. blue skies and sunshine, some fairly heavy showers. not all of us will see them, the atmosphere isn't reactive at the moment, so lots of energy and some cloud. some of our weather watchers have been out cloud spotting today. this rotating column ofa spotting today. this rotating column of a were seen in cardiff earlier. these clouds don't touch the ground, if they do, they become a tornado. another funnel cloud spotted in north yorkshire, just a sign that we have got some big showers around. there was heavy, thundery showers will ease through this week, more in the way of warm sunshine on offer and light winds. back to this afternoon, most of the showers across parts of the east of england, and the south coast. wales too. north, scotland has more clout and
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patchy outbreaks of rain. temperature wise, not too bad, particularly in the south, 21 degrees, further north mid to high teens. into the evening, most of those heavy and thundery showers tend to ease away. sky is clear, dry for most places, we keep a bit more clout around these north sea coast, particularly parts of northern and eastern scotland. cloudy and damp to start tuesday morning. elsewhere, clear skies, the odd mist, any mist clears away quickly, and a decent day across most parts of the country. blue skies, sunshine, across northern and eastern scotland to keep that clout and it will produce if few showers. in the sunshine, 22 degrees or so, up to around 1519 further north. through the day on wednesday a similar sort of day, mostly dry, parts of
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northern and eastern scotland keep some of that showery rain. a few showers in the east, further south as well. in between any showers lots of dry and warm weather, temperature is more like 16 to 20 degrees through this stage in the week. looking ahead towards the end of the week, we've got a bank holiday weekend looming. a change in thejet strea m weekend looming. a change in thejet stream and a kink moves across the atlantic, that may well drive low pressure systems towards the uk. mostly towards the north and north—west, a little bit of rain as we look towards the end of the week. try a further south, with temperatures not bad for the time of year. time for the sport now. scotland have named their new manager. yes, as expected, steve clarke has been confirmed as the new head coach
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of scotla nd been confirmed as the new head coach of scotland than a three—year deal, the day after he guided, led to third in the scottish premiership. clarke, who was voted sba manager of the year, replaces alex mcleish, who left in april. he takes over a scotla nd left in april. he takes over a scotland side sitting fifth in the euro 2020 qualifying group after four games. as pa rt of four games. as part of our change the game season, we have spoken to victoria aza renka season, we have spoken to victoria azarenka after her return to tennis following the birth of her son. she has successfully campaigned with others for a new ranking protections for new mothers on the tour, and she told us she feared she would not play tennis again after her surprise pregnancy in 2016. in my mind, my first thought was, oh, my god, my career is over, i will never play tennis again, they don't know what to do. it was panic. but then, it was all about, i know i am going to come back and i know
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when i am going to come back, because i thought that is a blessing for me, you know? it is a blessing, but i still want to have my own dreams and my own career. fullback israel folau has decided not to appeal against his sacking by rugby australia for homophobic comments posted on social media. he said it did not mean he accepted the findings of the panel that upheld his dismissal, but was considering all potential avenues. he could still take his case to the high court in australia. tom daley has won gold at diving's world series event in london alongside grace reid in the mix three metre synchro springboard. the title with this superb final dive. it's proving to be a successful partnership. the two had already won a silver and three bronze medals in the series, but this was their first goal. billy mungo said he was over the moon after winning a race for the first time since winning —— since
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losing both legs in a crash two yea rs losing both legs in a crash two years ago. he posted this picture on social media after winning the p grand prix. he said, i couldn't believe that two years on, i would believe that two years on, i would be winning races. he told us how motor racing has helped his recovery. when i wasn't racing, i felt like i was missing out on so many of the things that i enjoyed doing before, and getting back racing, i think, gave me the extra motivation in other areas to get back walking in my day—to—day life and things like that. it spurred me on, and i don't look at my disability as a negative thing. i look at it as a challenge that i've got to overcome, and there are more challenges racing as an amputee than i had when i was racing with both my legs beforehand, but it is something i enjoy doing and something that isjust part of me, i guess. jamie chadwick, one of britain's leading female racing drivers, has
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joined the williams formula 1 team isa joined the williams formula 1 team is a development driver. she is the only british woman to win a formula 3 race and is currently leading the standings and the new female w series afterfinishing standings and the new female w series after finishing first and second in the opening races. chadwick will attend three grams praise for williams this year, starting with the british gp in july. ama aguese say she still wants to carry on playing international netball despite being left out of britain's netball squad. she is not fully fit after injury and was incredibly emotional when she was told that she had not made the final list. i thought that i did really well and i would be part of it, but iam well and i would be part of it, but i am still hopefully there in spirit, and i will be able to watch the games, if i don't end up crying like this! but yes, i'm definitely disappointed. but that is performance sport.
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and that is all the sport for now. thanks, simon. thanks, simon. thank you very much. nearly 170,000 people are expected to attend this year's chelsea flower show, which opens its doors this week. many of the gardens on display will focus on the theme of health and well—being. one of the exhibits has been co—designed by the duchess of cambridge, and our royal correspondent, daniela relph, has been there. checking over their mother's handiwork, three young royals. george, charlotte and louis testing out the garden the duchess helped design. even if louis seemed a little distracted. early in the year, the children collected leaves and twigs that are now part of this back to nature garden. barefoot and carefree, it is a project that fittingly promotes the importance of family. the duchess has worked alongside a team of landscape architects for months. heavily involved in every stage of the project. the water will flow under that bridge?
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last week, she helped install the garden at chelsea. it is inspired by many of her own childhood memories, including jumping over boulders in the lake district. this has been a very personal project for the duchess of cambridge, she is rarely interviewed, but on this, she wanted to speak out. there's so much kiddies particularly can learn from environments like this. they can learn life skills, anything from learning empathy from watching plants grow, to physical activities and climbing onto trees or onto boulders and things. it helps their balance and coordination. it's really an open playground for them. it's a natural space, a really exciting space for kiddies and adults alike to share and explore, and hopefully that's what this garden does.
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as ever, chelsea is a mix of the old and the more traditional. this garden is a mixture of the 75th anniversary of d—day. garden is a mixture of the 75th anniversary of d-day. we are really trying to recreate the experience of 75 years ago, and keep the memory alive. much of the attention here this week will be on the duchess' garden. she showed two groups of local schoolchildren around this morning, and they seemed impressed. but perhaps the seal of approval of her own three children matters most. and they liked this piece of old—fashioned outdoor they liked this piece of old —fashioned outdoor family adventure. you are watching afternoon live, live in middlesbrough. in addition to its efforts in economic growth, middlesbrough is also committed to its cultural experience. platform a, founded as an extension to platform art studios in 2011, is a gallery dedicated to innovative developments in contemporary art through its diverse programme of exhibitions. the gallery represents emerging
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and established artists. michaela wetherell, the curator and marketing manager for platform a gallery, is with me now. you don't live in middlesbrough, you live in sunderland? yes, i live in sunderland. tell me as someone who doesn't live here, what it is about this city that excites you. i call ita this city that excites you. i call it a city, it is technically a town! what is it? from becoming a curator and developing creativity in the north of england, middlesbrough has a wisp been the home of my career, and how i have emerged into the art scene, andi i have emerged into the art scene, and i think the community here, especially the artist, are very supportive of each other. it's a diverse community, and everyone talks about the community feel. definitely. how does that manifest itself for you. why are driving the way it is he a? i think it's because people are trying. whenever you start your art career, people are like, you have to go to london, but
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now you don't. it's brilliant appear, there is a lot of space for us, and as i said, the community aspect. we all work together, no one is trying to put the other person down, and! is trying to put the other person down, and i think middlesbrough was like, why can't we be a cultural hub? is there a sense that middlesbrough gets a bad rap, especially from people in the south? well, i am from sunderland, and we often do as well, but these little towns are just proving that you do not have to move out of them, and they are a creative and amazing space to work. you talk of it is a little town. this was a thriving hub of industry for decades. how has that affected... i know you work with a person who decided one day in industry to say, i have had enough. i will follow what they want to do. are many people doing that, who perhaps see that careers that were once offered here are not going to happen, so they change direction? i think they change direction? ithink so,
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they change direction? i think so, definitely. i think now iam i think so, definitely. i think now i am extremely lucky to have had this career in the north—east of england, but if you think an artist who has had their career and think, i can't be an artist because it's not for me, there is a platform here for any ages of people, and if they wa nt to for any ages of people, and if they want to change their career they can, and especially in the arts. and talking earlier about this going for the capital of culture 2025, would that be a huge deal for this town? definitely. people work so hard, mainly for no money at all. we get as much support as we can and build itjust get as much support as we can and build it just because get as much support as we can and build itjust because of the passion of the city and how they want to merge into a cultural hub. you talk about the passion of the city. what does that mean? what happens to the city at weekends? because we get so much negative news reports, especially middlesbrough, and people saying it is a horrible place, people who live a psa, now, we need
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this, we love this space, we want to make sure we are cultural and to share our voices where we live. so, shout about it. very good to talk to you. thank you. as part of the bbc‘s series ‘we are middlesbrough‘, we've been hearing about some people in the area who are struggling to find work. but dozens of former prisoners and long—term unemployed people in middlesbrough have been given jobs at the fork in the road, a restaurant which aims to give people a second chance.
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let's pick up on middlesbrough and what it's got to offer. with me now are two fine art and photography stu d e nts are two fine art and photography students who have chosen it to start their career. izzy, first of all, why middlesbrough? it'sjust a brilliant place to study. we've got the art college on our doorstep, bus routes that go straight there, and we are surrounded by really good up—and—coming art scenes. we have got sculptures that we can take inspiration from and be inspired by, that prove we can get somewhere. you presumably had a choice of where you could go, so what was it that swung it? well, there is only a few big art colleges in the north—east, so the school of art was the place to
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be, really. eve, sell middlesbrough. it's amazing. i'm so proud to be from here. being from here means that i can attend the northern school of art, which in my opinion is one of the best in the uk. as izzy said, there are only for actual art colleges in the uk right now, so the fact that one of them is on my doorstep is great, really. i feel so privileged. it is such an amazing college, and there are so many people from middlesbrough that have gone there and gone on to do incredible things globally, and that's such an inspiration for young students, because we now have seen it happen. one of the other things young students, and i canjust remember about this, are interested m, remember about this, are interested in, is the out of college life. middlesbrough has a lot to offer with that as well? yes, definitely. we have the modern art museum. people like mackenzie thorpe from
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here. his new sculpture is outside of the transport bridge. waiting for me dad. it's really nice, really nostalgic. it's brilliant, it really shows middlesbrough. he made an interesting comment that people go on from middlesbrough globally. what would it take for people to think, actually, i'll stay here. do people stay after college? yeah, definitely. i mean, we are off to university in september. i chose to stay here, going to the northern school of art in hartlepool. i want to stay here, because i love the north—east. we have such great history, industry, coastal scenes, andl history, industry, coastal scenes, and i have used a lot of those as inspiration for my work. we can go out, draw, paint, and it's like a nowhere else, really. i love it. izzy, do you sense that the parts of
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the country are beginning to realise that middlesbrough is not worthy of the reputation it has in some places, going back to the 705 and 805, of a town suffering because of the decline of major industry? yeah, i think people are starting to realise that we are more than the old industry we had. there is more to us than meets the eye, and that is really exciting. but for young people to be able to see middlesbrough in a new light and a more creative way, i think that surprises people. and it is good. yes. if someone was watching you right now, you are trying to tell them to come here, what would you say? do it, honestly. just do it, just come to middlesbrough, and if you love art, go to the northern school of art. funny people, friendly people. creative environment. sold, sold! thank you very much, izzy and eve. susannah streeter will bring us all the business news headlines in a moment, but first, our headlines afternoon life.
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google blocks huawei from using some of its mobile services, in a major blow to the chinese telecoms firm. iran has dismissed president trump's warning it will be "destroyed" if a conflict breaks out between the two countries. the inquest into the london bridge attacks has been hearing how spanish victim ignacio echeverria tried to fight off the attackers by hitting them with just his skateboard. here's your business headlines on afternoon live. thomas cook has been reassuring customers who have contacted the firm with concerns about holiday trips, after its share price crashed falling to just 10 pence today. it says its "business as usual" but added that it was looking to strengthen its financial position. news that google has barred smartphone maker, huawei, from some updates to the android operating system, has had a positive impact on shares of other telecoms equipment makers. shares in rivals ericsson and nokia are both higher in early trade.
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as you've been hearing, new designs of huawei smartphones are set to lose access to some google apps. tata motors, india's biggest carmaker and the owner of jaguar land rover has reported a 47% drop in quarterly profits — and a full year pre—tax loss of £3.6 billion. the group is struggling to sell the luxury cars in key markets such as china. however, jlr returned to profit in the fourth quarter following a cost—cutting drive. the cosmetic surgery industry has just released its latest report. it shows demand for cosmetic surgery remains a very buoyant, despite a year where the high street has struggled. 28,000 procedures were carried out over the past year — a very small increase on the year before. the number of people opting for liposuction procedures has risen by 9% over the past year — and the british association
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of aesthetic plastic surgeons puts this partly down to a rise in popularity of tv shows like love island, and also the increased popularity of close—fitting athletic leisureware. the figures also show that women underwent 92% of all cosmetic procedures recorded. joining us now is rajiv grover, a consultant plastic surgeon who is the former president of baaps, the british association of aesthetic plastic surgeons. hello there. can you really put that rise in liposuction down to the influence of fashion and what we are watching on television? it's difficult to be able to speculate what the reason for this might be, but certainly, we have seen in previous years a trend whereby if something is promoted on television with celebrity endorsement and also on social media that it seems to be followed through in terms of the trend that people are having surgery. trend that people are having surgery. having said that, we are rather concerned that this portrays cosmetic surgery as a commodity,
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when actually, it is a risky medical procedure which can have downsides as well, so we are very keen to warn the public to be cautious and see surgery as a the public to be cautious and see surgery as a last resort rather than asa surgery as a last resort rather than as a kind of fashion accessory. yes, and out of those 28,000 procedures, how many of them were to repair perhaps botched operations in the past? these would be primary procedures, not recording revision procedures. when we have done surveys in the past of our members, in fact, we get a large number of revision procedures, because often, people travelling abroad, and this isa people travelling abroad, and this is a very risky thing, they often see going abroad to have cosmetic surgery as some see going abroad to have cosmetic surgery as some kind of a holiday, and in fact, that can be the beginning of a whole series of problems, not just to beginning of a whole series of problems, notjust to do with consent, but to do with the ability to understand the procedure, but also particularly with the after—care, and also particularly with the
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after—ca re, and it also particularly with the after—care, and it is this group we are particularly keen to suggest, you shouldn't be going abroad for surgery, because you shouldn't be going abroad for surgery, because this is very dangerous indeed. why are fewer men having procedures? it is interesting that there has been a steady rise in the number of men having procedures. i think what is interesting, if you look at the spread of procedures in men versus women, men seem to spread of procedures in men versus women, men seem to be focused on procedures that occur on the face, where is the main procedures in women are those of the body. in respect to the face, there are now nonsurgical alternatives, so if you are trying to have a rhinoplasty, commonly referred to as a nose job, or ear correction or eye bag removal, these are things that there are nonsurgical alternatives to, and i think of men can have something less invasive which does not require them to have down time, perhaps they are opting for that as opposed to surgery are opting for that as opposed to surgery itself. thank you very much for talking to us. the former president of the
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british association of aesthetic plastic surgeons. i don't know where i would start! i would have a list. let's talk about the markets. what is going on? the ftse100 has fallen by around half a percent today. investors have once again been rattled by what seems to be another escalation of the china — us trade war. thomas cook is also on the border. its share price has fallen quite dramatically, down to around 10p today, which you can see is around 1496. foxto ns 1496. foxtons is on the board, issuing some numbers out today. its share price has fallen by around 5% after its sales revenues fell, and it said there was already a challenging market out there, particularly in london. looking at that thomas cook figure, that all follows those dramatic falls in the last couple of days.
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many people using that will be concerned about the future of thomas cook? the firm has said that it is business as usual, that it is going to ta ke business as usual, that it is going to take steps to look at the finances, but that it is definitely business as usual. as you say, however, that does follow that warning from citigroup on friday, following the news that thomas cook had made £1.5 billion half—year loss. so there are concerns, but thomas cook says it is business as usual and is reassuring all customers who have booked.” usual and is reassuring all customers who have booked. i will see you in an hour. thank you very much. let's find out what the weather has in store now on this monday. sarah keith lucas has the forecast. hello. with a bank holiday in one weekend looming at the end of this week, the weather looks mixed in the next couple of days, but we will see some sunshine. this picture comes from one of our weather watchers. some blue sky, so shower cloud around, but not all of
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us will catch those showers. through this week, the heavy showers we have seen this week, the heavy showers we have seen today should ease away. most bells of warm sunshine and fairly light winds, certainly over the next few days. this is the satellite on the radar showing the cloud and rain over the last few hours. northern ireland and scotland see patchy outbreaks of rain. elsewhere, showers few and far between, there we will catch the odd one over eastern england, and the central spine of the country has lots of dry weather on offer. in sunny spells, temperatures getting up to around 14-21 temperatures getting up to around 14—21 or so. we will keep the cloud in the patchy rain across many northern and eastern parts of scotla nd northern and eastern parts of scotland through this evening and overnight. that is if you showers lingering across the north—east of england as well, but elsewhere, the skies will clear. a largely dry night ahead. temperatures fall to 6-10d night ahead. temperatures fall to 6—10d first thing tomorrow morning. we may see the odd misty patch first thing, but that will clear away quickly. for much of the country, a dry day with lots of sunshine. more
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cloud persists across northern and eastern scotland, with patchy outbreaks of rain here. elsewhere, you could catch a rogue shower, particularly around the north—east of nguyen, but most places should stay dry towards their way through the day, and with most places reaching 22—23 for most of us, cooler in the sunshine. heading into wednesday, a similar picture. we have high pressure in charge of much of the uk. lots of dry weather, with sunshine, but there will be the chance of seeing some cloudy damp weather for northern and eastern parts of scotland. temperature is about 14—20d on wednesday, and further ahead, this is thejet strea m further ahead, this is thejet stream heading through this week in towards the bank holiday weekend. it looks like later this week, the jet strea m m oves looks like later this week, the jet stream moves and closer to the uk, but a kink in thatjet stream means may well drive low pressure weather systems in from the atlantic, so the next few days that woman settled, the hints of a bit of rain towards the hints of a bit of rain towards the end of the week, mainly in the north and north—west, warmest and
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driest towards the south.
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hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy. today at 4: we are in middlesbrough as the bbc focuses on this town's past, present and future and this hour we'll take a look
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at the impact of football in the town and how it's helping with people's mental as well as physical health. the main news headlines: google blocks some of its services from huawei, the world's second biggest maker of smartphones, after the us government blacklisted the chinese company. iran accuses donald trump of "genocidal taunts" and warns him not to threaten the country. the inquest into the london bridge attacks is told how this man tried to fight off the attackers by hitting them with just his skateboard. coming up on afternoon live all the sport with azi farni: steve clarke has been named as scotland's new manager on a three—year deal. it comes after he guided kilmarnock to third in the scottish premiership. more at 4.30.
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thank you. with the weather sarah. it isa thank you. with the weather sarah. it is a changeable day today, we have some warm sunshine, but also some heavy and thundery showers too. the weather is quietening down. all the details throughout the afternoon. thank you. also coming up, playing in mummy‘s garden — george, charlotte and louis enjoy the woodland wilderness designed by the duchess of cambridge. hello and welcome to afternoon live from middlesbrough. all this week, the bbc‘s "we are middlesbrough" series is focusing on stories, finding out what matters to people here and bringing those issues
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to a wider audience. the stories will be reported across bbc television and radio and on digital. this hour we take a look at the impact activities such as football in the town and its effect on people's health. stay with us for more on that. but first, our main news story today. google is blocking some of its services from the chinese technology giant huawei. it comes after the white house blacklisted the chinese firm because of fears huawei could be used to spy on american data networks. huawei is the world's second biggest manufacturer of smartphones, but insists it is not a security threat. google's decision comes amid an escalating trade war between the united states and china. here's our technology correspondent, rory cellan—jones. it was the brand few had heard of and fewer could pronounce, now huawei is number two in global mobile phone sales,
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with its latest p30 handset getting rave reviews. google's move to stop future huawei phones getting access to its apps and to updates of its android software could have a major impact, making shoppers think twice, even if they like what the chinese firm offers. the cameras are great on huawei phones, they absolutely wipe the floor with everything else at the moment on the market. but it means they won't get all the google services that so many of us rely on for every day. so that is maps, gmail, youtube and all of those things we use so much every day. it was president trump's order stopping american firms doing business with huawei over security concerns which forced google to act. but for the mobile phone industry, there could be wider consequences. at the moment phone buyers only have a choice between two mobile operating systems, apple's i0s and google's android. but if huawei is shut out of android, it could lead a revolution, starting its own
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rival phone software. huawei is working on its own operating system which could provide users with an alternative way of getting what google offers. it may be that paradoxically it is google that ends up more harmed because huawei is absolutely huge in developing countries and among young users. the united states has been pressing the uk to shut huawei out of the new 5g mobile phone networks. the government is apparently minded to avoid a total ban but today the home secretary said no final decision had been made. it is something we are looking very closely at. it is being discussed in government, there'sa numberof departments involved. i share some of the concerns of our allies and at this point, i think it is important to take all of that into account to remember, these are some of the closest intelligence relationships we have in the world. look at the evidence and then come to a final decision. huawei has always denied it poses a security risk,
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but is now at the centre of a trade battle between america and china and phone shoppers are caught in the crossfire. president trump has issued a stern warning to iran, saying that if it wants to fight, then that would be the ‘end' of the country. he told the iranian government never to threaten the united states again. in the last few days, there's been growing tension between the two nations, with the us deploying additional warships and planes to the gulf. iran's foreign minister has accused mr trump of making "genocidal taunts" and has warned him not to threaten the country. martin patience reports from baghdad. the american aircraft carrier, the us abraham lincoln, on exercise in the arabian sea. the latest move in a dangerous game of brinkmanship that could tip this region into war. american officials last week blamed tehran for the serious attacks on oil tankers in the gulf that
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sent tensions soaring. even so, donald trump insists he doesn't want a war. i just don't want them to have nuclear weapons. and they can't be threatening us. with all of everything that's going on, and i'm not one that believes, i am not somebody that wants to go into war, because war hurts economies, war kills people, most importantly. but with neither side willing to back down, the fear is a miscalculation could spark a conflict. and last night, a rocket exploded in baghdad's green zone, close to the us embassy. in a tweet after the attack, donald trump warned that... the us has troops stationed in iraq while iran backs militias in the country.
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iraq now fears it could be the battle ground for a war not of its own making. iraq has been living through hell for the last four decades and certainly, iraqis do not want to see this country yet again turn into a zone of proxy conflict. we are telling everybody, cool it. this is not the place to have your battles on. for now, america and iran are testing each other‘s limits. but that carries huge risks in such a volatile region. martin patience, bbc news, baghdad. the electoral commission says it will visit the brexit party's office tomorrow to review how its funds are recieved. earlier today, brexit party leader nigel farage accused gordon brown of ‘a disgusting smear‘ in a row over party funding. gordon brown had said an investigation into the brexit party's finances was urgent and essential.
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well we can get some more on that story now from our political correspondentjess parker. yes, so firstly on the electoral commission, they're set to visit the brexit party's offices tomorrow. we have had a statement from the electoral commission saying the brexit party has to comply with laws in terms of donations, as part of our active oversight they will be attending the brexit party's office to conduct a review of the systems it has in place to receive funds. from what i understand, that visit was already scheduled, but gordon brown, the former labour leader, and labour prime minister, has been expressing his concerns about donation to the brexit party. a lot centres on small donations, under £500 that can be made through the
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pa rty‘s pay £500 that can be made through the party's pay pal £500 that can be made through the pa rty‘s pay pal account. £500 that can be made through the party's pay pal account. the electoral commission and the european parliament should now investigate the finances of nigel farage and his brexit party. democracy is undermined and he says the election is about democracy. democracy is undermined if we have undeclared, unreported, untraceable payments being made to the brexit party f we have the potential for underhand anden under the counter payments. i suppose the concern is such smaller donations, which don't have to be declared, could be made from abroad and influence a uk election. but nigel farage, the brexit party leader, he has been
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campaigning. he was not impressed by gordon brown's comments. disgusting smear. gordon brown's comments. disgusting smear. this from the man who was pa rt of smear. this from the man who was part of a labour party who through lord lee levying were making donors members of the house of lord. how dare he. this has been people donating £25 and nearly 100,000 and i think this smacks ofjealousy, because the other parties can't do this. nigel farage campaigning in the north—east and he had a milkshake thrown at him in newcastle. polling day on thursday and this milkshake was thrown at him. we have heard from northumbria police saying a 32—year—old man has
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been arrested on suspicion of common assault and remains in custody. we have had a statement from no ten this afternoon, saying that politicians should be able to campaign without abuse or intimidation. jess, thank you. two groups of conservative mp5 are launching campaign groups aimed at shaping the future direction of their party, as the unofficial contest to replace theresa may is already up and running. former cabinet minister esther mcvey has launched blue collar conservatism, aiming to target "working people". work and pensions secretary amber rudd is among those backing one nation conservative caucus, a group opposing a no—deal brexit. the health seceretay, matt hancock says mp5 who want to deliver the referendum result should vote for the government's brexit bill and worry about the detail afterwards. a vote on the withdrawal agreement bill — the legislation that
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will implement brexit — is expected early next month. mr hancock says mp5 should back it ‘no matter the details' they want in a future relationship, but the former brexit secretary david davis warned against voting for the bill, saying it could tie the hands of the next prime minister. today we are continuing our series of interviews with meps and leaders from the main parties standing in the european elections in a special ‘ask this'.we've heard from the conservatives this morning — and this afternoon at half past five it's the turn of liberal democrat leader sir vince cable to answer your questions. if you have a question, send it in via text on 61124, tweet using the hashtag bbc ask this, or email ask this at bbc.co.uk. the inquests into the london bridge attacks has been hearing how one of the victims tried to use his skateboard to fight off the killers.
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ignacio echeverria, a spanish banker working in london, died after trying to help others who had been stabbed. he was posthumously awarded the george medal for bravery. 0ur correspondent, jon donnison reports. ignacio echeverria had been out skateboarding on the south bank. the court heard as they were cycling home, they ran into the attack. a statement was read from one of ignacio echeverria's friends, who said on seeing a woman being attacked and stabbed near london bridge, ignacio echeverria didn't even think about it, he pulled his skateboard from his bag, dropped his bike and started hitting the men with his board. but he fell to the ground and as he tried to parry the blows, he too was fatally stabbed.
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as the attacks continues, sanchez—montisi told the court if he hadn't have run, he would have died too. he said one of the attackers looked like the devil and would never forget the feeling of not being able to help his friend. last year, ignacio echeverria's family we re year, ignacio echeverria's family were at buckingham palace, where the 39—year—old was awarded the george medalfor bravery by 39—year—old was awarded the george medal for bravery by the queen. 0ur correspondentjon donnison is at the old bailey — tell us more about this off—duty junior doctor who begged to be allowed out of a restaurant to help victims. that's right, drjonathan moses, a junior doctor, he had only been qualified for a year and a half and had been working for a short time. he was out for dinner and from the
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restau ra nt he was out for dinner and from the restaurant he could see the injured people on the street and rushed down stairs and found that the door to the restaurant was under lock down. he said to the bouncer, look, you have to let me out, i can'tjust watch people die out there. he was allowed to go out and he treated five or six patients, including ignacio echeverria, he gave him cpr for 40 minutes and helped carry him across london brivenlg, all the —— bridge all the way to the north side of the bridge, where an ambulance was waiting. sadly, it was too laid for the spanish banker. but today the coroner and lawyers passed on their thanks to dr moses, who, like so their thanks to dr moses, who, like so many people we have heard from over the past few weeks, was just someone over the past few weeks, was just someone out enjoying a saturday night when they walked into
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something truly dreadful. thank you. ecuador has begun giving the united states some of the possessions left behind by the wikileaks founderjulian assange. the material includes legal documents, medical records and electronic equipment. mr assange's lawyer said the move was "completely unprecedented" in the history of asylum. you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines: google blocks huawei from using some of its mobile services, in a major blow to the chinese telecoms firm. iran has dismissed president trump's warning it will be ‘destroyed' if a conflict breaks out between the two countries. the inquest into the london bridge attacks has been hearing how spanish victim ignacio echeverria tried to fight off the attackers by hitting them
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with just his skateboard. in sport, steve clarke has been confirmed as scotland's new head coach after leaving kilmarnock a day after guiding them to third in the scottish premiership. brighton are expected to announce graham potter as their manager after the seagulls sacked chris houghton last week. one of tennis‘s stars has been speaking to the bbc about how motherhood has impacted her career. victoria aza renka impacted her career. victoria azarenka said she thought she would never play again after a surprise pregnancy in 2016. more just after half past. for the we are middlesbrough project, the bbc is spending a week focusing on the stories of the town — including its men, their mental
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health and music scene. well we can now speak to mike mcgrother — a local musician and men's mental health advocate with projects across teeside, who david cameron hailed as "point of light in young people's lives" during his time as prime minister. that is not a bad thing for anybody to say. first, you're a teessider, does it get a bad wrap from outside. i don't know, it is an area that is not difficult to define. we are not newcastle and we are not leeds. but thatis newcastle and we are not leeds. but that is our strength, we are like a melting pot. you take the raw materials as people, take your ideas and if you look around the world, you would be pushed to find a place that doesn't have teesside representatives. the history of the region is vital, but it had a
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malaise in the 705 and 805 and is rebuilding that. with that comes problems, particularly for men, many who have lost theirjobs. once you ta ke who have lost theirjobs. once you take somebody‘s identity, be that an individual or a community, they start to struggling with a lot of other related things, their place in the family and the community, a sense of their pride goes down. what we have always inherited from our, a lot of our irish ancestors came to the region, was the sense of a good work ethic, we're full of ideas, if you give us the opportunity we will deliver, we always have and we will again. you have a three-pronged attack on this. the choir first. infa nt attack on this. the choir first. infant hercules, how did you get men interested in that to start with?
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yeah, well it wasn't rocket science if you live around here. if you set anything up in a pub, people will come. so, iwas anything up in a pub, people will come. so, i was asked to form a choir that would represent the, our heritage and our geography and our people. so what i did was i put a bartap on and people. so what i did was i put a bar tap on and the first week we had about six people turned up. a free drink? yes, just the one mind! then the next week there was 24. now we are up to about 50 lads who turn up each week and itjust gives us a chance to let our hair down, a lot of them haven't got hair, but be a bit of a brotherhood, sing songs that make us proud and socialise. the music is secondary is it? yeah... i can't see, maybe i the music is secondary is it? yeah... ican't see, maybe i am. it is the words and the spirit of the
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choir that i think is important. you have set up what you call a social clu b have set up what you call a social club for the 21st century tshs pals. explain that. around here as in a lot of industrial areas, the social clu bs a re lot of industrial areas, the social clubs are where people would go and talk about their problems and they tended to be attacked to factories and foundries and as they have gone, so and foundries and as they have gone, so have the social clubs. i tried to create a virtual environment where men in particular come together and have a sense of identity. walk the line is another initiative that, benefits prisoners among those who you help? yeah, i i'm a firm believer a community isn't what you pick and choose, it must involve the whole and notjust different sections. i have been working in home house prison in stockton and
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i'm asking the prisoners to help me to help other people to learn from their lessons in life and i have become if you like their mouth piece, their voice in the community and we are spreading messages about mental health and recovery from addiction and choices in life, including criminalology. somebody comes to middlesbrough for the first time, how would you describe that community feel, it is a disparate community, there are a lot of asylum seekers and yet that word community i keep hearing it. we always have been. we are a young community, less than 250 years, but we have been a place that welcomes people from across the world and i think that is pa rt across the world and i think that is part of reason why wherever i travel asa part of reason why wherever i travel as a musician, the first person i seem as a musician, the first person i seem to meet seems to come from teesside, wherever it is in the
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world. we are a welcoming community and made up of a lot of different facets. when you put that together and you add a spark, you get something that is unique and special. thank you. let's take a closer look at this town — the bbc‘s steph mcgovern was born and bred here and she's been tackling a look at a recent poll about the town. this is my home town, middlesbrough, and i know loads of you know this because i bang on about it all the time on the telly — i am really proud to be from here. it has given me my accent, a great education and some of my happiest memories. i am independent and resilient, because i grew up here. so, a couple of years ago when a report came out saying this was the worst place to grow up as a girl in england and wales, i was absolutely raging. and i wasn't the only one. so were liz and krista.
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to teach girls to believe in themselves and when they work together that they can accomplish their dreams. brilliant answer. in response, they set up a charity called rubies to help empower girls. i was really upset and disappointed having grown up in middlesbrough my whole life, ijust thought it was not a league table i wanted to be associated with really or our girls. so we decided we needed to put a different message out there. before you were doing this, did any of you feel like you weren't good enough. did you! oh, my god, that makes me really sad. before i started rubies i used to hate everything about me. i don't know why. i always thought i was ugly... 0hh, i want to hug you cause you are not. you are gorgeous and you're brilliant. how do you feel now? ifeel like i'm beautiful. you are beautiful and do you know what, you said that really quietly but i am so pleased you feel like that. it's teaching us to not bottle up all the feelings and think that we are good enough. i never thought i would be able to become a doctor but rubies has helped me to believe i can do it
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if i put my mind to it and keep it going to school. just because this is my home town i am not going to pretend things are perfect. of course, they're not. it has problems just like anywhere but things are improving. would you all say you are confident women? yes. meeting some of the girls studying at middlesbrough college, there is no shortage of ambition. i am going to uni in september, doing primary education with mathematics. brilliant. what do you want to do? work in a day nursery. i actually already work as an electrical technician. you're doing an apprenticeship? yeah. do you think it's harder being a girl here compared to anywhere else in the country? not at all. i think they're focusing on the negative and not looking at the positives of middlesborough. do you think anything more could be done? more work experience. more focus on mental health. because with having confidence issues, things to help deal with it and conquer it is a big issue, anywhere, not just middlesborough. what these girls also
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need are role models. as female business owners we are giving back now and we are trying to encourage people. these businesswomen think they are making progress. in the last few years, i think there has been much more collaboration. there's been initiatives like business women awards but much more working in partnership. there have been some real challenges in the area but there's also amazing regeneration and innovation happening locally. i thinkjust that pride that you cannot measure and it counts for so much. we have this momentum and we must keep it going, we must encourage our young people to challenge themselves, to try something new, to show them what opportunities are out there. are you proud to be from middlesborough? all: yes. do you think you can do just as well as anybody else in the country? yes. good, because you can. yeahhh! steph mcgovern, bbc news, middlesbrough.
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everybody i speak to here knows her! and for the diverse town with plenty of culture, there's also a drive towards inclusive exercise. like boro is a running club which meets at centre square in middlesbrough every week, for everyone, of any ability, designed to embrace everyone. we can now speak to like boro founders gavinjasinek—smith and danny lowe. welcome, you're both middlesbrough born and bred, when you decided to set up this group, what was the catalyst, what made you think we can do something? what we wanted to do was be positive and put a positive message out there. i think at the time we set this up, there was a lot of negativity around and we felt this is the time to really talk about people in a positive way. this is the time to really talk about people in a positive waym was the manchester bombing i think that probably... i was in a site cabin at middlesbrough town hall and
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i was having a conversation a scaffolder and it was a moderate, measured conversation, a lot of his friends came in for bait time and the tone changed and he jumped on that bandwagon. i went to see gav and said we need to do something and show the positive things in this town. what happened then? we talked about doing an event and it was to promote middlesbrough, middlesbrough was built on migration. what became middlesbrough, there was 100,000 people here, because people came from all over the place and made it this beautiful diverse mix of people. that is something we want to celebrate. so we put on an event based on that. having been here not very long, there is a sense of community that people seem to be
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proud of, if you're outside middlesbrough you don't hear of this. no, the negative stories seem to get out quicker. it seems like an easy stick to beat. why do you think? it is very unfashionable, even the accent, it sounds rough and people say it doesn't sound intellectual. there is a lot of industrial small towns that don't get that kind of coverage, so, but that wasn't why we did this, we wa nted that wasn't why we did this, we wanted to be positive. did you find that there was a need, that perhaps people themselves were not aware of? yeah. that is exactly what this whole thing is about. a lot of people, so many families have background from all over the place and a lot of things we have been doing is highlighting that and people who have gone, you know, i
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didn't realise, that street was named after the scandinavian influence, that road was and our family lives there and people go, hang on and when you see the penny drop and people think a bit, that is what is fantastic for us. the more people are positive, the better. a generation here will remember this isa a generation here will remember this is a thriving steel town, with big industry. it has gone. what has that done, particularly to the men of this town? it has left a massive weight, something that possibly gives us a lack of identity, because we always came to that industry, that steel. 0ne came to that industry, that steel. one thing we want to celebrate is, can people replace that industry as the void? can we celebrate people, and the diversity, and use that as our currency, the fact that we've got so many willing, hard—working people? how do you do it? is there a particular skill set in this area? i
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hear about technology, and this is very much a digital town. computer gaming is very big here, computer game manufacturing and programming. technologies... there is, though, but for me, anything can happen if people get behind things. it doesn't matter if it is technological steel works or whatever. the thing that makes it happen as positive people, and that is one of the biggest things we have to promote. do you find that when you get people together, that positivityjust comes? it just together, that positivityjust comes? itjust flows, doesn't it? the running group has been unbelievable. after the first event, danny was saying, i want to do everything every week, spread that positivity every single week, and how do we do it? so we went from an event to a running group. the first one wasjust, event to a running group. the first one was just, the first person over the line, you celebrate, you clap, you pass that on. 0ver the line, you celebrate, you clap, you pass that on. over the year, people have got to know each other. people just get to know each other, and it is really an absolute joy.”
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have am glad you have had that was, because you are about to leave me a poem? correct, a poem written for the first event, the ethos of what the first event, the ethos of what the first event was about, and it is called borough immigrant. i would like you to read it. i love the borough, me. i'm at borough immigrant, spent my youth in thornaby. towns whose name is called after their viking history. thornaby. towns whose name is called aftertheirviking history. like this town's history, and doors along the tees. we've used each other's inputs, values, capabilities. i love the borough, me, because this town goes with ease. if your sound, so am i. goes with ease. if your sound, so am i, and you do as you please. moses made his way as a member of the world. it is still alive, because this town is still alive. and i'm a borough citizen, an immigrant, in a world in which so much of what we drive is tied by bonds that go on to this town of mine, and yours, and everyone's, of course, because that is how it has been since day dot.
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lama is how it has been since day dot. i am a borough citizen, that means my heart is warm. i live among these places, these faces are one. because i'm a borough citizen. i love the borough, me. i'm borough citizen, a proud immigrant is me. thank you, danny. nice to meet you both. thank you very much. plenty more throughout the afternoon, but first, let's catch up with the sport. that was amazing. thank you, simon. a busy day of managerial appointments in football. two announcements. i'll bring news of brighton's new manager shortly, but first, steve clarke has been confirmed as scotland's new head coach on a three—year deal, the day after he guided kilmarnock to third in the scottish premiership. clark, voted pfa scotland's manager of the year, replaces alex mcleish, who left in april. he takes over a scotla nd left in april. he takes over a scotland side sitting fifth in their euro 2020 qualifying group after two
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games. graham potter has become brighton's new manager on a four—year deal. he joins after a year with swansea city, who he guided to a tenth place finish in the championship last season. the announcement comes a week after the seagull sacked chris hughton afterfinishing week after the seagull sacked chris hughton after finishing 17th in the premier league, having wonjust three of the last 23 games. as pa rt of three of the last 23 games. as part of our change the game season, we have spoken to victoria aza renka season, we have spoken to victoria azarenka about her return to tennis after the birth of her son. along with other leading players, she has successfully campaigned for the introduction of new ranking protection for new mothers. she feared that she would not play tennis again after his surprise pregnancy in 2016. in my mind, my first thing was the thought, oh, my god, my career is over. i will never play tennis again, and! over. i will never play tennis again, and i don't know what to do. i was shocked, i was panicked. but then, it was all about, i know i am
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going to come back, and i know when iam going going to come back, and i know when i am going to come back, because i felt that it is a blessing for me, you know? it is a blessing, but i still want to have my own dreams, i still want to have my own dreams, i still want to have my own dreams, i still want to have my own career. tom daley‘s husband dustin lance black says there is an illness within british swimming which has led to a family averse culture. black is also described the organisation is corrupt and toxic on twitter. an issue about the use of child buggies arose during the diving world series, where tom daley one they mixed three metre synchro gold alongside grace reid. british swimming said it was extremely disappointed black felt he couldn't be there to support tom. billy gong says he was over the moon after winning a race for the first time since losing his legs in a crash two years ago. he posted this picture on social media after winning the power grand prix. in it he, he said he could not believe it and did not think two years on, he would be winning races. he spoke to
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bbc sport about how motor racing has helped his recovery. when i wasn't racing, i felt like helped his recovery. when i wasn't racing, ifelt like i was missing out on so many of the things that i enjoyed doing before, and getting that back racing definitely gave me the extra motivation and other areas to get back walking in my day—to—day life and stuff like that, itjust spurred me on. i don't look at my disability has a negative thing. i look at it asa has a negative thing. i look at it as a challenge that i got to overcome, and there are more challenges racing as an npt than i had when i was racing with both my legs beforehand, but yeah, it's something i enjoy doing and something i enjoy doing and something that is just part of me, i guess. 0ne guess. one of britain's leading female racing drivers, jamie chadwick, has joined the formula 1 williams team isa joined the formula 1 williams team is a development driver. she's the only woman to win a british formula 3 race, and she is currently leading the standings and the new all—female w series afterfinishing the standings and the new all—female w series after finishing first and
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second in the opening races. chadwick will attend three grand prix is for williams this year, starting with the british one in july. and fullback israel folau has decided not to appeal against his sacking by rugby australia for homophobic comments he posted on social media. he said he did not accept the findings of the panel that upheld his dismissal, but was considering potential avenues. folau could still take his case to the high court in australia. that is all the sport for now. we will have more for you in the next hour. thank you very much. azi farni will be back later. i don't know if i will be! how chief political correspondent vicky young is here. hello. i am diversifying into cuisine. yes. i'm not sure that is a great idea. but we will first introduce you to the national dish of middlesbrough, as described, which is the parmo. vicky has done lots of research on this
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and will now tell me... oh, my god. what on earth is this? first thing to say, it it is really healthy. yes, it looks it! some research done is said that one of these and some chips is 2600 calories. so this is a diet for me, then! its really healthy! you tell me what you think is in it. ok, i'll tell you. there is in it. ok, i'll tell you. there is chicken. chicken, that's nice. parmesan, some chips, and basher mel source. parmesan, some chips, and basher mel source. in this particular one is from the central park restaurant in middlesbrough. —— bechamel source. you keep talking. it is said to have been created by a chef in the american army in world war ii. he was wounded, brought to the uk, treated here, and eventually brought to middlesbrough. .. treated for what, a heart attack in terra bank where he at the grill in
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19 58. do you want some? not very much. you have got to have a bit of salad with it. you had chocolate for breakfast! this is really good. 2000 calories? apparently, 2600 with that and that. go on. this is not going to end well, as it? this will is good. the only way ican get it? this will is good. the only way i can get vicky be quiet. this is unbelievable! no, this is not working at all. so it is a bit like a schnitzel? is it? apparently. actually, it is really nice. it is really good. well, there you are. where is that going afterwards? i know where that is going afterwards! coming back with me! thank you very much. i can't speak. now, on
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afternoon live, time to go nationwide to see what's happening in our newsrooms around the uk. rights, as we clear all that away... good? in a moment, i'llspeak to matt campbell, who is with me to tell us about an lgbt nightclub here in middlesbrough that is being reopened after its own staff stepped in to save it. also joining alsojoining us, greatjoy. peter leavy is in hull to tell us about a model railway club which is raising funds after an exhibition was destroyed. how was it destroyed? tell us about this, peter, what happened to it? this is the sad story of the market de ping model railway club. they have their annual
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show in stamford in lincolnshire for the last 12 years. months of planning goes into making one of these shows. you can imagine the horror when they were greeted with these scenes on saturday morning. the layout and all the trains were destroyed by vandals. hours of painstaking work, and also, look at the pictures, and there were some very valuable engine is ruined, just hit with a hammer. 0ne very valuable engine is ruined, just hit with a hammer. one of those engines was worth £8,000. apparently, a mindless act, hitting the equipment with hammers, pure vandalism. people have been horrified by the story, and today it has had worldwide coverage, so they will probably even be talking about it in middlesbrough. people have been shocked and saddened. well, from the market de ping model railway club, this is peter davies. absolute horror. i have never seen anything like it in my life. it was just total devastation. the layout had taken many years to build, one of the m25, and they were just so
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much match would. it was unbelievable. this is just much match would. it was unbelievable. this isjust one example of a logo that had been attacked with a hammer, been thrown around the room. just unbelievable. i'll tell you what, peter, that is heartbreaking, even if you are not into model railways. you can see how upset he is. but i gather there is some rather good news this afternoon? yes, i mean, he caused it, total wanton destruction of the highest order, those are his words. at the story has got so much coverage and so at the story has got so much coverage and so many at the story has got so much coverage and so many people talking today, and after an appearance on afternoon live, what next? but a just giving page was set up by the model railway club. i have the screen model railway club. i have the screen in front of me, and the latest total is over £63,000. that has been raised since the weekend, and the owner has set a target of only £500. amazing generosity. since you have been in the air this afternoon, simon, sir rod stewart, a
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model railway fan, which i did not know, has given a donation of £10,000 to the club. he has also urged fellow enthusiasts —— you can't make this up, really —— jools holland and roger daltrey to do the same. and i would say that four youths were arrested in connection with the incident on saturday morning, but have been released on bail. simon, idon't morning, but have been released on bail. simon, i don't know if you have a miniature one, but for enthusiasts, this is really angered them, and it has had amazing coverage today throughout the world, actually. yes, peter, a lot of people have been shouting at me, why don't you go to hull, or it sounded like that. good to talk to you, thank you very much. you get one over me, butjust remember, that's the only one! when i heard the words a few minutes ago, i can't speak, the nation suddenly went, at last! i know you're desperate to do the
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show. you're going to have to wait, peter leavey in hell. always good to see you. thank you very much. now, matthew, here in middlesbrough. tell us first of all, because there was a night club, what happened to it? so, basically, it sort of started to decline. there were a group of us working there, and essentially, what happened was, it had a flood, and then a number of other factors, like then a number of other factors, like the place just kind then a number of other factors, like the placejust kind of then a number of other factors, like the place just kind of decline, then a number of other factors, like the placejust kind of decline, and the placejust kind of decline, and the old owner i think was just done in the end. so he decides to shut it down, effectively. and then what happened? it was a bit of a funny one. a couple of us took a managerial role over the last six months or so, and we all kind of got together and went, you know what? i think it's really sad that that has closed. for all of us, it was like a really close community, and we had really lovely people who work there. we
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discussed it and said, let's have a go and see if we can put something together. within 24 hours, we wrote this huge business plan and started... i have had business experience before, and the others have had lots of different experiences, so have had lots of different experiences, so we have had lots of different experiences, so we put all of those together, and this business plan, took it to the landlord, and then there was a load of competition, so a load of other people applying for the same bar, not to keep it as it was but to change it to something different. luckily, the landlord chose us, so three months on, we have got the keys, everything is sorted, the legalities are done. have got the keys, everything is sorted, the legalities are donem is this friday? this friday! scary stuff. and what is it called? it is called club tiny on albert road. on albert road. there seems to be a thriving arts culture in middlesbrough, and there is a community feel particularly amongst young people. is that part of your business plan, that you know people will use it? absolutely. my other job is as a teacher, and this area is massively cultural generally, and
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there is a legacy of that in the lg bt there is a legacy of that in the lgbt scene as well. that whole scene is generally very artistic in everything they do. it's a very extra scene! what is a very extra scene? there are lots of drag queens, lots of crazy make—up, eve ryo ne queens, lots of crazy make—up, everyone speaks their mind, and generally has good relationships with the other artistic folk in the area as well. and what sort of catchment area are you looking at? everywhere, the whole of tees valley, from darlington up to sunderland, redcar, middlesbrough central. just everywhere. why, when one thinks of middlesbrough, that is not necessarily the first image that comes to mind? is that something thatis comes to mind? is that something that is changing? i think so. i think over the last few years, we have had to change because of the industry that it is famous for is not as busy as it was. there is not that same... young people aren't necessarily going into those industries any more, so creativity
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is really something that is i think quite inherent about this area anyway. you have to come up with creative solutions to your problems, and myfamily creative solutions to your problems, and my family have come from an engineering background, so my grandfather, my grandmother, my mum, all of my side of the family are from that side, so i have gone into the arts and the cultural stuff. we are coming from middlesbrough this week, and you have the big weekend next weekend. that is not a bad weekend to launch a new club, is it? absolutely not. to be honest, it was not supposed to happen this weekend but last weekend. the way things happen in business, we had to delay it slightly. really glad we did, to be honest, because it has given us more time to put finishing touches on. with the big weekend, it's such an opportunity for this area. we thought, is so cool we can do something alongside it. and because it's called tiny, you've got the big
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weekend and the tiny weeken! we are working with the crowds and offering special offers to people who have been to gigs and things, get them through the doors. we are hoping it is remembered. something that strikes me, given the cultural difference in middlesbrough, very disparate communities. how does an lgbt club fit in? are the some tensions?” wouldn't say so. there have been some issues surrounding the community, in terms of... there have been a couple of attacks and things like that in previous years. recently, it is nowhere near as often as it used to be, and it does feel like there is a real air of a cce pta nce feel like there is a real air of acceptance at the moment, and that is nice that that is changing, and that we are going into a place that seems a lot more... and generationally, there is a difference between the younger generation of young lgbt people, who are reaching out and talking to
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people, and tweeting, and doing more social stuff, that he stigmatises it, you know? it is not an issue any more, and that is great. it is great that there are people out there doing positive stuff. well, i wish you all the luck. hope it goes well. great to talk to you. good to talk to you. thank you very much. that is what is happening in middlesbrough, and that is nationwide this evening. and if you would like to see more on any of those stories, you can access them via the bbc iplayer, and a reminder, we go nationwide every weekday afternoon at 4:30pm here on afternoon live. time now for the business news. thomas cook shares have continued to fall thomas cook shares have continued to fa ll after thomas cook shares have continued to fall after the big slide began at the end of the last week. now the share price is down to around 10 pence.
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the firm has moved to reassure customers, to reassure customers, though, its business as usual. but on thursday the firm reported a half year loss of one and a half billion pounds — then on friday analysts at citigroup said it considered the shares to be worthless. the wider ftse100 has fallen by around half a per cent today. investors have been once again rattled by what seems as another escalation of equity the china—us trade war — with action against the telecoms giant huawei which has led to google banning the firm from some of its updates. and tata motors — the owner ofjaguar land rover — has reported a 47 per cent drop in quarterly profits — and a full year pre tax loss of 3.6 billion pounds. the group is really struggling to sell the luxury cars in key markets such as china. however, jlr returned to profit in the fourth quarter — following a big restructuring and cost cutting drive. joining us now from the city is james hughes, chief market analyst at axi trader. hello there. let's talk about thomas cook, because it has been a huge
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slide, down to around ten p. what is happening? 0f slide, down to around ten p. what is happening? of course, this is all down to this confident situation, and you can't really blame consumers for being a little bit wary of what is going on here, because we have seen is going on here, because we have seen this story so many times before, with these holiday companies and these budget airlines we have seen and these budget airlines we have seen before. we have seen people go away on holidays and be stranded. this doesn't mean, of course, that this is going to happen to thomas cook customers. they have been tweeting all day. they have had a real pr offensive around the whole situation of really trying to instill that bit of confidence, still, saying, we will still be able to ta ke still, saying, we will still be able to take you on your holidays, we are looking strong financially, we are looking strong financially, we are looking in a strong financial position, and lenders are helping us, which is one of the things they have said in the last couple of days. the banks are helping them to prepare for that winter period where they don't necessarily get so much in terms of cash flow in, because
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the summertime is the key time for a company like thomas cook. so they are trying to instil confidence, but it's a real struggle when this has happened so many times before, you don't see too much of a light at the end of the tunnel at the moment, because it is continuous bad news after bad news. the numbers are not there, and whether thomas cook tell us they have a good performance or not, it is hard to tell that within the numbers they are producing. do you think there is light at the end of the tunnel forjaguar land rover? we have seen a bit of a turnaround of the last quarter. yes, for sure, and we have seenjaguar land rover perform slightly better than expected. tata motors posted one of the biggest corporate losses in indian history, so the fact that they are returning to some kind of profitability. but there are some sceptical points within there. china, if you look at a lot of earnings coming from other areas of the economy, a lot of companies
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blaming a slowdown in china, and the fa ct blaming a slowdown in china, and the fact that that is just not picking up. but what tata motors say about jaguar land rover is that they are seeing a pick—up in the sales of luxury saloon cars, 4x45, and especially within china, and they expect the chinese market in terms of their cars to return to growth within the next quarter, which is a big statement when you consider there is so much going on in terms of china, there's so much uncertainty going on around the economy, we don't know what the trade war the us and china is going to mean for the chinese economy going forward, and how hard that is going forward, and how hard that is going to hit. so it is a big statement to say, we actually see a return to growth and sales in china within the next couple of quarters, when so many companies are reporting bad numbers on the back of the fact that sales in china are just really stagnant. 0k,james hughes, many stagnant. 0k, james hughes, many thanks. chief markets analyst at axitrader. that's all the business news from me for now. back to you, simon.
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thank you very much. for the we are middlesbrough project, the bbc are spending a week focusing on the stories of this town. the middlesbrough football club foundation is an independent charity that works with 35,000 people every year and runs 30 different projects that are all grassroots —based, with schools, looking at mental health support, and back to work programmes, and! support, and back to work programmes, and i have great pleasure to say that anne—marie anderson from the foundation is with me now. so who is attained at? how does it work? we work with a huge cross—section of the community, and anybody can be a pa rt the community, and anybody can be a part of what we deliver. so our youngest participant is only two, and comes to soccer youngest participant is only two, and comes to soccer sessions at our football centre with their parents, and enjoys a weekly session of learning to play football. and our old est learning to play football. and our oldest participant is 96, and he
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will come along to work with us through our dementia programmes. so we look and work with the elderly, reminiscing about days gone by and the football club gone by, and then everybody in between. so, you know, it's everybody in between. so, you know, its huge. everybody in between. so, you know, it's huge. but the brand and the badge of the club, we won't mention what's going on at the moment, the search for a new manager at least. but how important is that in getting people in? it's massively important. that badge and that brand is something that people now, they like it, they trust it, and the stadium itself is a huge beacon for people locally, and that brand engages people where other people fail to engage elsewhere. it is something people have an affinity to, and they just love it and will come along. in
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terms of difficult issues for young men and others, mental health, things like that, when football is at the heart of it, they perhaps tend to open up in a way they wouldn't otherwise? absolutely, and the programmes we offer around mental health particularly offer a sense of belonging for people. it's quite difficult when you have a mental health problem to feel like you belong anywhere, trust anybody, or have any kind of friendships, and belonging to a team is really, really important for all of us, whether that be through work, through a sports club, and the work that we do helps people hugely to ove rco m e that we do helps people hugely to overcome the barriers. they feel less isolated. they have a support network around them. they have people just like them playing network around them. they have peoplejust like them playing on network around them. they have people just like them playing on a tea m people just like them playing on a team with them, having the same issues, and that's really important. that sense of community, which i am getting loud and clearfor that sense of community, which i am getting loud and clear for many when
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i have spoken to this afternoon, that that is something the club looks at, but there is also a large proportion of asylum seekers, refugees, in this town, and they too get involved? absolutely, so we run a programme called club together, which is a programme that supports refugees and asylum seekers. they come to us and learn english, but most importantly, they partake in the international language that is football. again, it is that sense of belonging. belonging to a team, belonging. belonging to a team, belonging to a culture, and what it is to live in middlesbrough and feel welcome. a huge part of what we do is about making sure that whoever comes to us feels welcome. the guys that come and are part of the refugee or asylum programme work together with the guys that come to our mental health programmes, they play against each other, and it's so nice, because you see them walking down the street, and they would have
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never really talked to each other in the past, or might have been a little bit dubious about, who is this person? they will high five each other in the street, they will say, are you coming down to the project on sunday? and it is really building friendships in the communities, and that is so important that that community cohesion and togetherness is built upon football and i think that is a great thing. great to talk to you about it. ann—marie anderson from the football clu b ann—marie anderson from the football club foundation. that is it from afternoon live this afternoon. i will be back in the five o'clock hour briefly, but in the meantime, let's get a weather update from sarah. hello. the weather has been somewhat changeable over the past couple of days, and todayis over the past couple of days, and today is no exception. some warm sunshine over there, but equally some thundery and heavy showers. temperatures in between showers doing reasonably well, 14—21 also. most showers will be for eastern england. around south coast as well.
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for scotland, more cloud persists through this evening and overnight, with patchy rain, but elsewhere, the rain should clear, so it becomes dry overnight, and temperatures fall to about 6—10 for most of us. patchy rain across most of scotland, a few misty patches here and there which should clear away very quickly tomorrow. tomorrow sees a fine day for most of us. we will keep the cloud and outbreaks of rain across northern and eastern scotland. elsewhere, just the chance of a rogue shower elsewhere, just the chance of a rogue shower across parts elsewhere, just the chance of a rogue shower across parts of eastern england, but for most places, it looks like a dry day with plenty of sunshine on offer, and it will feel quite warm in that sunshine, with highs of 14—22. today at five: google blocks some of its services from huawei — the world's second biggest maker of smartphones. it comes after the us government blacklisted the chinese company as a security threat.
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this is unfortunate for huawei because we are a football in the middle of a massive trade war between the united states and china. we'll look at what impact google's move could have on huawei customers. the other main stories on bbc news at five: moments later, he was killed trying to fight off the london bridge attackers with his skateboard. the electoral commission says it will visit the brexit party's office tomorrow to review how its funds are received.
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