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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  July 28, 2019 8:00am-9:01am BST

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good morning. welcome to bbc breakfast with ben thompson and nina warhurst. our headlines today... no—deal brexit planning is now the government's number one priority — the man in charge says ministers assume that the eu will refuse a new agreement. a last—ditch effort to save the nuclear deal with iran — senior international diplomats will hold an emergency meeting today. the youngest tour de france winner in more than a century. colombian egan bernal has the yellow jersey going into today's processional final stage in paris. is there anything wrong with ‘hopefully‘ and should all men be called ‘esquire‘? the wordsmith extraordinaire gyles brandreth will give us his verdict on the new style rules imposed by the prime minister's right hand man. rules imposed by the prime good
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rules imposed by the prime morning. today is look similar good morning. today is looking similarto good morning. today is looking similar to yesterday's weather. if you had rain yesterday, it is likely to stick around today as well. they could be a few showers around, too. join me laterfor all the details. it's sundayjuly the 28th. our top story... the government is now "working on the assumption" of a no—deal brexit — that's according to minister michael gove. mr gove, who's now responsible for planning for such a scenario, said his team still aimed to come to an agreement with brussels but, writing in the sunday times, he added — "no deal is now a very real prospect." our political correspondent tom bartonjoins us now. this is a language we have the sort of heard before by theresa may. she kept repeating leave means leave and nothing moved forward. is this different? i think it is because we have a government which is entirely
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new, made up of a new prime minister and a cabinet who have all signed up explicitly to boris johnson's pledged to leave on the 31st of october, come what may. michael gove reiterates that promise in his article, saying no ifs, no buts, no delay, brexit is happening at the end of october. i think while we have heard the words before, the conviction with which they are being delivered as much more solid. also, you have got, i guess, a move towards a presumption of no deal. when michael gove says they might prefer when michael gove says they might p refer to when michael gove says they might prefer to leave with a deal, they say they have heard the response from the eu, the deal that was agreed with theresa may is the one on the table, take it or leave it. he says while he is optimistic that a deal can be reached, they say they
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must operate on an assumption that the eu will not budge. he says there is now a very real prospect of no deal and planning for no deal is now the government's number one priority. tom, the new prime minister is not wasting much time. he was here in manchester yesterday offering money for the north. it is early days, but the boris bounce is on? the boris bounce, of course, thatis on? the boris bounce, of course, that is what the newspapers are calling it. it is good news, as far as opinion polls go. four of them all of them are showing an improvement for the conservatives. it is not uncommon, any new leader, new government, often have a honeymoon period where the see the polling numbers increase. there has been an improvement, somewhere between three and 10% boost for the conservatives, depending on which
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opinion poll you look at. across the parties, the range is still relatively narrow. the conservatives more or less on 30%, the labour party around the mid 20s, the brexit party, the liberal democrats both sitting around the mid to high teens. not a massive range between those four parties. good news for the conservatives. like you say, early days and do not draw any conclusions yet. so much for politics taking a break over the summer. politics taking a break over the summer. thank you, tom. no such thing. it is just approaching five past eight. senior diplomats from britain, france, germany, russia and china will meet representatives from iran later today to discuss how to save the 2015 nuclear deal. tensions in the gulf have soared since last year when president donald trump withdrew the united states from the landmark accord, which curbed tehran‘s nuclear programme in return for an easing of economic sanctions. bethany bell reports from vienna.
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the iran nuclear deal is under pressure. since washington pulled out of the accord, it has reimposed punishing sanctions on iran. in response, iran has breached limits on its sensitive nuclear work. it's now enriching uranium to a higher purity, and has exceeded the amount of enriched uranium it's permitted to hold under the deal. tehran has threatened to take further measures if the remaining parties to the accord, especially the european nations, don't help it to circumvent us sanctions. in recent weeks, tensions have escalated further, with a number of incidents involving tankers and drones. last week, iran impounded this british—flagged vessel in the gulf. the step was apparently in retaliation for britain detaining an iranian tanker in gibraltar. europe's foreign policy chief has called on iran to reverse its breaches
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of the nuclear deal, but iran says the steps are allowed as a response to us noncompliance. bethany bell, bbc news, vienna. more than 1,000 people have been arrested at a protest in moscow after some opposition candidates were prevented from standing in local elections. the opposition say they were barred for political reasons. demonstrators were dragged away from the city hall as security forces used batons against the crowd. the eu foreign affairs spokesperson condemned the detentions. fresh protests are expected in hong kong today as the territory continues to be engulfed by huge anti—government demonstrations. in the latest confrontation, police fired tear gas into crowds as tens of thousands marched to condemn an attack on pro—democracy campaigners by armed mask men last week. what you are looking at there are
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live pictures from hong kong. we know tensions have been building over the weekend. our correspondent stephen mcdonell is in hong kong for us. we were talking to you yesterday as the protests were building once again. bring us up—to—date on what happened yesterday. we were expecting more violent clashes. what is happening today now? despite yesterday's violence, increasing violence, we are now seeing in these protests, pro—democracy activists dressed in black are gathering here again today. as i said, that is despite the violence yesterday. we heard from hospital officials that dozens heard from hospital officials that d oze ns of heard from hospital officials that dozens of people were injured as a result of those clashes yesterday. it is not surprising as the more ha rd core it is not surprising as the more hardcore element of the protest movement were throwing bricks and other projectiles, metal poles and the like, at police. the riot police
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responded with a lot of tear gas yesterday, rubber bullets, shields and batons and attacks. it is not surprising we are seeing injuries. it is probably lucky the injuries have not been even greater. and yet this just keeps have not been even greater. and yet thisjust keeps on have not been even greater. and yet this just keeps on going. there have not been even greater. and yet thisjust keeps on going. there is no sign of an end to this crisis.|j wa nted no sign of an end to this crisis.|j wanted to ask that, actually, what would be enough to start to change this? the demands of the protesters are getting bolder, aren't they? they say they will not give up the protests until they see some real movement. yes, it has changed from a protest movement opposing this very unpopular extradition bill, allowing people to be sent to courts in mainland china, controlled by the communist party, to one with much more broader objectives. people are calling for democracy here. given this is not something beijing are going to give them in a hurry, they
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are not going to allow them to vote for their own leader, allow them to choose directly members of the legislative council, which is kind of rag, in the view of these demonstrators, to ensure a pro—beijing majority. the protesters say they are not going to give up u nless say they are not going to give up unless they get something approaching that. it is hard to see where the end now lies. every week, we are seeing where the end now lies. every week, we are seeing more where the end now lies. every week, we are seeing more and more protests. this weekend, there have been three and they are becoming increasingly violent. part of the reason these demonstrators say is when there were those initial large peaceful protests, hundreds of thousands of people opposing the bill, the government ignored this. and so many of them think the peaceful way is not the way to go and that is why they are ramping up the pressure on the government. thank you for now, right there in the middle of those protests that are now entering further days the
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process continues until there is any real protest. we will stay right across that protest of you and continue the coverage on bbc news all day. a man and woman, aged 43 and 41, are being held by police after an alleged mass brawl on board a cruise ship. the p&o britannia was returning to southampton after a week—long voyage around the norweijian fjords, when the disturbance took place on friday. a witness said trouble flared when one passenger objected to another wearing fancy dress. a british teenager has won nearly a million pounds after coming second in the world cup finals of the online game fortnite. jaden ashman, from essex, was competing in new york, in what was billed as the biggest ever e—sports event. joe tidy reports. fortnite world champions, aqua and nyhrox! they're as shocked as you are. playing the game they love has just earned them a shared $3 million,
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or £21; million. 16—year—old emil bergquist pedersen from norway, known online as nyhrox, and 17—year—old david w from austria, known as aqua. it all ended in a hail of bullets after a day of action watched by a packed new york stadium crowd. the prize purse for this, the first fortnite world cup, is the largest ever in e—sports. even the second—place team became millionaires. 15—year—old jaden ashman, known as wolfiez, is from essex. he'll share $2.25 million with his 22—year—old dutch team—mate, dave young, known online as rojo. it hasn't really hit me yet what is going on. when i get home it'll be insane. 2.25 million between you, over a million each, what are you going to do with it? i'm probably going to try to save most of it, i know that sounds a bit cliche, but save maybe half of it and put quite a lot of it
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into a house and my family. i have been quite against him gaming, pushing him to school work, and i have thrown out an xbox, snapped a headset. we have had a nightmare. bringing the fortnite world to the real world has been a big development for this game which some say has peaked in popularity. it's also undeniably a big moment in e—sports in general. later today, once again the arena will fill for the final event, the solos. not bad if you are ever considering telling your children not to spend so telling your children not to spend so much time on the computer, maybe they could because they might when you £1 million. ——win you. and that wasjoe tidy reporting. you are watching breakfast. it is 12 minutes past eight. it's every parent's worst nightmare. you turn your back for a second and your baby starts to choke,
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would you know what to do? it's an issue that's got a lot of people talking this week, after one mum shared her story on facebook. luckily for alex and her son theo, their story had a happy ending. here is theo pictured with his dad jamie. theo was rushed to hospital after choking on some bread and melon, but was discharged that same night. let's talk to steve carter from the royal life saving society and francesca lowe who delivers training in baby first aid, after a similar incident with her son thomas. just briefly tell us what happened with thomas. thomas was in his car seat, we were going shopping, i was on the back of the car and my mum was driving. i looked left and he had turned blue. he was premature, two weeks old. i wasn't sure if he was breathing. i did not know first aid. iwas 15 was breathing. i did not know first aid. i was 15 minutes away from hospital and i went to the fire
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station, passed him to a fireman. they took him into the fire engine and gave him oxygen. it was a really quick thing that happened. and gave him oxygen. it was a really quick thing that happenedm and gave him oxygen. it was a really quick thing that happened. it was very quick. it was very fortunate that you are near the fire station. and also quick thinking that you could go somewhere like that. i wouldn't know how to get in or find anyone inside. it was really lucky there were 12 firefighters in the garden. i was in the right place at the right time. what did he choke on? we will never really know. maybe his head was tucked in the car seat and brought some milk up. there was no noise, he was blue. itjust takes a moment. steve, if you find yourself in that situation, or any other parent does, what should be your first response? what should parents be thinking about? be mindful of the airway. the airway is now closed. if we identify choking
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was the cause, we need to deal with that. we get the little one and we support the head, make sure the little one is about 45 degree angle down because what we are doing now, as an adult we are encouraged to cough, but the little ones do not have a grasp of coughing, so we need to use gravity. do five sharp back blowers. three, four, five. quite farm? yes. checking each one. they would be harder than that in the real world. if that haven't cleared it, turn them over. two fingers into the centre of the chest and do five sharp chest thrusts. one, two, three, four, five. if that hasn't worked, turn back again and five
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sharp back blowers into the shoulder. we keep alternating that. if that is unsuccessful, it would be the resuscitation process. and that applies to babies that are younger than 12 months old? if they are older, that changes, doesn't it? what should parents be mindful if they are older? the only difference, instead of using the gravity side of things, we go into the abdominal thrust instead. that is where you stand behind somebody. you literally go in between the belly button and the rib cage, you force it into the abdominal muscle into there. francesca, from your experience you have now turned that into a vocation. you have been teaching people about bb first aid. clearly, that advice is welcome, but do you
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think there is a lack of understanding? people do first aid at work, you wouldn't necessarily as at work, you wouldn't necessarily as a parent go and look for first aid courses unless something has happened. my boro have taken this on board and we are teaching at across five centres. that means that 2000 people have now learnt paediatric first aid. it could save a life. i teach mums and grandparents, them coming and not knowing and leaving with confidence to do it. you just never know, do you? you do your best to chop up the food to the right side. but it can still happen. to chop up the food to the right side. but it can still happenlj to chop up the food to the right side. but it can still happen. i am aware of things like olives, chocolates, hired lollipops, children put everything in their mouth anyway and they can chalk from
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being very young up until five or six. for it to be a free option and a two hour workshop, it is accessible for everybody. if you cannot get to a class that francesca is running, where else can you get the advice? from our website. the bonus of it is you can get a group of people together and it does not have to be delivered in a classroom. if you have a group of family members, you can deliver this in your own home, your dining room, your own home, your dining room, your lounge. obviously if the room is big enough. and we bring the equipment to them. it is great to have that confidence. as thomas all right now? he is four years old now and will start school. he is still testing me. the fear hits you, but
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asa testing me. the fear hits you, but as a mum or adds a dad, you when things, don't you? —— make a mum or a dad. i wonder why we do baby massage sessions but nobody is teaching us the basic first aid skills. that is the time to learn it. i have learnt so much. thank you. it is just approaching 20 past eight. here's stav with a look at this morning's weather. he is ona he is on a beach. good morning. yes, i thought i would put a sunny picture behind me because it is not raining everywhere. it is sunny across parts of south wales and south of england. it is on the south side of this weather front, which has brought awful conditions to south—west scotland, north wales and into the north midlands and anglia.
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heavy rain, standing water and minor flooding around. it has been a lot of rain falling in the same areas. that is going to continue through this morning and into the afternoon. the rain may be pulling away from the south—east, but still heavy in north england, north wales and a wet day for northern ireland as well. scotla nd day for northern ireland as well. scotland starting off slightly dry. fog into the afternoon. lovely sunshine across the northern isles. the best in the south—west of england and wales. temperatures reaching 23 celsius. cool under the rain band, which will gradually fizzle out as we head into the overnight period. it will stay damp across northern england, central scotland. a dry story for the south. temperatures up to 16 celsius. quite muggy. this weather system will be
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bringing some windy and showery conditions into tuesday and wednesday. before it reaches us, monday is a breather. dry weather for much of the country. quite a nice day. some sunshine around. some showers for scotland, but also some sunshine in between them. a warmer day. up to 26 celsius. windy later in the day across south—west england and into south wales, as the area of low pressure moves in. that sets the scene for a tuesday. he windy day for parts of england and wales. the showers will be heavy and thundery. if you catch them, they could cause localised flooding. unseasonable for the time of year. gusts of up to 30 mph. northern ireland into scotland, should stay largely dry. 22 celsius
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will be the high. up to 24 celsius in england and wales. warm in the sunshine. that area of low pressure will be sticking around, bringing heavy downpours. they still will be some warm spells and sunshine. no heatwave on the cards for this weekend. it is looking like a typical british summer. what else did we expect? more gorgeous photographs. thank you very much. it is packed everything weather. rain courts, sunglasses, ponchos. —— rain jackets. whether you're jetting off with the grandparents or sunbathing with the in—laws, it seems that more of us are going on holiday with our wider family members. for some, it's about cost, for others, childcare. but most say that family trips are a great way to spend quality time with one another, as more families live further apart. here's our consumer affairs
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correspondent, colletta smith. james and jessica are having a ball this summer. but it's notjust mike and his partner claire who are busy keeping them occupied. grandma stella and grandad robert are on hand to help out. oh, no! it's not their first holiday as three generations. in fact, it's becoming something of a family tradition for all kinds of reasons. ohh! we've both got credit cards, so that's always a bonus. grandma is always treating them! they know who to come to if they want anything. to be honest, it is about spending time together as a family, you're making memories for yourselves, for the kids, everybody. now, businesses are adapting to meet the new demand. we need to make sure that the accommodation that's available for holiday makers to choose from is right for them. if you are a large family, you need extra space. plenty of open—plan living for everyone to come together. they are holidaying together, they want to spend time together.
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it is important that they can have space together. it's not just happening in uk holidays. we spoke to eight of the biggest names in the business. they all told us they had seen a rise in bookings for multi—generational groups, and in some cases, well over half of customers surveyed had already taken or wanted to take a break with their grandparents. this is grandad and nanna. then we have mum and dad. some nights eat out, other nights, one of us will cook, so it'sjust helpful, isn't it? as family life evolves, our holidays are taking a different shape. if travel companies want us to keep spending our cash, it will be down to them to keep up with this latest holiday trend. colletta smith, bbc news. it does very much depend on whether your father—in—law snores heavily. it does very much depend on whether yourfather—in—law snores heavily. i am talking from experience. it sounds like this is a family issue. we came back from a lovely family holiday in portugal. we had a week
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in portugal and it was lovely. good. it does depend how well you get on. we are going to take a look at the papers now. tom harwood from the centre right westminster news site guido fawkes, is here to tell us what's caught his eye. this is interesting, inside the son today, project nor fear. this is interesting, inside the son today, project norfear. there is going to be a government campaign to prepare for every home. the government says it should not panic from a zero deal exit. when you prepare that to what the former chancellor was seeing nearly a fortnight ago, that it was damaging fortnight ago, that it was damaging for the country, it is telling, isn't it? it is a total contrast. it isn't it? it is a total contrast. it isa isn't it? it is a total contrast. it is a stark contrast from the leaflet we received, it is quite nice to have a government who believes more positively in this country. the keep calm and carry on attitude we are going to see. it is crucial in the
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negotiations to say, if we do not get something better from the negotiations to say, if we do not get something betterfrom the eu, we are willing to walk away. this is a stronger government that might end up stronger government that might end up getting us a better deal. the keep calm and carry on idea has been parodied and it has appeared on so many bits of merchandise. are are at that level of preparedness and worry less about what no deal will look like that we need a leaflet? there isa like that we need a leaflet? there is a bit ofa like that we need a leaflet? there is a bit of a shame that a lot of the commentariat around westminster are whipping up fear about it. in reality, there are serious problems that could be caused by it but we have three to mitigate those issues. if we have a government who are committed to doing that, it is going to not be... it could be a positive outcome for the country. you have freedoms from that, you can slash ta riffs freedoms from that, you can slash tariffs from day one, there is lots
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of freedoms that are granted once you leave the crutches of brussels regulation. there are calls on a general election. the last party ma nifesto general election. the last party manifesto at the referendum from the conservatives said... that is what people voted for last time. it is a familiar sight, we had jeremy corbyn in liverpool and borisjohnson was in manchester, sin is the pit on the high viz and a hard hat, it looks like a general election, doesn't it? —— as soon as the pit on high viz. this is about attracting back the donors that abandoned the conservative party under theresa may and building a bit more of a movement under boris johnson. and building a bit more of a movement under borisjohnson. we have had a media advert tojoin
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movement under borisjohnson. we have had a media advert to join the conservative party, and something people can believe in rather than a wooden mechanism. it is something to reignite the passion within the country. i think that is quite an exciting thing. what part of the electorate is he targeting? mainly people who voted leave in 2016, the 17.4 million people, more people than have voted for anything in the history of the country. if he can get a sizeable chunk of those, it is a clear path to a victory. labour voters as well? dominic cummings, the main picture there, his first day with his downing street pass around his neck. explain the link with the nightclub. his uncle owns a brilliant night in durham. i spent a lot of nights at university there.
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it was voted the worst nightclub in europe. it is brilliant. sticky floors. dominic cummings worked there in his summers, sometimes on there in his summers, sometimes on the door, sometimes as a bouncer and also overseeing the redecoration of it. this piece in the express as explaining how he is going to use all of that he learned from working in the nightclub and bring it to downing street. i think people like it when people work outside of downing street. yes, especially when it isa downing street. yes, especially when it is a place like the nightclub. coming up in the next half hour. headbanging meets haberdashery. we meet the woman from edinburgh who kicked off the world's first ever heavy metal knitting world championships. you will want to wait and see that. it is as weird as it looks. stay with us, headlines coming up.
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hello, this is breakfast with ben thompson and nina warhurst. it's 8.30am, here's a summary of this morning's main news. the government is now "working on the assumption" of a no—deal brexit — that's according to minister michael gove. mr gove, who's now responsible for planning for such a scenario, said his team still aimed to come to an agreement with brussels but, writing in the sunday times, he added: "no deal is now a very real prospect." meanwhile the chancellor sajid javid has confirmed he will soon announce extra funding for no—deal preparations. an emergency meeting
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will take place later today to try to save the international deal with iran, designed to curb its nuclear programme. senior diplomats from britain, france, germany, russia and china will hold talks with representatives from tehran. tensions in the gulf have soared since last year when president trump withdrew the united states from the landmark accord and re—imposed punishing sanctions on iran. in response, tehran has breached limits on its uranium enrichment. more than a thousand people have been arrested at a protest in moscow, after some opposition candidates were prevented from standing in local elections. the opposition say they were barred for political reasons. demonstrators were dragged away from the city hall as security forces used batons against the crowd. the eu foreign affairs spokesperson condemned the detentions. fresh protests are expected in hong kong today as the territory continues to be engulfed by huge anti—government demonstrations. in the latest confrontation police
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fired tear gas into crowds as tens of thousands marched to condemn an attack on pro—democracy campaigners by armed mask men last week. it's still unclear how china will react to the increasingly violent demonstrations. it's emerged that a uk soldier who died in syria fighting the islamic state group was killed by friendly fire. it was previously reported by us officials that sgt matt tonroe was killed by a roadside bomb in 2018. however, the ministry of defence said the 33—year—old died as a result of "explosives" carried by allied american forces. democrats in the united states have renewed accusations of racism against president trump after he criticised an african—american congressman. the president accused elijah cummings, who's the head of a powerful committee, of trying to hurt innocent people while doing nothing for his baltimore district, which mr trump branded as "very dangerous" and badly run. mr cummings recently criticised the trump administration over conditions
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in migrant detention centres. a man and woman, aged 43 and 41, are being held by police after an alleged mass brawl on board a cruise ship. the p&o britannia was returning to southampton after a week—long voyage around the norweijian fjords, when the disturbance took place on friday. a witness said trouble flared when one passenger objected to another wearing fancy dress. now, you might want to take a look down the back of the sofa, because there's still £145—million old pound coins that have yet to be returned to the royal mint. shops have been unable to take the old—style coins since 2017, but they can still be deposited at most high street banks. the 12—sided version was introduced to help crackdown on counterfeiting.
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that's a lot of pound coins down the cipher. a lot of heavy sofas! a british teenager has won nearly a million pounds after placing second in the world cup finals of the online game fortnite. jaden ashman, from essex, was competing alongside his gaming partner in new york, in what was billed as the biggest ever "e—sports" event. the singles contest takes place later today. 1 million quid! it does throw up that question about how much you should allow your kids to play on computers. because they are learning, but at the same time... they should have a revision timetable for fortnite, if you can wina timetable for fortnite, if you can win a million quid on it. make mummy a millionaire! is it a sport? it is a millionaire! is it a sport? it is a sport, one of the fastest growing new industries on the planet, it is
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e—sport. new industries on the planet, it is e-sport. bringing people together as well. hand eye coordination, and you can win £1 million. there's so many tournaments as well, it's notjust fortnite, you have soccer games, battle games, its fortnite, you have soccer games, battle games, it's ridiculous. what a lwa ys battle games, it's ridiculous. what always fascinates me about stuff like this, there is a whole industry of people watching people playing the game, not just of people watching people playing the game, notjust playing yourself. we saw the people in the venue watching this stuff. incredible. what else is incredible, bernal‘s performance in the tour de france. it's a big day for egan bernal, the 22—year—old set to become the youngest winner of the tour de france in 110 years, and the first columbian. he's got the leaders yellow jersey going into today's final stage in paris, which is mainly processional so he won't get challenged. patrick gearey reports. on top of a mountain and on top of the world. egan bernal, the 22—year—old colombian, will almost certainly become the third youngest winner in the history of
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the tour de france. born in the andes, and crowned in the alps, bernal was followed all the way to the top by his countrymen who had never seen a colombian win this race. bernal‘s job was to stay in yellow and maintain his lead over the shortened 37 mile course. last year's winner, britain's geraint thomas, and the rest of team ineos, playing wingmen, protecting him from threats. like the man in blue behind him, frenchman julian alaphilippe was the chaser but that takes its toll on these punishing slopes. this is the moment france's bid for a first tour winner in 34 years ran out of puff. thomas was now second but launched no challenge, effectively handing over the title to his team—mate. so what was his message to his successor? ijust said to him, just enjoy it, soak it all up and don't worry about crying because all real men cry. it's amazing to be part of it, he's a phenomenal athlete, 22, he's got an amazing year ahead of him and it'sjust an honour
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to have been a part of this. the two will ride together again in paris later. all bernal must do is stay on his bike. he has climbed his mountain already. patrick geary, bbc news. lewis hamilton will start today's german grand prix from pole, but he's not been well. the world champion says he felt so ill, that at one point, he thought he might have to drop out of the race weekend altogether. so to then come back and take pole position at hockenheim is no mean feat. he was given a helping hand though, after both ferrari's failed to make it through qualifying. just four days to go until the start of the ashes and, as expected, england have named world cup winner jofra archer in their test squad for the first time. the fast—bowler only became eligible to play for england earlier this year but took 20 wickets in their world cup—winning campaign to force his way in. ben stokes meanwhile is re—instated as test vice—captain. he lost the role after that incident outside a nightclub in bristol in 2017. warrington will play
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st helens in the final of rugby league's challenge cup. warrington were made to work for their victory by a well—drilled hull fc side, but eventually won by 22 points to 14. joe philbin going over the line late on, to send warrington through to the final for a third time in four years. the other semifinal always looked to be a mis—match on paper, but part—timers halifax put in a really resiliant performance to frustrate st helen's early on. but saints proved too strong in the end, running in four tries to win 26 points to two, qualifying for their first final in 11 years. really proud of them. talking about effort all week, and we certainly didn't get beat on effort which is really pleasing. i think it might even have been a little bit tighter, if we had had the ball a bit better. but saints definitely know they had a game anyway and that's a big thing for us. and leeds rhinos won the women's challenge cup for a second year in a row. they beat the same team, castleford, in the process. it was pretty close for a while, 10—all before courtney hill went
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over for the rhino's with 20 minutes to go, 16—10 the final score at the university of bolton stadium. rory mcilroy looks like he's returned to form after missing the cut at the open championship last weekend. he leads the wgc invitational in memphis, after shooting an eight under par 62 in his third round. he birdied nine holes including four of the last five to leave him 12 under par overall, one shot ahead of us pga winner brooks koepka. the five—time open champion tom watson will retire from competitive golf after today's final round of the senior open at royal lytham & st annes. the american turns 70 in five weeks' time, and says he just doesn't "have enough tools in the tool box to compete successfully." britain's adam peaty could win his fouth medals as the world aquatics championships come to an end in south korea today.
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it's been a brilliant competition, one of the last major meets before next year's olympic games. the former commonwealth champion mark foster is here, he's part of the bbc‘s coverage. caeleb dressel, we saw him yesterday, three golds, is he the next big thing in swimming? yes, it's one of those things that michael phelps left the building and caeleb dressel walked back through the door. america has always had had a big name, but it is the sprint events, the 50 freestyle world champion from yesterday, this race here, he has the best start in the world. ben proud's start is amazing but he whipped him to play pieces. we were hoping he would break the world record in the 53 yesterday, he has 150 and 100 in a free and fly, he almost floats along the surface of the water, such an athlete. what makes him so good, can you pick out certain things about why he is so
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successful? it's hard to see from the surface, everybody has, i'm not competing any more, but six foot four, six foot six, that comes down to the levers, the paddles and flippers, hands and feet. he has the right attributes. he is a little bit more dynamic, more of an athlete, and in —— america, excuse the pun, the pool of people that we choose from is much greater. we have 100,000 people in england and they have half a million people who swim. the world record from michael phelps, we thought it would have been beaten at some point but not so quickly, it was beaten, his 200 metre record as well. caeleb dressel will be the big name in the olympics next year. what about british talent? adam peaty led the way, his
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100 breaststroke, 56.8, he went project 56, he is 1.5 seconds faster than any other human being has ever being. we watched caeleb dressel win the 50 free by .3 of a second, adam wins by one second over 100 breaststroke. hot new name we have in 50 and 100, she is going this evening, freya anderson, 18 years of age. she is tall, she has the right attributes but she needs to get a little bit stronger so she has some more speed. luke greenbank, james wilby, 100 breaststroke, behind adam the —— adam peaty, we have strength and depth. you see it in the relay.
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when we can compete, we can compete. set optimism ahead of next year. is there room for women to improve before the individual events? the men's team is really strong at the moment, and the women's side, siobhan mary has had health issues and hopefully she will come back before the limbic. aimee willmott was a little bit of, molly renshaw stepped up, anna hopkin, they are nearly there, women's swimming, we are looking at thejuniors as well, we don't have the same depth. i don't know why that is. it's just one of those things that comes through decades. you touch on the success , through decades. you touch on the success, i know you have been anchoring the coverage for the bbc, have you got any highlights, what stands out? adam peaty is a big one, he performed, and we knew he had performed. the hungarian, malacca,
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200 fly, performed. the hungarian, malacca, 200 fly, regan smith on 200 backstroke, 17 years old from america. there have been some fast swimmers coming through, swimming never seems to stay still. sport progress is all the time but swimming, world records constantly, well, not constantly but they are being broken. i love seeing the sport evolved and get faster. people say, why is that possible? underneath the water, so much goes on and now we have technology to look at that, and make athletes go faster in the gym and with diet as well, that creates, it interesting. our multiple swimming after the success of 2012, are we seeing the grass roots swimmers come through or is it too soon? it's always one of those things, if you have kids, you teach them to swim and you need to learn to swim because it's a life skill. it's whether we retain people in swimming clubs. if you are a pa rent in swimming clubs. if you are a parent and your child has athletic ability, i'm going to say generally you push them into football because
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there is money in that. they will be lost to swimming and other minority sports. it's one of those things now, we try and catch them in their if they are good, put them in the right areas with the right coaches and hopefully get the next adam peaty. that desire to continue to win golds, project 56 with adam peaty, where do you think that intrinsic desire is from? some of it is just your mindset. human intrinsic desire is from? some of it isjust your mindset. human beings in general, we like to improve and progress. any ten—year—old with the best time, every time they go on to the pool, every time they get in they want to do a better time. adam peaty, 56.88 is his world record, he has blown the rest of the world away, he will go into training and go to doa away, he will go into training and go to do a better time again, forget everybody else, just beat yourself, we like to progress. anki so much for coming. —— thank you so much.
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and you can watch highlights of all the day's coverage on bbc two at 3.30pm. i'm going to go for a swim this afternoon, i'm inspired! go outside, you will be fine! he's not joking. let's get the details. it's pretty wet in most places this morning. it is indeed, north west midlands into north—west england, standing water and minorflooding into north—west england, standing water and minor flooding on into north—west england, standing water and minorflooding on the roads will continue today. so will start with a picture which is sunny because it is not so wet everywhere, glorious conditions in the west of england. it will get to 25 degrees in some spots. the rain in northern ireland, south—west scotland, north—west england, north wales and the midlands, the heaviest of the rain and pretty wet across lincolnshire at east anglia, that will start to pull away from the
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south—east this afternoon, becoming confined to the north midlands and north—west england so very wet for you. further north, dry across scotla nd you. further north, dry across scotland and humid conditions, some sunshine but also heavy and thundery showers developing into the afternoon. glorious conditions in the northern isles and across the south—west. parts of the very far south—west. parts of the very far south—west of northern ireland as well, as we will see the best of the temperatures here in the sunshine. very wet through the central swathe, which will continue to ease down through this evening and overnight as it drifts north. a dry story across the south with clear skies, temperatures 12 or 13 celsius. further north, a little bit milder but quite muggy as well with cloud cover. that is the weather front moving northwards, showers coming into scotland during monday. the next area of low pressure will bring windy and unseasonable weather through tuesday and through the week. in between these fronts,
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lovely weather, a much better looking day for monday for northern ireland, northern england, north wales and the midlands, sunshine and feeling warmer. 26 the highs. 20 further north, wet and windy during the south—west during the day. that low pressure will hurtle towards england and wales affecting western areas through tuesday, then transferring eastwards for wednesday and thursday. some of these downpours could be torrential, thunder and lightning through tuesday, west of england affected. gusty winds, 30 to 40 inland, not feeling like summer. in between in the sunshine, feeling quite warm. seasonal average temperatures. scotla nd seasonal average temperatures. scotland dry with the best of the sunshine. that area of low pressure is very slow moving through the
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week, bringing a mixture of warm sunshine but heavy and thundery downfalls. —— downfalls. sorry, we were busy having a chat about the weather! they will be some sunshine in some parts. it's head—banging meets haberdashery, shredding versus threading, casting on and rocking out. it's heavy metal and knitting. finland recently hosted the first ever heavy metal knitting world championships. and nathalie cortada from edinburgh was the first to take the stage. here she is to spin us a yarn.
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my name is nathalie cortoda, and i was the first ever person in the world to be on stage knitting to heavy metal. heavy metal knitting is basically what it says on the tin — a mixture of heavy metal and knitting. someone had the brilliant idea to combine them both and create this first heavy metal knitting world championship. it was absolutely an amazing experience. everybody was so warm. although it was a competition, to be quite honest, it was about meeting your tribe and making new friends. it was just a real metal feeling. knitting can be seen as quite a conventional, traditional pastime.
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what i do is i knit with unusual materials to take it to a new dimension. i pretty much 90% use recycled materials. inner tube yarn is actually quite thick. you can't make it too thin because it might break or stretch. but it makes it really quite tough to knit. it's also quite smelly! a lot of people have told me, you know, "what the hell are you doing? what?! knitting? heavy metal? how does that link up?" and in knitting or crochet or any kind of textile work, there's a kind of rhythm to it, which goes very well with metal. i think next year will be just mega. and it's brilliant that people are being encouraged to try things out. just let go, let loose, just go for it. knit!
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you could have someone's i out, with that! many more stories like that! you can see more stories like that on bbc scotland every weekday evening at nine o'clock or on the bbc iplayer. it's been a busy week at westminster, with many mps being given new responsibilities, and teams of civil servants getting to know their new bosses. )and jacob rees—mogg, the new leader of the house of commons has been quick to tell his staff what he expects, by issuing a style guide and banning a number of words and phrases. so what are jacob's rules? gone are the words ‘very‘, ‘hopefully‘ and ‘ongoing'. he's reminded staff that organisations are singular, so for example, "the government is", not "the government are".
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men without a title should be referred to as esquire and you should always type a double space after a full stop. and finally he wants his staff to use imperial measurements, so miles, not kilometres. let's talk to the author, actor and wordsmith gyles brandreth. he's also a former conservative mp and he's in our norwich studio. a very good morning to you. what is your initial thoughts on this? it's really caused a mixture of views on twitter, some people think it's incredibly patronising and inaccurate. at times i think it might be inaccurate but there is nothing new in it. you must remember that at westminster, they called jacob rees—mogg the honourable memberfor the 18th jacob rees—mogg the honourable member for the 18th century, he jacob rees—mogg the honourable memberfor the 18th century, he is quite a traditionalist, he likes things as they were. he would like
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to think he is as modern as tomorrow with a lot of time for yesterday, he likes traditional values. at some of it is maybe not quite right. the idea of good english is good communication, you want people to read what you write and understand it. they have been doing this at westminster for many years. when i was at the treasury in the 1990s, they were still using a manual produced for the treasury, produced in 1954, a book on plain english, to ensure good, clear style. in 1954, a book on plain english, to ensure good, clearstyle. but in 1954, a book on plain english, to ensure good, clear style. but you are right, esquire is quite an old—fashioned way of addressing men and some men may not like it. jacob rees—mogg will accept ms instead of miss. but some men think that esquire is old—fashioned. and i would quibble with something saying there should never be the, before
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there should never be the, before the end, but i like some things, like my children say can i get when they mean may i have, i think that's annoying. hopefully means full of hope, not i hope. i'm with him because he wants to get rid of cliches and tired turns of phrase, we all do. for example, i work for the one show and the editor does not like us to overuse the word iconic. so on his band list is iconic, nuanced, on a level playing field, faces like that, sometimes we get caught up with tired freighters. another age old institution which is moving with the times is wimbledon, we saw that this year they banned ms
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and misses from the boards when they announced the women, should we not all be moving with the times? i'm all be moving with the times? i'm all for being at the cutting edge, i like new words and the world is changing, or symbols, yolo, like new words and the world is changing, orsymbols, yolo, i'm there. awesome — balls. but when you write a letter, it should reflect your personality. he used to give these rules to his staff, it reflects his personality, he would never say i personally, because the word personally is redundant. he would say think. the idea is to communicate well. but i'm with you, make the language clear. we are so blessed to have the richest language in the world, we should revel in it. he must be extremely excited, jacob
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rees—mogg, as achim brexiteer, to reflect that we have most vocabulary of any language on earth. we have half a million words in our language, the four french have fewer than 100,000. language, the four french have fewer than100,000. our language, the four french have fewer than 100,000. our language is five times richer than theirs, let's revel in it. if you are one for traditional use of punctuation and grammarand spelling, as traditional use of punctuation and grammar and spelling, as i am on the whole, and words that are not cliche ridden, then i think in a way, his rules are in the right direction. everyone should make their own rules. there should be criminal punishment for people who put in apostrophes. yes, bring back the stocks for a rogue'. and every time you ask a politician they say things like, so, well, anyway, these are time fillers, redundant terms of phrase. like is my current phrase, i
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was on the bus the other day, the young people behind me use the word like 78 times in five minutes. he said, like, like, like, it gets on my nerves. we all have words we would like to see in the jacob rees—mogg were jailed. would like to see in the jacob rees-mogg were jailed. that is, like, amazing. what is your absolutely pet hate?” like, amazing. what is your absolutely pet hate? i think it is the' in the wrong place, i cannot bear that. and when the comma is missing, have you eaten grandma, have you eaten, grandma, the difference between those two! thank you, for your company today. breakfast will be back tomorrow at 6am with charlie and naga.
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enjoy the rest of your weekend.
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this is bbc. the headlines... no—deal brexit planning is now the government's number one priority — according to michael gove — the minister responsible for preparations to leave the eu. a last—ditch effort to save the nuclear deal with iran — senior international diplomats will hold an emergency meeting today. democrats in the united states have renewed accusations of racism against president trump after he criticised an african—american congressman these early scenes in hong kong, where protesters a re these early scenes in hong kong, where protesters are gathering as the territory continues to

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