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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  July 29, 2019 6:00am-8:30am BST

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good morning. welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and mega munchetty. our headlines today: the prime minister heads to scotland to sell his commitment to a united kingdom, despite strong opposition to a no—deal brexit. the uk's biggest business group, the cbi, is warning that we're not ready to leave the eu with no deal. i'll be explaining why. a man who became trapped in rocks while saving a toddler from the sea has been rescued on the norfolk coast. max verstappen storms to victory in hockenheim while lewis hamilton was left in a spin. the world champion struggled in the wet in an extraordinary rain—hit german grand prix.
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the british teenage gamer who's won almost a million in the fortnite world cup finals. she thought i was spending eight hours in my dayjust wasting my time so now hours in my dayjust wasting my time so now that i have proved to her that i can do stuff, i am really happy. today, more rain in the forecast, turning shari through the day. dry weather as well but i will have more inis weather as well but i will have more in 15 minutes. weather as well but i will have more inis minutes. —— weather as well but i will have more in 15 minutes. —— sharla ri. —— showery. it's monday the 29th july. our top story: boris johnson will travel to scotland today to announce 300—million pounds of new funding for scotland, wales and northern ireland. yesterday, the conservative leader in scotland, ruth davidson, said she couldn't support a no—deal brexit. today the business organisation, the cbi, warned the government that neither the uk or eu is ready for a no—deal brexit on october 31st. here's our political
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correspondent jonathan blake. days into thejob, borisjohnson is on the road again. after visiting manchester and birmingham last week, the prime minister is going to scotla nd the prime minister is going to scotland where he will announce £300 million worth of funding for local communities and argue for a renewal of ties that bind the united kingdom as it prepares for a future outside the eu. yesterday, michael gove, the minister in charge of preparing for a no—deal brexit said that was now the government's number one priority. the prime minister wheelchair a new twice—weekly meeting of senior government figures to oversee the uk's accent. it is pa rt to oversee the uk's accent. it is part of a new approach the government hopes will send a clear message about its promise to deliver brexit by the end of october without a deal. it comes as the business group the cbi issues a new warning that neither the uk nor the eu is ready for a no—deal brexit. that neither the uk nor the eu is ready for a no-deal brexit. the uk government is saying it'll put a of
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time, energy and net effort into preparing for a no deal. we want to see businesses doing that as well and the eu responding in kind but ultimately, we can avoid all this. and the leader of the scottish conservatives ruth davidson made clear to borisjohnson when he meets him today that she cannot support leaving the eu without an agreement in place. the prime minister is also expected to meet the scottish first minister nicola sturgeon who says leaving without a deal would be catastrophic. jonathan blake, bbc news. we'll be speaking to the new foreign secretary dominic raab after 7:00. let's find out more about those warnings. steph is here. the cbi has made statements on a no—deal brexit. the cbi has made statements on a no-deal brexit. cbi obviously the biggest business group. not all of them but certainly a big chunk of
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them. what they have come out and said today is they have done a report on what would happen if we leave the eu without a deal and they're saying that businesses are not prepared for us to leave. they are saying yes, 0k, there have been some companies, particularly the bigger ones, have been looking at contingency plans, but there are still a lot of issues around what the timelines are, the uncertainty around that. also the cost, the complexity about how we leave and all of those things, means, that no matter how much they plan, there is still a lot that cannot be mitigated and that is what they are saying they are worried about. they are saying this could impact three or four out of the 27 areas of the economy where we make money so that could cause disruption across all of those 2a sectors. they are saying they appreciate the government has been trying to plan but it is just not enough to mitigate the problems that could come and the disruption that could come and the disruption that could come from it. they are saying it is particularly the smaller ones who have the problem here and then on top of that, so thatis here and then on top of that, so that is the cbi representing businesses overall, and at the same time, we have had vauxhall, a big
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ca rd time, we have had vauxhall, a big card maker in the uk, their boss has said that actually they could move their plant out of the uk if we leave without a deal. if it is unprofitable for them. he's as if we have problems and can't make money from that plant because of everything going on, we will have to think about moving. there is 1000 people work there. really uncertain times, isn't it? we are already worrying about carmakers at the moment and their contempt — make commitment to the uk and export et cetera. we have a ready had a out of news on carmakers and that could be a problem. it is important to point out it isn't happening now. they are just saying in the future if we have problems we will have to think about moving. a man's been rescued after spending more than three hours trapped between rocks off a seaside promenade.
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it happened yesterday in norfolk, as will batchelor reports. for the emergency services, it was a race against time. a man trapped between rocks with a time coming in fast... make tired. he entered in sheringham near norfolk to save a toddler who had fallen in. having rescued the child, he got stuck. the coastguard, rnli, police and fire service worked to free him, some holding his head above the water and others cutting the rocks. itjust goes to show that all the emergency services, when required, can come together, act as a single team, putting a plan and save people ‘s lives. all i would like to do is just ask people to be aware of this, aware of their surroundings around the beach and although this was purely an accident, we need to be able to get the emergency services there as quickly as possible and therefore we can add to sooner. the coastguard said it was a very frightening experience for the man but that he suffered only minor injuries. a gunman's opened fire at a food festival in california,
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reportedly killing at least three people and wounding several others. it happened during the annual garlic festival in the town of gilroy, which is around 80 miles from san francisco. the bbc‘s correspondent, peter bowes, is in los angeles. tell us what happened, peter. this isa tell us what happened, peter. this is a three—day event. it was just drawings to close when festival—goers and eyewitnesses described to us what happened, they heard gunshots, they saw people leaping to the ground, others drove into the back of pickup trucks. did anything possible to get to safety. by anything possible to get to safety. by all accounts, a terrifying scene as this festival was closing. it is as this festival was closing. it is a very well—known food festival, a garlic festival, there are competitions, food of course taking centre place and there is live music as well. it is meant to be a fun weekend event and we are hearing from the police that it is still an active crime scene and that suggests
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that they may well not have caught the person or persons, we do not know on that, the person or persons responsible for carrying out the shooting. we know a number of people have been taken to hospital. at least one man is said to be in a critical condition, and this investigation certainly in california time, it is after 10pm, looks like it will go on all the way through the night. we are expecting a police news conference at some point in the next hour. the governor of california, avenue sim, has described this as nothing short of horrific. 0k, described this as nothing short of horrific. ok, thanks very much, peter. so you say the press conference in about an hour. hopefully we can get an update on what is going on. a former boeing engineer has told the bbc that work on the production line of its 737—max model was not adequately funded. the aircraft is currently grounded after two crashes which killed 346 people. boeing denies the claims and says it's committed to making the plane one of the safest aircraft ever to fly. richard bilton reports.
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the 737 max has been a commercial triumph for boeing. 5000 have been ordered. but two of the aircraft crashed after being forced down by the plain cosmic computer software. 346 people were killed. — make adam gilson ran a team of engineers who worked on the max and he said they we re worked on the max and he said they were under constant pressure to keep costs down and the production line was under resourced. —— plane's computer software was up the culture was cost centred and incredibly pressurised. -- culture was cost centred was not engineers were trying to get costs out of the plane. there were no such cost—cutting in the boardroom. the ceo is being paid $7 billion. —— 7
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million. it has also spent a further $43 billion buying its own shares. a spending spree that has helped boeing treble its share price in just five years. critics say boeing cosmic executives have been too focused making money. — boeing's executives. if you tell them their job is to get the stock price up, they are not going to pay the kind of attention they need to pay to ensuring their produce is safely. of attention they need to pay to ensuring their produce is safelym denies that corners were cut on the max and says it has always held true to values of safety, quality and integrity. you can see more on this story on tonight's panorama — "boeing's killer planes" — which is on bbc one at 8.30pm. nearly half of those living below the poverty line in the uk are in a family where somebody has
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a disability, according to a new study. the social metrics commission also found overall levels of poverty have remained virtually the same since the turn of the millennium. the government says it's working on targeting support more effectively. commuters travelling on thameslink trains face another day of disruption after network rail failed to complete repairs on overhead power lines outside london st pancras over the weekend. a reduced service has been running since thursday after severe heat damaged the lines between luton and london. passengers are being urged to check timetables and allow extra time for their journeys. the duchess of sussex has become the first person to guest edit the september edition of british vogue — the magazine's most important issue of the year. meghan has chosen to feature 15 women on the cover who she describes as ‘forces for change'. the duchess declined to appear on the cover herself, telling the editor she felt it would be "boastful".
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holly is here with all the support for the weekend. sometimes it feels like i am bringing you the weather. last week it was the son and the heat and this week it was the rain at hockenheim. a lot of people say this season has been predictable and boring but this race was anything but. it had everything. drama, crashes, it was even described as a horror movie. it is very, very rare that you see lewis hamilton crash. it is rare we see him even making a mistake and he made to he admitted it was entirely his fault. it was a day to forget for lewis hamilton at the german grand prix. despite starting on pole, a couple of big errors cost him in really tough weather conditions, as he finished ninth. max verstappen won the race to claim his second win of the season. 22—year—old egan bernal becomes the youngest winner of the tour de france in 110 years
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after sealing victory in yesterday's final stage in paris. britain's geraint thomas was second. adam peaty made it three gold medals at the world championships as part of the british 4 by 100 medley relay team thatjust beat the usa in a thrilling final in south korea. ko jin—young won the evian championship, the fourth women's major of the year, by two shots in france. it was the south korean's fifth lpga tour championship win in less than two years, and her second major of the year. the women's open is taking place. hopefully the former winner can do better defending her title. i think we are going to have a chat with carol now. how are things, monday morning? not too bad,
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charlie. we are going to a more u nsettled charlie. we are going to a more unsettled week compared to last week in terms of rainfall but today, although we are starting off with rain in the forecast, it will be showery and today could prove to be one of the warmest days of this week. we saw a lot of rain over the weekend in some parts of the country and the weather front responsible for that is across the central sway. that produced more than a month's worth of rainfall, for example, in rochdale. this morning, low cloud and mistand rochdale. this morning, low cloud and mist and fog across england and parts of scotland and also around the coast. that rain edges out of north—west england, northern ireland into scotland and eventually peters out. the rain in the north of scotla nd out. the rain in the north of scotland pulls away but at the end of the day we have low pressure coming into the southwest and that will bring in some heavy, buttery showers across south—west england and south wales. you can tell they are heavy by the brighter colours on the radar picture. in between all of
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this, we are looking at sunshine. in the sunshine, temperatures getting up the sunshine, temperatures getting up to about 26 degrees. you will notice, too, that it will start to get quite windy in the south—west and even more so as we go through this evening and overnight. notjust the south—west. as far east as dorset. some of the showers will be still heavy and potentially thundery. a lot of low cloud still across the south—west of scotland and drizzle coming out of that but not a particularly cold night. we are looking at overnight lows of between 14 and 17 degrees. as we had through tuesday, low pressure is still with us. it is slowly moving northwards and eastwards. windy around it, look at this squeeze of isobars. to the north of it, hardly a breeze. we started with cloud and drizzle but look how the low pressure m oves drizzle but look how the low pressure moves northwards and eastwards. some heavy, thundery downpours. gusty winds are accompanying this and not as windy as we push further north butjust as
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much as 39 mph. some of the showers won't make it towards the east and in the east, in the sunshine, we could get up to 24 degrees, for example, in whole. as we move from tuesday into wednesday, it continues to drift in the direction of the north sea —— hull. still a squeeze in isobars. still that rain is with it. there it goes. heavy, thundery still, the potential for it. there it goes. heavy, thundery still, the potentialfor it it. there it goes. heavy, thundery still, the potential for it to it. there it goes. heavy, thundery still, the potentialfor it to be slow—moving across parts of scotland. to the of it, we will start off with conditions and you are more likely to hang onto them in the north. behind it, cloud with brighter skies for top the temperatures are slipping down. 21 or 22 at best. a lot of people will be quite pleased after all of that heat. farmers and growers especially. let's take a look at today's papers. we start with the front pages. ‘boris beefs up brexit plans'
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is the headline in the express. it describes the government holding emergency no—deal brexit meetings in a bunker beneath whitehall. the guardian leads on claims that a no—deal brexit would leave spending plans in tatters. a think—tank has said the various domestic spending pledges mrjohnson has made in his first week in office would be crushed by the economic effects of the uk leaving the eu without a deal. moving away from politics, the mirror's main story warns of the dangers of stabbings and muggings at a popular holiday resort. we will talk about the front page picture on the guardian, bernal, 22—year—old colombian, youngest winner in 110 years of the tour de france. it comes after a young holiday maker was stabbed with a screwdriver in maguluf in majorca. the mail says patient numbers at gp surgeries rose by up to a third between december, 2016 and the end of 2018. it says nhs figures indicate a growing population and recruitment crisis, meaning family doctors are coming under huge pressure. let's look at some of the inside
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pages. steph? in the ft this morning, a story i mentioned earlier, about vauxhall. the owners have come out with fairly strong words about what would happen if the plant in ellesmere port becomes unprofitable, he says he's ready to quit the uk if the no—deal brexit hits profitability. something that caught my eye on the inside, you know when we talk about retailers and if they're having problems, they will go to their landlords to try to get rent cuts in order to save them. we seen that with the likes of debenhams to see if they can get a deal to help them out, because that's obviously a big cost for them. primark, which isn't having problems, but because they have seen these retailers getting cheaper deals on their rent, they're now trying to get rent cuts from landlords to compete with the growing number of high street retailers using insolvency procedures to cut costs. that's
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interesting it's inevitable, isn't it? they are fighting business rates so the rents have got to be...m the landlords are giving good deals to other companies, they think, hang on, we want a bit of that! what have you got for the back pages?” on, we want a bit of that! what have you got for the back pages? i love this on the guardian, bernal crossing the finish line in the champs—elysees with his ineos teammates, to his right, geraint thomas, handing the bat on, his teammate. this is massive for colombia. the first colombia. now on not only will he dominate the sport but colombia as a country will dominate cycling. fantastic image and a great story. people will be interested in him because he is so young. 22 years old and my favourite line is his first bicycle was yellow! the famous yellowjersey colour. mine was too! written in the
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stars... but you haven't won the tour de france, but there's still time! the gay footballer in the telegraph here, on twitter, there was talk that this was a hoax and the twitter account disappeared and there's been speculation about it. they've spoken to andy brennan, a 95v they've spoken to andy brennan, a gay footballer in australia, one of the first to come out and he said no matter what it was, a hoax or not, he said what came out was positive and anyone who has come out on social media before and said they are gay, they've had so much online support and that's a positive message to come out of it. technology stories, which i always struggle with to a degree. computers now analyse pictures, pictures can see your face and the idea is they can read your mood and use that information. they are saying the computers are struggling because they look at you, for example, right
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now, steph, and... not that face, that face, and you are happy because you are smiling but we all know deep inside you are angry! laughter. we know that but you can put the smile on. the computer doesn't know that! it would read all these faces and go happy people when they might not be. that's the fault with computers, they don't know how we are feeling! that's the problem! the flaws in technology where they can't read humans! how did you know i was angry? we were there this morning! throwing things around! very close, that which in the icon we can see it from here! that's the test! ok, well, i think we are generally happy, aren't we? —— that which in the ivy. talking about brexit and all things to do with no deal. we will talk to the foreign secretary later on and getting some thoughts on government planning around no deal ahead of was
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av planning around no deal ahead of was a's visit to scotland later today. and we'll speak to the msp, derek mckay, in about 20 minutes. you would have seen peter bowes, our correspondent in los angeles, wringing you an update on a shooting in the us at a food festival and police have confirmed three people have been killed at that shooting in california. police say 15 people have been wounded in gilroy. police shot and killed the suspect but they don't know if a second suspect is at large. more from peter through the programme and we'll bring you up to date with that. this week, a group of avid gamers have been battling it out in new york to be crowned the world champion of the popular online game fortnite. it's been billed as the biggest ever esports event, and a british teenager, jaden ashman, walked away with nearly one million after coming second in the duo part of the tournament.
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hejoins us now with his mum, lisa, from new york. very good morning to you both. can i say, jaden, congratulations on your success! thanks very much! for those people who don't know what it is that you've won, this was a massive event with a serious prizemoney pot. how much money have you and? -- earned. we got £1.8 million split between me and my duo, so £900,000 each. wow! mum knows the numbers! jaden, tell us a bit more about the competition itself. how was it for you? we had to get here on tuesday. so we flew out on tuesday. we had, like, four days of practice all the way to saturday. then on saturday we took a shuttle bus at 10am and were ready
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to play by 12:30pm after, like, one hour of practice. you seem very calm and mellow and relaxed and whatever, but it's quite an amazing thing that's just happened to you! yeah. i'm pretty good at, like, containing my nerves. so during the practice, i had a really good game where i placed really well and it helped, like, my confidence. it was a really good confidence booster for like, my confidence. it was a really good confidence boosterfor me like, my confidence. it was a really good confidence booster for me so like, my confidence. it was a really good confidence boosterfor me so i was really, really confident going into the first game. lisa, you must be a very proud mum. presumably now is not the time when you say to your son that he's been spending too much time on the computer! i have spent plenty of time saying that to him to be honest before this! but i'm really proud of him. seeing you up there on that stage, i tell you what, there's no feeling like it. amazing to my boy up there in front of the world, lovely! funny you saying that about now not
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being the time and you said it before about spending too much time on the computer, because lots of pa rents on the computer, because lots of parents will watch you this morning thinking, you know what, i think he or she spends too much time on the computer. you went through that kind of phase? 100%! i'm sure everyone has heard the story quite a few times now. but me and jaden have had our differences with the game, to say the least, haven't we, jaden? but, yeah, it's been difficult because teenagers are hard anyway with their habit and stuff, and jaden is quite a typical teenager. but he did invest a lot of time in the game and, you know, it did affect his schoolwork and stuff. i have two take my frustrations out on him by throwing one of his xboxs out and snapping one of his headsets. we've had our differences over the
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game overtime, so, yeah, definitely. jaden, when did you realisejust definitely. jaden, when did you realise just how good you were at this game? you wear that good that you could win a worldwide competition... i know it's second place, but when did you know that? so, like, most of the games i've played, because i've been playing xbox on a controller since i was six yea rs xbox on a controller since i was six years old. so, like, fora xbox on a controller since i was six years old. so, like, for a really long time i've been learning this play staff called claw. normally on the best in my friendship group and i normally go on to play others online that are better than my friends so i can get better myself. i played fortnite since the beginning, so as soon as they announced at the world cup i was ready to play. as soon as week two came out, as soon as we started playing, i realised i had a really good shot and i was confident i was going to qualify. jaden, are you back to school?
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what happens now? at the moment i'm ona what happens now? at the moment i'm on a six—week holiday break. i'm definitely going to go back to school and i promised my mum i would get my gcses. there you go. mum will be happy about that! thank you very much and congratulations to both of you. thank you! there you go. £900,000. it's a lot of money, isn't it? a lifetime of money at 15, 16! impressive! time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london. i'm tolu adeoye. a council tenant will have to pay back £100,000 in profits to westminster council after illgally subletting his flat on airbnb. 2 toby harman has now been evicted from the property. he was caught after council officials found reviews on the website from users thanking him for their stay.
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a london mp believes we could be following in the footsteps of canada by legalising cannabis here within five to ten years. tottenham's david lammy was among a cross party group of politicians who went on a fact finding trip to the country, arranged by a campaign group. the home office says there are no plans to change the law on recreational cannabis, but he's urging them to rethink. 2 two 2ton 2 two i want the market legalised and regulated, taken away from criminal gangs. young people not criminalised because of use, properly educated, but i actually wa nt to properly educated, but i actually want to see the strength of the stuff reduced, labelled and properly organised in our country. from today, queens park rangers' football ground will be known as the kiyan prince foundation stadium. kiyan was a member of qpr's youth academy and he was stabbed to death in 2006. the club has played under the loftus road name for 100 years
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but will unveil its new title later. let's take a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tube this morning. there's disruption to thameslink and southeastern services because the overhead wire issue. some trains are being diverted. there's also a reduced great northern service. moving on to the roads, and in chelsea, albert bridge is closed in both directions due to roadworks until 7am this morning. in barking, london road is closed eastbound between the flyover and the northern relief road roundabout. finallym in balham, station road is closed in both directions between the high road and bedford hill due to roadworks. now the weather, with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. it's going to be rather changeable and unsettled at times this week. there are some showers in the forecast and its set to turn rather windy tomorrow. today, the nicest looking day of the next few, it will stay dry and there will be lots of sunshine throughout the day. a fresher feel to things
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this morning, some early high cloud should clear away. lots of morning sunshine, plenty of blue skies. a bit more fairweather cloud through the afternoon but still long, sunny spells and temperatures that when 25 and 26 celsius, so pleasantly warm in the best of the sunshine without being too hot. more sunshine this evening and overnight tonight we keep the clear skies, a bit of cloud to the west. the wind will start to pick up tomorrow morning. overnight close between 14 and 17 celsius, so not quite so fresh tomorrow morning. tomorrow will be quite a blustery day, unseasonably windy with some gusts of wind up to 40 to 45 miles an hour in the south. also some showers around, aided intent through the week. wednesday will start off with some showers and then it will be dry. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half—an—hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now it's back to charlie and naga. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and
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naga munchetty. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning. it's the final of love island tonight. the contestants are already big stars and some couples could potentially earn millions of pounds over the next year. we'll be joined by one of the contestants from this year's series and talk about the commercial opportunities the show brings. this is the scene in blackpool this morning. matt will be up the tower later looking at its weather station, as we mark a major anniversary in tv weather forecasting. and if you think you're owed a refund from mis—sold ppi payments, steph will tell you why you'll have to get a move on. good morning. here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news: boris johnson will travel to scotland today to announce 300—million pounds of new funding for scotland, wales and northern ireland.
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mrjohnson has insisted the uk will leave the eu by 31 october with or without a deal, but yesterday the conservative leader in scotland, ruth davidson, said she couldn't support a no—deal brexit. today the business organisation, the cbi, warned the government that neither the uk or eu is ready for a no—deal scenario. three people have been killed and 15 injured after a gunman opened fire at a food festival in california. it happened at the annual garlic festival in the small town of gilroy, which is around 80 miles south of san francisco. police say a suspect has been shot and killed, but it's not clear whether a second suspect is still at large. we have one suspects, we know he is down. we have some witnesses are saying there could have been a second suspect but we don't know whether that suspect was engaged in any shooting or whether they might have been in some sort of a support role. the person that we have accounted for. we have at least 15 people injured. we have four
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fatalities that we know of including the suspect. a man's been rescued after spending more than three hours trapped between rocks off a seaside promenade. he entered the water in sheringham in norfolk, to save a toddler who had fallen in. emergency services faced a race against time to free the man before he became submerged by the rising tide. it just goes to itjust goes to show that all of it just goes to show that all of the emergency services, when required, can come together, act as a single team, putting a plan and save people ‘s lives. all i would like to do is just to ask people to be aware of their surroundings when they're on their surroundings when they're on the beach and although this was probably purely an accident, we need to be able to get the emergency services there as quickly as possible and therefore we can act sooner. a former boeing engineer has told the bbc that work on the production line of its 737 max model was not adequately funded. the aircraft is currently grounded after two crashes which killed 346 people. boeing denies the claims and says it's committed to making the plane one of the safest ever to fly.
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the duchess of sussex has become the first person to guest edit the september edition of british vogue — the magazine's most important issue of the year. meghan has chosen to feature 15 women on the cover who she describes as ‘forces for change'. the duchess declined to appear on the cover herself, telling the editor she felt it would be "boastful". catching up with a busy weekend of sport. a lot of people had been saying this year's formula 1 season had been a bit predictable, a bit boring. lewis hamilton dominating once again. it did look like at one point he was on for his —— and it all went well for to be got into a bit of a spin. it was a bit like a horror show. a day to forget for the
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world champion. wet and chaotic — yesterday's german grand prix was certainly action packed. but it was a day to forget for the reigning world champion lewis hamilton as his red bull rival max verstappen took his second win of the year. patrick gearey reports. one of those days for lewis hamilton. filthy weather, you're feeling sick, then you have to go to work and it is a safety car start. hamilton's firstjob was to somehow stay in front, when all behind was the wacky races. rain scrambles formula 1's precise engineering and strategy. this was charles leclerc, just as he was about to take the lead... no! a minute later, hamilton echoed that, going in seconds from winning to spinning and damaging his front wing. he arrived at the pits without an appointment. they'd have it ready as soon as they could. but in the meantime, max verstappen, third in the drivers' standings, went first in the race. these weren't conditions to chase in. hamilton's shocking time in hockenheim got worse still. his team—mate valtteri bottas didn't even finish. all the while, steadily gaining in the rain was sebastian vettel,
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the german driver going from 20th to second, behind verstappen, dutch conqueror of the chaos and the winner of a race that was never clockwork, but definitely orange. patrick gearey, bbc news. a combination of a lot of things. ultimately, a really terrible, disastrous day. it had the potential for that when it started to rain. i thought i had it under control and then... it was really risky putting us then... it was really risky putting us out on slicks and then after that, just went to pot. egan bernal has become the youngest rider in 110 years to win the tour de france. with the race leader traditionally not challenged on the final stage, 22—year—old bernal was hand—in—hand with his team—mate and last year's winner geraint thomas, who finished second overall. the traditional sprint finish was won by australian caleb ewan. but it was the colombian rider's day and night on the champs—elysees.
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adam peaty claimed his third gold of the world aquatics championships as great britain won the men's 4 by 100 metre medley relay. it's peaty‘s fourth medal overall in south korea but duncan scott took the plaudits for his amazing final leg. they were in a team with james guy and luke greenbank and set a new european record. the usa top the medal table. great britain finished in seventh with three golds, all from peaty, and seven medals overall. liverpool signed fulham youngster harvey elliott yesterday and then he went on to make his debut a few hours later. the england youth international came on during his new clubs 3—nil defeat to napoli in edinburgh — he still can't turn professional until his 17th birthday next april. he became the youngest ever player to feature in the premier league last season at just 16 years and 30 days. england women's disappointing ashes series continues. they were defeated by australia in their second twenty20 game.
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england could only muster 121—8 after winning the toss and batting. the australians took control and reached their target with 13 balls to spare and win by seven wickets. they've already won the ashes and lead the series by 10—2. rory mcilroy could only finish fourth in the stjude classic despite holding the lead going into the final round. he was a shot clear after the third round but could only manage a 1—over par round of 71 in memphis. mcilroy was playing with brooks kopeka who was once again in imperious form finishing three shots clear of second to win. ko jin—young won the evian championship, the fourth women's major of the year, by two shots in france. it was the south korean's fifth lpga tour championship win in less than two years, and her second major victory of the year after the ana inspiration in april. jonathan rea helped his kawasaki team win a dramatic suzuka 8 hour event after a successful appeal following a late crash.
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the world superbike champion had a commanding lead as he rode the final leg injapan but slid off with just two minutes left in the event after another bike had deposited fluid on the track. the race was red—flagged but rea and his team were eventually declared winners. and finally, two members of the same family have taken home the titles in the world thumb wrestling championship. the thumb to thumb combat, which is now in its 11th year, took place in sussex, with paul browse winning the men's event. his mother—in—law janet coleman won the women's event. mr browse, who competes with the name under the thumb, won the event for the fourth time and walks away with the top prize of £350. it is no fortnite, is it? yet! some day. i like the little contraption.
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i've never actually played a farmer was. well, you and me, later on. -- thumb wars. boris johnson makes his first visit to scotland as prime minister today, but with the cabinet now working under the assumption there will be a no—deal brexit, what sort of welcome will he receive? well, we can take a look at a selection of the scottish newspapers this morning to get some idea. the scotsman says that mrjohnson will tell scottish people he wants to work with them to save the union. the herald reports on the expected clash between mrjohnson and scottish conservative leader ruth davidson over the prospect of no—deal. and the scottish daily mail says the prime minister is flying into a political storm. in the past few days, the first minister, nicola sturgeon, has said a no—deal scenario means an independence referendum is more important than ever. let's talk now to the scottish government's finance secretary, derek mackay.
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thank you very much for talking to us thank you very much for talking to us today. the prime minister is travelling to scotland, boris johnson, first time in scotland as prime minister. tell me, when you hear £300 million is going to be distributed to scotland, northern ireland and wales, what sort of a difference do you think that is going to make? £300 million i am aware of is recycled — make a recycled announcement part of the growth of deals we were already discussing in a scotland with the uk government so it was already in the pipeline. —— a recycled announcement. it pales into insignificance in terms of the natural physical disputes that we have with the uk government in terms of scotland's fair share, so it is not really new news, it is recycled news and to be honest, it is a distraction from the main issue that we face right now which is the calamity that would come from a no—deal brexit which of course the prime minister is now presiding over
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and planning for and that would be disastrous for the whole of the uk, not just scotland. what conversation needs to take place today with boris johnson when he comes to scotland? we feel that boris johnson is just the bluff and bluster and his premiership willjust represent that but with some stamp —— substantially significant damage to the economy of the whole of the uk and if they are to have a serious conversation, borisjohnson to have a serious conversation, boris johnson needs to have a serious conversation, borisjohnson needs to seriously respect scotland and respect what we are saying and that is to overt brexit and particularly a no—deal brexit. that is a primary issue before a — make before us right now and it would do borisjohnson quite well for him to listen. theresa may didn't listen to the first minister terribly much but maybe boris johnson will be different but i
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don't really think so. he is already facing a fight with his own party. it shows you how split they really are. the whole country voted for brexit, those who voted for brexit. scotland, if you take the results just for scotland, voted to remain. the fact is you are part of the union and that is what borisjohnson has made very clear, that he wants to keep the union together. by you saying with this bluff and bluster that he is not listening to what scotla nd that he is not listening to what scotland is saying, you are not listening to what the union wants. we offered a differentiated approach that could respect how scotland voted even if the uk had to leave the european union. we set out a compromise proposal to try and protect what was important to scotland, but by that compromise that was on that table and the prime minister refused it, did everyone in the uk know that a no—deal brexit would mean recession? that is what
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all economists are pointing to. a ratio is that —— recession, unemployment, disguise —— a decline in exports and i think with this information and knowledge that the prime minister has to reflect and act responsibly, but scotland has voted to stay in the european union. scotla nd voted to stay in the european union. scotland did not vote for this prime minister. scotland did not vote tory andi minister. scotland did not vote tory and i think that the parameter should listen to scotland. we have tried to talk to the uk. today's announcements are not new, they are recycled and he will try to shore up support. even the scottish tories are taking on the prime minister. you have made very clear that no deal is unacceptable to the snp and to scotland. october 31 comes around
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and boris johnson has to scotland. october 31 comes around and borisjohnson has secured a deal with the eu, one accepted on both sides, eu and the uk. it then would you throw your support behind the prime minister? that would be speculation. it would still be a brexit. no deal is a speculation at the moment so what if there was a deal? i don't know what what grounds the prime minister can get a deal when the red lines haven't changed. we are in the position that the eu have said they are not changing their position. the prime minister has hardened his position. it seems unlikely they will get a deal but any form of brexit would deal —— damage the uk's economy and any form of brexit would damage the scotland economy. the prime minister seeks to fulfil his mission. it is not reflecting how scotland has democratically voted or what scotla nd democratically voted or what scotland needs and it is damaging, asi scotland needs and it is damaging, as i say, to the whole of the uk. we are trying to listen to the interests of the whole of the uk to
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say that a no—deal brexit in particular would be a calamity and particularly an economic recession. the damage it would do to households because of it is unlikely to think that the prime minister can get a deal with the eu, knowing where we stand, and that is why we believe it is just stand, and that is why we believe it isjust bravado stand, and that is why we believe it is just bravado and bluster and ultimately, people will pay the price for this. thank you for talking to us this morning. thank you. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. looking more unsettled this week thanit looking more unsettled this week than it was last week. good morning everybody. today we still have rain around. this weekend, rochdale had more than a month's worth of rain in just the weekend. that rain band is still with us today but it's moving away and will eventually peter out. for many parts it's actually going to be dry with some sunshine. today could prove the warmest day of the week. you can see on the
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satellite all this cloud and embedded in it is the weather front i was talking about. low pressure is coming in from the south—west and a weather front in the north of scotla nd weather front in the north of scotland is producing rain. that will move away and the weather front that brought the rain on the weekend will move out of north—west england and northern ireland into southern scotland, weakening all the time before it peters out. later, we've got the next area coming in from the south—west, this is an area of low pressure, and as you can tell from the bright colours, there's going to be some heavy and thundery showers. in between all of this, there will be some sunshine. first thing this morning, low cloud, mist and fog in north—west england and parts of scotland. scotland likely to hang onto it, especially close to the coast, but top temperatures 26 in east anglia and the south—east. through this evening and overnight, our low pressure comes in a bit more in the south—west and wales. still heavy, thundery downpours from it. they are showers, so not everyone
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will catch one, and the winds will strengthen, anywhere from the isles of scilly to dorset and we could have just of 40 mph. if you're sleeping in a tent overnight, for example, worth bearing in mind. this wind strength will be with us for the next couple of days in parts of the next couple of days in parts of the south courtesy of this area of low pressure, and there is a lot of trees in leaf and if you're camping it's something to consider. the low pressure tomorrow moving further north and east and still taking its showery outbreaks with it. some of those will be heavy and thundery. again tomorrow, very gusty winds around it. ahead of it, we're looking at some brighter conditions, some sunshine around but still some showers moving across northern ireland and southern and northern scotland. the black circles indicate the wind gusts. there's a hefty one, 39 mph across parts of the south—east. temperature—wise, in any sunshine, and quite a lot of the showers will make it to the east,
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we're looking at 23 or 24. 21 or 22 in aberdeen or glasgow. heading on from tuesday into wednesday, low pressure is still with us but edging closer to the north sea. again, still quite gusty winds through wales, the midlands, east anglia and we still have the rain associated with it, still heavy and thundery. back to the north and south of that, something a bit drier and brighter but temperatures going down attached, peaking at 21 or 22. certainly a change from last week. carol, thank you very much. steph is going to talk us through the self—employed in the uk stop who are these people? it's interesting, some research has been done on this and we have some statistics saying it's a big thing for people over 50. good morning everyone. this is research from rest less, they're a volunteering and jobs website for the over—505. they analysed official stats from the labour force survey for the first three months of this
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year and compared it to ten years ago. they found there are now 2.27 million over—50s who are self—employed. that's about half of all the people in the uk who are self—employed. there are also more people working for themselves today than ten years ago, about a million more. over—50s are responsible for most of that increase, but the centre for ageing better says that rise in self—employed workers might not always be by choice. patrick thomson is from the centre for ageing better. thanks very much for watching us. what are your thoughts on what's going on here? —— joining us. this is part of a larger trend over the last ten years where we've seen more in work over 50. many are going into self—employment and for many that's a great thing that allows flexibility at work and choice and control over how and when you work. for many, it's being able to be your own boss and lots of people have wa nted own boss and lots of people have wanted to do that. overall, really
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positive and we support it and it's pa rt positive and we support it and it's part of people working for longer to fund retirement and remain active and have meaning and purpose in their work. the only caveat is it's not always through choice. some people would much rather work for an employer but self—employment is all they can find. it is good to get support for doing that but it's not a lwa ys support for doing that but it's not always choice. is this people being made redundant? very often, yes, we see the number of people being made redundant increasing over 50 but people are leaving work for lots of reasons and not always through choice. it might be a health condition, so we know you're more likely to develop a health condition as you age, or being a carer. your peter age for a carer is midlife —— peak age. it might be a part or a relative. —— partner. peak age. it might be a part or a relative. -- partner. is thisjust inevitable because everyone is
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working longer? even over 50, that isn't old at all by any stretch. is this inevitable that people are taking on different careers and they get to the point where they want to be their own boss? you're right. when we say what is old, over 50, it is very subjective and people think different things and lots of people are thriving in midlife and will go on for a lot longer. it is around attitudes across society, attitudes from employers as well. often we see ageist attitudes in recruitment or how they support people in work. often people don't get the same opportunities at work a younger person might get. especially around things like training, development and aggression and people often think that's only for a younger person for the start of your career but people are going in and out of work at different ages. we are working for longer, we have an increasing state engine age, so increasingly people need to work for longer and they need support to do that —— pension age.
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always good to analyse these stats. thanks for your time. that's it from me for now. we like anniversaries on this programme and everyone is always interested in the weather, they have been for many years. it's now 70 yea rs been for many years. it's now 70 years since the first tv weather forecast happened. but the way we get predictions has really changed rather dramatically, almost as dramatic as the weather. matt taylor has been finding out. a dull and wet start to the day... the way we consume the weather forecast has changed immensely. from simple hand drawn charts and magnetic symbols... let's do it again... to to 3d graphics and sophisticated mobile phone apps. we now have more information at our fingertips than ever before but how exactly fingertips than ever before but how exa ctly d oes fingertips than ever before but how exactly does that information get their? it all begins at a weather station like this. the ratcliff observatory has been recording data for over two centuries, making it one of the
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old est centuries, making it one of the oldest and longest running in the world. we've been taking temperature observations here on a daily basis since 1814 and then we've got daily rainfall observations as well from the 1820s. everything used here to measure the temperature and the rainfall has been issued by the met office must overall standard kit. so what's measured here will be measured likewise in other parts not just in the uk but around the world? absolutely. bit with the atmosphere stretching kilometres about us, we also need radar, weather balloons and satellite data and all that information gets sent here. where supercomputers like this one, doing trillions of calculations every second, turn all that whether observational data and create the forecast. this is planning for food, forecast. this is planning for food, for transport, for health, for energy, for anything that's part of society that's making society. agriculture needs to know when to
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borrow, buy, rent equipment and they need to know what crops to use when. that up—to—date personalised information is crucial for all of us. the bbc weather app since 2015 has been downloaded eight times a minute, with 15 million using it every week and it continues to innovate and evolve. the amount of information and technology available may have changed rightly over the last 70 yea rs, changed rightly over the last 70 years, but for me you can't beat netting in front of the camera and communicating the forecast and its uncertainties personally. now, if you don't mind, i have a job to do! they took a break during the second world war for weather forecasts and revived it. people set their days by carol and matt's forecasts on brea kfast, carol and matt's forecasts on breakfast, don't they? it's what they tune in for! where is matt this morning, are you thinking? let's have a look like paul now and
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a p pa re ntly have a look like paul now and apparently he is there somewhere —— blackpool. is he, at the top? not sure. we will locate him later and he will talk more about the origins of the forecast as we know it now. at the top of the tower they have a thing where they measure the wind so they know if it is to run the lifts up they know if it is to run the lifts up and down if it isn't too windy he will be in the left. probably has a more technical term than a thing! time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london, i'm tolu adeoye. a council tenant will have to pay £100,000 to westminster council after illgally subletting his flat on airbn. toby harman has now been evicted from the property and must pay back the profits. he was caught after officials found reviews on the website from users thanking him for their stay.
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a london mp believes we could be following in the footsteps of canada by legalising cannabis within five to ten years. tottenham's david lammy was among a group of politicians who went on a fact—finding trip arranged by a campaign group. the home office says there are no plans to change the law on recreational cannabis. he's urging them to rethink. i want the market legalised and regulated, taken away from criminal gangs. young people not criminalised because of use, properly educated, but i actually want to see the strength of the stuff reduced, labelled and properly organised in our country. from today, queens park rangers' football ground will be known as the kiyan prince foundation stadium. 15—year—old kiyan was a member of qpr's youth academy — he was stabbed to death in 2006. the club has played under the loftus road name for 100 years but will unveil its new title later. let's take a look at the travel situation now.
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there's a good service on the tubes this morning. there's disruption to thameslink and southeastern services because the overhead wire issue. some trains are being diverted. there's also a reduced great northern service. lane one is closed on the m25 anticlockwise between junction 24 and junction 23 due to a collision which involving a lorry and a car. in barking, london road is closed eastbound between the flyover and the northern relief road roundabout. finally, in balham, station road is closed in both directions between the high road and bedford hill due to roadworks. now the weather, with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. it's going to be rather changeable and unsettled at times this week. there are some showers in the forecast, and it's set to turn rather windy tomorrow. so today, the nicest looking day of the next few, it will stay dry and there'll be
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lots of sunshine throughout the day. a fresher feel to things this, though morning, some early high cloud should clear away. lots of morning sunshine, plenty of blue skies. a bit more fairweather cloud through the afternoon but still some long, sunny spells and temperatures that when 25 and 26 celsius, so pleasantly warm in the best of the sunshine without, of course, being too hot. more sunshine this evening and overnight tonight we keep the clear skies, a bit of cloud to the west. the wind will start to pick up tomorrow morning. overnight lows between 14 and 17 celsius, so not quite so fresh tomorrow morning. tomorrow will be quite a blustery day, unseasonably windy with some gusts of wind up to 40 to 45mph in the south. also some showers around, bit of a dip through the week. wednesday will start off with some showers and then it will be dry. i'm back with the latest from bbc london in half an hour. bye for now.
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good morning. welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. our headlines today: the prime minister heads to scotland to sell his commitment to a united kingdom, despite strong opposition to a no—deal brexit. the uk's biggest business group, the cbi, is warning that we're not ready to leave the eu with no deal. i'll be explaining why. three people are confirmed dead and 15 injured as a gunman opens fire at food festival in california. one suspect has been
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killed by police. a man who became trapped in rocks while saving a toddler from the sea has been rescued on the norfolk coast. max verstappen storms to victory in hockenheim while lewis hamilton was left in a spin. the world champion struggled in the wet in an extraordinary rain—hit german grand prix. my my robust will see rain then we did last week but many of us will have a dry da with son shane. —— a dry day with sunshine. —— many of us will see rain. it's monday the 29th july. our top story: boris johnson will travel to scotland today to announce 300—million pounds of new funding for scotland, wales and northern ireland. yesterday, the conservative leader in scotland, ruth davidson, said she couldn't support a no—deal brexit. today the business organisation, the cbi, warned the government that neither the uk or eu is ready for a no—deal brexit
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on october 31st. in a moment we'll talk to our assistant political editor norman smith who's in westminster, but first we can go to our scotland correspondent lorna gordon who's in glasgow for us. what reaction can mrjohnson expect? his first visit to scotland as prime minister. i was talking to the snp and i'm not sure whether he will be getting the warmest of welcomes, politically. yellow this ———— this could be the day that he from a distinctly chilly bath from the north. -- chilly blast. that is because of ruth davidson, the leader of the scottish conservatives, and nicola sturgeon, well, ruth davidson
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won't support a no—deal brexit. then there is nicola sturgeon. she has said she has a profound concerns about boris johnson premiership. said she has a profound concerns about borisjohnson premiership. the snp have believed that borisjohnson will be the last prime minister of the united kingdom. yes, they will be announcements about funding when he comes here but this is setting up to bea he comes here but this is setting up to be a very tricky visit. we can go live now to norman smith, our assistant political editor, for more on this. norman, there are warnings this morning that the uk is not ready to leave without a deal. the prospect of a no deal. what does it look like in prep this? we have had the rhetoric around no deal and the promise of more cash. what we get today is the overhaul of the machinery of no deal to get it in
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place that we can leave without a deal and it had all got a bit half—hearted under theresa may, devoid of cash. we have one chaired by michael gove, effectively the minister for by michael gove, effectively the ministerfor no deal, and that by michael gove, effectively the minister for no deal, and that will mean every day he is responsible for the nuts and bolts, the nitty—gritty, of no deal planning and significantly, they will meet in the emergency room, the room set aside for national emergency planning, to convey the idea that this is a national endeavour. then there will be a second wall cabinet chaired by boris johnson there will be a second wall cabinet chaired by borisjohnson himself which will meet twice weekly to take all the key, big decisions about no deal and the point of all this is not just to step deal and the point of all this is notjust to step up no deal planning that also crucially to try to crank up that also crucially to try to crank up the pressure on the eu to get them to blink and condemn —— convince them we are very serious about leaving without an agreement.
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while all of this is going on, the cbi has been warning about whether the uk or the eu is ready for a no—deal brexit. steph, it says it is not. while all this political madness is going on, all the businesses are around trying to figure out what is going on. the cbi have come out and said that from the analysis they have done, they don't think on the whole, these nurses are ready to leave the eu without a deal. because they say although this does make billions has been spent on contingency plans, there is still a lot of things that aren't clear. —— businesses are not ready to leave the eu without a deal. the cost around it, too, they think that no matter how much they plan they still think they will be disrupted in some way by all of this and the cbi have
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worked out, out of the 27 different areas of the economy, 24 of them will be disrupted if we leave the eu without a deal and they are saying it is the smaller companies more than the larger ones because obviously the larger ones had a bit more money and time and things to be able to work out better contingency plans whereas the smaller ones are left not really knowing what is going on. on top of that, you have a vauxhall, the boss of vauxhall, he has put out warnings before about brexit but this is a much stronger one where he has basically said if the plant proves to become not as profitable or unprofitable because of everything going on with the uncertainty of brexit, and they do have plans to move it out of the uk. they have other plants they can move it to. that is where it hits home. when you hear the tangible effect. allan when it can threaten 1000 jobs. a lot of people are there who are very jobs. a lot of people are there who are very committed to working there.
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that is a concern. they are not saying that will definitely happen if but putting out a strong warning, slightly stronger than the one they put out last year, saying they will move if they have two. the warnings coming out make things a lot more tangible for people, don't they? they certainly do. we'll be speaking to the new foreign secretary dominic raab in about five minutes. three people have been killed and 15 injured after a gunman opened fire at a food festival in california. it happened at the annual garlic festival in the small town of gilroy. police say they shot dead a fourth person, believed to be the gunman. andy moore reports. 0h, oh, what is going on? what is going on? that is the question everyone was asking. why would someone with
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an assault rifle opened fire on men, women and children enjoying a food festival in the californian sunshine? as the calls for help came m, sunshine? as the calls for help came in, police swamped the area. witnesses said the white man in his 30s stood in front of the stage and started shooting indiscriminately. it was the third day of the event. one of the largest food festivals in the country. there were so many shots and i saw people falling down. kids falling down. i had tojump over three of the kids. one bullet passed me very closely and it hit ourfriend's passed me very closely and it hit our friends boot. passed me very closely and it hit our friend's boot. police had to cut into the perimeter fence to get into the area. there were reports of shooting on the north side. the garlic festival area. officers were in that area and engaged the suspect in less than a minute. the suspect was shot and killed. as darkness
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fell, it was still a confused picture. police said a second suspect who could have been acting ina suspect who could have been acting in a supporting role, could still be at large. andy moore, bbc news. our reporter dave lee is live in the town of gilroy for us. what's the very latest? we understand, we were talking to peter bowes earlier. police have been trying to update with press conferences but this is a very fluid situation? very fluent indeed. they have just held a press conference in the area behind me which is the place they are telling family members to come to get more information if they think one of their loved ones has been caught up in what happened here today. from that press conference, we know that there are three people who have been killed. a fourth person believed to be the suspect has also been killed. this is an active shooter situation. there is still a possibility, police say, that they could be somebody else involved in the attack which they are looking for. one of the big question is already emerging here is how the alleged shooter was able to get into the festival. police are
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saying he came through a fence using bolt cutters, potentially evading security at this event. as we came in to set up here, we see large lines of traffic of people leaving this event, the third and final day of this event, presumably wondering how on earth something like this can happen at an event such as this. a lot of shock here tonight in gilroy. we know that you are going to keep us up—to—date throughout the morning. a man's been rescued after spending more than three hours trapped between rocks off a seaside promenade in norfolk. it happened yesterday after he went into the water to save a child, as will batchelor reports. for the emergency services, it was a race against time. a man trapped between rocks with a tide coming in fast. he entered the sea in sheringham near norfolk to save a toddler who had fallen in.
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having rescued the child, he got stuck. the coastguard, rnli, police and fire service worked to free him, some holding his head above the water and others cutting the rocks. itjust goes to show that all the emergency services, when required, can come together, act as a single team, put in a plan and save people's lives. all i would like to do is just ask people to be aware of their surroundings when they're on the beach and although this was probably purely an accident, we need to be able to get the emergency services there as quick as possible and therefore we can act sooner. the coastguard said it was a very frightening experience for the man but that he suffered only minor injuries. will batchelor, bbc news. when borisjohnson said the uk would be leaving the european union on october 31st, "no ifs or buts", he signalled that a no—deal brexit was now a very real prospect. cabinet committees designed to deliver brexit by halloween will begin meeting from today. let's talk to the new foreign secretary, dominic raab.
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good morning to you and thank you for your time. can you give us exactly what they will comprise, these new meetings? some everyday, some twice a week. would you outline that for us? well, the first thing to say is we want a good deal with our eu partners and friends but that must involved the abolition of the undemocratic backstop and if the eu sticks to their position that they can't be any change other than some sort of political loss of words, then we will leave at the end of october on wto terms and so what the prime minister has instructed and the cabinet has accepted, is a turbocharging of those preparations. pa rt turbocharging of those preparations. part of that will be to make sure that we have the committee structures of cabinet in place. so that we can respond as effectively as possible, in real time, to all of theissues as possible, in real time, to all of the issues challenges that we will face to the lead up to october. there will be daily committee that will look at some of the no deal
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planning. there will be twice weekly meetings looking at the wide apology making and strategy for a deal and a no deal scenario and at the same time, the chancellor has made clear that he will allocate the funds that are that he will allocate the funds that a re necessary that he will allocate the funds that are necessary and has instituted a review of any new funding that will be necessary to make sure that we can leave the eu and manage the risks but also grasp the opportunities, come what may at the end of october. is it true that within cabinet so that makes circles, this is being called a war cabinet? i have heard that in the media. iam cabinet? i have heard that in the media. i am not sure cabinet? i have heard that in the media. iam not sure if cabinet? i have heard that in the media. i am not sure if that is the formal term that is being used. the reality is we need to respond with effective decision—making and to all of the issues as they arrive and arise and that is what the cabinet agreed yesterday. we are already in the best decision position to make sure all of the planning and preparation that needs to be done can be done and of course that builds on the whole series of work thatis builds on the whole series of work that is being done since 2016 but has been stepped up in recent
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months. so the phrases you used a moment ago were turbocharging and you announcing a series of meetings. how much money will be allocated to brexit no deal planning? how much money? £4 billion has been allocated to the process of leaving the eu already and the chancellor will set out the further money that will be required and available. really, his message is a very required and available. really, his message is a very clear one. that we will do whatever it takes to make sure that we can leave the eu, manage the risks and make a success of brexit. -- the review going on currently is to make sure that those areas that need a greater injection of funding will get that as soon as possible. so, when you hear the boss of the vauxhall talking about ellesmere port with the vauxhall plant of course, and he outlines very clearly the problem he faces as a boss which is that 80% of the
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vehicles they build they are exported to europe, three quarters of all components are brought into the uk so they are imported, and he wa nts to the uk so they are imported, and he wants to know how much more it will cost him to do those things and your government's likely no deal scenario, your answer is what? well, first of all, a load of preparation has been done but we want to reach out to the sectors that will be affected. remember, the car sector has been affected by a range of other issues, including the diesel situation and demand in china. with respect, what is your answer to his question? well the tariffs be higher and will he pay more to bring stuff in? those are clear questions and he'll understand there is planning involved and he wants to know whether you think they will go up and it will cost him more? the tariff schedules for a no deal
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scenario have already been published, and part of this will depend on what the eu does both in a deal but also a no deal scenario. some of that is a question that will have to be teased out with the eu over the coming months. this is outside of your control? of course, we would rather have a deal but if because of the position the eu takes we end up with no deal, some of it depends on them. we've known every time there's been concern, for example, about delays at the border, the authorities in northern france and elsewhere have said we want to keep the flow of goods running because, of course, it would be damaging for the eu side if that would be impacted. the cbi report you mentioned has made clear they think it will be more damaging because of the level of preparation on the eu side. that's not what we want. brexit is about win—win for
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the uk with our eu partners, but we are doing the preparation we can control to mitigate as best as we can do risks and disruptions for vulnerable sectors. it should be said that in recent weeks we've seen amazon, umtiti, the big japanese tech firm, and jaguar land rover announcing fresh investment into the uk so it's not all 1—way or all the risks are downward, and there are opportunities here and we need to be ready to mitigate the risks and grasp those opportunities. for people watching this... industry is one big question obviously, but for people watching this programme, and given the change of tone in your government, which is your working on the assumption of a no deal, our people right to be worried? people at home, having their breakfast this morning thinking about how things are going to be, are they right to be worried? well, i think the most important thing from the position of government is to provide the assurance about the risk in a balanced way. the biggest risk i
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would say is to allow the uncertainty of the tortuous process we've been in with the eu to continue. i think the one reassurance we can give both businesses worried about uncertainty but also voters watching is provide finality by coming out at the end of october. that's one thing, finality, but it's a very basic question. you must the aware of this. you can't be entirely isolated from this notion that people have concerns about no deal. they might think it's a good thing to do what your government plans to do, but that doesn't necessarily think they're not worried about how it might impact on their families. you don't have to be against your idea to be concerned about how it might impact on you. know, and of course there are risks with any great change, and brexit is a great change, whether we leave with a deal or no deal. what i'm seeking to make clear is first of all the planning and preparation is there and in place to mitigate the risks and
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provide reassurance but also to make sure, and let's face it, there's been some pretty pessimistic doomsday scenarios banded around, to make sure people have a good balanced assessment, but also to grasp the opportunities for england and we will be ready to do that when we leave at and of october, prefera bly we leave at and of october, preferably with a deal, but if the eu doesn't move, we will leave on wto terms and we'll be in the best position we can be to manage the risks and make a success of brexit, which is what i think above all people who are eating their corn fla kes people who are eating their corn flakes or toast over breakfast want to know. thank you very much, don eric rab, the first secretary and secretary of state. —— dominic raab. i think people want to know what's happening with the weather. it is all change but all good for so many. red sky at night, shepherd's
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delight, red sky at morning,...m isa delight, red sky at morning,...m is a picture from this morning! so many questions to start the day! a beauty, look at the sunrise in east cambridgeshire. the weather this week will be more unsettled than last week with more seeing rain. today, although there's rain around for many, it will be dry and we'll see some sunshine, although that's not necessarily how we are starting off. there's a weather front draped over northern england, northern ireland and southern scotland bringing rain and this area of low pressure from the south later in the day will bring heavy, thundery downpours and later the wind will strengthen and we've got rain in the north of scotland this morning, which will clear. there's quite a lot of low cloud and mist and fog particularly around the coast, that will linger in scotland but it should lift in north—west england. we have some sunshine and where we have the sunshine is where we'll see the highest temperatures, getting up to about 26 in east anglia and around london this afternoon. about
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19 in aberdeen and 20 in belfast and 24 in cardiff. through this evening and overnight, you can see how our low pressure continues to bring in its heavy, thundery downpours, gusty winds around it with the wind really picking up. you might hear it howling across the isles of scilly, cornwall, devon, as far east as dorset so if you're camping tonight, bear that in dorset so if you're camping tonight, bearthat in mind. dorset so if you're camping tonight, bear that in mind. but not a particularly cold night, temperatures between 13 and about 17. more comfortable than sleeping than last week. tomorrow our low pressure is still with us, slowly moving north and east. still a squeeze in isobars in southern areas, so still windy here, but slack isobars further north, so not much breeze. tomorrow in scotland we start with this cloud, drizzle, mist and fog but in will brighten. in england, wales and northern ireland, look at the rotation around the low pressure and that's where we see the heavy, thundery downpours and the
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gusty winds with the gusts represented in the black circles. 39 mph and 36 mph in parts of the south. if you're in school holidays, and you are outside, bear that in mind. in between, we'll see some sunshine and temperatures up to about 22 or 23, naga and charlie. what a contrast, carol, hey! what a contrast to last week! totally. but some people quite rightly want rain. the gardeners do! not in manchester, because you saw a deluge this weekend, but other parts do. i'm quite pleased with that sitting here all week! thanks, carol! a group of mps have predicted that cannabis will be legalised in the uk in the next five to ten years. they've recently returned from a fact finding trip to canada, which legalised the drug last year. here, the government says it has no intention of changing the law. newsbeat‘s political reporterjim connolly followed the politician's trip. these buds will probably get about four times larger by the time
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evenif even if you years ago this would have seemed unimaginable. three mps from across the political spectrum here in canada looking at how the legalisation has been implemented. we're following the liberal democrat sir norman lamb, the conservativejonathan djanogly and labour's david lammy. you could go to prison for a very long time in britain if you had anything like this. the trip's been organised by a london—based campaign group volteface. it's sponsored by a big north american cannabis company which runs this facility. we've been happy to be a host to them to give them some exposure to the business and give them an understanding of what's happening here in north america. if that helps make the right decisions in the united kingdom, its money well spent for us. canada's prime minister, justin trudeau, came to power promising to legalise cannabis. it's been available here for medical use since 2001, but as of last october, recreational users could use it too without fear of breaking the law, meaning places like this have been springing up all over the country.
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for one of the mp5, the trip has led toa for one of the mp5, the trip has led to a significant change in point of view. i want the market legalised and regulated, taken away from criminal gangs, young people not criminalised because of use, properly educated. which do you tend to use? i've done this one. he decides to buy some. he wa nts to this one. he decides to buy some. he wants to know what it feels like and ta kes wants to know what it feels like and takes some before bed. now i'm supposed to put it under my tongue. he claims it helped him sleep. the home office told us there would be no change in the law on recreational cannabis, but all three mps think there will be on the drug will be legal within five to ten years. jim connelly, bbc news. let's talk now to karen tyrell from addaction, a drug, alcohol and mental health charity. good morning. you were also on this trip. what did you make of what you saw? i think it's really useful to go and see a different way of
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thinking about cannabis. what we know is public perception around cannabis is changing in britain, and has been for quite some time, so for somebody like me who's worked with drug and alcohol users for about 20 yea rs, drug and alcohol users for about 20 years, it's drug and alcohol users for about 20 yea rs, it's really drug and alcohol users for about 20 years, it's really important to think about alternative ways of providing help and support for people. the change in legislation we saw in canada is a potential different way about thinking about how we protect young people from some of the damaging effects of cannabis. there's two ways that change in legislation could have an impact on society, main ways, one when it comes to criminal activity, criminal gangs, but two, attitudes towards cannabis and whether or not it leads to stronger addictions. if we take the first one, what was the impact in terms of criminal activity? so, in canada, they've only done it in the last, sort of, 12 months and the attempt is to try to move people away from that illicit market into a
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regulated market. obviously that was going to take several years, so there is an acknowledgement that that's a work in progress basically, something that's going to take quite a long period of time. but what doesn't change is that perception that if you start as a kid, say, smoking cannabis, it leads to other things. you try other things and it can lead to other things and it can lead to other things and it can lead to other things and then you have psychosis issues as well. i think the whole gateway drug theory is a debate in our sector about what that is and whether it is about what that is and whether it is a thing or not. certainly if you think that that is a theory, it's equally true for caffeine. it's true for alcohol. it's true for nicotine. all of those substances could be a gateway for other substances as well. our issue is if you move cannabis into a regulated market, actually what you're doing is you're breaking that link with young people talking to drug dealers on street corners. instead, they're going to
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somewhere where they would know exactly what they‘ re somewhere where they would know exactly what they're getting and we would be able to provide clearer information to help prevent and reduce harm. the company who hosted you and the mps, david lammy, we will speak to him later this morning actually, they are clearly interested in making money, they are a company. they want more people to use cannabis. that's their intention. that means they make more money. so do you want more people to use cannabis? that's their driver, that's why they wanted you there. absolutely. so they can have a bigger business, they are open about that. is that a good thing? not necessarily, it's not necessarily good or bad. it depends on your view about substances. you have to have a view? absolutely, we do. our view is we are realists, we are a treatment provider. some people are always
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going to have issues around different su bsta nces going to have issues around different substances and for us, it's about making sure that when people do need help and support its there for them. it's also about living in the real world. this market is worth about £3.5 billion, whether in the hands of drug dealers or companies. is better the devil you know an unfair phrase here? it's a really difficult debate and i don't think there are straight forward answers. but what i do think we know is the system we've got at the moment isn't working and not protecting our young people, not thinking about public health as the foremost way of doing it and a regulated market would give us the chance to learn from other countries and adapt it for what works in britain and try to protect our young people. thanks very much. karen terol. we will speak to david lammy, one of the mps on that trip, who had something of a change of mind as a result, a little later on the programme. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are.
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good morning from bbc london, i'm tolu adeoye. a council tenant will have to pay £100,000 to westminster council after illgally subletting his flat on airbnb. toby harman has now been evicted from the property and must pay back the profits. he was caught after officials found reviews on the website from users thanking him for their stay. a london mp believes we could be following in the footsteps of canada by legalising cannabis within five to ten years. tottenham's david lammy was among a group of politicians who went on a fact—finding trip arranged by a campaign group. the home office says there are no plans to change the law on recreational cannabis, but he's urging them to rethink. i want the market legalised and regulated, taken away from criminal gangs. young people not criminalised because of use, properly educated, but i actually want to see the strength of the stuff reduced, labelled and properly
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organised in our country. from today, queens park rangers' football ground will be known as the kiyan prince foundation stadium. 15—year—old kiyan was a member of qpr's youth academy — he was stabbed to death in 2006. the club has played under the loftus road name for 100 years but will unveil its new title later. let's take a look at the travel situation now. there severe delays on the overground. barking to gospel oak because of a faulty train at crouch hill. otherwise it's a good service. but on the trains, there's disruption to thameslink and southeastern services because the overhead wire issue. some trains are being diverted. there's also a reduced great northern service. turning to the roads and lane one is closed on the m25 anticlockwise between junction 24 and junction 23, that's after a collision involving a car and lorry. the woolwich ferry is down to a one boat service due
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to technical issues. finally, in balham, station road is closed in both directions between the high road and bedford hill due to roadworks. now the weather, with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. it's going to be rather changeable and unsettled at times this week. there are some showers in the forecast, and it's set to turn rather windy tomorrow. so today, the nicest looking day of the next few, it will stay dry and there'll be lots of sunshine throughout the day. a fresher feel to things this, though morning, some early high cloud should clear away. lots of morning sunshine, plenty of blue skies. a bit more fairweather cloud through the afternoon but still some long, sunny spells and temperatures that when 25 and 26 celsius, so pleasantly warm in the best of the sunshine without, of course, being too hot. more sunshine this evening and overnight tonight we keep the clear skies, a bit of cloud to the west. the wind will start to pick up tomorrow morning. overnight lows between 14 and 17 celsius, so not quite so fresh tomorrow morning. tomorrow will be quite a blustery day, unseasonably windy with some gusts of wind up to, say, 40—45mph in the south. also some showers around.
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a bit of a dip in temperatures through the week. wednesday will start off with some showers and then it will be dry. i'm back with the latest from bbc london in half an hour. now it's back to charlie and naga. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. here's a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news: boris johnson will travel to scotland today to announce 300—million pounds of new funding for scotland, wales and northern ireland. mrjohnson has insisted the uk will leave the eu by 31 october with or without a deal, but yesterday the conservative leader in scotland, ruth davidson, said she couldn't support a no—deal brexit. today the business organisation, the cbi, warned the government that neither the uk or eu is ready for a no—deal scenario. but earlier on breakfast
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the foreign secretary told us preparations are being made by the government and will mitigate any disruption. the biggest risk is to allow the uncertainty of the torturous process we have been in with the eu to continue so i think the one reassurance we can give both those nurses worried about and surety but also voters watching the show is that we will provide some finality by coming out at the end of october. three people have been killed and 15 injured after a gunman opened fire at a food festival in california. it happened at the annual garlic festival in the small town of gilroy, which is around 80 miles south of san francisco. police say a gunman has been shot dead by officers, but it's not clear whether a second suspect is still at large. a man's been rescued after spending more than three hours trapped between rocks off a seaside promenade. he entered the water in sheringham in norfolk, to save a toddler who had fallen in. emergency services faced a race against time to free the man before he became submerged
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by the rising tide. a former boeing engineer has told the bbc that work on the production line of its 737 max model was not adequately funded. the aircraft is currently grounded after two crashes which killed 346 people. boeing denies the claims and says it's committed to making the plane one of the safest ever to fly. the duchess of sussex has become the first person to guest edit the september edition of british vogue — the magazine's most important issue of the year. meghan has chosen to feature 15 women on the cover who she describes as ‘forces for change‘. the duchess declined to appear on the cover herself, telling the editor she felt it would be "boastful". coming up we‘ll get the weather from carol. but first, dramatic, wet and chaotic
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sport. it happened yeah it had everything. it was incredible. a lot of people complaining about the rain on the weekend. not formula 1 fans because it means exciting things. we had drama, the weather, crashes. it was daniil kvyat who pulled in that race and he described it as a horror movie mixed with black comedy. not for lewis hamilton. wet and chaotic. yesterday‘s german grand prix was certainly action packed. but it was a day to forget for the reigning world champion lewis hamilton as his red bull rival max verstappen took his second win of the year. patrick gearey reports. one of those days for lewis hamilton. filthy weather, you‘re feeling sick, then you have to go to work and it is a safety car start. hamilton‘s firstjob was to somehow stay in front, when all behind was the wacky races. rain scrambles formula 1‘s precise engineering and strategy. this was charles leclerc, just as he was about to take the lead...
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no!! a minute later, hamilton echoed that, going in seconds from winning to spinning and damaging his front wing. he arrived at the pits without an appointment. they‘d have it ready as soon as they could. but in the meantime, max verstappen, third in the drivers‘ standings, went first in the race. these weren‘t conditions to chase in. hamilton‘s shocking time in hockenheim got worse still. his team—mate valtteri bottas didn‘t even finish. all the while, steadily gaining in the rain was sebastian vettel, the german driver going from 20th to second, behind verstappen, dutch conqueror of the chaos and the winner of a race that was never clockwork, but definitely orange. patrick gearey, bbc news. egan bernal has become the youngest rider in 110 years to win the tour de france. with the race leader traditionally not challenged on the final stage, 22—year—old bernal was hand—in—hand with his team—mate and last year‘s
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winner geraint thomas, who finished second overall. the traditional sprint finish was won by australian caleb ewan. but it was the colombian rider‘s day and night on the champs—elysees. adam peaty claimed his third gold of the world aquatics championships as great britain won the men‘s 4 by 100 metre medley relay. it‘s peaty‘s fourth medal overall in south korea but duncan scott took the plaudits for his amazing final leg. they were in a team with james guy and luke greenbank and set a new european record. the usa top the medal table. great britain finished in seventh with three golds, all from peaty, and seven medals overall. a completely unexpected gold. peaty has in the past spoken of the importance of positive mental health and last night he took to twitter to admit his struggles
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with depression. he says "athletes go through the toughest of highs and lows, i‘ve had many of both. i‘ve struggled and triumphed, gone through depression and come out the other side, i want to help people come out the other side." to football, and new liverpool signing harvey elliott made his debutjust a few hours after completing his move from fulham. the 16—year—old came on during his new club‘s 3—0 defeat to napoli in edinburgh. he still can‘t turn professional until his 17th birthday next april. he became the youngest ever player to feature in the premier league last season at just 16 years and 30 days. england women‘s disappointing ashes series continues. they were defeated by australia in their second t20 game. england could only muster 121 for 8 after winning the toss and batting. the australians took control and reached their target with 13 balls to spare and win by seven wickets. they‘ve already won the ashes and lead the series by 10 points to 2. rory mcilroy could only finish fourth in the stjude classic despite holding the lead going into the final round. he was a shot clear after the third
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round but could only manage a one over par round of 71 in memphis. mcilroy was playing with brooks koepeka who was once again in imperious form finishing three shots clear of second to win. jin—young ko won the evian championship, the fourth women‘s major of the year, by two shots in france. it was the south korean‘s fifth lpga tour championship win in less than two years, and her second major of the year. rob cross has won the world match play darts in blackpool. the former world champion beat michael smith by 18 legs to 13 at the winter gardens. he takes home the phil taylor trophy and 150 thousand pounds. jonathan rea helped his kawasaki team win a dramatic suzuka 8 hour event after a successful appeal following a late crash. the world superbike champion had a commanding lead as he rode the final leg injapan but slid off with just two minutes
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left in the event after another bike had left fluid on the track. the race was red—flagged but rea and his team were eventually declared winners. and finally, two members of the same family have taken home the titles in the world thumb wrestling championship. the thumb to thumb combat, which is now in its 11th year, took place in sussex, with paul browse winning the men‘s event. his mother in law janet coleman won the women‘s event. mr browse, who competes with the name ‘under the thumb‘ won the event for the fourth time and walks away with the top prize of 350 pounds. how do you go in it with your mother—in—law. it wouldn‘t be my top one. a bit of shopping perhaps? as an event. i can make shopping an
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event. a family not to be messed with, basically. not with your thumb, anyway. it makes me wonder what sort of attributes are required. you do when £350. you can go shopping with that! all let‘s talk about one of the most talked about tv shows of the year. it‘s been one of the most talked about tv shows of the year and tonight, after eight weeks in the villa, it‘s the final of love island. as well as providing counselling to the contestants, as they prepare for life "on the outside" the programme makers will also be offering advice on the commercial opportunities that will follow. some of the couples will be very much in demand. before we talk about all that, here‘s a quick look at last night‘s episode. last night, you while secretly voted for the couple you thought should be dumped from the island. your votes have put three couples at risk. which means two couples are
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definitely safe and through to the love island final. you are all at risk of being dumped tonight. however... only one couple will be going home. let‘s talk now to one of the contestants from this year‘s series, yewande biala, and also with us is sedge beswick who runs a company specialising in marketing and social media. let‘s start with your yewande biala.
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you came out of the series a little earlier on but the opportunities that are afforded to you, particularly through social media, what have you seen? allan i think a lot of it is paid advertising elaborations with brands and a lot of public opinions. — make i think a lot of it. how much guidance have you been given in terms of what is good to endorse and work with, which public appearances are good for your image, how much have you been told? we haven‘t been told a lot. it is up to personal preference. some people might want to do personal appearances and some not to be depends upon what the individual wa nts. depends upon what the individual wants. in terms of collaborations with brands, we haven‘t been given guidance on how much we should be expecting that if you can‘t have a manager “— expecting that if you can‘t have a manager —— can have a manager, they can kate —— take care of that. manager —— can have a manager, they can kate -- take care of that. so you now have a manager? yes, i do.
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your instagram followers, you are a biologist by trade. that is your day job. what was it before, what is it now? how many people are following you? i had 1000 and now! have now? how many people are following you? i had 1000 and now i have 770. quite a job. three quarters of a million people! does it feel like a pressure or a good thing?|j million people! does it feel like a pressure or a good thing? i think it isa pressure or a good thing? i think it is a bit of both. obviously there is pressure to always post and give an insight into what you are doing to your viewers in your day—to—day life and then you have to be careful about what you say and you have a big platform and it is so important to not say the wrong thing or offend people. there is quite a bit of pressure as well but it is nice that so many people do support you. a lot of people feel the first pressure and responsibility of that but then the business side as well. as a
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social media marketing expert, what should these contestants be thinking about? the first thing is about getting management and support. it is not the life that you had eight weeks ago before being in the show. influence and marketing is absolutely at its peak on the back of fire festival this year —— five has come to document that came out and subsequently people in reality tv shows are in more demand than ever so it is really getting that grounded support, making sure you are choosing the right partnerships that give you longevity as well, rather than it being a six—month stint and panicking about what is next. you come out of love island, what is the lifespan of popularity and influence? it varies. the winning couple will have a solid 12 month ride so if you take last year‘s winner, she is reportedly made 7 million in the past six months. she has hosted baftas, she
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has written a book. she wears things at her personal appearances which are instantly shop a bill for that brand. it all depends on the collaborations that that islander then chooses but usually you are looking at around 12 months. is there some sort of formula? we were talking about instagram followers. if you have three quarters of a million instagram followers can you compute what it is worth? she has a 16.4 engagement rate and that is astronomical because the public is fixated on what she will do next. what do you mean engagement rate? the amount of people that are liking and commenting on her post. where does the money part come in? for1 million followers, the cost per post should be around £3000. yewande is nodding, she‘s had a few of those offers!
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ino of those offers! i no you don‘t want to name names, but how frequent are the offers and what are they roughly amassing to? the offers come in daily and it's normally four sponsorships for watches or clothes. are you asking how much per post? yeah, roughly, i am! i don't really deal with that aspect, my manager deals with how much i get per post. how long do you think it‘s going to last? what is your big plan? you went on to love island, i don‘t know if you went on looking for love or if you went on looking for love or if you went on looking for love or if you wanted to be famous, but what is your big plan? i wouldn't say i have a big plan. i went have a big plan. iwent on have a big plan. i went on to love island looking for love and i came out, i still have two degrees at the end of the day so my big plan is eventually to go back to work and just work as a biologist really. but i'm just enjoying what comes with the experienced. at the moment, the work you had four has stopped? this is full—time now,
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you are a full—time former love island contestant? —— before. you are a full—time former love island contestant? -- before. yes, but this will die down eventually and when it does i will have my career to full—back on. thanks for talking to us. thank you so much. thank you both. we should say, the final love island is on itv2 at 9pm. past our bedtimes! here‘s carol with a look at this morning‘s weather. it's it‘s all change and carol, we‘re enjoying this... you have some red hot pokers, is that what they are?” think so, now go, they look like them, don‘t they? you‘re right about all change. compared to last week, this week is more unsettled with more seeing rain, and at times, particularly windy for some. today we have some rain, a lot of it will clear and then it will be dry for many parts, with some of us seeing some sunshine. this morning,
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there‘s a fair bit of around and some of that is low cloud with some mist and fog and we‘ve got low pressure coming in across the south—west of england later on and introducing some heavy, thundery showers. the wind later on will also strengthen. we‘ve also got rain across scotland and that will move away northwards and clear and the rain in northern england, northern ireland and south—west scotland petering out through the course of the day. in between, dry conditions and also some sunny skies. temperatures getting up to about 26. somewhere in east anglia around the london area could be that. 19 edinburgh and glasgow, 20 in belfast and 24 towards cardiff. through the evening and overnight, you can see how the low pressure starts to get hold of the weather as it pushes in across south—west england and wales. the bright colours indicate some heavy, thundery downpours and with that gusty winds, gusting 40 mph from the isles of scilly in the
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direction of dorset. if you‘re camping tonight, bear that in mind. not a particularly cold night and certainly not as humid as last week. tomorrow, our low pressure is still with us very slowly moving north and east. look at the spacing of the isobars, you east. look at the spacing of the isoba rs, you can east. look at the spacing of the isobars, you can tell it‘s rather windy across the south but not the north. focusing on this area of low pressure, you can see the rotation around it with all those showers with the bright colours indicating heavy bursts and gusty winds gusting 40, 45 heavy bursts and gusty winds gusting 40,45 mph or more on the coast. heavy bursts and gusty winds gusting 40, 45 mph or more on the coast. the black circles indicating the wind gusts. northern ireland, some showers. scotland, some showers. in between, sunny skies as well. lots of the showers not making it over to the east, where in the best sunshine we‘ll see temperatures of 22, 23 or maybe 24 in hull. carol, thanks very much!
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steph is going to tell us about the countdown for pp! payments and how long you have for your claim. one month left! i thought we had ages! quite a story behind this, it‘s hard to believe! ina month, in a month, you might never see one of those ads asking if you have in mis—sold ppi, you might not get those cold calls any more! that‘s because 29th august 2019 is the final deadline for you to make a claim. ppi, or payment protection insurance, was designed to cover repayments in certain circumstances where you couldn‘t make them yourself. it‘s estimated as many as 64 million ppi policies were sold in the uk, mostly between 1990 and 2010, but some as far back as the 19705. they were usually sold alongside a loan. this could be anything from credit cards, store card, to mortgages or car finance. but many of these polices were mis—sold with many people thinking it was a condition of the loan. since 2011, banks have paid out about £36 billion to people for this mis—selling.
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emma stranack is here from the watchdog the financial conduct authority. thanks forjoining us. explain what this deadline is actually for. the 29th of august is the last possible time that you can get your complaint in. if you want to complaint in. if you want to complain about ppi, you must do so by that date and you can look at our website fca.org.uk/ppi for the information on how to do that. can you send it off on the 29th or has it got to be received by the banks by then? received by the banks really but you can do it on the day because there‘s online tools that a lot of banks have, or you can find them. if you‘re going to put it in the post, you‘re going to put it in the post, you need to do that before the 29th. as naga said, this feels like it‘s
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been going on for years. it has. why is there a deadline being brought in now? as you say, it's been going back many years. after 2012, complaint levels were going down. volumes were going down and down and down. in 2015, we consulted about having a deadline and actually our research said consumers thought a deadline would nudge them into action so they would get the redress sooner, so that‘s why we‘ve put that do you think by this deadline anyone who ever got mis—sold it will have their money back? i‘m not sure, because some people have just decided that they are ruling themselves out of actually making a complaint, but for anyone who does want to, it‘s pretty straightforward. you just need your name, date of birth, your address, any addresses you might have had credit ducts when you were living at, you might have moved house since they were sold in the 90s and the
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noughties —— credit cards. as much information as you can provide and your ready to go. you can do this for free. claims management firms have often made money off the back of this? that's right. if you use a claims company you can expect to pay up to 20% of any money you get back, plus vat, which is 24%. you can do it yourself or free which is 24%. you can do it yourself orfree and which is 24%. you can do it yourself or free and go to our website, fca.org.uk/ppi, or call our helpline and we can give you information about how to do that —— for free. so soon in the not—too—distant future do you think you won‘t be able to talk about ppi anymore, and me as well? yes, the 29th of august, none of us! in terms of what the banks are saying, will it be sorted for them? when i‘ve done bank results, i‘ve a lwa ys when i‘ve done bank results, i‘ve always said, lloyds, one of the biggest, they‘ve had to write down so much money for it. well that come to an end? it should do.
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it takes about eight weeks for complaints to go through to the end so you won‘t get your money back immediately, it takes some time for it to be processed. but within a couple of months of the deadline you‘d imagine that would be over. i can‘t wait for the day when we don‘t get the cold calls any more! emma stranack, thanks for talking to us! if you are going to claim, the 29th of august! that‘s it for me for now. you've got the tune in your head, the final countdown!m now. you've got the tune in your head, the final countdown! it is! the earworm is in! we can go to the top of the blackpool tower today. matt is there celebrating an anniversary of sorts in weather forecasting. good celebrating an anniversary of sorts in weatherforecasting. good morning at. —— good morning mum matt. this is the top of like full tower. two
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anniversaries this year. this is the top of blackpool tower, it opened 125 years ago —— top of blackpool tower. 125 metres from base to top and it takes seven years to com pletely and it takes seven years to completely paint that. it‘s the anniversary of blackpool tower celebrated this year. as charlie mentioned, it is 70 years since we started forecasting tv weather forecasts regularly on bbc on this day in 1949. they‘ve transformed over the years, right from the initial slate with someone giving a voice—over to the forecast to the magnetic symbols, the 3d graphics, and the forecasts today. we now broadcast over 100 forecasts everyday. a special package in the next hour to show you how we go from weather observing to the forecast. it's weather observing to the forecast. it‘s the summer holidays, you might wa nt to it‘s the summer holidays, you might want to know what the weather is
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doing where you are at the moment. time for that all—important weather forecast, as well as the news and the travel wherever you‘re waking up this morning. good morning from bbc london, i‘m tolu adeoye. a council tenant will have to pay £100,000 to westminster council after illgally subletting his flat on airbnb. toby harman has now been evicted from the property and must pay back the profits. he was caught after officials found reviews on the website from users thanking him for their stay. a london mp believes we could be following in the footsteps of canada by legalising cannabis within five to ten years. tottenham‘s david lammy was among a group of politicians who went on a fact—finding trip arranged by a campaign group. the home office says there are no plans to change the law on recreational cannabis, but he‘s urging them to rethink. i want the market legalised and regulated, taken away from criminal gangs. young people not criminalised because of use, properly educated, but i actually want to see the strength of the stuff reduced, labelled and properly
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organised in our country. i actually want to see the strength of the staff reduced, labelled and properly organised in our country. from today, queens park rangers‘ football ground will be known as the kiyan prince foundation stadium. 15—year—old kiyan was a member of qpr‘s youth academy — he was stabbed to death in 2006. the club has played under the loftus road name for 100 years but will unveil its new title later. let‘s take a look at the travel situation now. there are severe delays on the overground, barking to gospel oak because of a faulty train at crouch hill. but on the trains, there‘s disruption to thameslink and southeastern services because the overhead wire issue. some trains are being diverted. there‘s also a reduced great northern service. turning to the roads and lane one is closed on the m25 anticlockwise between junction 24 and junction 23, that‘s after a collision involving a car and lorry. finally, in balham, station road
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is closed in both directions between the high road and bedford hill due to roadworks. now the weather, with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. it‘s going to be rather changeable and unsettled at times this week. there are some showers in the forecast, and it‘s set to turn rather windy tomorrow. so today, the nicest looking day of the next few, it will stay dry and there‘ll be lots of sunshine throughout the day. a fresher feel to things this, though morning, some early high cloud should clear away. lots of morning sunshine, plenty of blue skies. a bit more fairweather cloud through the afternoon but still some long, sunny spells and temperatures that when 25 and 26 degrees celsius, so pleasantly warm in the best of the sunshine without, of course, being too hot. more sunshine this evening and overnight tonight we keep the clear skies, a bit of cloud towards the west. the wind will start to pick up tomorrow morning. overnight lows between 14 and 17 celsius, so not quite so fresh tomorrow morning. tomorrow will be quite a blustery day, unseasonably windy with some gusts of wind up to, say,
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40—45mph in the south. there‘ll also be some showers around. a bit of a dip in temperatures through the week. wednesday will start off with some showers and then it will be dry. i‘m back with the latest from bbc london in half—an—hour. now it‘s back to charlie and naga. bye for now. good morning — welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. our headlines today... the prime minister heads to scotland to sell his commitment to a united kingdom, despite strong opposition to a no—deal brexit. the uk‘s biggest business group — the cbi — is warning that we‘re not ready to leave the eu with no deal. i‘ll be explaining why. three people are confirmed dead and 15 injured as a gunman opens fire at food festival in california. a fourth person —
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believed to be the gunman — has been killed by police. for a few seconds, there was so many shots — rat—tat—tat—tat — and i saw people falling down. a man who became trapped in rocks while saving a toddler from the sea has been rescued on the norfolk coast. max verstappen storms to victory in hockenheim while lewis hamilton was left in a spin. the world champion struggled in the wet in an extraordinary rain—hit german grand prix. more of us will see rain this week compared to last week. today, some rain in the forecast but also a fair bit of dry weather and i will tell you where in 15 minutes. it‘s monday 29th july. our top story. boris johnson will travel to scotland today to announce £300 million of funding for scotland, wales and northern ireland. yesterday the conservative leader in scotland, ruth davidson, said she couldn‘t support a no—deal brexit.
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today the business organisation, the cbi, warned the government that neither the uk or eu is ready for a no—deal brexit on october 31st. in a moment we‘ll talk to our assistant political editor norman smith who‘s in westminster, but first we can go to our scotland correspondent lorna gordon who‘s in glasgow for us. give us a sense of what the new prime minister can expect when he arrives in scotland. i think this could well be a very tricky day indeed for the new prime minister. yes, there will be announcements for extra funding from the prime minister who has also given himself the title of minister for the union. he is likely to face opposition from both the snp and from the conservative party itself here. the snp has said they believe he will be the last prime minister of the united kingdom. scotland‘s first minister nicola sturgeon says she has profound concerns about boris johnson‘s premiership particularly
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when it comes to brexit, and breaks is causing him problems from the conservative side as well, and ruth davidson has said she believes the westminster government shouldn‘t pursue a no—deal brexit and if it comes to it, she wouldn‘t support it. a lot of challenging meetings coming today. we can go live now to norman smith, our assistant political editor, for more on this. we were speaking to dominic raab earlier and we put the phrase war cabinet to him because a series of cabinet meetings will take place as we move to october 31. there are. the viewing government is we have to dramatically step up preparations for a no deal planning. under mrs may it had all become a bit casual and half—hearted with not enough money devoted to it. borisjohnson is now unveiling an overhaul of the machinery preparing for no deal, so there will now be daily meetings chaired by michael gove and held in
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the cobra committee room, the committee room where national emergencies are handled. designed, i think, to send out the message that this is a national endeavour we are engaged in and they will be responsible for the nuts and bolts and nitty—gritty of no deal. at the same time, there will be twice weekly brexit war cabinet meetings under dominic rab to set overall strategy. the aim is to not only step up preparations but convince the eu we are deadly serious about being ready to leave without a deal. norman, thank you very much. let‘s find out more about those warnings about a no—deal brexit from the cbi. steph is here. the cbi, the big business lobby group representing around 200,000 businesses. they have done lots of analysis about what no deal could mean for businesses. we have talked about it for the last few years, what businesses are doing to prepare. billions have been spent by
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them on contingency plans, but the cbi is saying that actually there is still a lot they can‘t prepare for. they say some of the advice they have been given has not been particularly helpful. the complexity, cost and time lines, so much uncertainty around it that no matter what if we leave with no deal there will be disruption. they say out of 27 areas of the economy, there are 24 of them where they think there will be disruption if we leave without a deal and they say it is the smaller companies rather than the larger companies. they say they appreciate the government has been preparing in some way for this, but for them, they feel there is not enough certainty. dominic raab use the phrase turbo—charging the planning and the meetings stop but that doesn‘t necessarily answer the very specific questions that some parts of industry want answered. exactly. we have heard a number of times since the new prime minister and cabinet came in that they are
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increasing the plans and have a potential war cabinet style set of meetings going on but for businesses, you are right, there isn‘t a definitive thing of what will it mean for trade, bringing in components that they need to make things worse. what will it mean for the people working for us. it is not all properly defined yet and that‘s why there is a problem. we have had the big vauxhall car maker in the uk, they have the big ellesmere port plant and the boss of the owner of vauxhall has been strong in his warnings today, he said if business is not profitable anymore when we leave the eu, will consider making peace taking the plant out of the country. these are warnings, the flip side is that it could make things better for us. but flip side is that it could make things betterfor us. but we flip side is that it could make things better for us. but we don‘t really know yet, which is what we have to say whenever we talk about brexit. we do say it a lot. three people have been killed and 15
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injured after a gunman opened fire at a food festival in california. it happened at the annual garlic festival in the small town of gilroy. police say they shot dead a fourth person, believed to be the gunman. andy moore reports 0h, bleep! what's going on, what's going on? that was the question everyone was asking. why would someone armed with an assault rifle open fire on men, women and children enjoying a food and music festival in the californian sunshine? as the calls for help came in, police swamped the area. witnesses said the white man in his 30s stood in front of the stage and started shooting indiscriminately. it was the third day of the event — one of the largest food festivals in the country. there were so many shots — da—da—da—da — and i saw people falling down, kids falling down. i had tojump over three of the kids. one bullet passed me very closely and it hit our friend‘s boot. police said the gunman cut through a the perimeter fence to get through a perimeter fence to get
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into the festival area. there were reports of shooting on the north side of the garlic festival area. officers were in that area and engaged the suspect in less than a minute. the suspect was shot and killed. as darkness fell, it was still a confused picture. police said a second suspect who could have been acting in a supporting role, might still be at large. andy moore, bbc news. a former boeing engineer has told the bbc that work on the production line of its 737 max model was not adequately funded. the aircraft is currently grounded after two crashes which killed 346 people. boeing denies the claims and says it‘s committed to making the plane one of the safest ever to fly. a man‘s been rescued after spending
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more than three hours trapped between rocks off a seaside promenade in norfolk. it happened yesterday after he went into the water to save a child, as will batchelor reports. for the emergency services, it was a race against time. a man trapped between rocks with the tide coming in fast. he entered the sea in sheringham, norfolk to save a toddler who had fallen in. having rescued the child, he got stuck. the coastguard, rnli, police and fire service worked to free him, some holding his head above the water and others cutting the rocks. itjust goes to show that all the emergency services, when required, can come together, act as a single team, put in a plan and save people‘s lives. all i would like to do is just ask people to be aware of their surroundings when they‘re on the beach and although this was probably purely an accident, we need to be able to get the emergency services there as quick as possible and therefore we can act sooner. the coastguard said it was a very frightening experience for the man but that he suffered only minor injuries.
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will batchelor, bbc news. we can go back to our lead story this morning. boris johnson makes his first visit as prime minister to scotland today, promising that under his leadership, no corner of the united kingdom will be left behind. but in a nation where the first minister nicola sturgeon says a no—deal brexit would make an independence referendum more important than ever, what kind of reception will he get? let‘s talk now to shona craven from the national newspaper which favours independence, and rachel watson from the scottish daily mail. good morning to you both. let‘s start with rachel, your view of how you feel borisjohnson will be received in scotland today is.” don‘t think boris johnson received in scotland today is.” don‘t think borisjohnson is under any illusion about how difficult
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this trip north of the border will be, as well as a visit out to the west coast and we expect him to meet nicola sturgeon and ruth davidson andi nicola sturgeon and ruth davidson and i understand both will not be shy about raising concerns about a no—deal brexit. actually the more difficult meeting of the two will be with ruth davidson who has been open about her willingness to challenge the government and oppose a no—deal brexit should that be the way we leave the eu. i think for that boris johnson should go in with an open mind and be ready to bury the hatchet with ruth davidson. i think they will both want to do that, but i think over the last couple of months that relationship has been difficult. but it is important. theresa may realised the political clout ruth davidson house, not only in opposing a second referendum and building that policy for them, and her response to nicola sturgeon and dealing with the snp, but also keeping the conservatives in number ten and! keeping the conservatives in number ten and i think boris has to be extremely aware of that. ruth
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davidson help to get an extra 12 mps north of the border to take them to 13, which helped the conservatives to stay in government, and he has to be aware of that today. it's always interesting watching a new prime minister take the first steps, so to speak, and his personality certainly isn‘t retiring, so how do you think that will be received, shona? in a sense he has made the choice to come toa sense he has made the choice to come to a secure location initially. you will not encounter members of the public which i think is deliberate, i think it's ironic you should talk about safety and security when a no—deal brexit is widely acknowledged to be a considerable threat to security, information sharing and crime fighting notjust in the uk but across the eu. when he goes to bute house i imagine he will receive a more lively reception given that three quarters of scottish people polled said they believed he was incompetent. two thirds of scottish people think he will either be a poor or terrible
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prime minister. these are very poor ratings and it's notjust his personality. a lot of people don't like this kind of bumbling, supposedly friendly uncle persona. but in scotland it is more than that. it's notjust that but in scotland it is more than that. it's not just that they don't like him personally, they can see he doesn't have the track record and has no business being prime minister. rachel, is that fair? looking at the overall polling, there were reports over the weekend that the conservatives have jumped up that the conservatives have jumped up in the polls. i don't think that‘s entirely fair. there is a lot of talk in scotland and it is helpful for nicola sturgeon to make him look like a right—wing bogeyman and talk of how he is toxic north of the border. but he hasjust become prime minister, he hasn‘t spent much time in scotland, and actually he is not as right—wing as nicola sturgeon would make him out to be. look at his time as london mayor and his policies around immigration, where the scottish government have been
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very open in asking theresa may previously for a differential immigration policy, which the uk government has never wanted to devolve powers, but borisjohnson has been more open in looking at different regions and what they need immigration wise. he has also talked more openly about scrapping the limits theresa may brought in. looking at the policies he is willing to bring in, his talk about the union as well, which will be very important today when he brings it up. when he was in perth previously talked about putting the integrity of the union ahead of delivering brexit. those messages hit the right tone and it will be interesting to see if he repeats those today. it flies in the face of what nicola sturgeon is trying to do by pushing to take scotland out of the union. you can see his talk about the union will be significant today but i don't think it will be significant to anyone in scotland regardless of where they stand on
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the constitutional question. i think everyone was expecting a combination of bribes and bluster, and that will be offered, but it is laughable to think anyone in scotland will be fooled by a share of 300 million for certain communities in devolved parts of the uk. cbi scotland says a no—deal brexit will cost scotland £16 billion per year. we are talking about completely different sums of money. it's notjust that people think borisjohnson is incompetent and right—wing, is the fact he is saying that when he speaks to a uk wide audience, brexit is the most important thing, regarded as the defining feature of his prime ministership. he might only last six months but by then so much damage will have been done that any domestic policies or general election policies sort of pale into insignificance when you compare it to what he is very gung ho about doing. thank you both for your time
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this morning. here‘s carol with a look at this morning‘s weather. i tell you what, the weather is mad sometimes. last week, with record temperatures and now a lot of places with extraordinary reign over the weekend. that‘s right on both counts. a lot of rain around greater manchester for example, more than a month‘s worth injust a for example, more than a month‘s worth in just a weekend, for example, more than a month‘s worth injust a weekend, not for example, more than a month‘s worth in just a weekend, not the sort of rainfall we want, although we do still need some rainfall. today there is some rain in the forecast but also a lot of dry weather. we have rain in the north of scotla nd weather. we have rain in the north of scotland moving away. we have the same band of rain that fell across manchester through the weekend and other areas moving through northern ireland and in through south—west scotla nd ireland and in through south—west scotland that will eventually petered out. and low pressure coming in from the south—west that will
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bring heavy and thundery downpours across south—west england and south wales later today. and the wind will strengthen. in between all of this, dry weather and sunshine, hanging on to low cloud across parts of scotla nd to low cloud across parts of scotland as we go through the day, holding the temperature at around 19 in glasgow with the top temperature likely in the south, 24—26. through this evening and overnight, low pressure gets going, bringing heavy and thundery downpours with wind strengthening. gusty howling winds from the isles of scilly to dorset, gusting at around 40 mph. if you are camping over the school holidays, bear that in camping over the school holidays, bearthat in mind. camping over the school holidays, bear that in mind. showers across northern scotland with temperatures falling to between 11 and 14 so not as sticky as last week. low—pressure still in charge of the weather tomorrow, slowly moving north and east with the squeezing on the isobar is telling you it will be windy across the south. you can see
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all the showers associated with it, some of them not making it to eastern england, but some will. where we have the sunshine, we will have the highest temperatures. showers in northern ireland and scotland. wherever you are, gusty wind, but most of all in the south. carroll, to speak to you about something other than the weather, the nettle eating championship, chomping down on 58 feet of plants. eating stinging leaves. if you had a choice, stuffing your face with either stinging leaves or hot dogs ina either stinging leaves or hot dogs in a whole minute, which would you stuff your face with? hotdogs, easily. i don‘t fancy either, to be honest. we are talking about sausages, not animals.” honest. we are talking about sausages, not animals. i never know with you because the bid could be anything. this is how your mind
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works. everybody thinks you are lovely but you are thinking of dogs panting in the heat that you want to eat. that‘s happened on live national television, carol kirkwood wa nts to national television, carol kirkwood wants to eat dogs. i‘m shocked. go and have a long hard think about yourself and i hope you will be better in half an hour. charlie, help! things have taken a peculiar turn! a 16—year—old american gamer has won £2.4 million after being crowned the world champion of the computer game fortnite. and we thought we had a misspent youth! kyle giersdorf won the solo event in new york last night. he‘sjoined by a number of british teenagers who also won huge sums of money after their success in the competition. joe tidy reports. juggling a schoolwork and missing
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out on parties with friends and practising for eight hours a day for months. your world champion! 16—year—old kyle was fortnight‘s first ever world champion. he takes home this giant trophy and $3 million, £2.4 million. ifeel pretty amazing, honestly, but at the same time, not too much emotion because it hasn‘t really kicked in yet. time, not too much emotion because it hasn't really kicked in yet. they are down! bow down. he is the first fortnite world champion but not the only millionaire this competition has made. it‘s been a big moment for the players but also a major moment for easy sports. in fact, the crowds at the stadium in new york witnessed eight players become millionaires, and one of them is 15—year—old jayden from essex. he won $1.1
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million, £108,000. kyle jackson jayden from essex. he won $1.1 million, £108,000. kylejackson also won big, earning $375,000. $30 million was dished out in total in the largest prize pool in e sports history. but such is the growth of the industry that that record is already set to be broken next month during another massive event. joe tidy, bbc news in new york. it was a really interesting talking to that kid earlier from it was a really interesting talking to that kid earlierfrom britain it was a really interesting talking to that kid earlier from britain who came second. he got £900,000. he shared the second—place prize. his mum said that for years she was saying, get off the computer. eight hours per day, i suppose he‘s working hard at something. we can talk about cannabis now. it would be legal in the uk within the next five and ten years according to a cross— party and ten years according to a
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cross—party group of mps who recently returned from a fact—finding trip from canada, which legalise the drug last year. the government here says it has no intention of changing the law. jim connko intention of changing the law. jim connolly followed the politician‘s trip. even a few years ago, this would have seemed unimaginable. three mps from across the political spectrum here in canada looking at how the legalisation has been implemented. we are following the liberal democrats‘ sir norman lamb, the conservativejonathan djanogly, and labour‘s david lammy. you could go to prison for a very long time in britain if you had anything like this! the trip has been organised by the campaign group volte face. it‘s sponsored by a north american cannabis company which runs this facility. we've been happy to be a host to them to give them some exposure to the business and give them an understanding of what's happening here in north america. if that helps make the right decisions in the united kingdom, it's money well spent for us. canada‘s prime ministerjustin trudeau came to power promising to legalise cannabis. it‘s been available here for medical uses since 2001,
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but as of last october, recreational users can use it too without fear of breaking the law. for one of the mp5, the trip has led to a significant change of you. i want the market legalised and regulated, taken away from criminal gangs and young people not criminalised because of use. sir norman was central to the lib dems‘ policy of backing legalisation. which do you tend to use? i have done this one... he decides to buy some. thank you very much, thank you. he wants to know what it feels like and takes some before bed. so, now i‘m supposed to put it under my tongue. he claims it helped him sleep. the home office told us there will be no change to the law on recreational cannabis, but all three mps think there will be, and that the drug will be legal within 5—10 years. jim connolly, bbc news. let‘s talk now to the labour mp david lammy. as we saw there, he‘s one of a cross—party group of mps
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which has been looking at this issue. thank you for your time this morning. we got a sense of what impact the trip had on you. what‘s you‘re thinking now? impact the trip had on you. what‘s you're thinking now? obviously canada is a big and powerful country, like our own. this is a huge experiment for them. but i think when you see it up close, you realise that we will probably be stepping on the same direction, and that‘s because we have already made the change, which many of your viewers would have heard and seen at the end of last year to make the medicinal use of cannabis in our country possible. once you‘ve made that step and you have said cannabis is okfor that step and you have said cannabis is ok for people with certain medical complaints, as night follows day, you then get to the discussion about recreational use. in our country at the moment, young people can country at the moment, young people ca n a ccess country at the moment, young people can access cannabis easier than they
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can access cannabis easier than they ca n a ccess can access cannabis easier than they can access tobacco, and very worryingly, they can access very strong, highly potent cannabis, and some of that leads to serious psychosis. what we saw in canada was justin trudeau‘s government‘s attempt to regulate, to control, and to tax cannabis and keep it away from people under 16. my sense is thatis from people under 16. my sense is that is absolutely the direction of travel we should be going. at the same time, the nhs, the current guidelines from the nhs say regular recreational cannabis use increases the risk of developing psychotic illnesses such as schizophrenia. that‘s the current nhs thinking. they are right about that because they are talking about the regular use of high potent skunk which is freely available to young people as we sit here today. the question is, what will we do about it. are we
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going to regulate it in the same way we regulate alcohol? we are not in a country where people are drinking high potent alcohol and moonshine in the way they might have been in the old days. we are not in a place where people don‘t see what they are getting when they smoke a cigarette, and for the same reasons we should be in the same place with cannabis. of course, once you have regulated and controlled it, you can also better understand the science and to make rules around driving and other things. that‘s what we have seen in canada. i think we are also able to form strong views about the illicit drug market, big drug barons. when we talk in our own country about growing knife crime, county lines, young people running drugs across the country, let‘s take the drugs away from the drug barons and actually regulate control of it. big business will love what you are saying. the people who are in the
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business of legitimate cannabis supply, business of legitimate cannabis supply, and the people indeed who you met in canada, they will love what you are saying because there is a big new market potentially opening up a big new market potentially opening up in the uk if it were to come to pass. it means an awful lot more cannabis would be sold. well, there isa cannabis would be sold. well, there is a hell of a lot of cannabis being sold in britain at the moment! do you agree with it being legally available over—the—counter, more people will use cannabis? is that reasonable to assume? no, i think it depends on how the government to regulate. there is a big difference between calling for regulation and how the government choose to do it. in the united states, there is big business, big flashing lights and a lot of commercialisation. that‘s not the direction of travel canada has gone in, there‘s a lot more state control. we in the uk might implement even more state control.
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how you do it is a separate question. of course, big business is present, but i for one would want to see much smaller suppliers and less advertising. all of the safeguards you would expect to be put in place in the uk. david lammy, thank you for your time this morning. thank you. a significant day in tv weather forecasting today. matt is able to tell us from up high. that's correct, 60 years ago today the bbc started regular weather forecast. we are at the top of blackpool tower this morning, celebrating its own 125 year anniversary. we are exposed to the elements here, but it‘s the middle of the summer holidays, so if you have plans today you will want the forecast. take a look at the latest weather and travel where you are this morning.
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hello. some heavy and at times are slow moving thundery downpours over the next few days. we have started to see the shower is pushing into the isles of scilly, south—westerly, southern wales. good spells of sunshine across england and wales, brightening up across northern england, northern ireland as we move through the day, rain becoming confined to central and southern scotland, temperatures around 26 degrees. through this evening and overnight this area of low pressure bringing showers in, pushing its way they‘re in. bringing quite blustery winds, gusts of around 40 miles an hourfor winds, gusts of around 40 miles an hour for the south west, 50 miles an hour for the south west, 50 miles an hourfor hour for the south west, 50 miles an hour for the south west, 50 miles an hour for the isles of scilly. moving into tomorrow, continuing to work its way in, further widespread
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showers, the best chance of dry weather for eastern coastal areas, plus still blustery areas for the southern half of the uk. 50 miles an hour on exposed coasts. highs of 24 degrees. this is business live from bbc news with ben thompson and maryam moshiri. talking tough on trade. talks resume in shanghai to solve the us—china trade war. live from london, that‘s our top story on monday the 29th july. america‘s top trade negotiators head to china — as hopes fade of a quick deal to resolve the trade war. profits tumble at europe‘s largest airline —

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