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tv   Outside Source  BBC News  July 16, 2019 9:00pm-10:01pm BST

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hello, i'm ros atkins, this is outside source. it's 50 years to the day since the apollo 11 crew blasted off into history. five, four, three, two, one. we'll be marking the historical significance of that moment where it all started — the launch site at cape canaveral in florida. ursula von der leyen has been confirmed for the european union's topjob — we'll report from the european parliament in strasbourg. president trump denies he's a racist — but steps up his attacks on four democratic congresswomen of colour. this is the us house of representatives right now, where democrats are preparing to vote on a resolution condemning the president.
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there's still been no significant criticism from senior republicans. 50 years ago, something took place that changed our world, that defined an era — that opened an array of new possibilities. this happened. six, five, four, three, tear, one. zero. all engines running. left of, we had a lift off, dated ten minutes past the hour. lift off on apollo 11. three men were on board apollo 11 when it set off for the moon in 1969. neil armostrong and buzz aldrin, and the command module pilot, michael collins.
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here he is describing the launch. as you lift off, if there is any imbalance, it's compensated for by the swelling of your motor is below you. there are five engines down there, and as you and send it very slowly and majestically, inside is a different situation. you feel like a figgfing different situation. you feel like a jiggling left to right and you're not quite sure whether those jiggles are big or small as they should be or how much closer they will put you to that launch umbilical tower, which you do not very much want to hit right that moment. when it launched, the saturn 5 rocket which took apollo 11 into space was burning 20 tons of rocket fuel every second. here's rebecca morelle on how it worked. it's made up of over three stages, each played a key part in getting astronauts to the moon. the first
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stage had been less powerful engines, it did the heavy lifting, getting the nasa spacecraft off of the ground. apollo 11 is on its way. once the first state served its purpose, it separated, following a way to the ocean and from there the second stage fired carrying the rocket almost into our third stage and finished thejob, pushing almost into our third stage and finished the job, pushing the spacecraft to its moon destination. the apollo 11 mission launched from cape kennedy, now called cape canaveral. four days later, it was orbiting around the moon. here's palab ghosh on what happened next. the lunar lander ego separates from the command module, but as eagle
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approaches the surface, armstrong notices the spacecraft is off course and headed not for the preplanned landing site, but terrain littered with dangerous boulders. the flight director asks control team to call up, whether it was a bell or a no go for a up, whether it was a bell or a no go fora landing. so up, whether it was a bell or a no go for a landing. so the mission continues. but then, an alarm sounds and the lunar module. within minutes together for a and the lunar module. within minutes togetherfor a landing, and the lunar module. within minutes together for a landing, the and the lunar module. within minutes togetherfor a landing, the computer on the eagle primitive by today's standards, crassus. neil armstrong has to take manual control, and with field writing love, brings a spacecraft down. running low. neil armstrong then makes his descent onto lunar surface. i'm going to
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step off now. and uttered the overt —— words that reverberate their history. one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind. the anniversary celebrations are well underway in cape canaveral. jane o'brien is there for us. fantastic atmosphere as he sea visitor centre here is absolutely packed, people have come from all of the world to be here right now for that moment that the blast took place. the launch of apollo 11, exactly 50 years ago. the star of the show, everyone talks about landing on the men but they start of the show today is the saturn five rocket because that phenomenal piece of machinery, which has a top speed at seven miles a second is what got the three astronauts to the moon, and when you compare that to the
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capsule they were inside, which is tiny, you get the sense ofjust how vulnerable they were. we had michael talking about what it felt like to be on board at the minutes to go. just how vulnerable and grey that they must‘ve been —— brave to risk their lives on that. the people there, how did they categorise as categorise a scientific legacy of this nation? that's a very complicated question to ask people coming here, i put my simply, they say it's awesome, it's cool and inspirational, they think it's absolutely terrific that 50 years later, we are still commemorating this extraordinary piece of history when i a noun at the time it was quite controversial, there are questions about how much it cost and the point of it all, questions about how much it cost and the point of it all, a question to be here again today as plans are afoot to try and put people on the moon in 202a. if eve ryo ne put people on the moon in 202a. if everyone here, it's about remembering and commemorating human
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endeavours, about the spirit of inquiry and exploration, all the talking to children it's interesting because they're not interested in going back to the moon, they like to going back to the moon, they like to go to mars. later we speak to an astronomer royal in the uk who is a leading extra astrophysicist on the legacy apollo 11. ursula von der leyen has been confirmed as the most powerful official in the european union. she'll be the new president of the european commission from november — and will be resigning as germany's defence minister. this was the moment she heard she got through. the european parliament has the final word big smile of relief raises eyebrows and gratitude as he can see, they confirmed this appointment.
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but it's never turned down a nominee before — and it didn't break with the routine. the european commission is so powerful because it proposes and enforces eu laws and rules and it sets the eu budget. so its president has huge influence. earlier ursula von der leyen set out her agenda. some are turning towards authoritarian regimes. some are buying their global influence in creating dependencies by investing in ports and roads. and others are turning towards protectionism. nine of these options are for us. we want multilateralism, we want fair trade, we defend the rules —based order because we know it is better for all of us. we have to do it the european way. in the past this vote had been a formality. but less so this time. this is why.
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the new european parliament has no majority for the centre lef5t and centre right blocs — liberals, greens and to some extent nationalists did better — that means there a lot of different people to please. and remember the process of choosing the nominee was also fraught — with leaders of the eu's member statets locked in talked for hours trying to agree. all of this explains why ms von der leyen has been trying to build bridges. for example. "europe should be the first climate neutral continent in the world." but not everyone came round — here's damian grammaticas in strasbourg. it was through by a whisker, i mean eve ryo ne it was through by a whisker, i mean everyone thought it was hard to predict and when she got was 52% of their votes in the chamber. and
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there are 750 in total. and she got just nine more than a half she needed, and that really was scraping through. the difficulty on this like she's a centre—right conservative, the way parliament now is after recent elections, the socialists and the liberals and greens and far right and the liberals and greens and far rightand far the liberals and greens and far right and far left all had chunks of both, she tried to appeal to those pro—eee sort of parties centre and left, but her attempts to to reach out to greet the socialists don't seem out to greet the socialists don't seem to have really worked. they didn't think she was green and a half or would do enough to protect the rights of refugees who are trying in the training to receive. the rights of refugees who are trying in the training to receivelj wonder if this is parliament ‘s moment of maximum influence because now that she's been confirmed, can they really influence what she when she's in the role? while, interesting, that's exactly why the
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greens did not vote for her, and they who did very well the european elections had tried to make the case to the other parties and they said this is the moment of maximum parliament at those parties, the could come together on a pop vibe, they could almost demand who they wa nted they could almost demand who they wanted in heading that commission so they are angry and never happened. what she now faces is a difficult task because it seems like she squeaked over the task because it seems like she squea ked over the line, task because it seems like she squeaked over the line, probably with the help of some of the both of your sceptic mep is further right, so your sceptic mep is further right, so polish and peas and light, so that means narrow majority, could difficult getting legislation, because you can't rely on that to place new legislation through this parliament. ms von der leyen will be taking up her post on november i. remember brexit is scheduled to happen on 31 october. here she is on that issue.
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with strong agreement concluded with government of the uk, provides certainty where brexit created uncertainty. in preserving the rights of citizens, and in preserving species —— patent peace and stability in the island of ireland, these two priorities are my two. however, istand ireland, these two priorities are my two. however, i stand ready ireland, these two priorities are my two. however, istand ready for further extension of the withdrawal date should more time be required for a good reason. in any case, the uk will remain our ally, our partner, and our friend. next reception, bear in mind the favourite is borisjohnson who has
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said that it will happen on the sist, said that it will happen on the 31st, so taking that is worried that there will be no extension needed evenif there will be no extension needed even if it's mighty to offer. here's damian again in strasbourg. she won't be there as the current sta rtu p she won't be there as the current startup phase of negotiations play out, the next couple months this crucial period where a new prime minister comes in and has to resolve something by the end of october, she comes in on the 1st of november, so whatever happens if the uk is out, she will be there overseeing negotiations or whatever follows, that to the uk crashing out in a disaster is no deal exit and all sorts of problems resolved immediately. they could be overseeing trade negotiations for a future relationship, but at the uk wa nts future relationship, but at the uk wants an extension and gets one to get a brexit process, she will come in and oversee the next part of that so in and oversee the next part of that so whatever way you look at it, she
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is not very immediately, but she will have a sort of important overseeing role looking down on the negotiations from november.‘ overseeing role looking down on the negotiations from november. a story about twins in pakistan who joined by the head but after operation had been separated. we'll have that in a few minutes. number of drugs has gone up, meaning scotla nd number of drugs has gone up, meaning scotland has the highest drug death rate in the eu. many people will have a long history of drug is perhaps injecting drug use, which will contribute to advance physiological health damage.
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advanced disease progression increases how time, and we know many of the baptist, nearly all of them, have more than one substance of people are taking multiple su bsta nces people are taking multiple substances and in the case of scotla nd substances and in the case of scotland we see opioids and other d e p ressa nts scotland we see opioids and other depressants contributing to that and can contribute to higher risk of fatal overdose which we believe is contributing to high numbers. this is outside source live from the bbc newsroom. our lead story is... president trump has again attacked four democractic congresswomen on twitter. meanwhile, the house of representatives is preparing to condemn his earlier racist tweets. more than 30 people are thought to be trapped under the rubble of a collapsed building in the indian city of mumbai.
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at least 12 people were killed when the four storey structure gave way. it's the second time a building has collasped in less than 10 days there following torrential rains. the south african musicianjonathan johnny clegg has died. he founded the music bandsjuluka and savuka and was known as the ‘white zulu' because of his love for traditional zulu music. he's most known for his anti—apartheid songs. and spanish police have arrested a man at barcelona airport who had half a kilo of cocaine under his wig. customs officers noticed that the colombian was wearing a rather large hairpiece under his hat. last night we brough you the remarkable story of twins, safa and marwa from pakistan, who were born joined at the head.
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surgeons at great ormond street hospital in london separated the sisters over the course of three major operations, lasting more than 50 hours. this tonight, is the second installment — and it shows how the twins were finally separated, and the rehabilitation that followed. fergus walsh's report includes pictures of the operation on the girls. safa and marwa share a single skull. the two—year—olds have already undergone two complex operations at great ormond street hospital to prepare them for separation. now, finally, that day has come. their brains, lock together since birth, are eased apart. so this is safa's brain, that's marwa's brain. so they are now separate, apart from that piece of dura? after seven hours, the final connection of bone and tissue are severed. fantastic. at last, after three major operations, the twins
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are no longerjoined. what was the moment like when they were separate for the first time? what did that feel like? it's a very emotional moment. we've been working a long time to get them here, they've been through so many operations, and now it's worked! so you still got, what, four or five hours to do? yes, we have to put them together now. so we've taken them apart, and we have to reconstruct their heads. marwa are still in the operating theatre through here while safa has been moved just next door. for the first time, the survival of each of the twins is not dependent on the other. and that will make it easier for the two surgical teams to regulate their heart rate, blood pressure and other vital signs. safa and marwa's brains used to have a distorted shape. but four months earlier a plastic sheet was inserted between them, and by gradually tightening the pressure, it has largely
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corrected their appearance — essential before their skills can be rebuilt. this means both teams can begin reconstruction. the patchwork of skull pieces are shared between theatres. a piece for me, a piece for you. to have enough to cover their heads, they have to divide each bit in two. the bone fragments were pieced together to form the skull of marwa on the left and safa on the right. the gaps were seeded with bone cells. these should slowly close up. the final task is to stretch the skin over their reconstructed skulls. there's just enough to make the join. a pretty amazing day, isn't it? hi, everything is good! at 1:30 in the morning, the surgeons
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tell the family it's all done. # hello, safa! # hello, marwa! # how are you today? then begins the long road to recovery. the twins have daily physiotherapy. this will help them reach some basic milestones — learning to roll, sit, and hold their heads up. # twinkle, twinkle, little star. # how i wonder what you are... but the separation has taken its toll, especially on safa, who suffered a stroke after one of the operations. we made the decision that the bulk of the common vessels go to marwa, the weaker twin. because of that decision, safa suffered a stroke. what i really want to see is the weakness that safa has at the moment, and she has a weakness in her left arm and left leg, improves.
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so for me the big moment is going to be when she walks and when she uses her left arm properly. because, you know, i have given her that weakness, and for me that is a hard thing. five months after separation, nearly a year since they were admitted to hospital, the girls are leaving great ormond street. time to say goodbye to doctors and nurses who have become friends. until the twins are well enough to return to pakistan, they'll stay in london — all paid for by the donor who funded the surgery. the twins are likely to have some learning difficulties, but their mum is overjoyed at the freedom separation has brought.
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whatever hurdles safa and marwa may face in years to come, they will at least do that as separate, independent girls. twins still but conjoined no more. fergus walsh, bbc news. we'll have fergus' third and final report, tomorrow. facebook was accused of being manipulative and dangerous by us senators. they also told the head of facebook‘s cryptocurrency subsidiary that the company was "delusional" to believe that people would trust it with their money. this is all in the context of widespread criticism of the plans for this currency called libra. after listening, this
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was facebook‘s reply. a spotjust talk a spot just talk to dave, a spotjust talk to dave, how a spot just talk to dave, how are you, help me understand what's happening today apart from handing out criticism, did they have power to stop and face the? they do, they have been talking about what that power might be to prevent face but necessarily having a regulatory approval to launch the currency and how it operates in the us. the concerns are two pieces, one crypto currency concerns in general, the previous crypto currency like bitcoin have been used for illegal activity and buying drugs online in laundering, that's the kind of thing lawmakers want reassurance that it won't happen with facebook‘s crypto currency but there also concerns about facebook itself and what it might do with the data it collects
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rent payments and generally speaking whether it all again and amount of power in the global banking system, by launching a currency like this, so concern by launching a currency like this, so concern about what their are and what that could mean. leaving it there tight on time but thank you anyway. let's talk about christine, sees the current head of the international find and she has resigned because she is not nominated to lead the european central bank. help me understand the difference in the two roles between what she did and what she will be doing. so the international find that she's been the home up for eight years, she really played a key role in the organisation's response in the wake of the financial crisis. in part, the lender of last result, the other
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role it has is one of gazing into a crystal ball and warning economies around the world of the sort of dangers lurking ahead. trying to get government to pay attention to that. as had if she gets the job, government to pay attention to that. as had if she gets thejob, she would be responsible for the policy. in the lake at the crisis, her predecessor —— in the wake, was likely saw in america responsible for unconventional policies to try and boost era's economies, while germany was stronger than say current —— countries like greece and italy who needed my help, he had to navigate and that that did the needle to achieve that balance. the question is, where does she go from there if she's confirmed to try and address the weaknesses existing in europe. michelle, thank you very much. updating us on the stories. the next half of the programme, we
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talk about the fallout from donald trump's racist tweets. remnants of what was tropical storm barry, heavy flooding rains across deep south early in the week, is moving north. the moisture is going to increase humidity across central and eastern portions of the united states and into southern canada. the head towards the latter part of the week, there's an area of high—pressure building in the southeast drawing very high temperature across central plains to new england and southeast canada. with this energy in the atmosphere, humidity and heat likely to see intense showers and thunderstorms break out from tennessee through ohio valley into great lakes across in to the northeast states and new england. it's capable of producing large flash flooding.
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thursday and friday as well, as you see here, middle parts of the week looking like lots of thunder but then as a clear way, heat starts to build over the weekend into next week. close to a0 celsius in dc, as the reach of the weekend. across into south asia, monsoon rains and intends the past week across the northeast of india into bangladesh and nepal, we have had quite a few fatalities from the torrential rain. and the flooding in this scene behind me occurred in bangladesh. it looks like towards the end of the week and into the weekend, we will see heavy rains shift to the southwest, looking like parts of south india could be in the fire line with heavy and prolonged thunder and rain about 400 mm of rain the next few days. also windy as well. temperatures remain low 30 celsius but then parts of northern india through pakistan,
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some sunshine, temperatures stifling into low a0 celsius. across the asian pacific region, big story is this. this is a tropical depression bringing heavy rain the next few days across central and northern philippines and then moving north into taiwan and eastern china, for friday into the weekend, more flooding likely share but if it goes further east, it could affect southern japan and south korea. we have to watch this feature the next two days. across into europe, we gradually lose violent thunderstorms for italy and greece as low—pressure ships due wednesday and thursday, stays unsettled and cool across northeast europe, but an area the end of the week, of low pressure pushing into british isles to the end of the week, something we had not seen for a while. it brings a change to the weather the next few days, it be
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cloudy with more rain and it appeal cool as well so stay tuned for a full uk weather forecast.
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hello, i'm ros atkins, this is outside source. it's 50 years to the day since the apollo 11 crew blasted off into history. 5, 4, 3, 2, one. we'll be marking the historical significance of that moment where it all started — the launch site at cape canaveral in florida. president trump denies he's a racist — but steps up his attacks on 4 democratic congresswomen of colour. this is the us house of representatives right now, where democrats are preparing to vote on a resolution condemning the president. there's still been no significant criticism from senior republicans.
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ursula von der leyen has been confirmed for the european union's topjob — we'll report from the european parliament in strasbourg and we'll have the latest on the floods and landslides in south asia — triggered by heavy monsoon rains. let's go straight to the house of representatives in washington dc we're expecting a vote there on a resolution condemning comments made by president trump as racist. it will probably pass, because the democrats
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have a majority there. what would happen in the senate, which the republicans control, is less clear. the target of president trump's tweets was these these four congresswomen of colour. on sunday, he sent this racist tweet, telling them to ‘go back and help fix the totally broken and crime infested places from which they came.‘ on monday he said this. if you are not happy in the us, if you are complaining all the time, very simply, you can leave. you can leave right now. on monday evening, all four congresswomen gave a press conference — here's what one of them had to say. he is launching a blatantly racist attack on four duly elected
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members of the united states house of representatives. all of whom are women of colour. this is the agenda of white nationalists. there's been no condemnation from senior republicans. but many democrats have commented — this is the veteran civil rights activist jesse jackson talking to the bbc. mr trump has a theory about the racial hierarchy. he believes the norwegian is superior to the african, he believes in the race theory. he believes america should be white again with slave masters and the rules ofjim crow. that america will never be again. we cannot only respond to his attacking kind, to his attack in kind, is not four women, it's toward women, it's more than four. more than that he focused on the border. 13 million undocumented
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workers, not a thousand, 13 million, the asians coming into silicon valley, the eastern european, the russians, the dues, the russians, thejews, the palestinians, he is targeting black and brown people as a racist tactic designed to divert them to the back. this is the resolution that the house will vote on. it says the president's comments "have legitimized fear and hatred of new americans and people of color". president trump is having none of it. earlier he tweeted i don't have a racist bone in my body! the so—called vote to be taken is a democrat con game. republicans should not show "weakness" and fall into their trap." the republican leadership in the house says it won't support the resolution. here's kevin mccarthy when asked if donald trump is racist. no. and i do not believe the speaker of the house was racist last week
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when those individuals on her side of the aisle who are claiming the president's racst when they claimed she was racist either. i do not believe either. i believe this is about ideology. this is about socialism versus freedom. president trump thanked kevin mccarthy on twitter for saying that — so he's currently in favour. next this is white house advisor kellayane conway. the president said today that he doesn't have a racist bone in his body. i have been by his side for over three straight years. people show their true selves in private more often than not. i have never ever heard that man say anything untoward based on race in my experience. here's how the website the hill has been covering this. i spoke cristina marcos who is a reporter there, and asked her what the purpose of the democratic resolution is. us democrats are trying to accomplish two things this resolution today. in recent weeks, these for progressive congresswomen
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have been at odds with the democratic leadership, you can say it is sort of a new guard versus an old guard fight going on. democrats have been experiencing some internal divisions that have been playing in the open, they're trying to unite around his resolution to do what they are calling the common enemy which is donald trump and they are also trying to highlight division among republicans. kevin mccarthy was struggling to defend president trump, denying that this was racist, and there are several republicans they did come out and explicitly called the comments races. they are encouraging their rank and file to vote against the resolution so we are unlikely to see a bipartisan breakdown for this resolution. and interested and that's how you categorise the republican response, looking at it from afar, most republicans of consequence if i decide nothing or supported the president. there have been a handful
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that have come out and said that these comments are racist, but most of them have sided with the president, particularly leadership, mccarthy did not think there are racist and mitch mcconnell was just asked this afternoon and his wife is actually from taiwan as a child and actually from taiwan as a child and a reporter asked him if someone told your wife to go back where she came from which you think there was racist and he didn't answer the question. so republicans of figuring out how to respond to this and for now, they're starting with the president because there are not that many republicans left in the party any more that are willing to strongly push back against this president. why make a couple of other things to ask you. the president does not think his tweets are racist and for what they have set in the past, here's the president at a cabinet meeting earlier. it is terrible and people
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speak so badly about our country when people speak so horribly, i have a list of things and i am not going to bore you with it because you would not want to hear it anyway. but i have a list of things said by the congresswomen, that is so said by the congresswomen, that is so bad, so horrible that i almost don't want to read it. it's my opinion that they hate our country and that is not good. my back we what is on that list two of the congresswomen speaking out against conditions and detention centres. globally say to the generation of children and parents to be imprisoned for seeking safety? we should be the ones begging for forgiveness. american flags hanging all over these facilities that children being separated from their parents in front of an american flag that women are being called these
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names underan that women are being called these names under an american flag! this isa names under an american flag! this is a story that we covered back in january, causing controversy when she used explicit language and calling for donald trump's impeachment. and this senator has been critical of the treatment, calling it the apartheid israeli regime, she was heavily criticised for that by republicans and some democrats. she also published an apology online after c suggested republicans support of israel is fuelled by donations from a pro—israel group. we heard a lot about criticism of the president but in terms of these comments that he wa nts to in terms of these comments that he wants to highlight, have these democrats also been criticised? they have. as a matter of fact, early
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this year, but of the comments drew some condemnation from democrats. democrats actually passed a resolution on the floor that was in response to her comments. but it was officially condemning all forms of hatred because democrats were also making the point that even if they do take some issue with what he collea g u es do take some issue with what he colleagues said about israel and there is some division about the party about that, they also have to keepin party about that, they also have to keep in mind and perspective that they are trying to push back against trump but they believe has said far more outrageous things and so, they are trying to seek a balance between keeping their own members and check, as well as recognising that donald trump is the one they really want to focus on. will keep an eye on the house of representatives, but i expect this to be off the air before we get the conclusion to that story. let's return to the 50 year anniversary of the apollo 1! launch that took mankind to the moon. at the time it was watched by nearly
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a third of the world's population. it still resonates today. british astronaught tim peake has tweeted. american astronaught scott kelly calls it and with the future of space travel in mind, let's talk to leading astrophysicist and astronomer royal, professor martin rees, who is in cambridge. does astronauts both in the different way suggesting that this plotted a way to the future, can you explain how? i believe it did, it is the high point of space exploration by humans. i thought the footprints
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on mars far before today, what happened was the programme was fuelled by a huge federal budget, 4% of the federal budget and the aim of beating the russians and once that was achieved, the budget was cut and there was no motive to go on so it was remarkable that this 50—year—old episode is still a hurled episode and still the high point of space flight. and still the high point of space flight. deeding the country should be spending more money trendy back to the moon and build on what was achieved? i think the practical case of sending people into space is gotten weaker as robots got better, but i think as an adventure, it would be good if men did go back to the moon and eventually to mars. but my personal view is that if i were to make a taxpayer, i would not fund it. i would leave that to the private sector and i would do that because they can take much higher
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risks than nasa could impose on public funded civilians. the shuttle crashed twice in hundred 35 lunches, each of those crashes were national trauma. if you have adventurers, the kind of people who climb mountains oi’ kind of people who climb mountains or hand glide, they're prepared to ta ke or hand glide, they're prepared to take much higher risks, space travel by humans should be left to those private companies that can do priced ventures sending brave people at lower costs. deeding the space travel has become more about business rather than about adventure? the programme is partly for science, partly commercial, we depend on it every day for communication, weather forecasting and all the rest, but human beings in space go as an adventure, i do not think there is a great commercial case and incidentally i think they phrase space tourism and
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plaster team, it is a very dangerous adventure. those prepared to take those events and treated as an extreme sport. your memories of 15 yea rs extreme sport. your memories of 15 years ago today? -- 50. i remember the actual one small step and i remember the next day talking to my boss who was a science fiction writer, he was even more excited than me. but we both expected there to be footprints notjust on the moon, but on mars long before today and it is odd that our students cannot remember this, it is ancient history. they know americans landed men on the moon, the egyptians made the pyramids, but do not know what motivated the goals. a massive
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there's been a massive data hack in bulgaria where the personal and financial data of millions of people have been a massive leaked. britain's railways should be overseen by someone independent of government — that's the view of the man tasked by the government to work out how to improve the network. keith williams is due to publish his final recommendations this autumn, but he's been giving our transport correspondent, tom burridge, an indication of some of the changes he's planning to recommend. driving change on our railways, a mix of privately run trains and publicly managed to track is the task of a review. publicly managed track is the task of a review. the man appointed by the government to run the review wants a new body to manage the rail system day today. the rail system day to day.
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he told me that more accountability is needed at the top and more input from councils and city mayors. someone needs to be accountable to the public for the services that they receive and that needs to be at a national level. but we also recognises that the role of the regions needs to be emphasised because maybe what has been lacking in the past is regional input into the national system. one idea is to make rail franchises more accountable to passengers by basing contracts with train companies on performance related targets. we all want cheaper tickets, but someone has to pay. there have been rail reviews before, but significant change now feels inevitable. passenger growth on our railways has slowed dramatically and now some rail franchises are losing money. companies are not queuing up to run our trains and so less competition. a principle which underpins the system today.
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one union criticised the review for ducking the question of whether the trains should be re—nationalized. but this is a review commissioned by the current government. unless there is an election, it will be conservative ministers to implement change. this is outside source live from the bbc newsroom. our lead story is: president trump has again attacked four democractic congresswomen on twitter. meanwhile, the house of representatives is preparing to condemn his earlier racist tweets. more than 30 people are thought to be trapped under the rubble of a collapsed building in the indian city of mumbai. at least 12 people were killed when the four storey structure gave way. it's the second time a building has collasped in less than 10 days there following torrential rains. the former south african
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president jacob zuma says he and his family received a death threat after he appeared at the corruption inquiry against him on monday. he's been testifying again today. he denied overseeing a web of corruption while president. african services and spanish police have arrested a man at barcelona airport who had half a kilo of cocaine under his wig. customs officers noticed that the colombian was wearing a rather large hairpiece under his hat. heavy monsoon rains have triggered floods and landslides in south asia. at least 119 people have been killed and four million displaced. this is the vast area that's been affected — stretching from kashmir and india to nepal and bangladesh. india's bihar and assam states have been particularly badly hit. droves of people are leaving
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their homes in assam and seeking shelter in relief camps. these people are using any mode of transport they can there to escape the flood waters. this is gaibandha in bangladesh and you can see how the rain has swollen already raging rivers. here, in neelum valley in pakistan—administered kashmir — flash floods have damaged more than 50 houses, killing at least 23 people. the flooding is also affecting relations between india and nepal the neighbours share an open border that stretches for nearly 1800 km — with a number of rivers flowing down to northern india from nepal — so when they overflow, tensions rise. the bbc‘s navin singh khadka has explained it all on this article —
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and spoke to me earlier. india's disaster risk reduction track record is improving. but on that, to some extent, it has become an issue for neighbouring countries. nepalfor become an issue for neighbouring countries. nepal for instance talks about the structure and the border area which they have constructed along the border which means that they have not been able to save its side of settlements, where's the police and local people say they are being inundated. so that is the kind of issue that is exacerbating the strain on the relationship. and when those are put to the indian authorities, what is the justification for what they have done? this is something that we have investigated two years ago. oh, it
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is just investigated two years ago. oh, it isjust a road, but investigated two years ago. oh, it is just a road, but officials on the police i'd say it is just not roads, if they are no roads then how can they have no things beneath them and when things happen heavily, they get an undated. they also, the diplomats have been criticised for not being able to raise this as an issue effectively and as a result, that has many meetings and the last one in last may that we cannot do much about this, this has to be taken up ata about this, this has to be taken up at a diplomatic level. that is what he suggested. and again, these diplomats, the question is if they we re diplomats, the question is if they were able to raise effectively, by and large people think no. now to bulgaria where there's been a massive cyber attack. the country's finance minister has apologised to the entire country after admitting hackers had stolen millions of taxpayers' financial data. one official said the attack may have compromised nearly every adult‘s personal records. on monday a person claiming to be russian hacker emailed local media
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on monday offering access to the stolen data. dimitar bechev is from the atlantic council think tank. i know you have been looking at the story. does look like a huge embarrassment for the government. story. does look like a huge embarrassment for the governmentm absolutely is, it reflects on poor standards of personal data security and safety. for me, as a bulgarian citizen and for pretty much everybody else, it is very concerning. and temps with the government has said, it sounds like this data was found a few >> “ this data was found a few >> —— taken a few weeks back. this data was found a few >> -- taken a few weeks back. for your viewers, this is not the first time, the government has been persistent in bulgaria, the company registered because a lot of
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businesses as a result were cut off from their data stream. a lot of whistle—blowers, to be honest i been raising alarms about the low quality standards. so it is been in the making for quite some time. what are you hearing from inside bulgaria? there is anger and concern. but if you work through the implications, and the fact that your personal data is study from how much tax you pay to which a physical address and licence plate is so on and so forth, publicly available, you never know how the state it is used online. from what kind of fraud there is and to miss use by any third party. so i can see there being similar anger
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and many aspects of bulgaria. this from a russian hacker, we cannot confirm that but are russian criminals known to have deep connections in bulgaria ? criminals known to have deep connections in bulgaria? a long—standing connection between bulgaria and russia. but we do not know that for sure whether the person is posing as a russian hacker oi’ person is posing as a russian hacker or indeed, he asserts that he is a bulgarian national and has been doing it due to concern about the governing standards. i guess there will be a narrative were to come, the government will try to spin the story as one concerning foreign interference, but the russian connection, i hope somebody is doing thejob connection, i hope somebody is doing the job thank you forjoining us. a
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political link to russia and saying we must look at this with political analysis. we will get more on this tomorrow i'm sure. hello. welcome to our long weather forecast and as we look ahead to next week, there could be some warm weather on the way butjust how warm it will be remains open to question asi it will be remains open to question as i will show you in a moment. between now and then, we'll see some u nsettled between now and then, we'll see some unsettled weather, frontal systems heading our way, this one bringing some wet weather during wednesday, that ran across northern ireland from the word go forth and extend into scotland, could be some heavy thunder bursts and some damp weather across northwest england and northwest wells. brisk winds accompanying our rain band, further east with high cloud and turning
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sunshine increasingly hazy but still some once to be had and 26 in london, turning cooler behind our rain dance because the northwest. that band will continue into wednesday night and thursday, getting to the southeast, but as it clears, all of us will have cooler airand clears, all of us will have cooler air and showers comes from the shadows across the northern half of the uk could be pretty heavy. briefly, as a star friday, this pump of high pressure here should bring a dry interlude but it will not last because there is an area of low pressure and some uncertainty about the track of this, because it looks like it will be some bursts of heavy rain and potential strong winds as well, particularly for wells in the southwest of england. temperature wise afternoon, we're looking at highs of around the high teens celsius in northern ireland, maybe the low 20s for some impressive wells in southern england. as you start the weekend there will be some wet weather to get out of the way with the area of low pressure
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continuing to run its way eastwards and more persistent rain should clear away as to go to saturday but behind that is to be some further showers and spas of sunshine as well. just signs of things turning a little more humid towards the south of the stage and at belfast and glasgow, temperatures will be around 20 degrees. for sunday, we'll see some outbreaks of rain at times, showers and longest buzz of rain with more persistent wet weather returning from the west later in the day was still some spots of sunshine and temperatures in the low to mid 20s once again. now, and next week, the wind up in the atmosphere. going across the atlantic generating areas of low pressure which are likely to sit to the northwest of the uk and thatis sit to the northwest of the uk and that is where it will be much more u nsettled that is where it will be much more unsettled allowing high pressure to build summer across continental europe. while all of that is going on, is likely to build across southern europe, but the question is, how much of that heat will we
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get to tap into and it looks most likely with high pressure across central europe and love precious to the northwest and south westerly wind, the data sheet will give for towards parts of germany and we will see something a little less hot. but owsley one computer weather model, here's another one. only a subtle difference but the area of high pressure in this model is a bit further north toward scandinavia that will allow us to draw in the flow of airfrom that will allow us to draw in the flow of air from the south to tap into a bit more of that heat. one thing we can say is that the west is the windiest weather towards the northwest, clustered areas of low pressure, but there is a potential that it did turn very warm for a time and we'll keep an eye on those computer weather models and keep you up—to—date.
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a record number of drug—related deaths in scotland — more than a thousand people died last year. it's three times the death rate for the rest of the uk and the highest in europe. it is children. who are taking drugs? who are dying. shown for the first time — the off—duty police officers who tried to take on the london bridge attackers as a jury says the killers were lawfully shot dead. bornjoined at the head — the twins separated at last, thanks to the extraordinary skill of great ormond street surgeons. it's a very emotional moment, we've been working a long time to get them here. they've been through so many operations, and now, you know, it's worked!
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