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tv   Outside Source  BBC News  July 15, 2019 9:00pm-10:01pm BST

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hello, i'm ros atkins. this is outside source. president trump is digging in after those racist remarks about four democrats. if you hate our country, if you don't like our country, if you're not happy here, you can leave. in a tweet he told the congresswomen of colour to go back to the countries they came from. here's what one of them had to say. he relies on racism, division and anti—immigrant sentiment to consolidate power because he does not have a positive vision for the future of america. we will hear from the two contenders to become the uk's next prime minister on what they think of
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president trump's racist tweets. surgeons in the uk successfully separate these conjoined twins from pakistan after 50 hours of surgery. we will see how that was done. the twins have been in theatre now for more than seven hours, and there are still seven hours of this operation to go. so far everything is going to plan, and both girls are doing well. we will speak to the co—author of ground—breaking research that finds the origins of anorexia nervosa are both in the mind and the body. the fallout from donald trump's racist tweets continues. and america's profound political and cultural divisions are there for all of us to see once again. this was what the president
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said yesterday. "progressive democrat congresswomen, who originally came from countries whose governments are a complete and total catastrophe..." and he went on to say... "why don't they go back and help fix the totally broken and crime infested places from which they came?" the women he was talking about are these three congresswomen. alexandria ocasio—cortez, rashida tlaib and ayanna pressley — who were born in the us. and this woman, ilhan omar — she came to the us as a refugee from somalia when she was 12. this is the reaction of alexandria ocasio—cortez. it's unfortunate that he feels the way he feels about people of colour in this country. it's unfortunate the way he feels about immigrants, naturalised citizens or not, in this country. but i think what i would tell him is that it's time to move on. he relies on racism, division and anti—immigrant sentiment to consolidate power because he does not have a positive vision for the future of america.
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no backing down from doanld trump. this is from a couple of hours ago. it doesn't concern you that many people saw that tweet as racist, and that white nationalist groups are finding common cause with you on that point? it doesn't concern me because many people agree with me, and all i'm saying, if they want to leave, they can leave. now, it doesn't say "leave forever". it says leave, but what it says... and go where? john, what that says as if they're not happy with the united states, if they are doing nothing but criticising us all the time... you see these people walking down criticising the united states... well, senior republicans have largely been silent or supportive of what president trump has said. many democratics though
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have condemned him. this is amy pope, a former advisor to president obama. it's completely indefensible. right, this is the president of the united states. he is representing all americans, and he is attacking american citizens who are notjust representing themselves but they're representing their constituencies. this is something that should be condemned in the strongest terms, especially by republicans. we really need the republicans to stand up here. i mean, this is not republican rhetoric. this is unique to this particular individual, and republicans are looking for support from minorities as well. they cannot be alienating huge populations within the united states — and their silence is deafening. as amy pope was saying, republicans have not condemend the racism in president trump's tweet. the only real comment has come from senator susan collins, who says... well, the chief of staff for vice
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president, mike pence, has also defended the president, saying... this women here is the current transportation secretary, an asian immigrant. to try to understand that logic, this is more of what he said... he has an asian woman of colour in his cabinet... element what does that... i am making the case that this is not a universal statement he is making, he is making it about the very specific, pretty much the individual member of congress who i think has said mostly that she has unhappy about the united states of america. next literary analysis of katty kay in washington. i had a couple of interesting conversations, one with the donald trump supporter, the founder of latinos for trump, and she was effectively saying the same things, she buys the presidents argument is that this is what a lot of people think, people shouldn't be
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this critical and actually is congresswomen where being anti—american. she flat out denied the idea president trump was racist. i also spoke to president trump's very briefly communications director and he said the president might be doing this for political reasons, it might bea doing this for political reasons, it might be a tactic for him to try to win the 2020 election, but it is fundamentally un—american, and he called it racially charged, and said he would advise the president if he was still working in the white house to ta ke was still working in the white house to take the high road not to get involved in this kind of discussion and not use this kind of language. the republican senator lindsey graham is one of president trump's strongest allies and he has declined to condemn the president over these racist tweets. we all know that aoc and this crowd are a bunch of communists, they hate israel, they hate our own country, they are calling our border patrol agents concentration camp guards. they accuse people who support israel of doing it for the
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accuse people who support israel of doing it forthe benjamins, accuse people who support israel of doing it for the benjamins, they are anti—semitic, anti—american. well, this isn't the first storm that donald trump has stirred up with controversial remarks. in january of last year he was called racist after he described african nations — as well as haiti and el salvador — as "shitholes". and in 2017, after this white nationalist rally in virginia in which a woman was killed after a man deliberately drove his car into protesters, mr trump sparked outrage by saying there were "very fine people on both sides" of that rally. let's go back to katty in washington. donald trump today at the white house saying, look, a lot of people agree with me. a lot of people think this is controversial but he thinks it has a lot of support. he thinks this is a winning political strategy for him and that for the 28—32% of the american public who seem to support him whatever he does, this kind of thing galvanises their support, but it does very much play into the notion that the republican party is the party of white people. this is a notion that back in 2012,
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when the republicans lost with mitt romney to barack 0bama, they wrote a whole thesis, ros on how they had to do outreach to minority groups, get more african—american voters, get more african—american voters, get more hispanic voters, by appealing to those voters and not using this kind of language, so we have seen a real sea change in the republican party strategy from 2012 up until 2019. this is now the party of donald trump and it acts the way donald trump and it acts the way donald trump and it acts the way donald trump wants it to act. let's talk a little bit more about the republicans, katty. is it a case of some behind—the—scenes saying, we don't like this but politically we can't afford to speak out? or are they genuinely aligned behind the president? there is probably some of both. for elected republican officials they have seen that criticising donald trump on this kind of thing comes with a very high cost, and supporting donald trump has enormous amounts of benefits.
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taking somebody like lindsey graham, the outspoken hawk on foreign policy used to be a critic of donald trump, is running for re—election in south carolina, was down in the polls, changed his tune and has become a hard—line supporter on donald trump including on the issue of these tweets and is now up in the polls, so somebody like that is looking at the president and thinking, i am better off aligning myself with donald trump, i can't afford to criticise him. take someone like mitch mcconnell, the leader of the republicans in the senate, back when the president said the hispanic origin judge, the president said the hispanic originjudge, an the president said the hispanic origin judge, an american who came from mexico originally, couldn't be impartial because he came from mexico, you had someone like mitch mcconnell saying that kind of language was unacceptable and the president should not use it. 2019, mitch mcconnell, on this particular incident, notably silent, so that is the shift in the republican party. borisjohnson boris johnson and jeremy hunt borisjohnson and jeremy hunt other two men trying to be the uk's next
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prime minister and both in the last hour have been asked about president trump's comments. the two had their last encounter before the conservative party chooses its next leader who in turn will become the uk's next prime minister. more on that debate more broadly in a moment firstly here are their comments on donald trump's racist tweets. sigh andi donald trump's racist tweets. sigh and i said what i said. i think he was totally u na cce pta ble and i said what i said. i think he was totally unacceptable -- welcome is it what i said. in a modern multicultural country which you are trying to lead. i simply can't understand how a leader of that country could set. why won't you condemn it as racist? you can take from what i said what i think about president trump's woods. wasn't racist, mr hunt? ithink president trump's woods. wasn't racist, mr hunt? i think that. .. look, i am racist, mr hunt? i think that. .. look, iam foreign racist, mr hunt? i think that. .. look, i am foreign secretary and this is the president of the country that happens to be our closest ally and so it is not going to help the situation to use that kind of
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language about the president of the united states. i can understand how many people in this country would wa nt many people in this country would want politicians like me to use those words, and would feel that sentiment, but i will make absolutely clear, and i hope i have made absolutely clear, how totally offensive it is to me that people are still saying that kind of thing. both men condemning the tweets. neither calling them racist, even though the tweets were racist. here isa though the tweets were racist. here is a political correspondent chris mason who watched the debate in london. 0nce mason who watched the debate in london. once it was over he spoke with two other conservative mps, one supporting jeremy hunt and one supporting jeremy hunt and one supporting boris johnson. supporting jeremy hunt and one supporting borisjohnson. welcome supporting jeremy hunt and one supporting boris johnson. welcome. the spin room where people are dissecting what they have just seen in this 90 minute debate hosted by the sun and talk radio. we have a supporter ofjeremy hunt, steve, and a supporter of boris johnson, dominic raab. quite a controversial discussion tonight. not the two men going at each other but having a
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fairly consensual conversation? two very big figures here, both of whom will play a central role in the next administration, and actually there isa administration, and actually there is a lot more unites than divides them. of course there are points of difference and it was quite crunchy tonight but you're right, it was conversational and consensual in parts. that is good because we are conservatives and we want to try to come back together and run the country. there was some crunchy stuff around immigration and points around brexit but ultimately it comes down to who you trust and can see on the world stage as your prime minister. we will talk about immigration ina minister. we will talk about immigration in a minute. a sense of there being a bit of a double act, dominic raab? i remember david davies and david cameron said this at the very end of a very long leadership contest in 2005, you're right, actually it has been a pretty good natured contest and there are some things we all agree. i think the one dividing line is boris's insistence we must leave by the end of october in brexit and i think jeremy still struggled a little with
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that and i think that is the defining issue in this contest and it was probably, over a rather long debate,... might make that clearly is one dividing line and one well rehearsed one. let's talk about immigration because pointedly boris johnson did not commit to cutting it, he talked about controlling it, whereas jeremy hunt said it, he talked about controlling it, whereasjeremy hunt said he would like to see it cut. it was likely a twist of fortune is because boris johnson said he had a proper plan for controlling it with an australian —based point system and what he will not do a set an arbitrary target because that is one of the reasons public trust in immigration has eroded over the years because we have failed in getting the current next target down so getting the current next target down sol getting the current next target down so i think he was trying to say target setting will happen in due course but the key thing is we will have the control over the advantages of immigration but also the pressures. all very well committing toa pressures. all very well committing to a cut but we have seen what has happened to the existing target, governments not coming anywhere near it? i agree with dominic to an
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extent, but over the last three years, it has been very hard to decipher what people meant by that brexit vote, from the prime minister and the government, but i think one thing that ran through is that desire to take control of our borders and immigration and i think jeremy was saying tonight i think they would feel it was a massive betrayal of the brexit vote if it did not see a reduction in net levels of immigration but ultimately jeremy isa levels of immigration but ultimately jeremy is a pragmatist, an entrepreneur, and we need to have the people that the economy needs, andl the people that the economy needs, and i think both men understand that. let's talk about these remarks from president trump over the weekend. strong words of condemnation from both candidates about what he had to say, but crucially neither of them being willing to describe what was said as racist. why not go that extra step, given how many people say that kind of language plain and simple as racist? i am a backbench mp and i think it was disgraceful what he said. i thought jeremy think it was disgraceful what he said. i thoughtjeremy should quite a lot of himself tonight actually as well as being across the detail. he said, you know, i have three
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children who are half chinese and half british, and if anyone said that about them i would be absolutely appalled, but he also saidl absolutely appalled, but he also said i am the british foreign secretary and if the rules of diplomacy doubt seem to exist on the other side of the atlantic they do exist here and i think that was the right thing to do. but what about calling it what it has had lots of people say it is straight up and down racism? he did, in his own words. he made reference to his own children and said it was out of order and children and said it was out of orderandl children and said it was out of order and i think that was the right way for the current setting foreign secretary who respects the office of president, the country that is our closest ally, i think you answered it in his own way and pretty well. do you think it was racist? sigh and i personally do, yes, and i think it was a disgraceful thing to say, but lam was a disgraceful thing to say, but iamon was a disgraceful thing to say, but i am on the backbenches, not the foreign secretary. we have seen criticism of borisjohnson in the last few weeks were not being willing to criticise the president and tonight he did but did not use the word racist? i think you got the balance right. steve has spoken
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aboutjeremy balance right. steve has spoken about jeremy being the balance right. steve has spoken aboutjeremy being the foreign secretary will actually both want to be the prime minister, well then i think they can be clear this is language they find it deplorable without attacking the president personally. do you think it is racist? i am the son of a refugee and have two boys at home who are half brazilian, well then i think it was totally deplorable. if someone said to me, you know, my wife or my boys should go home, itjust wouldn't make much sense. britain is their home, and one of the reasons we are so their home, and one of the reasons we are so proud to be british, particularly talking to someone like me were immigration is very much pa rt of me were immigration is very much part of my family life, that is what it means to be british. we integrate in this country and we take the opportunities this country has.” get that you find it deplorable and repugnant, but where they racist? i'm not really sure but i think it misses the point. i think they were wrong, pretty outrageous, and again in truth i don't know enough about the families of the congresswomen he was talking about. i don't think that language should be used in politics anyway. ijust that language should be used in politics anyway. i just wish for once president trump would surprise us once president trump would surprise us and just challenge the perception people have of him. he has had far
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too much involvement in this leadership campaign. this is about who will be the next british prime minister, who will appoint the next ambassador, who has the character to be on the world stage as our prime minister, this is aboutjeremy be on the world stage as our prime minister, this is about jeremy and boris, not donald trump. which is also why we are avoiding trying to be sucked into it because we want the message to clearly be about the message between these two make impressive candidate and what really matters to the british public. thank you, gents, we appreciate your time. perspectives from either side, then, and we are very nearly there. one more week to go and this will be over, except it won't because then there will be the formation of a new government but we're nearly there in this contest between borisjohnson and jeremy hunt. studio: and of course once we have a new government that government has to set about working out how to do some form of brexit deal that can actually get through the house of commons because the uk is due to leave the eu at the end of october. there will be no respite for chris, whatever he says, but it is true. we will know who wins the conservative
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party leadership election by next week. in a few minutes on outside source we will talk about south africa's former president who you can see in the middle, jacob zuma, strongly pushing back at allegations he presided over a web of corruption. that is all any brand—new inquiry looking at what the south africans call state ca ptu re. police in england and wales are targeting airports as part of a crackdown on forced marriage. campaigners say victims are more likely to be taken overseas during the summer holidays. police will train airport staff how to spot suspicious signs. aneeta prem is founder of the freedom charity, which works to eliminate forced marriage. many of these girls have no idea it will happen to them. they are told, particularly this time of year, they are going on a family holiday, not told they will be a potential bride, and they may just told they will be a potential bride, and they mayjust find out at told they will be a potential bride, and they may just find out at the airport themselves, and rather than
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getting on that plane, by raising the alarm, speaking to staff when they are being interviewed, as they are going through passport control, it will make a big difference, and knowing there is a last chance hope to stop them going abroad, because thatis to stop them going abroad, because that is really important. because once they are abroad they often don't know where they are and then it is very hard for them to communicate to charities like freedom or the forced marriage unit to get help. iam ros i am ros atkins. this is outside source, live from the bbc newsroom. our lead story... president trump intensifies the row over his racist remarks about four democratic congresswomen, by accusing them of being anti—american. let's turn to some of the main stories from bbc world service. the world health organisation says the confirmation of an ebola disease victim inside the congolese city of goma could be
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a game—changer. over 1,600 people have died of the disease in eastern congo in the outbreak that began a year ago, but this is the first confirmed case in a major city. floods have forced more than three million people out of their homes in northern india. it follows days of heavy monsoon rains. bihar is the worst affected state with almost two million people displaced so far. from bbc hindi. four children between the ages of 10 and 1a allegedy took this stolen car on a 1000km joyride in australia. they're reported to have driven for 11 hours from rockhampton in queensland to grafton in neighbouring new south wales. they've now been arrested. time to learn about an international study which has found the origins of anorexia nervosa is in the mind and in the body. this is a
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ground—breaking conclusion because it is currently seen as a psychiatric illness. scientists found these changes hard—wired into people's dna alter the way they processed fats and sugars and may make it easier to starve their bodies. first of all, here is the lead researcher... the metabolic picture we see with anorexia we don't fully understand yet, but it does seem that people with anorexia are genetically predisposed towards having a lower bmi, lower body fat, an increased risk of type 2 diabetes, and towards having higher levels of good cholesterol. researchers analysed the dna from 17,000 patients across 17 countries to see if they could find out more about anorexia, and the need to do this is urgent. anorexia nervosa has the highest mortality rate of any psychiatric illness and these are the figures behind that. 46% of sufferers make a full recovery, 33% improve, 20% of patients don't
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respond to treatment and become chronically ill. this is more from the bbc‘s james gallagher... anorexia nervosa largely affects young women but cannot delete my affect people of any age and any gender. there is often a conception that this is a modern disease but it has actually been around throughout human history and is prevalent all around the world —— but it can affect people of any age or any gender. if you go back 100 years people did think this was a disease solely of the body, something that happened in the body to cause the weight loss and the disease, but thenit weight loss and the disease, but then it moved to being largely a psychiatric disorder, people thinking it was all in the brain, and this latest study shows it is a little bit of both. we have a doctor from the university of north carolina, the co—author of the study, from chapel hill. cynthia, thank you very much for your time. can you help me understand what this study means in terms of why it
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increases the chances of certain people having anorexia? absolutely, the largest genome study that has ever been done on anorexia nervosa, and what you hinted too, anorexia is not just a psychiatric and what you hinted too, anorexia is notjust a psychiatric disorder. the pattern of genetic links we so firmly allows us to say there is a psychiatric component but there is also a metabolic component to this illness, and some people are at higher risk genetically. but let's be clear, those people at higher risk, the majority of them still wouldn't suffer from anorexia ? risk, the majority of them still wouldn't suffer from anorexia? well, i think that is the really interesting thing about complex traits like anorexia nervosa. when we say a complex trait it means it is influenced by probably hundreds of genes of small to moderate effect and environmentalfactors. of genes of small to moderate effect and environmental factors. so of genes of small to moderate effect and environmentalfactors. so there might be some people out there with high genetic risk, but they also might have inherited some buffeting genes from their other parent, and
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it also might live in a buffeting environment so they are less likely to express that underlying genetic predisposition. now you have these conclusions might impact on how you treat anorexia ? conclusions might impact on how you treat anorexia? absolutely. i think todayit treat anorexia? absolutely. i think today it actually has impact because this metabolic component suggests how important it is to adequately re—nourish someone with this illness. we know that if we don't we nourish them adequately enough, only get them up to a body mass index of 17, risk is so high they are going to be discharged from hospital and they are going to drop their weight again, and this metabolic factor might be something that contributes to that. whether we do in pay should be nourishment or family —based treatment, it is so important to get the metabolism and opportunity to re—equilibria it, to re—stabilise at that new rate, because relapse is really quite dangerous. and then, down the line, what we are actually hoping is that as we increase our sample size, using genetic studies,
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we will be able to identify more genes and more biological pathways that might contribute to this metabolic dysfunction, then hopefully we can hand this information over to our genetic collea g u es information over to our genetic colleagues and neuroscientist couege colleagues and neuroscientist college and they will be able to and develop interventions that speak directly to the underlying biology of the illness. just very quickly, what has been the reaction of people you deal with who have anorexia? have they reacted to this? both people with illness and their family members have been enormously grateful for this research, because for decades they have actually been telling us, look, there is more to it than some of these sociocultural theories say. "my daughter and my son went from being a fairly well—adjusted, healthy, positive person, tojust being deadly ill almost overnight, like the switch turned on," and they have also said how difficult it is to recover. it is so hard to recover this illness.
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i'm going to apologise, i'm going to jump i'm going to apologise, i'm going to jump right in because we are at the end of the programme. it has been a pleasure speaking to you. thank you, that was fascinating. cynthia bulik live with us, from the us. good evening. time to look at the weather elsewhere around the world, these storms forecast in europe, but these storms forecast in europe, but the main talking point has been barry, very briefly a hurricane, but has given ten inches of rain through louisiana and mississippi over the weekend and the progress is only very slowly northwards, so more flooding rains during monday, monday night taking it further north into arkansas, tennessee, all falling into the mississippi delta and its tributaries, already high or even a river flowing because it tributaries, already high or even a riverflowing because it has been such a wet spring. we anticipate further flash flooding in this part of the world. this is the forecast of the world. this is the forecast of the world. this is the forecast of the rocky mountains come into the
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upper plains and midwest into the great lakes, triggered by some of the heat pulled up by barry the stop 37 in dallas on tuesday, 33 in new york. not as high as the temperature of the night we have seen in algeria this weekend, 50 degrees reported here. the heat through libya starts to ease but still very warm in the south, not quite as record—breaking as last week but still it is winter. but we will see some much—needed rainfor cape but we will see some much—needed rain for cape town. where we don't need rain is the northern states of india, flash flooding here. it has been devastatingly wet through parts of nepal, tibet, bhutan, parts of bangladesh as well, and another hundred millimetres of rain could fall. red warnings and some orange warnings as well. in fact, we pick up warnings as well. in fact, we pick up the orange warnings mid week with this next batch of rain coming in to the likes of carolina as well. lots of activity with our monsoon at the moment. and a tropical depression, named locally by the philippines but it will head we think towards the
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san, giving wet weather, then potentially taiwan and china as well —— towards lusan. a developing situation and one we need to keep an eye on. heading further south, com plete eye on. heading further south, complete fire bans across northern parts of australia because of the strength of the wind. the wind also features further south but a cold wind bringing in rain, hill snow to victoria, tasmania as well, and we have had some really chilly nights around the subtropics as well, temperatures down to three or so degrees, continuing badly in high pressure. wet and windy weather this week for new zealand. these storms making their way across central and southern europe, the chilly air behind bringing snow to parts of the swiss alps but these will be severe. there could be some damaging hail stones, gusts of wind, the risk of a tornado as well into the balkans and greece for tuesday, then beyond that it will move into turkey, cyprus, and we could see some very lively showers. quite a chilly wind behind and some shower activity across
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parts of scandinavia. further west, high pressure for the time being, warming upa high pressure for the time being, warming up a little but the weather fronts stacking up to the west. more on that in about half an hour.
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hello, i'm ros atkins, this is outside source. president trump is pushing back over criticisms of his racist remarks about democrats. if you hate our country, if you're not happy here, you can leave. in a tweet he told these four congresswomen of colour to go back to the countries they came from. even though one of all of them come from the us. he relies on anti—immigrant sentiment to consolidate power because he does not have a positive vision for the future of america. surgeons in the uk successfully separate these conjoined twins from pakistan after 50 hours of surgery. we have an exclusive report. the
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twins have been in the theatre now for more than seven hours, and there is still several hours of this operation to go. so far everything is going to plan, and both girls are doing well. to the most extraordinary report we will play into a's programme, this is all about safa and marwa. they were born conjoined at the head — and now they've been separated in one of the most complex operations of its kind that's ever been performed. the twins are from pakistan, near the city of peshawar. after close to a two—year battle for treatment move they travelled to london. now they've been through three major surgeries lasting over 50 hours here at great ormond street hospital. and the bbc‘s fergus walsh has had exclusive access during that process. this is the first of his reports.
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so we have one case today, two kids, one case. they are in this journey together. in order for one of them to do well, they have both got to do well. joined at the head, they have never seen each other. this is the start of an incredible journey, aimed at giving them independence. it is october 2018 at great ormond street hospital. their mum has been praying for this day for nearly two years.
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they are what is known as craneopagus twins, their skull is one long tube. it's incredibly rare. the 21—month—old girls have separate brains, but are misshapen. the surgery is so complex, it will happen in three stages over several months. the twins won't be physically separate until the final operation. so we can see the artery but to do anything to it we will use the microscope. each twin is supplying the other‘s brain with blood. cutting these connections is dangerous and will take two operations to complete. so the artery has been clamped. the twins have been in theatre now for more than seven hours, and there are still several hours of this operation to go. so far, everything is going to plan, and both girls are doing well. the central segment will be our rigid keel. to hold our head together. webb
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the frame is made from pieces of the twins' skull, which can be detached in later operations. being older, they are pretty active, so whatever we do really has to be strong enough to resist the twisting and bending forces they will be putting on their heads. the twins are from pakistan. ideally, the surgery should have been done a year earlier, when healing ability is strongest, but there were delays finding a donor to pay the medical costs. despite the risks, the family and doctors believe it is right to go ahead. it is clearly very difficult to go through life when you are joined together like that. so it does make a very persuasive case in favour of attempting the separation. the family are very clear on that. if we felt there wasn't a very high chance we could do it safely, we'd be thinking quite carefully about whether we should do it or not. and i think the whole team feel there is an excellent chance of a successful separation here. models of the twins' brains and shared skull have been created using a 3d printer.
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for surgeons, it is massively helpful, so actually being able to touch and hold things makes so much difference to understanding how things are. this hemisphere, the right hemisphere of the brain, is standing up, so this is actually projecting into the other child's skull. what we need to achieve is effectively untwist the brains, and that's difficult, pretty difficult to do just in your head. and this is surgery without scalpels. absolutely incredible, this is exactly what we wanted. using virtual reality. it works, it really works. so now we can see a whole lot more information, a level of detail we have not been able to access previously. this is clearly the way of the future. a month after the first operation, the twins are back in theatre. surgeons have to finish separating their shared blood vessels.
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but marwa's heart begins to fail. they fear losing her. do you have a pulse or not? hang on, quiet. we are not stable but we are less unstable. good enough for me. the crisis passes, because marwa is the weaker twin, they give her a major blood vessel to increase her chances of survival. but it disadvantages safa. shortly after the 20—hour operation, she has a stroke. we were very close to losing her. she stayed in that critical state for 48, 72 hours after the surgery. it was a very difficult time for the girls, their families and the entire team
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looking after them. but after a lengthy time in intensive care, both twins pulled through. the last two months after their last operation on the brain has been a little bit of a stormy time for safa and marwa, but they are hanging in there, and both reasonably well. the next challenge will be to separate the girls. fergus walsh, bbc news. i spoke to ferguson earlier to get more details on what happens next. it took the twins three months to recover from those first two operations that lasted 35 hours, and that was just to divide their shared blood vessels. and then in february of this year finally the operation to physically separate them. it was extraordinary being present at that operation and seeing the two girls laid out, and the teams of surgeons working on them, and then when they we re working on them, and then when they were separated, the moment they were separated, both the surgical teams then became two separate teams, and
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one girl was taken next door, and the survival of each twin was not reliant on the other. a long period of recovery to teach them things, how to set up, how to roll, all the things they couldn't do when they we re things they couldn't do when they werejoined at the things they couldn't do when they were joined at the head, things they couldn't do when they werejoined at the head, and things they couldn't do when they were joined at the head, and then finally they were discharged from hospital just finally they were discharged from hospitaljust a finally they were discharged from hospital just a couple finally they were discharged from hospitaljust a couple of finally they were discharged from hospital just a couple of weeks finally they were discharged from hospitaljust a couple of weeks ago. they are likely to have some learning difficulties, but seeing their mum holding each twin one by one in theirarms, their mum holding each twin one by one in their arms, the family are absolutely convinced that this was the right thing to do. tell me about the right thing to do. tell me about the technology involved in being able to do this. so great ormond street has done more of these separations of twins joined at the head than any other centre, this is just their third, so it shows you how vanishingly rare this is, they used a number of things for the first time. virtual reality. they we re first time. virtual reality. they were able to take all the digital scans and then put them into a virtual reality programme, and then
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mapped out just how virtual reality programme, and then mapped outjust how complex, what they could do to separate them, and one of the surgeon said to me before we used to go by feel, and hope we would in a sense get lucky. here they were able to really see how tricky it was, they will be able to then use that for what they call less co m plex then use that for what they call less complex operations, like brain tumours and brain malformations. this is really complex, because the twins also had distorted shaped brains, and they had to correct that distortion. and then they used other things, 3d modelling. each of these models, they could say we want to see what the skin envelope would be like a see what the skin envelope would be likea man see what the skin envelope would be like a man they would programme it m, like a man they would programme it in, it would take then maybe two days to print this stuff. they spent a lot of time just holding these models in their hands, saying this is what we will be facing. extraordinary. in terms of what the expectations are for the kind of lives these two will be able to live, what are the doctors saying on that? it's very hard to know. i
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think they would have preferred to have done this surgery a year ago when the twins were less then 12 months old, when the body is at its most responsive, in terms of healing and regenerating. so it's likely they would have done better. but they would have done better. but they take their lead from the family. the mum is there from pakistan with her father—in—law, family. the mum is there from pakistan with herfather—in—law, and her brother. they are all extremely grateful for what the surgeons have done. they said it would have been difficult for the girls to have had any kind of semblance of a normal life, going back to bishara, if they had not been separated. so they are very happy and the family are overjoyed that safa and marwa, who they have always absolutely rightly consider two separate girls with two separate personalities are now com pletely separate personalities are now completely physically separate and can look to lead their lives
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hopefully independently. what an astonishing story and report from focus too. we will play the second report on these two girls, and on that final surgery that had to be carried out on them tomorrow around the same time on outside source. business now. facebook‘s digital currency plan has come under attack again — this time from the us treasury secretary. steve mnuchin warned that the planned libra cryptocurrency could be mis—used for money laundering. the idea is that it makes it make paying for things as easy as texting — but has been widely criticised by central bank and regulators. michelle fleury is in new york. we have talked about this before but for people who don't remember the original announcement, summarise for us original announcement, summarise for us what facebook is up to here. via social media giant planned to release its own virtual or digital
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currency, known as libra. it's a currency, known as libra. it's a currency that won't be backed by a central bank. if all goes according to plan, libra will be bought, sold, held, sent, whatever you want to say, received, or within held, sent, whatever you want to say, received, orwithin the held, sent, whatever you want to say, received, or within the firm's applications macro, messenger and whatsapp, as well as rival ones. in simple terms, one tapped on a smartphone and you could make money change hands almost instantaneously, that's the thing. but it hasn't got off the ground yet and already faces a huge backlash, steven religion, the us treasury secretary on monday made it clear that he agrees with his boss, which is that crypto currencies offer crooks. last week donald trump raised doubts about facebook‘s plans and questions the crypto currency‘s dependability, tweeting if facebook and other companies want to become a bank they must seek a new banking charter and becomes subject to all banking regulations, just like other banks.
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you've also got other high—profile figures weighing in, the head of america's central bank, jerome powell, who doesn't always see eye to eye with the president, he said last week libra raises many serious concerns, talking about privacy, money—laundering, consumer protection, financial stability. all of this comes ahead of two days of hearings on capitol hill in which we are likely to hear from facebook‘s david marcus. he is due to testify between the senate and house lawmakers and will tell them facebook won't move forward with its libra crypto currency without full approval and regulation. but here's the thing, given facebook‘s track record handling private data, is that going to be enough to satisfy the doubters? we will see. here is another tech story. amazon prime day has kicked off in the last few hours — it's a 48—hour promotion for amazon. warehouse staff in germany and the us are marking it by striking over pay and conditions and claiming they‘ re being denied a living wage. here's the experience of one
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employee, speaking to michelle. we are going on strike on prime day, mainly demanding safe, reliable jobs from amazon. the speeds that we have to work are very physically and me ntally to work are very physically and mentally exhausting. in some cases leading to injuries. and for people not seeing the job as a thing they can do long term, plus with amazon's reliance on temporary workers not having the same job security, basically we just want them to treat us basically we just want them to treat us with respect as human beings and not treat us like machines. for most consumers, you click a button, your package arrives a couple of days later, good prices, a convenience. what is the other side here?|j later, good prices, a convenience. what is the other side here? i am an order picker, so all the merchandise is on these storage pods that robots bring to my station and i have to pick an item about every eight seconds, or 332 per hour, for a ten
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hour day. 40 hours a week for these years. and it is very fast paced work. i have seen many people in my department have to deal with shoulder injuries, back injuries, knee injuries, after in some cases less than a year on the job. mechele, what is amazon's response to the criticisms of these striking workers? amazon has told us they have met many of the requests of these protesters. in a statement they say they pay fairly. i can read it to you, we provide great employment opportunities with excellent pay. they go on to say we encourage anyone to compare our pay, benefits and workplace to other retailers and employers in the shakopee community, where i spoke to
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that amazon worker, but also across the country. i think the point here is that amazon is famous for prising efficiency but for the people who work in those warehouses, that efficiency is putting them under a huge amount of strain and that is where you see both sides not necessarily seeing eye to eye. thank you for your help on both stories. one more business story. china is seeing very slow growth in its economy, the weakest growth enormous 30 years. gdp growth slowed to 6.2% in the last three months. president trump tweeted "us tariffs are having a major effect". that's not the only factor at play. here's one economist‘s analysis. at this stage, especially, you start to see some recovery. it has been contracting for the past 30 months and recently just started contracting for the past 30 months and recentlyjust started to rebound to 17%, so i think this is good news for the chinese government. sol think there will not be an imminent
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response. but having said that there are still some pockets of weakness in the economy. the best the government can do is to further explore cuts in the value added tax, to the corporate tax to support businesses in terms of trade attention. in a few minutes we will talk about alan turing, the great pioneer of human scientist, castrated for being gay, to be honoured on the new £50 note here in the uk. the mayor of london, sadiq khan, says new research on youth crime in the city shows a clear link between poverty and serious violence. the study comes amid fears that the beginning of the school holidays could see a rise in violence in cities most affected by knife crime. dominic casiani reports. full of fighting spirit for all the right reasons. volunteers at south london's dwaynamics boxing club coach 320 children, teaching them discipline, self—confidence, and how to avoid crime in one of the poorest
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parts of london. one, two. joshua simpson's jab is the measure of their success. once on the verge of a criminal life, the club has turned him into a 16—year—old champion. he is escaping gangs and looking to the future. there's people that are there that's trying to get out, and there's people that are there but, like, they like to be there. now i can see, like, loads of different routes and i can pick which route i feel is best. like, everything is open now. the dwaynamics boxing club costs £80,000 a year to run. and if everybody who volunteers here were properly paid, it would probably cost double that. the organisers say this part of south london needs 20 such clubs to reach all of the vulnerable children. they say that would be a small price to pay for the lives that could be saved. we are dealing with young children who are frightened, they are stressed, they are going through trauma, because this youth violence has now got so out of control.
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today london's mayor, sadiq khan, has revealed research which he says proves a link between serious youth violence and poverty, exacerbated by cuts in public services. we know that the time of day when there's most likely to be serious street violence is between 3pm and 6pm. so it beggars belief that because of government cuts we have closed down after—school clubs, closed down youth centres. which is why you see this increase in serious street violence at this time. the government says it's put an extra £100 million in to combatting serious violence, and there are plans to legally compel schools and other bodies to collaborate on solutions, but youth leaders say that's not enough for london, let alone the rest of the country and they're in downing street today to appeal for a lot more cash. dominic casciani, bbc news. this is outside source live from the bbc newsroom. our lead story — donald trump has been intensifying the row over his racist remarks about four democratic congresswoman, who is accused them of being
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anti—american. we have a talk about the england world champion men's cricket team. they have been visiting number ten downing st after winning one of the greatest, well, one of the greatest world cup finals of them all, the greatest world cup final of them all. here they are with theresa may, the prime minister, in front of the famous black door, still very much smiling and well they might. yesterday they beat new zealand in what was undoubtedly the greatest game of one—day cricket that has ever been. both sides batted, both scored 241 ru ns both sides batted, both scored 241 runs each, had a further over, they both scored 15 runs with new zealand run out two metres england were champions because of a little—known technicality that in these scenarios the team that scored more boundaries wins. england's captain. do you think the lack of an irishman got england over the line?
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we had allah with us as well, i spoke to adil rashid, and he said he was with us, and i said we had the rub of the green. it actually epitomises our team, it is quite diverse backgrounds and cultures and quys diverse backgrounds and cultures and guys grew up in different countries, and are at the stage where they are in their career. to find humour in the situation we were in at the time was pretty cool. it seems the queen was pretty cool. it seems the queen was watching. this is how the new zealand herald summed it up. the financial times, every paper in the country covered it, champagne super over was definitely the most popular headline. here were some of the fans. we did it, we did it! and we
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we re fans. we did it, we did it! and we were brilliant. jofra delivered! he is the boy. how can a final be better than that when it actually comes down to boundary scored? ridiculous. it's tough. at the end of the game i cried for about five minutes, honestly i had 15 english people consoling me full stop will new zealand get over this? we will. we have the rugby world cup to look forward to, so... come on england! forget about it being one of the greatest games of cricket ever, it is being called one of the greatest finals in the history of all sport. some thoughts on this from john watson. these teams, what, 48 matches in this cricket world cup, seven weeks of enthralling cricket, yet new zealand and england could not be split after 50 overs of cricket. each. then they could not be split still after that super over, england only winning, having scored more sixes, fours, and more boundaries than new zealand
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throughout the tournament, 26 to new zealand's 17. throughout the tournament, 26 to new zealand's17. it is that brand of cricket that has got england there, worth pointing out. since they went out of the world cup four years ago they have really improved. they have looked to entertain and it is that entertaining cricket that has got them over the line. this is the new bank of england £50 note. it will feature this man, the computer pioneer and codebreaker alan turing. my colleague christian fraser spoke to benedict cumberbatch, who played the scientist in the 2014 film the immitation game, and asked him what he thought turing would have made of the honour. i don't know, i really don't know. i think he would have been flattered, and then i think he would have got on with his day's work, which was everything to him. we were as a population rediscovering alan turing, the pivotal role he developed in the development of early computers, through the work you did with the enigma code machine. but do you think in some way the film has contributed into the way he is now seen? definitely it has brought him into a focus he
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maybe hasn't had before. i think people were aware of him both for his computing work, the turing machine and also his involvement at bletchley park. less so perhaps for what he endured as a man who was persecuted for his sexuality, so i think the combination for all three of those stories may be gave a sort of those stories may be gave a sort of cultural window into a man, and then hopefully people asked more questions and were more curious about his incredible achievements, which we continue to benefit from to this very day. you are right to draw attention to the persecution he suffered. he was prosecuted in 1952 for homosexual acts. do you think the rehabilitation of alan turing is now complete ? the rehabilitation of alan turing is now complete? i suppose it is, with the royal pardon and there with us honouring him on £50 notes. it is incredible how far we have come. lest we forget we live in a time
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when gay men and women are being persecuted. it is not something that has gone away. i will see you tomorrow at the usual time, goodbye. good evening. it's time to look at the weather elsewhere around the world, where more severe storms are forecast in europe but the talking point has been barry, which was very briefly a hurricane but it is all about the rain. ten inches of rain in parts of louisiana and mississippi through the weekend and its progress is only slowly northwards. we have had more flooding rains across southern areas during monday. monday night takes it further northwards into arkansas, tennessee, all falling into the mississippi delta and its tributaries, which are already high or even overflowing because it has been such a wet spring. we anticipate further flash flooding in this part of the world. severe thunderstorms forecast coming off the rockets into the upper plains,
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the rockets into the upper plains, the upper midwest and heading to the great lakes, triggered by some of the heat that is being pulled up by barry. 37 in dallas on tuesday, 33 in new york. not as high as the temperatures we have seen in algeria this weekend, 50 degrees reported here. heat here and through libya sta rts here. heat here and through libya starts to ease. still very warm in the south, not quite as record—breaking as last week but still it is winter, we will see some rainfor cape still it is winter, we will see some rain for cape town, much—needed rain. where we don't need anymore is northern states of india. flash flooding here. it has been devastatingly wet through parts of nepal, tibet, bhutan, bangladesh is well and another couple of hundred millimetres of could fall. still have red warnings, and some orange warnings as well. we pick up orange warnings as well. we pick up orange warnings mid week with this next batch of rain coming into the likes of karnataka batch of rain coming into the likes of karnata ka and batch of rain coming into the likes of karnataka and carragher as well. lots of activity with our monsoon at the moment. —— chorale. it has been named falcon locally by the philippines but will head its way
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and then taiwan and china, it could even head towards japan, towards the weekend. a developing situation and what we need to keep an eye on. as we head further south, we have com plete we head further south, we have complete fire bands across northern parts of australia because of the strength of the wind. the wind also a feature further south but a cold wind, bringing in rain, hill snow to victoria, tasmania as well. we have had some really chilly nights around the subtropics as well, temperatures down to three degrees or so and continues that way under the high pressure. wet and windy weather for new zealand. these are the storms we talked about, making their way across central and southern europe. chilly air has brought snow to some parts of the swiss alps but these will be severe. they could be some damaging hail, the risk of a tornado as it heads into the balkans and into greece as well for tuesday. beyond that it will move into turkey, to cyprus. we could see some very lively showers. quite a chilly wind behind, some very big showers
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activity going on across parts of scandinavia. further west, high pressure is here for the time being but the weather fronts are stacking out to the west. more on that in about half an hour.
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10:00 pm
a. as their extraordinary victory is celebrated in downing street. lifting the trophy — the prime minister hosts a reception for the england men's team that made history by winning the world cup for the first time. celebrations have been going on all day, starting at the oval, where fans flocked to see the team after the most dramatic of wins. when you see everybody‘s reaction, and you know how much support and following we had, that's when we really start to understand what we did. eight million people watched the match on television. will it be enough to inspire the next generation? also tonight: president trump is accused of being racist after telling four democratic congresswomen to go back to the "crime—infested countries" they came from. if you're not happy here, you can leave.

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