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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  July 21, 2019 6:00am-7:01am BST

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good morning, welcome to breakfast with ben thompson and rachel burden. our headlines today: passengers are left stranded as british airways suspends flights to and from cairo over security concerns. please confirm that you are not intending to violate international law by unlawfully attempting to board. dramatic audio reveals how a british warship warned iranian forces not to seize a uk—registered oil tanker. it was one of the greatest rounds of golf at a major. and it means ireland's shane lowry is leading the open by four shots, going into the final day at royal portrush.
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and england's dreams of netball world cup gold are over after defeat to new zealand. one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind. and: 50 years on, the world remembers as events are held to mark the anniversary of the apollo 11 moon landing. are fine, warm sunday on the way for most of us. but expected to turn wetter through the day. i have the forecast for that and the heat, that is what it's all about in the week ahead. join me later on. it's sunday, the 21st ofjuly, our top story: british airways has cancelled all flights to and from the egyptian capital, cairo, for seven days. the airline has described the move as a safety precaution. the german carrier, lufthansa, also announced it was suspending flights, but later confirmed its scheduled services
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will resume today. andy moore is at heathrow for us with the latest. what more do we know about the reasons for these cancellations? well, we don't know anymore, and since the are probably based on that intelligence assessment, we are unlikely to hear any more details. at the basic underlying fear is that some jihadi at the basic underlying fear is that somejihadi will use lax at the basic underlying fear is that some jihadi will use lax security to put a bomb on an aircraft. the last—minute cancellation of the flight the last—minute cancellation of the flight to cairo caused anger and confusion. one passenger, due to fly to her sister's wedding with her husband and two children, says she now faces a huge bill to rebook. husband and two children, says she now faces a huge bill to rebooki don't know what to do, i can't even tell my sister the flight is cancelled, my kids are feeling
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disappointed, very very disappointed. i had to tell them the truth that we are not going. disappointed. i had to tell them the truth that we are not goingm disappointed. i had to tell them the truth that we are not going. it may be very inconvenient for some travellers, but this plane crash is the spectre that looms behind the cancellations. in 2015, a russian jet plunged into the sinai desert, killing all 222 passengers on board. britain was one of the first countries to warn it was most likely a terrorist attack. other nations followed the uk in stopping flight out of sharm el—sheikh. it is now thought it was blown up by a bomb smuggled on board at the airport. so far, cancellations only affect flights to cairo, other destinations in egypt are not affected. foreign office has updated its travel advice, saying there is a heightened risk of terrorism against aviation. it's as extra security measures are in place for british planes leaving
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egypt. well, what is going to happen with the other airlines? with me is the independent travel editor. people who are booked to travel today from birmingham and manchester on thomas cook airlines to another airport will be going on as normal, just as they were flying out to gatwick yesterday. other airlines are continuing to operate to cairo right 110w. continuing to operate to cairo right now. the normal morning flight on egyptair to heathrow is preparing for departure. they haven't had any effect on their operations at all. this district the british airways, although as you mentioned, lufthansa also cancelled their morning flights, but they say they will be backin flights, but they say they will be back in the air this afternoon. ba
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have also said they will try to make alternative arrangements for those who have had theirflights cancelled, or they can get a refund. with just a few days to go until we find out who will become the next prime minister, the justice secretary, david gauke, has told the sunday times he'll resign if boris johnson wins. mr gauke, who has served in the cabinet since 2016, says a no—deal brexit would lead to national humiliation. let's speak now to our political correspondent, nick eardley who's in our london newsroom. we are awaiting the outcome of this entire contest. but how much of a loss will this be for borisjohnson if it is him? if you look at the sunday papers, it is as if the contest is already over. they all expect boris johnson contest is already over. they all expect borisjohnson to win, and if he is looking at the papers over his brea kfast he is looking at the papers over his breakfast it will be a stark reminder of the big challenges he is
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going to face if he takes over at number ten. the first one, that resignation that you mention. david gauke is someone really uncomfortable with the idea of leaving the eu without a deal, and he was saying this morning that he couldn't get on board with boris johnson's government if he is saying, if —— which he is, that we will leave on the 31st of october, deal or no deal. he is someone who could make life quite hard for mr johnson by refusing to get on board with that. also a reminder this morning, international problems that he will face if he goes to brussels to try to renegotiate. the backstop, the insurance policy to stop a hard border in northern ireland, ireland's foreign secretary saying this morning we want to sort this, we wa nt this morning we want to sort this, we want to work with the new pm, but the fundamentals are not going to
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change. if boris johnson the fundamentals are not going to change. if borisjohnson does beat jeremy hunt and take over on wednesday, there is a lot to do. a recording has emerged of dramatic radio exchanges between a royal navy warship and iran's revolutionary guard, moments before a british—based oil tanker was seized in the gulf. the stena impero was boarded on friday in the strait of hormuz, a key shipping route. the foreign secretary, jeremy hunt, has urged iran to release the vessel and its crew. ramzan karmali reports. the seizing of a british flag tanker, the stena impero, by the iranian revolutionary guard. iran says it was breaking maritime rules. the owners of the tank insist it was a bang international law. the british government has condemned iran's actions. we are calling on iran's actions. we are calling on iran to reverse this illegal act, we
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are looking for ways to de—escalate the situation but we will do what is possible to ensure the security of the vessel. it was in the strait of hormuz in omani waters, but made a sharp turn towards iran. that was the message from iran to the stena impero, and dramatic footage has emerged that appeared to show the hms montrose trying to stop the siege of the tanker, but it was too far away to intervene. please confirm that you are not intending to violate international law by unlawfully attempting to board. foreign secretary will update mps on monday what further measures the government will take, the threat level has been raised to the highest level has been raised to the highest level of alert. our middle east correspondent, tom bateman, is in fujairah in the united arab emirates for us now.
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good morning, tom. bring us up—to—date with what is happening. hearing that recording really does bring home the severity of what is going on. it is pretty dramatic stuff, that audiotape, which i think gives you a real sense of the way that tanker felt itself surrounded, it was unable to change course, even though it appears it did try to take some kind of evasive action. it was in these waters just hear that it had left its anchorage, on what should have been a routine voyage west, tankers do these kinds of trips all the time, but are now the crew of 23 finds itself in the opposite direction, off the coast of iran, out of contact with their families and with the glasgow—based company that runs the technical elements of the ship. as for the ship's owners, they tell me that they had real anxiety about the crew, because they haven't been able to co nta ct crew, because they haven't been able to contact them directly, but they did say last night that via their
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insurers, they have been able to find out that crew is in good health, but they don't know what will be the fate of the ship as the crew enters a second day of uncertainty. thank you, i know you will keep us up—to—date. scotland's public health minister is calling for the uk government to take part in a summit aimed at reducing the rising number of drug deaths. joe fitzpatrick has written a letter urging the home secretary, sajid javid, to work with him to tackle the problem. the home office said it would respond in due course. earlier this week it was confirmed that scotland had the higest rate of drug—related deaths in europe. overnight, events have been taking place in the united states, to celebrate 50 years since man stepped on the moon for the very first time. at washington's air and space museum, a special ceremony marked the exact moment that neil armstrong stepped out of the lunar module. nada tawfik was there
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and sent us this report. counting down the final seconds to man's first steps on the moon, 50 yea rs man's first steps on the moon, 50 years later. americans gathered at the national air and space museum in washington, dc to relive the historic moment. thejourney washington, dc to relive the historic moment. the journey was dramatic. after two computer alarms, and with just 30 seconds worth of fuel, astronaut neil armstrong manually piloted the lander down to the sea of tranquillity. more than a billion people around the world watched as armstrong stepped off the ladder and spoke those famous words that travelled hundreds of thousands of miles back to earth. is one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind. buzz aldrin followed him, and together they planted the american flag, but this was an
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achievement for all of mankind. this anniversary has been marked with events around the world, reminding people of a time when anything seemed possible. the apollo 11 astronauts propelled the world into astronauts propelled the world into a new era of space exploration. 50 yea rs later a new era of space exploration. 50 years later they are inspiring the next generation to discover new frontiers. more than 600 million people around the world watched the lunar landing on television, including the space journalist dr ken kremer who runs the website space up close. he joins us now from his home in florida. thank you for your time. the celebrations have been a wonderful opportunity to really remember some of the detail, the significance and the incredible efforts made by eve ryo ne the incredible efforts made by everyone involved in this mission. absolutely. there were 400,000 people who worked on this project, i remember it very well as a young lad, i looked up at the moon in all that there were people walking on
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the moon. 50 years ago today i was watching the tv, so it was very exciting. i have been at many events this week, including today, and you we re this week, including today, and you were talking about the washington, dc rib memorial, i was there for the replay of the launch, which was just two days ago. very exciting. replay of the launch, which was just two days ago. very excitingm replay of the launch, which was just two days ago. very exciting. it is extraordinary watching these pictures again. i am just wondering what they did when they were on the surface of the moon, because they we re surface of the moon, because they were there for about 20 hours. they we re were there for about 20 hours. they were on the surface for 20 hours, they got ready and they actually got out, they exited the lunar module, they got onto the service and spent two hours there, they collected rock and soil samples, planted the flag, had a phone call with richard nixon,
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set up science samples, so they did a lot. it was a short visit, but the combination of 8—10 years of work, since president kevin kennedy gave us since president kevin kennedy gave usa since president kevin kennedy gave us a direction to land on the moon before the end of the decade. it was a great accomplishment. and it led to further moon landings. i wonder if looking back it has really re—energised people's interest in the moon, but in particular what lunar exploration could hold for us in the future. absolutely. first of all we learned the origin of the earth moon system, so we learned a lot from the rocks about where we all came from. now we want to go back to the moon, and really we never should have stopped going to the moon. there is a lot of interest right now, the us is leading the artemis programme, to land the first woman and the next man within five yea rs. woman and the next man within five years. europe is part of that programme, the orion programme, they are building the service module, i just saw that capsule with the vice
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president a few hours ago, so it is ready to go on the first unmanned mission, then we will have a crew mission, then we will have a crew mission and within five years we will hopefully be landing, and it will hopefully be landing, and it will truly be an international effort, because as i said, europe is involved in that, and we will be doing a lot of great science, going to the south pole, looking for water, which we can make into rocket fuel and oxygen to breathe and live off the land, and do a lot of great science for the future. they often describe this sort of thing as a horizon project, to facilitate going out further in the solar system, like fulmars and so forth. absolutely, we have to prove that the technology can get us to the moon and is reliable, because we
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haven't been there for 50 years. if you have a problem, like you had an apollo 15, for the moon you are only three days away, but with mars it is six months, and the trip is really closer to two years. we have to prove we can do this on the moon and then go on to mars. there could be life on mars, i'm an organic chemist so i'm really interested if we can find life beyond the earth, to see if it is the same or different. that is the ultimate goal, but first we have to go back to the moon. thank you very much, and we love your shirt! it is extraordinary to think 15 yea rs it is extraordinary to think 15 years to that apollo 11 mission and the progress made and the 50 years subsequent to that, we haven't had that same sort of meteoric...” wonder what was the difference given the technology that is now available, whether you can do more, stay longer. you would think so. you limit it really does feel like there is so much more to be discovered in
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terms of research. bring it on. here's nick with a look at this morning's weather. it isa it is a fine start out there across much of the uk. some early sunshine to be had and many places are going to be had and many places are going to hold onto the fine weather today and get to see some warm, sunny spells. this indicates it is not for all of us, certainly to northern ireland and then into western scotland. rain is getting heavier as the day goes on. look at the bigger picture. this bias in the isobar shows a brief ridge of high pressure which means it is a fine start from oh. —— this brief ridge. producing cloud into western scotland with one or two light showers around but here comes the persistent, heavy rain around, moving into this afternoon. then moving into western scotland and elsewhere, the cloud is going to increase but they will be some sunny spells to be had, are perhaps the odd light shower breaking out here and there but for much of england and there but for much of england and wales, anyway, it will stay dry for much of the date and temperatures and the warm spots
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reaching onto the mid— 20s. with the rain here in northern ireland and western scotland, the wind will be picking up here as well and that will make for a very, very different day at the open. this is the average wind speeds for the royal portrush. it will get up to 35 mph this afternoon. looking at the swathe of heavy rain for northern ireland, the la ke heavy rain for northern ireland, the lake district into scotland as well. quite strong winds, gusty winds, particularly towards irish sea coasts. the midlands, east anglia and the south—east will have a mainly dry night to come and it will bea mainly dry night to come and it will be a little bit warmer than it was last night. starting with rain for northern ireland, parts of northern england and scotland in the morning. that will retreat to northwest scotla nd that will retreat to northwest scotland as we go through monday. a lot of misty but low cloud to the south—west, some of it will linger
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through the day but elsewhere, very warm to hot spell coming through. the story for the week ahead, near 34 monday in east anglia and south—east england. the weather patter —— weather pattern is such that we were dragging hot air from the concert —— continent. iberia into france and if we get to paris 41 celsius, it will be an all—time record. that is in the way. it threatened this week mid week. for the uk, mid 30s across parts of the east and south—east but for northern england, wales, we get to 30 may be about. upper 20s in the hot spots. the funds storms around tuesday night and into wednesday. still some warm— hot sunny spells continuing to england and wales so temperatures to -- trail england and wales so temperatures to —— trail offa england and wales so temperatures to —— trail off a bit later in the week. high humidity, warm nights to come, proper summer weather. it
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week. high humidity, warm nights to come, propersummerweather. it is on the way in the week ahead with everything because of the heat, humidity and thunderstorms as well. it looks really hot in some places. 41 in paris we saw there on nicholls map. we will get more from nick. the weather will be critical to gilly for those going out this morning. more with gavin. we'll be back with the headlines at 6.30. now it's time for the film review, with mark kermode and jane hill. hello and a very warm welcome to the film review on bbc news. taking us through this week's cinema releases, mark kermode. hello. hi. mixed bag this week. we have tell it to the bees, which is a new british drama. we have the lion king. is it live—action or animation?
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and varda by agnes — a film maker looks back on her life and career. let's start with tell it to the bees, which is adapted from a book by fiona shaw which i confess i have not read. i know you have seen the film... i have not read the novel either, actually. we are both working on just the basis of the film. holliday grainger is lydia, who is raising her son on her own in rural scotland. she finds herself homeless, and this new doctor — actually, returning doctor, jean, played by anna paquin — offers her a housekeeper because she doesn't have anywhere else to live. so she moves in, and the two women become very friendly. this kind of story is seen through the eyes of the young son. in the beginning, there is a voiceover of what did he see, what didn't he see? he becomes particularly fascinated by the fact, in the garden there is a hive of bees, and he's really interested in the way in which the bees live together in their society, and he is told by anna paquin's character, you tell your secret to the bees, which i think is where the title comes from. the bees sort of seem to serve a larger role which is both mirroring and, in some cases, actually moving on the story.
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here's a clip. oi, oi! get off! oh, it's on me! get it off me! stay still. no. we mustn't. what did you do to the bees? no, nothing, i, erm... so... and this is the ‘505. it's a period drama but i do think it still has some relevance, because it talks about some
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pretty tough subjects. it talks about homophobia, it talks about racism, it talks about domestic abuse. it does all of those things quite frankly. it is sort of upfront about them. there are a couple of scenes in the film that did make me wince because they are kind of tough. my problem is this. i didn't that it's very well—intentioned, and i think it's solidly played. i'm not entirely sure that, on the screen, the bee metaphor works, because up to a point, there is this idea of the discussion, you're telling your secrets to the bees, the hive mind. it's fine. there are moments, however, in which the bees to start to play an active part in the narrative, in which i did think this is falling apart... it was a bit peculiar, that point, wasn't it? the bee element was quite lovely with the little boy at the beginning, and then towards the end, you think, not sure where this is going! the more it was kind of happening in the background, as a counterpoint to the main story, the better it worked. when it actually became part of the story, it was less successful.
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that said, i think its heart is in the right place, and i think it is at least striving to tell a story in an adventurous way. i would rather watch something try to do something and fail then just simply play it safe. i think some of the performances are not quite as great as they perhaps ought to be, i think that's partly due with actors wrestling with accents which are not their own. yes, i agree. i kind of wanted to be... i wanted to be better! but i think there are still things, and there are individual moments in it which i think, oh, they work really well. individual moments of real electricity and spark, and kate dickie's in it, and i love kate dickie in absolutely everything. she is fantastic. she is flinty in this for them. very, very stern. she is aggressive and we don't mess with her. no, you don't. the lion king. why? why is it being remade? explain. well, i think the most obvious reason, live—action disney remakes are making a tonne of money.
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they are doing really well. in the case of this, this is kind of billed as live—action. it is not live—action. it is animated. everything you're saying on the screen is animation. the whole thing is done in a virtual reality environment in which the cameras are moving around in virtual reality but it is all completely computer—generated. it's photorealist animation. and what this does is, you can create a photoreal version of an antelope or a lion, or a lion cub. the only thing is, they look like real animals but they are talking in singing, and i have a slight conceptual problem with this. if you see a cartoon talking and singing, it is fine because you understand. if you see the stage production of the lion king, your mind is filling some of the gaps. you cannot fault it technically. it is breathtaking. the environment is the best sort of realised environment on screen you can possibly imagine, but it is... it's like a david attenborough documentary, and they're all singing. it's just weird! i am personally a great fan of old,
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traditional animation. i never watched an old animated film and thought, i wish it was more real. this is something very new and it is kind of ground—breaking. this is real cutting edge stuff, and it's made byjon favreau, who made jungle book, which did have a human character. it is very strange. i am not entirely convinced by it. our surgeries this week. people might think they would only like if they're obsessed with cinema! i don't know anyone like that! this is varda by agnes. it's agnes varda's final film, looking at her life, her extraordinary career. she's talking sometimes to an audience, sometimes she's talking to the camera, and so we get clips from her films. we get encounters of people who remember working with her, and how tough she was.
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when you see the film, what comes across as her generosity of spirit, her enthusiasm forfilm, her enthusiasm for the medium and also her great love of beaches. and she says this thing about "a beach is the opposite of a wall," which is a phrase which wins me over. here's a clip.
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it's so enchanting, and i did not actually expect to be enchanted, but there's something really... did you think it was going to be hard work and sort of...? i thought you would have to be really, super knowledgeable about her work to get some thing out of it, and you don't have to, because i am not. and yet, she is delightful to listen to. it shows you just as much as you need of the clips to make you think, i want to see that film — particularly the robert de niro film. she said, it's so great i got robert de niro. the film flopped, but it doesn't matter — i got robert de niro for a day! she says this thing about all film—making comes down to three things, and its inspiration, creation and then sharing. inspiration is where the film comes from, creation's how you make it and sharing is showing it to the audience. and i love the fact she loves cinema, but she loves the audience engaging with the cinema. she does these artworks, installations — did, her final film — and what you get
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from this is a portion of somebody, her enthusiasm, her intelligence, her empathy. i thought the film was great fun. there's many laughs in it. it's really funny and playful and witty. i thought it was really, really charming. it is an absolute delight. best out this week? i really, really love only you, which is the debut feautre by harry wootliff. i think she has done a greatjob of telling this story. about a relationship between two people, a slightly younger man, a slightly older woman. the woman thinks that their relationship is going to be unbalanced, out of sync, but he is the one who thinks, i think we should start a family. it is about what happens when something which is an idea turns into a demand. i think it is brilliant. i love the performances. fantastic, yes. it feels so intimate! and so honest! i absolutely believed in the characters! you loved it, too, right? yes. not quite as much is you, and we don't have time to explain why, but i thought the performances were fantastic. fabulous, fabulous. fantastic. captain marvel. i've watched it!
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this will surprise you. captain marvel, i did. i married someone who loves superhero movies. what was their verdict on it? she loved it. i loved it for about two thirds of it and then went, oh, is it still on? it felt a little bit long. when it came out, a lot of people saying, it cannot work, it has not enough blokes in it. and how dare they! and of course, it's been a runaway success. the reason i've chosen it on dvd is, i want to see it again. in cinema, i thought it was fine. i felt the same thing as you. two—thirds of the way... but i want to see it again because it's been such a runaway hit. i think there's stuff in there that i probably missed first time around. brie larson was good. brie larson is great! i think brie larson is really good, and i think she's got a great sense of humour as well. thank you very much. see you again soon. that is it for this week. see you next time. bye— bye.
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good morning, this is breakfast. a summary of today's main stories. british airways has cancelled all flights to and from the egyptian capital, cairo, for seven days. the airline has described the move as a safety precaution. german carry a also announced it was suspending flights, but later confirmed its flights, but later confirmed its flights would resume. british airways says it is helping affected passengers, but these are not very happy with the response so far. very disappointing and frustrating, especially with my kids and family. we have a biggerfamily especially with my kids and family. we have a bigger family over there waiting to see the children. there was no information or help, no advice on alternative ways of getting there, just a case of ring this number, which of course you
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could get through to. a recording has emerged of dramatic radio exchanges between a royal navy warship and iran's revolution regard, moments before a british—based oil tanker was seized in the golf. please confirm that you are not intending to violate international law by unlawfully attempting to board. iran said the ste na attempting to board. iran said the stena impero had broken international maritime rules in the strait of hormuz. jeremy hunt has urged iran to reverse what he calls it's illegal actions. thejustice secretary, david gauke, says that he will resign if borisjohnson becomes pm. david gauke, who has served in teresa may's cabinet since 2017, says he cannot serve in the cabinet if borisjohnson says he cannot serve in the cabinet if boris johnson pursues says he cannot serve in the cabinet if borisjohnson pursues a no deal brexit, which he said will lead to
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humiliation. events have been taking place to celebrate 50 years since man walked on the moon for the very first time. special ceremonies in london and washington marked the exact moment that neil armstrong stepped out of the lunar module. the original event was watched by a global audience of around 600 million people. more than 1000 paddleboard enthusiasts descended upon st petersburg's canals yesterday. many we re petersburg's canals yesterday. many were dressed up as cartoon characters as they floated past the famous landmarks of the city. a p pa re ntly famous landmarks of the city. apparently not everyone managed to stay dry, but that didn't seem to spoil their enthusiasm. iam quite spoil their enthusiasm. i am quite impressed that dominion stayed on. that would be quite tough to paddle with that outfit on. are pretty stunning location, st petersburg. gavin isjoining us for the
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petersburg. gavin is joining us for the sport. the open, how exciting! shane lowry is now leading, it was the best round he played in the third round, and it was unreal to watch, he is now in the lead by four shots. it is a captivating final—round ahead, because we have a lot of englishmen involved. a treat for thousands of fa ns involved. a treat for thousands of fans at royal portrush, who were there to enjoy one of the great majors from shane lowry, hitting a course record 63. he has a four shot lead heading into the final round. he has to be wary of the weather and the english, as we report. royal portrush has never seen anything quite like this. the open championship was always going to be special. you could have predicted just how special. the cause of the excitement on the causeway coast, ireland's shane lowry. the gallery
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was packed and he didn't let them down, cheers ringing around the course as putts dropped and records did as well. he now has a four shot lead. it has been an incredible day, andi lead. it has been an incredible day, and i am still trying to take it all in. this is something i never thought... this doesn't feel like golf to me, i don't know what it is but i am very happy with how today went. i'm in a great position, going into tomorrow, and i'm really excited. the tens of thousands of fa ns excited. the tens of thousands of fans who have been packing the galleries here at royal portrush have enjoyed much kinder conditions, and some of the spectacular golf we have seen suggests the players have been enjoying it as well. there hasn't been an englishman at the open for decades, and if anyone can stop shane lowry it may be tommy fleetwood, after another flawless round. and withjustin rose, lee westwood, and danny willett all in
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contention, it is set for a spectacular finish. contention, it is set for a spectacularfinish. bad weather contention, it is set for a spectacular finish. bad weather is expected, anything else impossible to predict. england's dreams of getting to a netball world cup are over after the commonwealth champions lost to new zealand. outgoing coach tracey neville said that her side made basic errors as they lost 45—47, and nor northern ireland finished 10th and scotland 11th. they say imitation is the highest form of flattery. tracey neville announced weeks ago she would step down after this world cup, and she no longer has to bang her own drum. her team are no longer has to bang her own drum. herteam are gaining no longer has to bang her own drum. her team are gaining fans but they knew this would be tough. they were wrong. a jumpy start saw new zealand brea kers wrong. a jumpy start saw new zealand breakers into the lead. england's usual swagger had been replaced with the jitters. new zealand's shooters we re the jitters. new zealand's shooters were on fire. the fans were cranking up were on fire. the fans were cranking up the pressure, england needed
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their attackers to hit their mark, and in the blink of a quarter, they had turned a six goal deficit into a three goal lead. the wind was now in their hands, but they threw it away. new zealand had all the answers, and with just a few minutes left, england with three goals down, valves were dry. but with new zealand so brilliant, the roses were left to rue their mistakes. 45—47 the final score. heartbreak for england, knocked out by a resurgent new zealand side. their third successive cup in the semi—final.m was down to legs, and just a few mistakes. there were opportunities to ta ke mistakes. there were opportunities to take that game and we left it too late to. the world cup final remains elusive for now, and england will have to pick themselves up for today to play south africa for the bronze, a match, as tracy's brother phil
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knows all too well, nobody wants to play. in cycling, defending champion geraint thomas lost to julian alaphilippe on stage 14 at the tour to france, with just alaphilippe on stage 14 at the tour to france, withjust over alaphilippe on stage 14 at the tour to france, with just over half a mile to go on the iconic mountain, thibaut pinot won the stage, and julian alaphilippe finished seven seconds ahead of geraint thomas to extend his lead. australia declared on 420 end today's women's ashes test match. england recovered to 199 — six, but with one day of the test left, i draw is the most likely outcome. england having lost 31—day matches already. she says she is in the best form of
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her life, and it was an impressive win for laura muir, who romped home in the ladies'1,500m. she was the favourite, after faith kipyegon withdrew from the race. i'm just going to sit and use my strength, i thought, and many of the girls run fast times over longer distances, andi fast times over longer distances, and i knew that it was my range and i use that. the bridge on just missed out on victory in the 100 metres, finishing just 0.02 seconds behind the south african. james ellington finished last in his
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hundred metres heat, but it is his first race back since suffering injuries ina first race back since suffering injuries in a motorbike accident. the netball was agonising, because they were so close the whole way through. and they were beaten in such a close game. the game has been phenomenal, it has really raise their profile. sadly, england won't be there. it is just approaching 6:40am. irritable bowel syndrome is thought to affect as many as one in five of us to affect as many as one in five of us in the uk at some point in our lives. new research suggests the condition may not exist at all. this study was sponsored by the british couege study was sponsored by the british college of nutrition, and they say it may not be a single condition, but symptoms triggered by a variety
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of different issues. a gastroenterologist is here to talk to us about it. what do we understand ibs to be at the moment? there is no doubt that it exists, it usually has symptoms of bloating, abdominal discomfort and bowel changes. it is where the bugs that live in the gut talk to each other, that changes, and it has these symptoms. the pain people feel is the same as a kind of pain people feel when they have cancer or a perforation in their gut. so what this study is suggesting is that rather than a problem or a condition, this isjust the result of something else, and it has in many cases been misdiagnosed.” think you race two issues. the first is that i think there are a significant number of people who have symptoms that would be similar
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or consistent with irritable bowel syndrome, who actually have another condition, and that emphasises the importance of doctors and other healthcare professionals taking care, making sure there are no red flags or alarm systems that would raise flags for any other conditions. and everybody should also have some tests to exclude anaemia, inflammatory disease and coeliac disease. it is one issue, that some people do have other diseases, and the second issue is that lifestyle issues may of course exacerbate irritable bowel syndrome. but if you look at all chronic bowel diseases, there are a number of factors that lead to a getting worse, so while there may be a number of abnormalities with irritable bowel syndrome, there could be a problem in the gut
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system, in the central nervous system, in the central nervous system, anxiety, or lifestyle in terms of sleep and diet, those are all things that influence other diseases as well. when you look at lifestyle, there a re diseases as well. when you look at lifestyle, there are some quite simple things. i'm sure you will be well aware that there are people who will say they have ibs for years and they follow this regime and the condition doesn't alleviate, but you say things like having a very regular meals, not eating too quickly, avoid spicy, processed foods, avoiding alcohol and fizzy drinks. these are basic health m essa 9 es drinks. these are basic health messages for anyone, i suppose. in a way, the good news is that those sorts of messages i could notjust for our bowels, but lifestyle is important in terms of sleep, relaxation and exercise, and it is really important that people don't ignore the stressors in their lives, because the gut has more nerves, more nerve cells, than the brain. there is a relationship between the gut and the brain? the gut is the
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primary organ of emotion, i would argue. we express that in a language, with a gutted, gutsy, a gut feeling, and actually there is more serotonin... i wasjust going to say, is there a suggestion that we may be too easily fobbed off? if we may be too easily fobbed off? if we go to the doctor they say it is ibs and you need to do these things, rather than looking into potential other causes? it is very challenging within the short time available for consultations to take a careful history, ensure there are no red flags, and arrange appropriate investigation. and i understand those challenges, i face them everyday in clinic, but i don't think that as an excuse for not doing the right thing. i think doctors also find irritable bowel syndrome challenging because it is not something where someone can come and have a pill and it all goes away. treatments don't work for
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everybody. and it is all about helping and empowering people to self manage their condition through lifestyle and diet and these other things. sometimes that is the ha rd est things. sometimes that is the hardest thing, it requires an awful lot of discipline. you very much for coming and talking to us. there will be people watching this morning who have their own experiences of this, so feel free to get in touch with us via social media. lets check in on what the weather is doing. nick, good morning. it is going to get a bit warm this week. you can say that again, it is going to get very hot. not necessarily for everyone. bye— bye. the symbol would suggest not all of us the symbol would suggest not all of us and there is another system on the way from the atlantic and that is going to be targeting northern ireland in the rain through the day and then into western scotland. it
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isa and then into western scotland. it is a fine start with a fair amount of sunshine. light showers, already into western scotland but for northern ireland, light rain moving in with more persistent, heavy rain which will feed into western parts of scotland. over eastern scotland, a large part of england and wales, it will stay essentially dry until very late on and the temperatures clearly just stuck in very late on and the temperatures clearlyjust stuck in the teens where you have the rain moving into northern ireland and western scotland. it will make things interesting at the open golf as things turned wetter through the afternoon. wind strengthens and these average speeds. start to see gusts of 30 to 35 mph. a wet end to the day in northern ireland, into scotland, especially the lake
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district, looking wet into tonight. some of the rain reaching to north wales and we may see some patchy rain into south—west england. the midlands, east anglia and the south—east having a dry night. it will be a warmer night than it was last night. tomorrow, a lot of cloud to begin the day, a lot of rain early on retreating to northwest scotla nd early on retreating to northwest scotland during the day and elsewhere a lot of misty, low cloud that may linger towards western coasts and hills but we will see warm, sunny spells coming through for many of us. those temperatures are already going up on monday. what is going on with the weather pattern? we are dragging in some hot airfrom iberia pattern? we are dragging in some hot air from iberia and pattern? we are dragging in some hot airfrom iberia and france pattern? we are dragging in some hot air from iberia and france with temperatures peaking around about. the record of paris will be broken at 41. staggering. for mid week, the
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most fine day where we see the most widespread sunshine across the uk is going to be tuesday. upper 20s, scotla nd going to be tuesday. upper 20s, scotland and northern ireland, from mid week, the heat becomes confined to central and eastern parts of england where we will see some days of temperatures into the mid 30s. elsewhere, it all seems to get a bit complicated. thunderstorms tuesday night and into wednesday was not another weather system for northern ireland and scotland later in the week. a lot of fine weather for england and wales but the temperature is come down a little bit. not out of the question we could get close to thejuly record in the uk as we look at things peaking towards the mid— 30s so we will keep a close eye on that but if you don't like the heat and humidity, this isn't necessarily the week you don't like the heat and humidity, this isn't necessarily the week for you don't like the heat and humidity, this isn't necessarily the week for you. you don't like the heat and humidity, this isn't necessarily the week for you. that's you don't like the heat and humidity, this isn't necessarily the week for you. that's how you don't like the heat and humidity, this isn't necessarily the week for you. that's how it you don't like the heat and humidity, this isn't necessarily the week for you. that's how it is looking. he gets a bit warm. thank you. just make your way to northern ireland where it looks much more manageable. we will be back with the headlines at seven o'clock. now it is time for click.
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jump on in. thank you. so you are not using the steering wheel at all, you are using...screams. wow! laughs. which way are we going?! i'm at nasa in houston, where lucienjunkin is taking me for a spin. using both a steering wheel and a joystick, you can point this vehicle in one direction and drive it in another. you can feel the forces
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in your tailbone. oh, i can feel the forces in my tailbone. laughs. and if that seems really confusing, well, it is. but this is drive—by—wire technology, which means the on—board computer works out which way you want to go and then calculates what to do with the wheels. all right, so we'll just go this way. this is just one of many experiments into how we might live, work and drive on the moon or mars. although this vehicle may also pave the way for smarter cars in smarter cities back down here on earth where, i have to say, parking may be one of the coolest things you get to do. no way! no way. come on, man. but, before we start driving around celestial bodies, we need to get there first.
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in the days of the moon landings, only two competing countries were locked in battle, driving space exploration forward. now, in the race back to space, the power is shifting. earlier this year, china's change 4 probe was the first spacecraft to land on the far side of the moon. and europe, india and japan are all pushing forward with their own space programmes. back in the us, nasa plans to get back to the moon by 2024. but now it has competition from private individuals. an idea that would've been laughable 50 years ago. rival billionaires, elon musk,
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founder of spacex, and jeff bezos, who owns blue origin, are racing to populate the moon and mars. but what kind of person would actually be on these spacecraft? the first people to go to mars will be risk—taking adventurers, accepting that they may have one—way tickets, a small chance of return and they will be probably financed or sponsored by one of these private companies. at nasa, we discovered a little—known department where these risk—taking adventurers live. right now, there are four astronauts inside a spacecraft on a mission to phobos, one of mars's two moons. whispers: but they're actually in there. yes, in this tiny habitat, volunteers are locked away for 45 days on a simulated mission, with cameras and scientists monitoring their every move. this is nasa's human exploration research analogue. hera for short.
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inside the module, the crew is poked and prodded in different psychological experiments, from sleep deprivation to diminished privacy, all to fine—tune a critical component that could make or break any future mission to mars — the humans inside the spacecraft. the primary purpose of hera is to learn about the effects of isolation and confinement on people, so a lot of the studies that we do are behavioural or psychological in nature. looking at the type of isolation from people so you are really only talking to or in contact with the other crew members that are in the vehicle with you, or mission control that is supporting you.
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yeah, astronauts on future missions to mars have more to worry about them at the toxic soil, the deadly atmosphere and high levels of radiation — they also have to worry about each other. and it is hard to say which of these will be more likely to result in someone's death. in its consistent low level stress over time, little things start to grate on you because the stress heightens how you react to the things around you. so the sound of somebody chewing cereal next to you, might be fine at first, and then 45 days later you really, really don't like that sound. even for an astronaut, the psychological demands of a journey to mars will be extraordinary.
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the spacecraft will only be the size of a small flat, and the round—trip will take almost three years. add in four different personalities cooped up together, and you may run into some problems. and with a range of characters needed, you never know who you could end up with. the habitat and workload
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are designed to mimic a real mission as closely as possible. and nasa's scientists throw in lots of elements to try and ensure that the volunteers forget that they are actually part of an experiment. if mcc talks to the crew, they ask a question, it takes five minutes to get to the crew and then they answer, it takes five minutes to get back. so a ten—minute round—trip for a question and answer. so the whole idea of creating a mission scenario — you're going to phobos, you're going to do an eva, you're going to pilot a small spacecraft on the surface — all that keeps them excited and engaged in the simulation. the goal here is notjust to study the effects of isolation and confinement but also to work out how to put together the perfect team for extreme space travel. it's all about the mix. and that's one of the things that we're looking at. what is that right mix or, given the particular mix of people. let's say you have one strong personality and three less strong personalities, what would we expect that to play out like? what kind of roles do you need
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to have a successful team for a space mission? and they were looking notjust at the functional roles, you know, a commander, a medic, an engineer, but they were also looking at the social roles, and found that they were just as, if not more, important for those long duration missions. having somebody that's providing humour and entertainment for the crew, that's way more important. and it won'tjust be down to humans to decide what the right social mix would be. masses of data is being generated from these experiments, making successful social interactions quantifiable. one of the research studies that is actually going on is looking at a way to get a little bit ahead of the personality problem by developing an algorithm where you can take the background information on an individual‘s personality test, that sort of information. plug it into the system and, based on the characteristics of all the people that you're putting in that team, figure out how they are going to work together, whether it's the right mix of people.
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unlike these potential martian voyages, we may think that three years in isolation is a bit bonkers. however, from jeff bezos to buzz aldrin, many are dreaming of trips to, and even living on the red planet. but lord martin rees, britain's astronomer royal, doesn't actually think that most of us are suited to space. nowhere in the solar system anywhere is as comfortable as the top of everest or the south pole. and so that's why i think the idea of mass emigration is a bit crazy. you have to bear in mind that space is not a place for human beings, except for adventurers, the kind of people who do go to the south pole and the top of everest. what do the hera crew think about the experiment? we caught up with them, unsurprisingly out in the fresh air, shortly after they left the habitat. you know, since we're all really similar, if we had one very
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extroverted person, that has maybe a strong personality that was slightly different than the group, that might have negatively effected the outcome. if you put four extroverts in there together, they are going to drive each other crazy eventually. maybe four introverts are not going to be able to come together as a team as much, 'cause they're more inwardly focussed. you want a good blend of people who are adaptable to not only a situation but to each other's personalities. you have a mission to mars — the goal is so huge, you know that you are extremely motivated. i mean, the aim of the analogue is to be one step closer to put humans on mars. i can barely imagine being in such a situation. the motivation is so huge that i think you can overcome anything. and i'm afraid that's all we have time for in this short version of click in space. there is much more in the full—length version
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which you can see on iplayer right now, and if you have any comments on this fascinating journey, we would love to hear from you. we're on social media — on youtube, facebook, instagram, and twitter @bbcclick. thanks for watching. and we'll see you soon. passengers are left stranded as british airways suspends flights to and from cairo over security concerns. please confirm that you are not
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