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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  August 1, 2019 6:00am-8:30am BST

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good morning. welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and mega munchetty. our headlines today: flood warnings are still in place across yorkshire and the north west of england after heavy rain caused damage to buildings, roads and rail lines. an extra £2 billion is earmarked for a possible no—deal brexit, something labour calls an appalling waste of taxpayers‘ money. fewer people in england are using single—use plastic bags. some of the biggest retailers say sales are down 90% in four years. we import more than half of all the food we eat in the uk, so why is the country not more self—sufficient? this morning i'm just outside hull for the annual pea harvest to find out why.
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the waiting is finally over for the start of the ashes. i'm at edgbaston, where i've been speaking to england captainjoe root ahead of the first test against australia. it starts today, as england look to claim the ashes back. having lifted it for under cooky, and to see what it's been like on the other end of it as captain, it makes me want to be up there on the podium at the oval hopefully with a massive smile on my face. we could get a shower at the oval, especially in a line from north—east scotla nd especially in a line from north—east scotland to east anglia, where it could be heavy, thundery and slow—moving. more in 15 minutes. it's thursday the 1st of august. our top story: flood warnings are still in place across the north west of england and yorkshire after a day of heavy rain left people stranded and caused damage to buildings, roads and rail lines. overnight, the water levels did begin to recede in some of the worst hit areas, but people are preparing for another downpour of rain later this afternoon.
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jon donnison reports. rivers where there were once roads. this is in stock bought. nearby cheadle hume was also badly affect heard by the heavy rains. and in point win, where the fire service declared a major incident, people we re declared a major incident, people were grabbing whatever they could to push back the water. it wasjust like a torrent coming down. got home and tried to get everything out as best as we could. it's onlyjust gone through the garage, so we are all right. in north yorkshire, this is leyburn, people are also facing a major cleanup. clothes, bedding, bookcases, drawers, tvs, washing machine, fridge freezer will be going. luke nelson runs a local pub. his beer cellar, though, now full of water. just came in way too fast for it to pump outand
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just came in way too fast for it to pump out and just filled up gradually, so i got about five foot of water damage. in the yorkshire dales, a torrent of water passed over the side of a music festival hosted on a local farm. parts of than north of england have now seen four days of heavy rain. and the bad news, while the water levels may be receding, forecasters say more downpours are expect it today. jon donnison, bbc news. more than £2 billion of additional funding is being set aside to prepare for a no—deal brexit by the chancellor sajid javid. the hovernment plans include substantial sums to support businesses, improve ports and ensure that vital medicines will still be available, as jessica parker reports. —— government. brexit preparations cost money, and today the man now in charge of the public‘s finances signalled that he's willing to turn on the taps. the chancellor, sajid javid, is announcing £2.1 billion to go specifically on no—deal planning on top of £4.2 billion of brexit preparation money already allocated
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when theresa may was in charge. not all of the new cash is to be made available right away, but funds are set to go on measures including extra border force officials, a public information campaign and, once again, buying up a freight capacity in case the country needs to ship in vital medical supplies. this extra cash is also designed to reinforce borisjohnson‘s claim that the government is gearing up to ensure that brexit happens by october the 31st, deal or no deal. we're going to fulfil the repeated promises of parliament to the people. but the labour party, which is adamantly against leaving the eu without an agreement, says that the day's announcement amounts to an appalling waste of taxpayer money that could be better spent on schools and hospitals. jessica parker, bbc news. voters in brecon and radnorshire go to the polls today to elect a new member of parliament. the seat in mid wales became vacant
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as a result of the sitting mp being recalled by a petition. a total of six candidates are standing in the by—election and polls will remain open until 10pm tonight. the result is expected in the early hours of tomorrow morning. reports in the us say that hamza bin laden, the son of the former al-qaeda leader osama bin laden, is dead. the pentagon has not released any information but he's believed to have been killed in a military strike. our washington correspondent chris buckler sent this report. these pick dues were apparently taken at these pick dues were apparently ta ken at any‘s these pick dues were apparently taken at any‘s wedding ceremony. america named him one of the world's most wanted. in recent years new images haven't emerged of the son of osama bin laden and his whereabouts we re osama bin laden and his whereabouts were regarded as a mystery. earlier this year, us officials offered a $1 million reward for information that led to his capture. the size of the bounty reflected their fears that he
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was emerging as a key and dangerous figure within the leadership of al-qaeda. hamza has released audio and video m essa 9 es hamza has released audio and video messages on the internet calling on his followers to launch attacks against the united states and its western allies. his father was responsible for the terrorist attacks on september the 11th, 2001. an unparalleled day of death and destruction in the united states. ten years later, us special forces eventually tracked down and killed osama bin laden at a compound in afghanistan. there they found letters, apparently written by the al-qaeda founder, in which he said he was grooming his son to succeed him. america believes any is no longer a threat but the legacy of his father's extremist ideology will continue to cause concern. chris buckler, bbc news, washington. a mobile phone app has speeded up
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the detection of a potentially fatal kidney condition in hospital patients. staff describe the technology as a potential life—saver, providing diagnoses in minutes instead of hours. acute kidney injury is caused by serious health conditions, including sepsis, and affects one in five people admitted to hospital. it costs the nhs £1.2 billion annually. whether it's the pager or the fax machine, there is no shortage of old technology across the nhs, but are we on the verge of a big leap forward 7 we on the verge of a big leap forward? one hospital that's trialled an app for staff says it's a potential lifesaver. this is the kidney function that we were talking about. edgar‘s being treated for different health conditions, and mary, a lead nurse specialist at london's royal free hospital is able to show him the result of blood tests on her mobile. she's on the lookout for acute kidney injury, most often found in older patients. warning signs from blood tests can take hours to come back up at mary will getan hours to come back up at mary will get an alert on her phone within 15 minutes also if there's any cause for concern.
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healthcare is mobile and real time, and this is the first device that's labelled me to see results in a real—time way. co nsulta nts real—time way. consultants involved in the project, which has been independently assessed, says it saves money on treatment as well as helping patients. potentially it is life—saving. we need to gather a lot more information about this technology and we need to look at it over a longer timeframe, but it's certainly the case that some patients are very unwell, information comes to the correct team very quickly and then we can put measures in place to try to make that patient safe and to reverse the impact on their kidney function. the royal free's collaboration with deepmind was criticised by the information commission over the use of patient data. the commission said the hospital had now completed all the hospital had now completed all the required actions. the hope is that in the fast paced world of a modern hospital, giving nurses and doctors patient information at their fingertips can make a big difference in the way patients are diagnosed and treated.
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hugh pym, bbc news. the care system in england is struggling to cope with rising demand from teenagers, according to the children's commissioner. research by the commissioner's office shows the number of children in care aged 13 or over rose by 21% over the last five years, and that teenagers in care were more likely to be vulnerable to sexual exploitation, gangs, trafficking and drug misuse. a record number of antisemitic incidents has been recorded in the uk for the first six months of this year by a charity set up to protect britishjews. the community security trust said there were 892 incidents, a 10% rise on the same period last year. it said a 46% rise in the number of online incidents was the most obvious single factor explaining the overall increase. the big question is why is there more anti—semitism? i think it comes down to the way hate crime works in general. when a target group is in the news again and again, the people that help them feel emboldened and
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their insight into drew moor actions against them, and the victims are probably more inclined to report. so i think we're seeing a combination here of more anti—semitism and probably more willingness on behalf victims to tell police about what's going on. the sale of single—use plastic bags in england has fallen dramatically since a 5p charge was introduced four years ago, new government figures suggest. customers at the biggest seven retailers, including tesco, sainsbury‘s and asda, used 90% fewer than in 2015, as john mcmanus reports. there the scourge of our streets and often of our oceans. trillions of plastic bags used globally every year. now you nude data for england shows single plastic bag use has dropped significantly since 2015. the information relates to seven major retailers. asda, marks & spencer, morrisons, sainsbury‘s, the co—op, tesco and waitrose.
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they've recorded a staggering reduction of 90% since the 5p charge was introduced. and in the last year alone, there's been a 47% decrease in single bag use. that means the average person now buysjust in single bag use. that means the average person now buys just ten single—use plastic bags a year compared to 140 five years ago. plastic bag use has also dropped in scotla nd plastic bag use has also dropped in scotland and the holyrood government is now pushing ahead with the deposit return scheme for some plastic and glass bottles and cans. some critics say ditching single—use plastic bags means shifting to heavy duty bags for life, which can often contain more plastic. but at a time when consumers are being urged to go green, this is one issue campaigners will probably feel has been all wrapped up. john mcmanus, bbc news. those are the main stories for you. one other story for you. the first three contestants for this year's series of strictly come dancing have been revealed. the england football star david james, the comedian chris ramsey
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and the actor emma barton will all be taking to the dancefloor. the trio appeared on the one show to announce they had signed up for the show. a silent drum roll! they work well, don't they? there's some legs! that is emma! she's got the moves already! the reveal as it was done on the one show last night went better than our version of it there! we are going to have a reveal tomorrow on the programme. are we going to have a silent drum roll? director, a silent drum roll? let's plan for the drum roll to be silent. give it 24 hours, we might be able to get sound on the drum roll. we'll see, we can't promise anything! mike is at edgbaston this morning, where the ashes gets underway later today.
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there's going to be so much excitement because england is obviously doing very well, but observing how the australian team, three particular members, how they are going to be treated. good morning. yes, very interesting. the likes of smith and warner. and bancroft. back for their first test appearance since they served that ban for the ball—tampering scandal in 2018. but as for england, wow, talk about trying to build on an unprecedented success at the world cup. i was here exactly three weeks ago this morning ahead of the one—day semi—final, the world cup semi—final, when england thrashed australia to get to the final. we know what happened in the final, beating new zealand in the super over, one of the most dramatic sporting moments ever to change the face of english cricket. english and wales cricket board cricket. they have a chance to build on that and potentially make it the biggest ever summer of cricket for england.
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winning the ashes on top of the world cup, what a chance that would be! i've been talking tojoe root, the england captain, we will hear from him properly at 630 a.m. , and if ago in early days of his captaincy, they got thrashed down under and he wants to make amends. edgbaston is a fortress for england, they haven't lost a test match here since 2011 and they haven't lost an ashes series on home soil since 2001 but different story down under! this is very different stop you will hear cricketers say this is different to the one—day game —— this is very different. you will hear cricketers say this is a different thing to the one—day game. you bat twice, you use a red instead all they white all. it is called a test match because it is aof is called a test match because it is a of strength and stamina. not since the days of morecambe and wise has there been so much excitement about a little and. this isjust a there been so much excitement about
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a little and. this is just a fridge magnet, £5 from a cheap shot! only you could get morecambe and wise into talking about the cricket —— cheap shop. i hope you get it because some of the younger members of the production team looked at me blankly and tumbleweed went across the table last night! a daily occurrence! we've all been there, haven't we? looking at those cloudy skies at edgbaston. carol, what is the picture over the rest of the uk? any tumbleweed for you ? picture over the rest of the uk? any tumbleweed for you? none yet, but a of time good morning, everybody. we saw the pictures of the flooding around manchester and cheshire yesterday, as well. today we have a few showers in the forecast and for the next few days that process will continue. they will be fewer showers and the wind continuing to drop. what has been happening as the low pressure that brought the rain in the showers everywhere is now moving
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into the north sea. you can see we still have a weather front very close by, so we are not immune to some showers in the east. many of us starting on a dry and bright note, even some sunshine, but as temperatures rise through the day we will see further showers develop. anywhere from north—west scotland down towards east anglia. you could see them on either side of that line, as well, but the heaviest ones are likely to be in those areas. and once again it could also be thundery. as you can see from the wind arrows, these are sustained wind arrows, these are sustained wind speeds, there is not much wind to be moving them along. if you catch one, you will know all about it. northern ireland seeing something brighter, but northern england down towards the midlands and east anglia, we have what we call a convergence line and we are likely to see some heavy and thundery downpours. parts of wales in southern england could see the odd shower, but for many of us it will stay dry and there will be some sunshine around stop temperatures today ranging from 16 on the north
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today ranging from 16 on the north to about 25 as we sweep down towards london. through the evening and overnight, we will still have the showers to start with, but by the end of the night any of them will have faded away. the other thing is they will be some patchy mist and fog forming, and we will also see some clear skies as well, the wind falling lighter. temperature is very similarto falling lighter. temperature is very similar to the last few nights, falling to between 13 and 15 degrees. so tomorrow we start off once again on a largely dry note. there will be some sunshine around. we've got a ridge of high pressure building in, so that will settle things down or stop however, as temperatures rise through the day, the sun gets to work, we will see further showers sparked off. there could be anywhere but by no means will be all see them, and there will be fewer showers tomorrow than today. temperatures of 17 to about 24 as we push from north to south. then, as we head into the weekend, well, saturday will be mostly dry. but you can see we have an array of
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france coming in from the atlantic, so this one coming on saturday will introduce a cloud and rain. but is it pushes eastwards it will tend to wea ken it pushes eastwards it will tend to weaken and turn my showery. on saturday itself, for many it is going to be dry. we will start out with some sunshine, but through the day the cloud will start to build ahead of that weather front coming in from the west. it rained wishing eastwards, turning more showery. but as you can see, monday, tuesday and wednesday still looking fairly u nsettled, wednesday still looking fairly unsettled, with some rain or indeed some showers in the forecast stop i think so many people are now, with these floods going on, really desperate for the rain to stop, with the devastation. and our correspondent will be bringing us up some real devastation with many farmers. their land and stock has been severely affected. more on that throughout the programme. let's take a look at today's papers. a picture of the destruction cased by flooding is on the front page of the times.
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this bridge in grinton, in north yorkshire, has been washed away after a month's rain fell in 24 hours. the daily mail leads on the plastic bag story. it highlights figures that show in the last year the number of bags sold by the top seven retailers has halved. the metro leads on reports that one of the sons of osama bin laden, the former leader of al-qaeda, is dead. the claim of his death came from us government sources, but no confirmation that american forces were involved. and the i also leads on the plastic bag story. sales of single—use plastic bags at england's seven biggest retailers have plunged. looking at the inside stories, have you got a picture? this can bring
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somejoy to people you got a picture? this can bring some joy to people this morning. this is a picture which has won an award, capturing the moment that a pairof award, capturing the moment that a pair of european mantis is danced on a stalk. it has won a prize at photography awards, an amateur and professional photography award. look at them, beautiful. and an amateur photographer has ta ken at them, beautiful. and an amateur photographer has taken that picture. and a little bit of news, there is concern in northamptonshire about an african bird which has temporarily migrated there. the exotic sacred ibis frequently visits the garden of a resident. the thing to worry about with this ibis is they eat... where didi with this ibis is they eat... where did i see this? they eat insects, worms, frogs, fish and small mammals. haven't got a picture of the bird, unfortunately. and from
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the bird, unfortunately. and from the obituaries, hal prince, who was a genius, he died recently, and he was 91, i think. and a genius, he died recently, and he was 91, ithink. and he a genius, he died recently, and he was 91, i think. and he was the man who basically brought us musicals in the west end and all over the world like phantom of the opera, evita and west side story, he brought that to the stage. he had an extraordinary impact in the world of musicals, and many people paying tribute to him, of course that is michael crawford in phantom of the opera. so many people still see those musicals that he was the mastermind behind. people still see those musicals that he was the mastermind behindm people still see those musicals that he was the mastermind behind. it was called the concept musical, where style a nd called the concept musical, where style and spectacle took over substance. ringing real drama onto the stage, and there we go. a year since an ebola outbreak was declared in eastern democratic republic of congo, more than 1,700 people
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have now died. the country has successfully dealt with nine previous outbreaks, but the current one has been difficult to bring under control. it is happening in an active conflict zone with a very mobile population, where some still deny the existence of the deadly disease. our senior africa correspondent anne soy has returned to the epicentre of the outbreak, in beni city. it takes a lot to beat ebola. those who seek treatment early have a better chance of survival. but at the heart of the outbreak, violence is driving infection. this treatment centre was much smaller when i was last here, six months ago. the expansion just speaks to how much the outbreak has grown. at some point there was no cases in beni. a lot of the services were moved to the new hotspots. it came back it down. more cases are being reported here daily than any other place. there are lessons to be learned,
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that until there is no more ebola in the region, the health workers cannot afford to relax. as people travel, the epicentre of the outbreak has kept shifting. some suspected cases have even fled their homes and spread the disease. the world health organization says they are now adapting their strategies. we've been asking the community themselves to elect the person who will detect the contacts, who will identify the contacts, follow them up, and alert us that there is a sick person in the households. but, a short distance from town, evidence that change is slow to come. a funeral is taking place, we are told, but the community has barricaded the road. within minutes, we are asked to leave, or risk being attacked. tension is high. even the staff and patients
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at this clinic have fled. this infection control team is allowed to contaminate after a patient tested positive for ebola. many still deny the existence of the disease, and resist care. translation: there have been attacks against health workers. we know of fellow doctors who were killed. that has a negative impact on the fight against this epidemic. dozens of armed groups operate in this region, making fighting ebola even more difficult. but there is some hope. these people never thought they would recover from the disease. now, as they return to their villages, they take a strong message back — that
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ebola can be stopped, and soon. and now, the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london. a londoner who has made it his mission to tackle knife crime is sharing his story in schools in the hope it makes a difference. the student was stabbed seven times outside a nightclub in 2011. he has produced a short film about his experience, which aims to show the harsh realities of youth violence and encourage teenagers to make better choices. i wasn't involved in a gang or anything like that, and i always believe it can happen to anybody, so it's best to stay away from situations if you can start to see them brewing. for me, i reallyjust wa nt to them brewing. for me, i reallyjust want to focus on the idea that young people are brilliant. the environment agency has been testing temporary defences in surrey to help detect against the risk of
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flooding from the thames. a metre high barrier is being trailed that can be erected quickly in the event of rising waters. the area was severely affected by flooding six yea rs severely affected by flooding six years ago, with many residents suffering damage to their homes. dozens of pubs and east end are be granted protection from property developers. tower hamlets has identified 37 it wants to list as assets of local importance. it is believed to be the first council in the country to offer this status to so many venues at once. it means developers will have to ensure they preserve the pub and its characteristics. reading fc‘s owner will pay for away fa ns to reading fc‘s owner will pay for away fans to travel by coach to the club's 15 most distant matches this season. the trips, which total more than 5000 miles, are available to anyfan than 5000 miles, are available to any fan with a match ticket and who isa any fan with a match ticket and who is a member of the supporters trust. the first match to benefit from free travel is the royals' trip to hull
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in august. let's ta ke let's take a look at the travel situation, and there is a good service on the tube so far this morning. on the trains, there is no service between hit the green and crayford on south—eastern trains due toa crayford on south—eastern trains due to a signal problem. on the roads, on the 813 westbound, traffic is building from dagenham into barking. let's see what the weather has in let's see what the weather has in store now. good morning. it's looking like a largely dry and fine day to day. i say largely dry, we are at risk of a shower, but to be honest, it looks like most places should avoid them. sunny spells, a little bit of patchy cloud around, especially first thing this morning, but that will thin and break fairly quickly. there is less ofa break fairly quickly. there is less of a breeze today as well, and temperatures likely to reach around 25 celsius by the end of the afternoon, so really feeling quite pleasant. now, into the evening, again there is a small chance of a shower. could be quite sharp, but i can say very isolated. barely anywhere will see one. temperatures overnight not especially cold
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either. we got some clear spells, the minimum between 13 and 16 celsius in central london. a similar day for friday, really. a bit of patchy cloud, some bright, some sunny spells, but it is looking dry as we head into the weekend. we got as we head into the weekend. we got a ridge of high pressure building m, a ridge of high pressure building in, so some sunny spells, patchy cloud for saturday. then for sunday, a bit more sunshine and temperatures just a little bit warmer. iam back i am back from the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half—an—hour. goodbye. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning: england cricket captainjoe root‘s been telling us how he hopes to bring home the ashes, just weeks after his team's incredible world cup win. more rain is on the way later today, which could mean more floods misery in the north of england. we will bejoined we will be joined by some of the female cyclist who've taken on one
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of the most gruelling courses in the world all in the name of equality. and comedian tez ilyas will be here to tell us all about his brand new satirical news show. good time to have a satirical news show! good morning, here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news: flood warnings are still in place across the north west of england and yorkshire after heavy rain left people stranded and caused damage to buildings, roads and rail lines. last night, cheshire's fire service declared a major incident in poynton due to severe flooding. overnight, flood water began to recede in some of the worst affected areas, but more rain is expected later today. let's go to report her fiona lamdin in north yorkshire for us. that's where almost a month of rain fell in four hours. that was on tuesday. fiona, they are still struggling with some of the problems that was caused then. tell us more. yes.
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yesterday i was talking to people in reeth. they think about a couple of hundred people flooded here and eve ryo ne hundred people flooded here and everyone seems affected. bridges have been washed away. a road has gone so it's very hard to get in and out of reeth. i was talking to the vicar yesterday, she's had three inches of mud and rain downstairs in her house. one of the most hardest hit in the community is this hill farm just outside reeth. if you can see that line of trees, that is normally where the river would flow. but on tuesday afternoon, they had so much rain it literally diverted right through the centre of the farmyard. you can see these boulders and the trees. if i can show you that over there, that was completely submerged. i'm going to try to show you the hay bales. you can see the level of water, how fast it rose, in
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just a few hours. this family has been farming here for four generations, and they say they've never seen anything like it. you can see all these walls, this was a com plete see all these walls, this was a complete wall here. they think they've lost miles and miles of walls. on tuesday afternoon, 80 of their sheep were washed away. that's yea rs of their sheep were washed away. that's years of work gone in just a few hours. fiona, gives us a real sense of the problems there facing. we'll be talking to you throughout the programme this morning. thanks very much. will have the weather forecast for the rest of the uk with carol and more details on that later on —— we'll have. more than £2 billion of additional funding is being set aside to prepare for a no—deal brexit. chancellor sajid javid's plans include substantial sums to support businesses, improve ports, and ensure that vital medicines will still be available. labour says it's an appalling waste of taxpayers' money. voters in brecon and radnorshire go to the polls today to elect a new
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member of parliament. a total of six candidates are standing in the by—election in mid—wales and polls will remain open until 10pm tonight. the result is expected in the early hours of tomorrow morning. reports in the us say that hamza bin laden, the son of the former al-qaeda leader osama bin laden, is dead. the pentagon has not released any information but he's believed to have been killed in a military strike. he's thought to have been 30 years old and was stripped of his citizenship by saudi arabia in march. the us had offered a million dollars for information on his whereabouts. at least 10 people were injured when fireworks were shot from a moving car into a crowd of pro—democracy activists in hong kong. crowds had gathered to support a small number of protestors detained at a police station. it is not clear who was behind the incident, which was shared on social media platforms. tensions are high in hong kong after weeks of anti—government protests.
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the care system in england is struggling to cope with rising demand from teenagers. research by the commissioner's office shows the number of children in care aged 13 or over rose by 21% over the last five years, and that teenagers in care were more likely to be vulnerable to sexual exploitation, gangs, trafficking and drug misuse. children aren't getting the help they need early on, which means they are getting into very risky situations and getting involved in all sorts of grooming and exploitation and gangs and the like. but also, the care system hasn't yet caught up or adapted to the point where they can then provide the specialist support needed for this new group of very complex teenagers in the numbers we are now seeing them. the sale of single—use plastic bags in england has fallen dramatically since a charge was introduced four years ago. customers at the biggest seven retailers, including tesco, sainsbury‘s and asda, used 90% fewer than in 2015.
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in the last year alone, sales have almost halved. if there are any potterheads watching... ever been called a potterhead?” didn't know it was a phrase. have you just made it up? it was on the autocue. someone who likes doing pottery? you might want to check your harry potter books because a rare original copy of the first novel has sold for £28,500 at auction. the first edition of harry potter and the philosopher's stone was bought by a private collector from the uk. the 1997 book, published with two errors, was originally sold by staffordshire libraries forjust £1 about 20 years ago. can you remember the last time a book sold for a pound? the hardback lay in a cupboard at the owner's home until it was discovered and put up for auction. not bad, is it? £1,£28,500.
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not bad, is it? £1, £28,500. the little errors make it worth serious money! let's turn our attention to the ashes. england, australia, cricket, doesn't get any better than this, doesn't get any better than this, does it, mike? at edgbaston, looks like you've got a pretty good day for it? yes, good morning. perfect timing because the sun has just poked its head up above the stand out of the clouds. i heard carol say earlier the slight chance of a shower but mostly it will be dry, so that's good. the ashes, one of the greatest sporting rivalries in the world ever, even more eagerly anticipated this time around because england have just won the 50 over world cup and this is the longer form of the game, the original form, and this is the longer form of the game, the originalform, the test and this is the longer form of the game, the original form, the test of strength and stamina. at the moment, australia hold the ashes after what happened when they thrashed england down under two years ago. england captain,joe down under two years ago. england captain, joe root, who was in the
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early days of his captaincy then is desperate to win them back and i sat down with him yesterday to get his thoughts ahead of this huge occasion at edgbaston starting today. just to play for england, to represent your country, is a huge honour. huge privilege, something i'll never take for granted. to getan i'll never take for granted. to get an opportunity to captain again isjust to get an opportunity to captain again is just another level of pride. it's not going to be straightforward in any sense, but very much just wa nt to in any sense, but very much just want to get things going and get things started. what a summer of cricket it's been so far with that incredible world cup when, and as a fan watching it was incredible edge of the seat stuff. what was it like for the players? it was as exciting for the players as for everyone watching. a great advert for the sport stop great starting the ashes with interest in cricket at an all—time high in this country. especially in recent times anyway. all the players very aware
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of the impact the world cup's made and this is a chance to take it further. how much does it motivate you that early on in your captaincy you took england to australia, albeit lost the ashes there, how much can that be used as a positive lesson to motivate you and what have you learnt since then? we've come a long way since then, we were hampered with missing a few players and a few injuries but we try to make the most of that and put out a good account of that and put out a good account of ourselves. it obviously wasn't good enough on that occasion but we are ina good enough on that occasion but we are in a different place now and in are in a different place now and in a strong spot to go and compete and try to take advantage of home conditions. edgbaston is a great place to start if you look at records? the atmosphere here is electric, the crowd offer so much more and almost act as an extra man. how about jimmy anderson, 37 this week, he gets better with age, like a good wine! there's no better way to describe him, year—on—year he seems to keep performing and setting the example to the rest of the bowling group. definitely someone you shouldn't
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write off and cag is just a number for him. he's a phenomenon, one of a kind, our greatest of all—time terms of seam bowling and swing bowling and it's great to have him involved in the squad. sum up what it would be meaning to live the... not this, this is a fridge magnet, you can have this, but the actual urn come september. it would be very special. the pinnacle of the test game in england and australia. having been on both sides of it, lifting it before under cooky, and missing out last time as the captain makes me very hungry to be at the oval as captain hopefully with a massive smile on my face. england fans will be hoping so. looking very relaxed, joe root. last night he spent time with his family, looks very cool and calm, he doesn't have many superstitions and he is already to go. i'm joined now by former english
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wicketkeeper and three—time ashes winner matt prior, and the ceo of egbaston neil snowball. matt prior won the ashes down under in 2011. good morning. you know what it's like to win the ashes, you've also lost them, but let's focus on the positive! stay away from that! there's a sense of excitement around the country with new cricket fans, a different format but what difference can the world cup three make?‘ different format but what difference can the world cup three make? a huge difference in that there are so many new cricket fans, and people that would have been grabbed by england winning the world cup. now we'll have a look and say, what's this ashes thing we are hearing about? what a fantastic series to come off the back of a world cup. doesn't get any biggerfor the back of a world cup. doesn't get any bigger for an england the back of a world cup. doesn't get any biggerfor an england fan, england cricketer or australian and fan as well. the ashes is different. there is test cricket and then there's ashes cricket. the morning looks like it's going to be all right weatherwise, we're here at fantastic edgbaston and it's all set
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another fantastic series. six of the players that won the world cup against new zealand start today for england. why is it still a different challenge for a player to play test cricket? the formats are very different, so you need slightly different techniques. the red swings a lot more and there's a lot more movement in the airand the there's a lot more movement in the air and the tactics are slightly different. it's a different mindset. from a batting perspective, to put it really simply, in the world cup, or one—day cricket, you need to have a very attacking mentality but in test cricket it's more about defence, what it used to be, the game is changing so quickly now, however. but england having won the world cup can be a huge positive and they will take a lot of confidence and positivity from that but it can bea and positivity from that but it can be a hangover. we did it the other way round where we played in an ashes series and had the world cup at the end of it. we won the ashes and then we woke up and hadn't thought about playing in the world
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cup. i'm sure this england team will not make that same mistake and they will be fully prepared. fascinating to get the insight. neil, edgbaston isa to get the insight. neil, edgbaston is a fortress. england haven't lost a test match in 11 years, what makes it like that? a combination of factors. england always perform well here, and in terms of the crowd, there is a fantastic crowd here, especially in the holly stand. the design of the stadium, the perfect goal, the sound resonates and brummies love their cricket! combination of factors, and 11 out of 11 in all formats is fantastic. tim paine said he could name 15 other more intimidating grounds, the aussie captain, yesterday!” other more intimidating grounds, the aussie captain, yesterday! i don't think he's played here before in an ashes test or a test before. he'll get a warm welcome with the other australian team members. the fans really get behind england, they love supporting their team and let's hope
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we can make it 12 out of 12. chris woakes, the home player, making his test debut on this ground having done so well in the semi—final against australia in the world cup. you havejust ridden the tour de france route, tell us about that? back a few days ago after riding the full tour de france, the event called 21, 21 stages and we rode one day before the pros went through and covered the full route. in fact we did more because they pulled out because of the hail and the rain but it didn't put us off! we got it done raise money for charity. well done, put your feet up today and enjoy the cricket. england restored some pride yesterday in the women's game. a 17—run win in the final t20 match at bristol. australia won the toss and put england into bat. they struggled at first, but a late flourish from kathryn brunt helped them reach 139—5
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from their 20 overs. and it was sophie ecclestone who got the key wicket of australia captain meg lanning as the visitors fell 17 runs short. now, the ashes isn't the only major sporting event starting today, because the opening round of the women's open golf has just got underway at woburn. it's the home course of england's charley hull while england's georgia hall is the defending champion after winning last year at royal lytham & st annes. i'm actually very excited. i don't feel any pressure. is really nice for me to be home, because i've been in the us for a whole year so for me i've done the hard travelling and now i can enjoy being at home with the home crowd. to be able to save i've one a major is very special. i think i'm going to get a lot of support, so i look forward to people out there watching and cheering me on. andy and jamie murray made it through to the second round of the men's doubles in washington last night. they beat the french pair of nicolas mahut and edouard roger—vasselin in three sets. it's the first time that andy
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and jamie have played together since 2016. andy is still considering a return to singles in two weeks time. physically i feel so much better stop the no pain, not restricting me in any of the shots i'm hitting. i'm still a bit slower, i'm hoping that something that will come back with time. i didn't know how much more i'd be playing after here last year but to come back and be competing and be pain—free is brilliant. good to see! and finally, some of the world's best cricketers may be on display on the pitch behind me over the next few days, but one bowler in particular has been attracting a lot of attention for his action on social media recently. this is 40—year—old pavel florin playing for romania in the european cricket league. now he may not be james anderson or even shane warne,
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and even florin has admitted himself that his action is not beautiful, but it's got him a lot of attention! good on him! it's all about being inspired by the greats. have a go yourself, don't be embarrassed if yourself, don't be embarrassed if you are rubbish, just have a go and ta ke you are rubbish, just have a go and take part! rate to. quite rightly doing really well on social media —— great to see. the gates open at 9am and the ashes series begins at 11am in the sunshine hopefully! let's go back to a story that has been very much in the headlines over the past few days. hundreds of vulnerable children were physically and sexually abused over a period of decades in nottinghamshire by people who were supposed to be caring for them. the finding by the independent inquiry into child sexual abuse came after it received 350 complaints relating to care homes and foster carers in nottingham and the surrounding area. its report says the true scale of the abuse could be higher. claire blake said she still suffers nightmares following her abuse. i was petrified.
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i was absolutely... in all fairness, there was a few times i'd actually peed myself in fear. i still suffer flashbacks. i'm 42 now. my children have witnessed me sleeping, and fighting in my sleep. i've never been able to at night — cuddle with my children at night when they've been ill, because if i fall asleep and i have one of my nightmares, i can't risk them being there. so... no, it's not any easier. debbie heath is a lawyer who has represented 18 of the victims involved in the inquiry. shejoins us now. ijust wonder if i just wonder if you could ijust wonder if you could tell us a little bit about how they have reacted, some of your clients, to this report the publication, and more people knowing about what happened. they are certainly pleased
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with the findings. they are happy that they feel that they are now being believed. they want to see action. they want to see something coming off the back of this, to make sure that all the effort they put in has not been wasted. what does that actually look like? nothing can make this better, but what will improve how they view the situation? they wa nt how they view the situation? they want adequate support to be put in place. so they want support from the nhs. they also wantjust to make the process a little bit easier in terms of being able to get compensation, having access to their records so they can peace their lives together. so they have no access to their records at the moment? is very much depends on person some people have one page, some people have the full set, it very much depends. there is a suggestion already that they will be many, many more victims who have yet to come forward. is that what those people you are representing have suggested? yes, and that is
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pa rt have suggested? yes, and that is part of the reason why a lot of them came forward. they want other survivors to know that they are not alone. there is a massive group of people who are therefore that support, and especially my group of survivors, they are very much about supporting each other this process. because they know how difficult it is to come forward. without naming names, we heard from claire there, in terms of time, in terms of the process , in terms of time, in terms of the process, typically what have they gone through when it has been an issue of saying this happened to me, will someone believe me? issue of saying this happened to me, will someone believe me ?|j issue of saying this happened to me, will someone believe me? i think the children, they would talk about it for yea rs children, they would talk about it for years when they were children, trying to make it known that things are happening to them, so they have been having this fight for years and yea rs. been having this fight for years and years. who were they telling? social workers, adults in their care home, police when they were making it known that something was going wrong, but nothing was done to protect them. and as they have gone through life, they have left that system. who would later talk to
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them? many of them didn't talk to anybody. so a lot of my clients have only just started talking anybody. so a lot of my clients have onlyjust started talking about anybody. so a lot of my clients have only just started talking about what happened to them, and some of them have only just disclosed happened to them, and some of them have onlyjust disclosed to their partners and their children, some of them have not been able to tell their children yet, and that is really ha rd their children yet, and that is really hard for a lot of them. some of the detail of what has been revealed is so shocking. one girl, for example, who was abused while in foster ca re, later for example, who was abused while in foster care, later placed into a children's home, presumably hoping that one part of the nightmare had finished, and then her abuser was allowed to visit her in that place. that's commonplace. if that is a story you have heard... yes, and a lot of my clients have said i was in one home and i was told i was leaving and i couldn't wait to leave because i thought i would be getting out of this nightmare, and they went straight into a situation where they had that abuse again. what is next?
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now that this report is out, at least showing that there is more to be done, what is next for your clients? they continue with their fight, so they continue to look for things to be put in place, and the legal teams will work with the individuals to make sure those things are happening. debbie heath, thank you very much for talking to us. a statement from nottingham council said: we are going to be across the country this morning because a lot of areas have been affected by flooding. fiona will tell us around 7am flooding. fiona will tell us around 7a m exa ctly flooding. fiona will tell us around 7am exactly the extent of that. carol will tell us about the fact
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there is still more rain expected. the intensity of the rain has affected so much infrastructure. that's right, we had a lot of rain at the weekend and a lot of rain on tuesday night and wednesday, and for the next few days you will be pleased to hear there will be fewer showers around. but having said that, today those that are around will be heavy and slow moving in places. this is what happened yesterday afternoon. look at all the thunderstorms, look at the thunder and lightning as well. we had almost 5000 strikes in about 24 hours. now what is happening is the low pressure that brought all this rain yesterday and last night and today, in fact, is now across north the weather front attached to that draped across parts of eastern england and pulling away. so this morning it is a quiet and dry start for many, because temperatures rise. that is when we will really start to see those thundery downpours
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developed. we are looking at north—west scotland, all the way down towards east anglia. not much wind around today, not as much as there has been, so what we do have is really not worth talking about, and it does mean that those showers will be slow—moving. for northern ireland, for parts of wales in southern england, it will be drier and brighter. there will be some sunshine around as well, one or two showers on either side of that line that i mentioned. if you are going to edgbaston, you could catch a shower, as you could at blenheim palace. for the evening and overnight, we will start off with those thundery downpours, but then you will find they will start to fade as we go through the course of the night. by the end of the night many parts of the uk will actually be dry. there will be some patchy mist and fog forming, some clear spells, and temperatures falling to similar levels to the last few nights. 14 to about 15 degrees. as we head through tomorrow we start off on we head through tomorrow we start offona we head through tomorrow we start off on a largely dry note. a high
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pressure starts to build across us. we will see some sunshine, but rather like today, as temperatures rise we start to see those thunderstorms developing once again and some heavy showers almost anywhere. but a lot of us will actually mist them. temperatures 17 to about 24 degrees. enter saturday, idry and to about 24 degrees. enter saturday, i dry and bright start at some weather fronts waiting in the winds. they are out towards the south—west. so through the day on saturday we will see more cloud developed from the west, just one or two showers dotted around here there, with the temperature range 16 to about 25. as this weather front moves from the west to the east during the course of sunday, it will tend to weaken. we will start off dry and bright with a fair bit of sunshine. parts of the south—east could well stay dry all day, and then showers moving from the west towards the east, with highs of 14 to 26. over this summer, we are going to be out and about talking about the business of food.
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today, ben is finding out why here in the uk we don't eat more of the food we produce. you are in a field somewhere in east yorkshire, good morning. a field somewhere, yes, good morning. we are just outside hull today. and we're talking about self—sufficiency. i went to reliant on imports from overseas when it comes to our food? we import about half of everything we consume in this country, comes from overseas. i'm sorry, i have been eating these peas this morning, and we have come to a pea farm in whole, and they freeze them in some of the farms in this region —— hull. they have to get this stuff out for the entire year. and this, of course, is what it ends up looking
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like, 1000 tons of these frozen every day from farms in this area. it isa every day from farms in this area. it is a huge logistical challenge, but it is one that means we have enough for the entire year. i will introduce you to two people who know a lot about all of this. james is from bird's eye, andjim is from the food and drink federation. you have just eight weeks to do this, haven't you? it just eight weeks to do this, haven't you ? it is just eight weeks to do this, haven't you? it is all nothing, and you have to get it right. it is, we have to get all our year's worth of peas in those eight weeks. it is a full year's worth of planning and preparation, hard work, cooperation with the farmers, our bird's eye field team, a lot of planning to make sure it goes well when you get to that eight weeks, because you don't get a second chance. we have to do it now and it has to be right. and the stuff that you harvest, by the end of the programme, this stuff will already be frozen and in storage to lassiter ‘s by the end of the year. that's right, it is the
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famous 2.5 hour rule, because as soon as we start picking them, they start losing their quality. they are froze n start losing their quality. they are frozen as quickly as possible, and thatis frozen as quickly as possible, and that is how it maintains the quality so they are as fresh all year round, even though they are frozen. and we are preparing for the rest of the year, but we still import half of all our food year, but we still import half of all ourfood and year, but we still import half of all our food and drink. year, but we still import half of all ourfood and drink. why do we rely on it so much? over the last 30 yea rs we have rely on it so much? over the last 30 years we have relied on imports a lot more, that is partly because travel has become cheaper. we go around the world, we find new foods, we wa nt around the world, we find new foods, we want them at home. it is partly because we want some fresh foods all year around, because we want some fresh foods all yeararound, and we because we want some fresh foods all year around, and we can't grow them all year round. and partly because the european single market has made it as easy to access food from northern france as it is from northern france as it is from northern england. all those things combined have made it easier to import more food. obviously a big cloud on the horizon is what happens
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after brexit. we keep being told there will be queues at ports, is it that bad? if we have an ideal brexit there is no doubt they will be disruption to our food supply and we will suddenly come to realise just how important food imports are, and also what an important driver of the economy food exports are. we will see disruption at the ports, selective shortages on supermarket shelves, and people will really start to think about food in a way they probably haven't for a long time. thank you, nice to see you. that is really the issue. it is whether we have lost that connection with where our food has come from. so used to be able to get —— being able to get what we want when we wa nt able to get what we want when we want it. we might start to rethink that if there are those disruptions at the ports. we will show you around here, on a glorious morning just outside hull. more from me after seven a.m.. it does look lovely, thank you very much. time now to get the news,
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travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london. campaigners are raising awareness of a little—known condition which greatly increases the risk of contracting our cancer. jenny was diagnosed with lynch syndrome. adults with the inherited disorder are entitled to regular checks, but campaigners say it is still relatively unknown, even amongst gps. the alarm bells will ring for gps. the alarm bells will ring for gps when a patient walks in, if they are aware of their family history. if you refer someone with stage i or stage two cancer, most of the time, imean, the stage two cancer, most of the time, i mean, the survival rate is really high. the environment agency has been testing temporary defences in surrey to help protect against the risk of flooding from the thames. a metre—high barrier is being trailed that can be erected quickly in the event of rising waters. the area was severely affected
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by flooding six years ago, with many residents suffering damage to their homes. dozens of pubs in the east end are to be granted protection from property developers. tower hamlets has identified 37 it wants to list as assets of local importance. it is believed to be the first council in the country to offer this status to so many venues at once. it means developers will have to ensure they preserve the pub and its characteristics. just imagine opening your boiler cupboard to find this hiding inside. that was the surprise in store for a homeowner in north london. police in islington tweeted that the large brown and gold — had been released without charge and was later collected by the rspca. let's take a look at the travel situation, and there is a good service on the tube so far this morning. on the trains, there is no service between hither green and crayford on southeastern trains, due to a signal problem.
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on the roads, there are delays on the a2. let's see what the weather has in store now, with kate kinsella. good morning. it's looking like a largely dry and fine day today. i say largely dry — we're at risk of a shower, but to be honest, it looks like most places should avoid them. sunny spells, a little bit of patchy cloud around, especially first thing this morning, but that will start to thin and break fairly quickly. there's less of a breeze today, as well, and temperatures likely to reach around 25 celsius by the end of the afternoon, so really feeling quite pleasant. now, into the evening, again there's a small chance of a shower. could be quite sharp, but like i say, very isolated. barely anywhere will see one. temperatures overnight not especially cold, either. we've got some clear spells, the minimum between 13—16 celsius in central london. a similar day for friday, really. a bit of patchy cloud, some bright, some sunny spells, but it's looking dry
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as we head into the weekend. we've got a ridge of high pressure building in, so some sunny spells, patchy cloud for saturday. then for sunday, a bit more sunshine, and temperatures just a little bit warmer. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. good morning. welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. our headlines today: flood warnings are still in place across yorkshire and the north west of england after heavy rain caused damage to buildings, roads and rail lines. this farm just outside reeth was much destroyed. they've lost half their livestock. today they start their livestock. today they start the task of rebuilding. an extra £2 billion is earmarked for a possible no—deal brexi, something the labour party calls an appalling
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waste of taxpayers' money. fewer people in england are using single—use plastic bags. good morning. uk imports half of all the food it consumes, so why aren't we more self—sufficient when it comes to farming? i'm on a pea farm in hull this morning to find out. the waiting is finally over for the start of the ashes. i'm at edgbaston, where i've been speaking to england captainjoe root ahead of the first test against australia. having been on both sides of it, lifting it before under cooky, and seeing what it's like to be on the wrong end of it as a captain makes me very hungry to be at the oval as captain hopefully with a massive smile on my face. good morning. we could catch a shower at edgbaston today but the mainline of heavy, thundery, slow—moving showers will be from north—west scotland down towards east anglia. i'll have more details in about 15 minutes.
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good morning. it's thursday the 1st of august. our top story: flood warnings are still in place across the north west of england and yorkshire after a day of heavy rain left people stranded and caused damage to buildings, roads and rail lines. overnight, the water levels did begin to recede in some of the worst hit areas, but people are preparing for another downpour of rain later this afternoon. jon donnison reports. rivers where there were once roads. this is in stockport. nearby cheadle hume was also badly affected by the heavy rains. and in poynton, where the fire service declared a major incident, people were grabbing whatever they could to push back the water. it was just like a torrent coming down. got home and tried to get everything out as best as we could. it's onlyjust gone through the garage, so we're all right. in north yorkshire, this is leyburn, people are also facing a major cleanup.
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clothes, bedding, bookcases, drawers, tvs, washing machine, fridge freezer will be going. luke nelson runs a local pub. his beer cellar, though, now full of water. just came in way too fast for it to pump out and just filled up gradually, so i've got about five foot of water damage in the cellar at the moment. in the yorkshire dales, a torrent of water passed over the side of a music festival hosted on a localfarm. parts of than north of england have now seen four days of heavy rain. and the bad news, while the water levels may be receding, forecasters say more downpours are expect it today. jon donnison, bbc news. our reporter fiona lamdin is in reeth in north yorkshire, where almost a month's worth of rain fell in just four hours on tuesday. you can get an idea of some of the devastation. you're going to be talking to a
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farmer who's been affected, but the devastation around you is really quite shocking? it is. if you think it's quite shocking? it is. if you think its august, and normally this river, you can hear it, it's just running normally this river, you can hear it, it'sjust running behind those trees but on tuesday, there was so much rain that it diverted and came right through the middle of the farmyard, uprooting trees. you can see all these boulders. that car over there was completely submerged. and if you look at the hay bales, you can see the level of the water and how high it rose. over here, this used to be a wall, this was com pletely this used to be a wall, this was completely washed away. they lost half their livestock. we can speak to carl boseman from north yorkshire fire and rescue. talk about the scale of the operation. this was an extraordinary event and a huge team effort from all the agencies involved. after 2pm we got the first of 160 emergency calls
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from people trapped in buildings and properties due to the water rising quickly. give mea quickly. give me a sense of now the cleanup operation. it's an immense cleanup operation now. we're into the recovery phase and local authority will lead on this. i'd urge anyone affected by this. i'd urge anyone affected by this to contact their local authority to assist them with the recovery. you've worked with fire and rescue for many years, have you ever seen anything of this scale? not in 27 years, no. communities in the upper dales and swaledale are used to this kind of weather, but this was extraordinary and in a short period of time we got well over 100 millimetres, which put people at great risk. thanks forjoining us. the cleanup operation after a few hours of rain, it's going to take months before this place gets back to how it looked just a few days ago. fiona, thanks very much. really startling images there. more than £2 billion of additional funding is being set aside to prepare for a no—deal brexit by the chancellor
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sajid javid. the government plans include substantial sums to support businesses, improve ports, and ensure that vital medicines will still be available. let's get more from our assistant political editor norman smith. people might have in their heads that there's already been sums of money allocated or set aside for no—deal brexit planning, £4.2 billion i think was the figure, so talk us through this next announcement stop either as another £2 billion going to be spent on no deal planning, £1 billion already allocated and this will be to boost the number of border staff, around 500 more will be recruited to boast the infrastructure around ports to ensure there are snarl ups, to book ferry capacity to ensure the continuation of vital supplies like medicine supplies. cash for looking warehousing and stockpiling of those essential
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supplies, cash for better it for customs. declarations, better facilities for passporting and a massive public information campaign. £130 million to be spent over the next three months on telling us all how we can better prepare. the part of this which doesn't involve cash, i guess, is the politics of it, which is the hope in government circles that this will help convince the eu that we are deadly serious about leaving without an agreement. but of course, there's going to be a huge row about it stop you already the labour party are saying why are you spending £2 billion on something that will never happen when you can spend it on, for example, social ca re spend it on, for example, social care or other public services in desperate need of that funding. and there will be questions about the practicalities of it. can you really advertise, train and recruit 500
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additional border staff in three months? a lot of hard questions about how this money is going to be spent. a thought on that so we understand, this money is money that will be spent or could be spent? no, this is cash that is going to be spent. most of it, i assume, will have to be spent within the next 90 days, because that's when we are due, if we don't get an agreement, to leave. but the government's argument is, well, even if we got a deal, they would still have to be extra spending to improve our customs facilities and put us in a better place for leaving the single market and customs union. they say evenif market and customs union. they say even if there was a no deal, we'd still have to spend this sort of cash. norman, thanks very much. worth staying at around 8:10am we will speak to the chief secretary for the treasury —— worth saying. we'll try to drill through some of those numbers with him. voters in brecon and radnorshire go to the polls today to elect a new member of parliament. a total of six candidates are standing
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in the by—election in mid—wales and polls will remain open until 10pm tonight. the result is expected in the early hours of tomorrow morning. reports in the us say that hamza bin laden, the son of the former al-qaeda leader, osama bin laden is dead. the pentagon has not released any information but he's believed to have been killed in a military strike. our washington correspondent chris buckler sent this report. the us had offered $1 million for information on his whereabouts. at least 10 people were injured when fireworks were shot from a moving car into a crowd of pro—democracy activists in hong kong. crowds had gathered to support a small number of protestors detained at a police station. it is not clear who was behind the incident, which was shared on social media platforms. tensions are high in hong kong after weeks of anti—government protests. a mobile phone app has speeded up the detection of a potentially fatal kidney condition in hospital patients. staff describe the technology as a potential life—saver, providing diagnoses in minutes instead of hours.
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acute kidney injury is caused by serious health conditions, including sepsis, and affects one in five people admitted to hospital. it costs the nhs £1.2 billion annually. we are going to talk a bit more about that later to find out how that app works in the care system in england is struggling to cope with rising demand from teenagers. research by the children commissioner's office, shows the number of children in care aged 13 or over rose by 21% over the last five years, and that teenagers in care were more likely to be vulnerable to sexual exploitation, gangs, trafficking and drug misuse. a charity which monitors anti—semitism in the uk says levels of abuse reached a record high in the first six months of this year, since the organisation began work in 1984. the community security trust said there had been 892 incidents, a 10% rise on the same period last year. it believes the increase is largely due to abusive behaviour online.
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the big question is why is there more anti—semitism? i think it comes down to the way hate crime works in general. when a target group is in the news again and again, the people that hate them feel emboldened. they're incited to do more actions against them, and also the victims are probably more inclined to report. so i think we're seeing a combination here of more anti—semitism and also more willingness on the part of victims to tell us at cst or to tell police about what's going on. the sale of single—use plastic bags in england has fallen dramatically since a charge was introduced four years ago. customers at the biggest seven retailers, including tesco, sainsbury‘s and asda, used 90% cent fewer than in 2015. in the last year alone, sales have almost halved. the first three contestants for this year's series of strictly come dancing have been revealed.
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it all took place on the one shown last night. —— one show. the england football star david james, the comedian chris ramsey, and the actor emma barton will all be taking to the dance floor. the trio appeared on the one show to announce they had signed up for the show. they will reveal more people taking pa rt they will reveal more people taking part over the next few weeks. we've got one here tomorrow on breakfast as well. who is it? worth a try, isn't it? we actually haven't been told, have we? of course not, that's how it works! because they don't trust us! plenty more on the flooding problems and carol will keep us up to date with any ongoing problems. as we've been hearing, a new app which detects early signs of kidney failure is being used to improve care for patients at a london hospital. it works by using an instant alert system which directs medical staff to patients who are at risk of or who have developed a serious condition called
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acute kidney injury. let's speak to professor rosalind raine of university college london, who evaluated the effectiveness of the app, and fiona loud a former acute kidney patient, who's also policy director for the charity kidney care uk. fiona, good morning and good morning rosalind. rosalind, you evaluated the effectiveness of this app during its introduction at the royal free hospital. what did you find out? that's absolutely correct. thank you, yes. what we found out is by looking at what happened to clinical ca re before looking at what happened to clinical care before the app was introduced, after it was introduced and also by comparing what was happening to clinical care at a system hospital, what we found was the app substantially reduced the amount of time it took to alert the clinical
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specialist team of kidney doctors and nurses to those patients who are at risk of acute kidney injury and at risk of acute kidney injury and at risk of deterioration, and it reduced at the time from a few hours down to less than 15 minutes. and this meant that patients could be reached far earlier and could be given specialist treatment much earlier than they were before. it also absolutely increased communication between teams, and allowed the specialist doctors and nurses to spend more time with patients rather than time sitting on a computer typing in information and trawling through notes in order to find key pieces of information. so wherever these doctors and nurses we re wherever these doctors and nurses were in the hospital, they the alerted in real—time as soon a disturbing finding came to light on
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a patient‘s blood results. these findings were significant compared to what was happening elsewhere. yes, so tell us about your experience. you had this acute condition. tell us about that.|j condition. tell us about that.” did, it was quite a long time ago. it turned out i had undiagnosed kidney disease because they had a very rare genetic condition, and it happened to me while i was pregnant, so as! happened to me while i was pregnant, so as i say it was more than 20 yea rs so as i say it was more than 20 years ago. and about two months before emily was due to be born, my blood pressure went up sky high. i started to get swollen ankles, i started to get swollen ankles, i started to get swollen ankles, i started to feel incredibly unwell, and it turned out that i had a condition called pre—eclampsia, but my kidney function was deteriorating very quickly. so what it meant was that she had to be born very prematurely, and it was all very scary and upsetting for us. but the thing was, if anyone had known i had chronic kidney disease, that might have been looked out for a little bit better, and the other thing is ifi
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bit better, and the other thing is if i had been told i had a kidney issue, i would have known what to look out for earlier, and what we wa nt to look out for earlier, and what we want to see happen is more like what happened when i went into hospital, because people knew i had a kidney condition. i have a kidney transplant now. they checked for acute kidney in injury. so are you thinking that this new app is something that would have made a significant difference?” something that would have made a significant difference? i would say that being able to detect and realise that this thing is coming down the line is incredibly important. i should say it doesn't just happen to kidney patients. it happens to all sorts of people, so anyone with a long—term health condition, diabetes, liver disease, for example, anyone who is older. actually about 100,000 deaths per year, of which 30% are able to prevented with the right care and treatment. the number one thing is you have to identify it first before you have to identify it first before you can apply the right treatment, depending on what is wrong with the
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person. and we know the importance of being able to identify this. you very clearly explained how this app works. what about how quickly this can get into use in all hospitals, then? if you are reducing time to just 15 minutes, that surely has to bea just 15 minutes, that surely has to be a priority now, hasn't it? so this is an example of a digital technology which really can produce benefits. the speed at which it gets introduced into the nhs is something thatis introduced into the nhs is something that is decided elsewhere. sorry, just to make the point, i know you area big just to make the point, i know you are a big fan of the app and it is obviously very effective. who is deciding this, and why isn't it being pushed if it is so crucial? well, you would need to speak to the nhs about that. but what is very important is that we did do this evaluation, and this is really a step change in the way that digital technology is evaluated. and what we
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showed is that this is the way that all new digital technology, there is great enthusiasm for bringing this type of technology and other digital technology into the nhs, and what we showed is it is possible to test it ina very showed is it is possible to test it in a very timely way, and to find out not just in a very timely way, and to find out notjust the benefits in a very timely way, and to find out not just the benefits for patients in the nhs, but also unforeseen consequences that might occur. so this is an example of how things need to be done across our nhs to bring benefits to everybody. the speed at which such innovations are then implemented on a much wider scale is a complex issue, which you would need to speak to the nhs about as to whether and how they are going to spread this. if i can just bring fiona in for a second, i know there was something you wanted to say there. ijust wanted was something you wanted to say there. i just wanted to was something you wanted to say there. ijust wanted to say was something you wanted to say there. i just wanted to say that five years ago i sat on the sofa, and nice brought in the first ever acute kidney injury guidelines. what they said was we need to do better
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in this country and identifying the fa ct in this country and identifying the fact that someone's kidneys are going wrong very quickly, we need to do better at preventing deterioration. and what we have seen after the first five years is that there has been quite a lot of work done on it, but now we need more. and what we need to do, of course, alongside the use of technology, of which this is a good example, it is the training, it is the awareness throughout healthcare the training, it is the awareness throughout healthca re professionals to be able to think kidneys and think are we looking after their kidneys as well? we want members of the public to be able to also think hang ona the public to be able to also think hang on a minute, i have stopped passing you're in, or my mum has, and she seems to be extremely unwell. and that is the point of this. it is part of thinking kidneys. i should ask! am this. it is part of thinking kidneys. i should ask i am great, this. it is part of thinking kidneys. i should ask! am great, i have been fortunate to be able to go ona campaign have been fortunate to be able to go on a campaign for more donations and awareness. thank you very much.
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thank you both for your time this morning. we have been talking about the devastation, a lot of rain in a very short amount of time, across the country. we have, and looking at your graphic of the next few days. good morning, everyone. there will be fewer showers compared to the last few days, that it will still be wet for some of us today. you can see on the radar picture from yesterday the number of lightning strikes we had. in the last 24 hours, about 5000. all the rain from yesterday has eased off for now, but later on, as temperatures rise, it will come back. the low pressure which has brought it all pushing away onto the near continent, but
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there is a weather front close to there is a weather front close to the east, so here we are also not immune to some showers as we go through the course of the morning. a lot of dry weather to start with, some patchy cloud and sunshine and a temperatures rise, the son gets going and we will see more showers. through north—west scotland and parts of england towards east anglia, those showers could be heavy and thundery and slow—moving. and yes, some could potentially fall in the same areas that we saw some of the same areas that we saw some of the flooding yesterday. now, on either side of that line there will be some scattered showers, but many of us will mist those and there will bea of us will mist those and there will be a lot of dry weather and some sunshine. temperatures today 16 to 25. certainly the winds are lighter than they have been for the last couple of days, which is why this line of showers will be slow—moving stop through the evening we will hang onto some of those showers, but by the end of the night most of them will have faded. we are looking at a largely dry night, some patchy mist and fog forming and also some clear skies. temperatures falling to 14 to 16, so similar values to the night just gone. tomorrow we start off on
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a mostly dry note with some sunshine around, just a few scattered showers, but again, through the day, we will see as temperatures rise some further showers develop. they could possibly be heavy, but you could possibly be heavy, but you could see a lot of dry weather, more dry weather than showers around tomorrow as a ridge of high pressure settles across us. temperatures 17 in the north to 24 in the south. saturday also starts dry and sunny. there will be some patchy mist and fog to clear. but we do have a weather front in the atlantic which will eventually bring in thicker cloud and some rain from the west. but many of us will stay dry, barring the odd shower on saturday itself. hires around 25. and on sunday a story. we start dry with some sunshine, but we do have that weather front. it is a fairly weak affair, and as it moves from west to east it will take some showery outbreaks of rain with it. unwelcome
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rain where we have the flooding. it becomes unsettled next week as well. i will tell you what, it makes your job, i know first thing in the morning when you take all the information in from the weather centre, this does make it very interesting, but really quite tricky to keep track of, because it seems so changeable now. it is very changeable, and when you are talking about weather like this that really does affect people's lives, it is so serious. that is not a pleasant part of thejob, i must serious. that is not a pleasant part of the job, i must say, serious. that is not a pleasant part of thejob, i must say, when serious. that is not a pleasant part of the job, i must say, when you are telling somebody that is already flooded that they will have more rain. it is not your fault, and people are obviously very grateful to get the information as well, but it is changeable. we will make sure we keep tuned into you, carol, and fiona is out and about for us later this morning, looking at what is happening. a year since an ebola outbreak was declared in eastern democratic republic of congo, more than 1,700 people have now died. the country has successfully dealt
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with nine previous outbreaks, but the current one has been difficult to bring under control. our senior africa correspondent anne soy has returned to the epicentre of the outbreak, in beni city. it takes a lot to beat ebola. those who seek treatment early have a better chance of survival. but at the heart of the outbreak, myths and violence are driving infection. this treatment centre was much smaller when i was last here, six months ago. the expansion just speaks to how much the outbreak has grown. and actually, at some point, there were no more cases here in beni, and a lot of the services were moved to the new hotspots. but then ebola came back, and more cases are being reported here daily than any other place. there are lessons to be learned, that until there is no more ebola
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in the region, the health workers cannot afford to relax. as people travel, the epicentre of the outbreak has kept shifting. some suspected cases have even fled their homes and spread the disease. the world health organization says they are now adapting their strategies. we have been asking the community themselves to elect the person who will detect the contacts, who will identify the contacts, follow them up, and who will alert us that there is a sick person in the households. but, a short distance from town, evidence that change is slow to come. a funeral is taking place, we are told, but the community has barricaded the road. within minutes, we are asked to leave, or risk being attacked. tension is high. even the staff and patients at this clinic have fled. this infection control team is allowed to decontaminate it
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after a patient tested positive for ebola, but the community blames the doctor here for sending her to the ebola treatment centre, to die, they say. many still deny the existence of the disease, and resist care. translation: there have been attacks against health workers. we know of fellow doctors who were killed. that has a negative impact on the fight against this epidemic. dozens of armed groups operate in this region, making fighting ebola even more difficult. but there is some hope. these people never thought they would recover from the disease. now, as they return to their villages, they take a strong message back — that ebola can be stopped. time to catch up on what is happening where you are this morning. we will see you shortly.
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good morning from bbc london. a londoner who has made it his mission to tackle knife crime is sharing his story in schools, in the hope it makes a difference. amani simpson from enfield was stabbed seven times outside a nightclub in 2011. he has produced a short film about his experience, which aims to show the harsh realities of youth violence and encourage teenagers to make better choices. i wasn't involved in a gang, or anything like that, and i always believe it can happen to anybody, so it's best to stay away from situations if you can start to see them brewing. for me, i really just want to focus on the idea that young people are brilliant. the environment agency has been testing temporary defences in surrey to help protect against the risk of flooding from the thames. a metre—high barrier is being trialed in chertsey, that can be erected quickly
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in the event of rising waters. the area was severely affected by flooding six years ago, with many residents suffering damage to their homes. dozens of pubs in the east end are to be granted protection from property developers. tower hamlets has identified 37 it wants to list as assets of local importance. it is believed to be the first council in the country to offer the status to so many venues at once. it means developers will have to ensure they preserve the pub and its characteristics. let's take a look at the travel situation, and there is a good service on the tube so far this morning. severe so far this morning. delays on the bakerloo line southbound. on the trains, there is no service between hither green and crayford on southeastern trains, due to a signal problem. and there is disruption on southern services to london bridge and victoria due to a faulty train early. on the roads, problems at the
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da rtford early. on the roads, problems at the dartford river crossing, causing tail backs, and in ealing, the mall is closed eastbound following an accident at ealing common. time for a check on the weather, with kate kinsella. good morning. it's looking like a largely dry and fine day today. i say largely dry — we're at risk of a shower, but to be honest, it looks like most places should avoid them. sunny spells, a little bit of patchy cloud around, especially first thing this morning, but that will start to thin and break fairly quickly. there's less of a breeze today, as well, and temperatures likely to reach around 25 celsius by the end of the afternoon, so really feeling quite pleasant. now, into the evening, again there's a small chance of a shower. could be quite sharp, but like i say, very isolated. barely anywhere will see one. temperatures overnight not especially cold, either. we've got some clear spells, the minimum between 13—16 celsius in central london. a similar day for friday, really. a bit of patchy cloud, some bright, some sunny spells,
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but it's looking dry as we head into the weekend. we've got a ridge of high pressure building in, so some sunny spells, patchy cloud for saturday. then for sunday, a bit more sunshine, and temperatures just a little bit warmer. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. now, though, it's back to charlie and naga. goodbye. hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. here's a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news: flood warnings are still in place across the north west of england and yorkshire after a day of heavy rain left people stranded and caused damage to buildings, roads and rail lines. overnight, the water levels did begin to recede in some of the worst hit areas, but people are preparing for another downpour of rain later this afternoon. our reporter fiona lamdin is in reeth in north yorkshire, where almost a month's worth of rain fell in just four hours.
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fiona, you are somewhere where the devastation really is so apparent. good morning. good morning. yes, good morning. yes, normally good morning. yes, normally the river flows. it follows that treeline just behind us. river flows. it follows that treelinejust behind us. but river flows. it follows that treeline just behind us. but on tuesday afternoon, it literally diverted through the farmyard, uprooting trees, rubble. that black car over there was completely submerged. we'rejust car over there was completely submerged. we're just coming car over there was completely submerged. we'rejust coming over to douglas. douglas, many generations of yourfamily douglas. douglas, many generations of your family have farmed here. you've been here all your life. looking around, some of how it feels this morning. devastation. years of work. unbelievable the power of the water and the work we need to do. tell me what you've lost. we've lost at least 80 sheep. we've lost most of the crop, that was in a big stack picture behind you. miles of wall, fencing and a lot of debris over the fields. it was very distressing. as we were
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here yesterday, people were turning up here yesterday, people were turning up with the dead animals and there isa up with the dead animals and there is a pile of them as we enter the farm. it's just heartbreaking. is a pile of them as we enter the farm. it's just heartbreakingm is, it's heartbreaking. years of work and you can't believe it that it can happen a couple of hours —— ina it can happen a couple of hours —— in a couple of hours. thanks forjoining us at such a difficult time. we'rejust thanks forjoining us at such a difficult time. we're just coming over to emily. despite the huge loss with all the sheep, there one positive story and its crunchy. coming over to emily, your horse managed to escape. what happened?- swung over a five foot gate and a lot of rubble to get out, then he got stuck in a bit of road but luckily some people passing were able to help him get out of. i've seen pictures of cctv with him literally up to his neck with water. luckily he swung out? he managed to get out of the gate somehow and fought for his life. —— swung.
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get out of the gate somehow and fought for his life. -- swung. over to nicola. how is crunchy this morning? he is unbelievable. we can't believe how lucky we are that he is still with us. he's very, very stiff. he's fine this morning, he wants his breakfast, but hopefully he'll make a recovery and we'll get back riding again. i've seen the gates. its literally extraordinary! i can't believe how lucky he is to have managed to get out. you see that he's swung past the car and everything. the people that were walking past, we are so grateful they pulled him out. thank you very much. crunchy is good news in what's a very difficult time for this farm and this family. it really is. fiona, thanks very much. other news this morning: more than £2 billion of additional funding is being set aside to prepare for a no—deal brexit. the chancellor sajid javid's plans include substantial sums to support businesses,
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improve ports, and ensure that vital medicines will still be available. labour says it's an appalling waste of taxpayers' money. voters in brecon and radnorshire go to the polls today to elect a new member of parliament. a total of six candidates are standing in the by—election in mid—wales and polls will remain open until 10pm tonight. the result is expected in the early hours of tomorrow morning. reports in the us say that hamza bin laden, the son of the former al-qaeda leader osama bin laden, is dead. the pentagon has not released any information but he's believed to have been killed in a military strike. he's thought to have been 30 years old and was stripped of his citizenship by saudi arabia in march. the us had offered $1 million for information on his whereabouts. at least 10 people were injured when fireworks were shot from a moving car into a crowd of pro—democracy activists in hong kong. crowds had gathered to support a small number of protestors detained at a police station. it is not clear who was behind the incident, which was shared on social media platforms.
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tensions are high in hong kong after weeks of anti—government protests. a mobile phone app has speeded up the detection of a potentially fatal kidney condition in hospital patients. staff describe the technology as a potential life—saver, providing diagnoses in minutes instead of hours. acute kidney injury is caused by serious health conditions, including sepsis, and affects one in five people admitted to hospital. it costs the nhs £1.2 million annually. the care system in england is struggling to cope with rising demand from teenagers. research by the children commissioner's office, shows the number of children in care aged 13 or over rose by 21% over the last five years, and that teenagers in care were more likely to be vulnerable to sexual exploitation, gangs, trafficking and drug misuse. children aren't getting the help they need early on, which means they are getting into very risky situations and getting involved in all sorts of grooming and exploitation and gangs and the like.
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but also, the care system hasn't yet caught up or adapted to the point where they can then provide the specialist support needed for this new group of very complex teenagers in the numbers we're now seeing them. the sale of single—use plastic bags in england has fallen dramatically since a charge was introduced four years ago. customers at the biggest seven retailers, including tesco, sainsbury‘s and asda, used 90% fewer than in 2015. in the last year alone, sales have almost halved. coming up on the programme, carol will have the weather. i'm quite excited because i get a peek into the men's dressing room now, because that's where mike is at edgbaston. what a treat, mike!” tell you what, this is special, how
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about this? inside the home dressing room at edgbaston at the start of the ashes. it says on the door you're only allowed here with the captain's permission, and i spoke to joe root in an interview yesterday, and he gave us permission to be here. allsorts in here, a trophy given to ben stokes by the barmy army lying around. it gives you an insight into how the players individually prepare. stuff everywhere here, not sure who's that is, but look at this, leading by example by the captain, joe root‘s corner. the box willingly laid out with all his bats, his hats, caps, gloves and hats. the picture, the inspiration from the one—day world cup victory a few weeks ago. his ba na na cup victory a few weeks ago. his banana all neat and laid out. i'm allowed to touch his shirt to say this is the shirt he will be wearing
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as he leads the team out at edgbaston. a reference to the famous road in america. so meticulous, the captain's road in america. so meticulous, the ca ptain's examples, that's road in america. so meticulous, the captain's examples, that's how all the stuff should be! i sat down withjoe root yesterday. he led england to years ago down under to a heavy ashes defeat but he said a lot of lessons have been learned as england try to reclaim that little urn. just to play for england, to represent your country's a huge honour. huge privilege, something i'll never take for granted. to get an opportunity to captain again is just another level of that. it's not going to be straightforward in any sense, but very much just want to get things going and get things started. what a summer of cricket it's been so far with that incredible world cup win. as a fan watching, it was just incredible edge—of—the—seat stuff. what was it like for the players? as you say, it was just as exciting for the players playing as it was for those watching. a great advert for the sport.
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very exciting starting the ashes with interest in cricket probably at an all—time high in this country, especially in recent times anyway. all the players very aware of the impact that that's made, the world cup's made, and this is a chance to take it further. how much does it motivate you that early on in your captaincy, you took england to australia, albeit lost the ashes there, how much of that can that be used as a positive force to motivate you, and what did you learn do you think? we've come a long way since then, we were hampered with missing a few players and a few injuries, but we tried to make the most of that and put out a good account of ourselves. it obviously wasn't good enough out there on that occasion. i think we're in a different place now and in a really strong spot to go and compete and try to take advantage of home conditions. absolutely. and edgbaston is a great place to start if you look at records? the atmosphere in particular here is electric, the crowd offer so much more and almost act as an extra man. how aboutjimmy anderson? 37th birthday this week. he's like a good win — he gets better with age! absolutely. there's no better way
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to describe him, year—on—year he seems to keep performing and setting the example to the rest of the bowling group. definitely someone you shouldn't write off and age is just a numberfor him. he's a phenomenon, one of a kind, our greatest of all—time terms of seam bowling and swing bowling, and it's great to have him involved in the squad. sum up what it would be mean to lift the... not this, this is a fridge magnet, you can have this, but the actual urn come september. yeah, it would be very special. it's pinnacle of the test game for any english or australian. having been on both sides of it, lifting it before under cooky, and seeing what it's like to be on the wrong end of it as a captain makes me very hungry as captain hopefully to be on the podium at the oval with a massive smile on my face.
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i'm sat here quietly trying to get into the zone imagining i'm joe root, in my dreams! this is where he will set. let's talk about someone who knows about what it's like to sit in the dressing rooms for english cricket. i'm joined by director of the english cricket board and former spin bowler ashley giles. he won the ashes in 2005. what's going onjust before he won the ashes in 2005. what's going on just before a test match? first day of the ashes series. how rather players getting ready?m will all be different. some guys like to get in early and settle and some like to come later after a bit ofa some like to come later after a bit of a lion. there a very different buzz. some are very focused and quiet, especially at the start of a series this big is a lot of expectation and nervousness. sum will be bouncing around. i'm sure sto kesy will will be bouncing around. i'm sure stokesy will be bouncing around. how did you prepare? a mix. i like to create atmosphere for everyone else,
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but you don't want to get in other people's space because everyone wa nts people's space because everyone wants their own time and they do it their own way and you have to respect that. i know had a bit of a get together with the current england team with the ashes winners from 2005 last night. what did you make of the mood in the camp? it's a different format, but after the world cup win, what difference can that make?” think we are ready now. last week was important. the guys were tired after the world cup, many were involved in that, but it was important experience for them but test cricket is different and we have to adapt. that experience was worthwhile and last night was great. we got some of my old teammates backed. what i said was that group into thousand five went through something really special and form friendships that last forever, and that's what the ashes is about. you go through that six or seven weeks, which is really tough, but if you come out the other end of it with
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success , come out the other end of it with success, it's an amazing feeling. is it possible to be so good at both? in the past we've had strong ashes teams but not doing well in the one—day. the last four years was focus has been the world cup. can they still get the ashes back and make it the ashes summer? —— four yea rs' make it the ashes summer? —— four years' focus. it's going to be tough the australians always come here and play tough cricket. is the chance we can do something to do something we could never do again —— it's the. the ashes and the world cup in the same year. i would carry that if i was one of these players coming onto the field, the chance to do something very special. there's the chance of a wounded animal with australia, smith, warner and bancroft coming back after the ball—tampering in 2018 in south africa. will it affect their psychological approach or is it all under the carpet now?” psychological approach or is it all under the carpet now? i think they will be ok. the welcome they get from some of the audiences around the country will be interesting, as
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we saw from the world cup. they will get a we saw from the world cup. they will getafair we saw from the world cup. they will get a fair bit of stick, but we will play our cricket hard, but the right way, as you should do. and ashes victory? haven't lost at home since 2001... thanks for reminding me, mike! focused on your win in 2005! it would be fantastic. these series are very special and they don't come around that often! i love being here, so special, a tingle down my spine! well, australia's women have already won the ashes, but england restored some pride last night with a 17—run win in the final t20 match at bristol. australia won the toss and put england into bat. they struggled at first, but a late flourish from kathryn brunt helped them reach 139—5 from their 20 overs. and it was sophie ecclestone who got the key wicket of australia captain meg lanning as the visitors fell 17 runs short. now, the ashes isn't the only major sporting event starting today, because the opening round of the women's open golf has just got underway at woburn.
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it's the home course of england's charley hull, while england's georgia hall is the defending champion after winning last year at royal lytham and st anne's. i'm actually very excited. i don't feel any pressure. it's really nice for me to be home, because i've been in the us for a whole year so for me i've done the hard travelling and now i can enjoy being at home with the home crowd. to be able to say i've one a major is very special. i think i'm going to get a lot of support, so i look forward to people out there watching and cheering me on. andy and jamie murray made it through to the second round of the men's doubles in washington last night. they beat the french pair of nicolas mahut and edouard roger—vasselin in three sets. it is the first time that andy and jamie have played together since 2016. andy is still considering a return to singles in two weeks' time. and finally, some of the world's best cricketers may be on display on the pitch behind me over the next few days,
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but one bowler in particular has been attracting a lot of attention for his action on social media recently. this is 40—year—old pavel florin playing for romania in the european cricket league. now, he may not be james anderson or even shane warne, and even florin has admitted himself that his action is not beautiful, but it's got him a lot of attention. asi as i say, it's all about not being embarrassed about how you play, just getting involved. picking up a bat and ball and going. getting involved. picking up a bat and balland going. so getting involved. picking up a bat and ball and going. so many people inspired by the victory of the england team. three weeks ago today at edgbaston england beat australia to go through that final, and the rest is history. now it is a very different approach, a very different sort of game, the red ball game, test cricket, over potentially five days, so a test of strength and
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stamina, led by the chap who will be sitting here in a few hours' time. the players might be arriving quite soon. i think i had the players might be arriving quite soon. ithink i had better the players might be arriving quite soon. i think i had better make sure it is all in place. the sock, the banana, everything there as if it has never been touched. don't tell anyone i was here. i want the camera to stay with him. the part we are enjoying is the look around. we want to look around more. it looks so messy, as well. very relaxed. i don't want to touch anybody‘s stuff, but this is i suppose what the average cricket dressing room will look like. look how many batsjoe root has. this is to get the grip on the bat. it says root has. this is to get the grip on the bat. it sastoe root, do not steal, which i certainly will not. he is very meticulous in his preparation, it shows why he is such a fantastic cricketer and captain. all those gloves, but he tells me he is not superstitious at all. this is
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just part of his preparation, making sure that no stone is left unturned, including the banana, and not to write, that banana. perfect condition, as well. i have realised after a ll condition, as well. i have realised after all of these years i am sitting next to another athlete, because your banana is perfectly honed, neat and tidy. the score is it is always porridge and a banana, you are set for a major sporting occasion, 3.75 hours on bbc brea kfast. occasion, 3.75 hours on bbc breakfast. carol does the same thing. banana in the morning, carole? always a banana in the morning. they are yummy and they fill you up as well. this morning we once again have some showers in the forecast. for the next few days the showers in the forecast will be fewer than those we have seen in the la st fewer than those we have seen in the last couple of days. but today's showers from north—west scotland down towards east anglia will be slow—moving. there down towards east anglia will be slow— moving. there is down towards east anglia will be slow—moving. there is not much wind around, and there could be heavy and
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thundery. so what has happened in the last 12 hours or so, you can the thundery downpours we have had. about 5000 lightning strikes in the la st 24 about 5000 lightning strikes in the last 24 hours, and overnight we start to fade. the low pressure which has brought all the thunderstorms our way pushing off into the north sea today, and it is what we call heat of the day showers we are likely to see, with first thing this morning, a lot of dry weather and sunshine and a few showers in the east close to that area of low pressure. through the afternoon, as temperatures rise, we will see those showers heavy, thundery and slow— moving will see those showers heavy, thundery and slow—moving across scotland, especially the north—west. coming down across northern england, especially the areas which saw them yesterday and had problems, down into east anglia as well. on either side of that line we are not immune to some showers, but they will be fewer and further between and there will be a fair bit of dry weather and sunshine, especially across northern ireland. here we have highs
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of 21, but the top temperature today is likely to be 25 in london. through the evening, we hang onto those showers for a time. but by the end of the night most of them will have faded away. some patchy mist and fog forming, some clear skies, and fog forming, some clear skies, and temperature values are very similarto and temperature values are very similar to the night that has just gone, falling to between about 13 and 15 degrees. tomorrow we start off with some patchy mist and fog which will lift quite quickly. a lot of dry weather, a fair bit of sunshine, but like today, as temperatures rise, we will start to see some more heavy showers develop. they will be hit and miss and fairly well scattered. temperatures 17 and the north to about 22 to 24 as we progressively move south. enter saturday, some patchy mist and fog to clear in the morning. a lot of dry weather to start the day. then we will start to see one or two showers and thick cloud coming into the west ahead of this weather front which is coming in from the atlantic. so temperatures again up
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to the mid—20s at best. sunday starts off on a largely dry note, sunshine for some as well, and you can see we have some showers coming in. that is that weather front which will be a fairly weak affair as it moves from west to east, and parts of the south—east could well stay dry. then there is another one coming in hot on its heels for the early part of next week, so it does remain unsettled. so if you are going to edgbaston today, you will find that you might catch a shower, but equally there will be some dry weather around to enjoy as well. thank you very much stop partly because of brexit there has been a lot of issues around the food chain and possible concerns around that. a lot of people concerned about how much we sell and how much we import. ben is taking a look at that, he is in a
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field in hull for us right now. good morning to you. we are talking about self—sufficiency and whether we actually eat enough of what we produce here. we still import half of everything we eat from overseas. so we have come down to the farm in hull, this is one of the pea farms in this area, and they have just eight weeks to get all of this crop in and frozen to last for the entire year. and it gives you a sense of quite how important this time of year is for them. it is the responsibility of this man, good morning to you. talk us through what is happening, because it is a huge logistical challenge to get all of this stuff in the phrases, and it is going to last the entire year. absolutely, there's a lot going on right now, but it is a lot of hard work, collaboration with our farmers and the bird's eye team as well, to make sure we get it right because we don't have a second chance. they have been busy all year. our field staff decided when this crop was
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ready to harvest, the vine came in, and as soon as we are in here, we have to move things extremely quickly to get them to hull to our freezing factory so we can get them froze n freezing factory so we can get them frozen within the 2.5 hours. give us a sense of how many you are producing here. we have seen the machines that sorted them from the rest of the vine, and it is a pretty big challenge for you right now. absolutely, and we have several more of these across north yorkshire and east lincolnshire. it has been flat out since june and with 10,000 hectares of crop to harvest in those weeks. it keeps us in peas for the re st of weeks. it keeps us in peas for the rest of the year and getting them froze n rest of the year and getting them frozen in the 2.5 hours means they are top quality all year round. and we are going to look at the big machinery on the farm because it really tells us a lot about our relationship with food and what we consume. you might expect that we would consume more, but we are so used to just being able to eat what
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we wa nt used to just being able to eat what we want when we want, not really thinking about where it is grown or whether it is even in season. so tim is with us from the food and drink federation, a familiar face. is with us from the food and drink federation, a familiarface. i mean, just on that issue of self—sufficiency, we still import so much food right now. why don't we eat more of what is produced here in the uk? it is so easy for us to import food from the single market, we can access food from northern europe as easily as we can northern england. i think people travel more and they experience food and drink around the world and they want to eat it here, they want to have it on their shelves. we want things all year round, so we can't grow crops all year round, so we have to import stuff. there's a number of things that are driving it, but it's basically just very simple to that are driving it, but it's basicallyjust very simple to do. and that's the point, isn't it? we're just used to having what we wa nt we're just used to having what we want when we wanted. do you think we will have to start changing our mindset a little bit, especially things we are hearing about brexit, cu es things we are hearing about brexit, cues that borders, perishable goods going off in trucks. will we have to
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think about it differently? we might have to, because we are also becoming more conscious of the sustainability of supply chains, the environmental cost of shipping food, and we might see more of this kind of operation where we are producing fresh within season but perhaps producing more locally produced but froze n producing more locally produced but frozen products. and i think consumers are getting a little bit more wise to the fact that a lot of what they want doesn't or cannot grow in the uk, and we have to import, but there is a consciousness coming through that means that we may, i hope, begin to take more mindfulness of where we get our food from in the future. it is really fascinating, thanks to you both for now. we will talk more about that later, and it really is that idea of having a bigger awareness and understanding of where our food is coming from and quite what goes into producing it. we will talk about this over the course of the summer. we are in hull today looking at peas, we will look at all sorts of different sectors and different parts of the industry as we go through the summer. more from me after eighta.m..
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through the summer. more from me after eight a.m.. you are talking to someone from bird's eye, it is interesting, we will be talking later to the chief secretary of the treasury about brexit and brexit spending. is it worth us trying to get a linejust spending. is it worth us trying to get a line just to see how much it cost, how much bird's eye thinks no deal brexit is going to cost them in terms of imports and exports? let me ask both, actually. in the studio they were just asking questions about brexit, it is related to both of you, but in terms of perishables, we talked about needing to freeze this stuff. you have it for the entire year, so that guarantees your supplies, doesn't it? absolutely, provided we have a good harvest, it should see us right through until next harvest. and him, from the food and drink federation, what money do you want to see from the government? we are hearing from farmers in wales being compensated, potentially a fund set aside for them in terms of the no deal brexit. what do you want to see? well, the welsh and scottish governments have made available grants to prepare for brexit. that
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is not happening in wales. the industry is spending millions of pounds preparing, and the best case scenario is that that money is wasted. it is a really bad situation for us. are really strange situation to be in right now. does that answer your question? a quick one to bird's eye. how much do they think no deal brexit is going to cost bird's eye? he hasjust nipped off, but i will ask him that and talk about that in the next hour. we will leave you standing ona the next hour. we will leave you standing on a pea field. that interview on the figures from the government out today is coming out in the next 15 minutes on breakfast. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london. campaigners are raising awareness of a little—known condition which greatly increases the risk of contracting bowel cancer. jenny was diagnosed with lynch syndrome. adults with the inherited disorder are entitled to regular checks, but campaigners say it is still relatively unknown, even amongst gps.
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the alarm bells will ring for gps when a patient walks in, if they're aware of theirfamily history. if you refer someone with stage 1 or stage two cancer, most of the time, i mean, the survival rate is really high. the environment agency has been testing temporary defences in surrey to help protect against the risk of flooding from the thames. a metre—high barrier is being trialed in chertsey, that can be erected quickly in the event of rising waters. the area was severely affected by flooding six years ago, with many residents suffering damage to their homes. dozens of pubs in the east end are to be granted protection from property developers. tower hamlets has identified 37 it wants to list as assets of local importance. it is believed to be the first council in the country to offer the status to so many
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venues at once. it means developers will have to ensure they preserve the pub and its characteristics. just imagine opening your boiler cupboard to find this hiding inside. that was the surprise in store for a homeowner in north london. police in islington tweeted that the large brown and gold python had been released without charge and was later collected by the rspca. let's take a look at the travel situation, and there are minor delays on the bakerloo line northbound. and there is disruption on southern services to london bridge and victoria, due to a faulty train earlier. traffic a faulty train earlier. slow on the m25 from junction traffic slow on the m25 from junction 3 at the dartford river crossing. time for a check on the weather,
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with kate kinsella. good morning. it's looking like a largely dry and fine day today. i say largely dry — we're at risk of a shower, but to be honest, it looks like most places should avoid them. sunny spells, a little bit of patchy cloud around, especially first thing this morning, but that will start to thin and break fairly quickly. there's less of a breeze today, as well, and temperatures likely to reach around 25 celsius by the end of the afternoon, so really feeling quite pleasant. now, into the evening, again there's a small chance of a shower. could be quite sharp, but like i say, very isolated. barely anywhere will see one. temperatures overnight not especially cold, either. we've got some clear spells, the minimum between 13—16 celsius in central london. a similar day for friday, really. a bit of patchy cloud, some bright, some sunny spells, but it's looking dry as we head into the weekend. we've got a ridge of high pressure building in, so some sunny spells, patchy cloud for saturday. then for sunday, a bit more sunshine, and temperatures just a little bit warmer. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour.
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good morning welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. our headlines today: flood warnings are still in place across yorkshire and the north west of england, after heavy rain caused damage to buildings, roads and rail lines. these bales, this horsebox, this quad were destroyed in the flooding. an extra £2 billion is earmarked for a possible no—deal brexit — something the labour party calls an appalling waste of taxpayers' money. good morning. are we too reliant on imported food from overseas? the uk imports half of everything we eat in this country. why are we not more self—sufficient? i am on a farm in
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hull to find out. and good morning from edgbaston, where the wait is finally over for the start of the ashes series. i've been speaking to england captain joe root ashes series. i've been speaking to england captainjoe root ahead of the first test against australia as england look to reclaim the ashes. having beenm both sides of it, lifting it before under cooky, and seeing what it's like to be on the wrong end of it as a captain makes me very hungry to be on the podium at the oval as captain hopefully with a massive smile on my face. good morning. edgbaston could catch a shower today. for most it is sunshine and showers. some of those showers will be heavy, thundery and slow—moving. i will tell you where in15 slow—moving. i will tell you where in 15 minutes. it's thursday, the 1st of august. our top story. flood warnings are still in place across the north west of england and yorkshire after a day of heavy rain left people stranded and caused damage to buildings, roads and rail lines. overnight, the water levels did begin to recede in some of the worst hit areas,
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but people are preparing for another downpour of rain later this afternoon. jon donnison reports. rivers where there were once roads. this is in stockport. nearby cheadle hume was also badly affected by the heavy rains. and in poynton, where the fire service declared a major incident, people were grabbing whatever they could to push back the water. it was just like a torrent coming down. got home and tried to get everything out as best as we could. it's onlyjust gone through the garage, so we're all right. in north yorkshire, this is leyburn, people are also facing a major cleanup. clothes, bedding, bookcases, drawers, tvs, washing machine, fridge freezer will be going. luke nelson runs a local pub. his beer cellar, though, now full of water.
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just came in way too fast for it to pump out and just filled up gradually, so i've got about 5‘ 8"‘s worth of water damage in the cellar at the moment. in the yorkshire dales, a torrent of water passed over the side of a music festival hosted on a localfarm. parts of than north of england have now seen four days of heavy rain. and the bad news, while the water levels may be receding, forecasters say more downpours are expect it today. jon donnison, bbc news. fiona lamdin is in reeth in north yorkshire, where almost a months worth of rain fell in just four hours on tuesday. and the devastation there, fiona, this is more than infrastructure being affected, isn't it? yes, as you say, hundreds of homes here have been affected. this farm just outside really has taken the brunt. if you had not been here before you would assume this river was always here. normally though, if we were
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back on monday or tuesday morning, this was a field full of sheep. in fa ct, this was a field full of sheep. in fact, the river should flow behind that barn. but the force of the water was so strong on tuesday afternoon that it actually came through the farmyard. you can see what it has carried. it has carried the horsebox, a tree, all these bales, the quad bike, these huge boulders. it has literally destroyed this firm. you can see months and months of bales that will feed the animals in the winter, they are now destroyed. it will cost the family thousands of pounds. i will show you the road. this is normally a tarmac road. it is nowjust rubble. and all these walls. the firm was encased with walls. now the sheep are free to go. this morning as we were driving here the sheep were all over the world —— road. the farmer has gone off with his sheep dog to round
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up gone off with his sheep dog to round up the sheep. many are now lost. 80 of the sheep died. amazingly, the horse survived as did the dog. some good news. years and years this family have farmed here and in one afternoon nearly everything has been lost. absolutely tragic. it is awful. fiona, thank you for bringing that to us. that is just one picture. fiona, thank you for bringing that to us. that isjust one picture. it is obviously affecting much more people around the country. we will keep you updated throughout the morning and carol will bring you the latest update on the weather because more rain is expected. the rest of today's news now. more than £2 billion of additional funding is being set aside to prepare for a no—deal brexit by the chancellor, sajid javid. the government plans include substantial sums to support businesses, improve ports, and ensure that vital medicines will still be available. let's get more from our assistant political editor, norman smith. help people with the maths here,
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because there are a lot of big numbers knocking around already. how do these figures fit into the picture? theresa may said she was prepared to spend £4 billion. now borisjohnson says, that is not enough, we need an additional £2 billion. this is cash which will recruit additional border staff, money to bilk more fairies, to ensure the continuation of vital medical supplies. it will be money to reserve warehouses and stockpiling facilities for essential goods. it will be more money to improve the it to deal with customs declarations. more money to improve the infrastructure around ports, to get around the possibility of a major, major snarl ups. and there will be a massive public information campaign course “— will be a massive public information campaign course —— costing around 30 men in pants. the policy side of it is to underscore their position in
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the positions —— negotiated with the eu, in effect saying to the eu, do not think we are bluffing, we are deadly serious about coming out without a deal on october the 31st u nless without a deal on october the 31st unless you get rid of the backstop and cut us new agreement. thank you. we will be talking to rishi sunak, the chief secretary to the treasury, in a few minutes. voters in brecon and radnorshire go to the polls today, to elect a new member of parliament. a total of six candidates are standing in the by—election in mid—wales, and polls will remain open until ten o'clock tonight. the result is expected in the early hours of tomorrow morning. reports in the us say that hamza bin laden, the son of the former al-qaeda leader, osama bin laden, is dead. the pentagon has not released any information but he's believed to have been killed in a military strike. he's thought to have been 30 years old and was stripped of his citizenship by saudi arabia in march. the us had offered a million dollars for information on his whereabouts. at least 10 people were
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injured when fireworks were shot from a moving car into a crowd of pro—democracy activists in hong kong. crowds had gathered to support a small number of protestors detained at a police station. it is not clear who was behind the incident, which was shared on social media platforms. tensions are high in hong kong after weeks of anti—government protests. a mobile phone app has speeded up the detection of a potentially fatal kidney condition in hospital patients. staff describe the technology as a "potential lifesaver", providing diagnoses in minutes instead of hours. acute kidney injury is caused by serious health conditions, including sepsis, and affects one in five people admitted to hospital. our health editor hugh pym reports.
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one hospital which has trialled an app says it is a potential life—saver. app says it is a potential life-saver. this is the function we we re life-saver. this is the function we were talking about. edgar has been treated for different health conditions and mary, an elite specialist at london's royal free hospital, can show him the result of blood tests on her mobile. she is on the lookout for acute injury, most often found in older patients. warning signs from blood tests can ta ke warning signs from blood tests can take hours to come back but mary will get an alert on her phone within 15 minutes if there is cause for concern. health care is mobile and real time. this is the first device that has enabled me to see results in a mobile real—time way. enabled me to see results in a mobile real-time way. consultants involved in the project say it saves money on treatment as well as helping patients. potentially it is life—saving. we need to gather a lot more information about this technology and we need to look at it over a longer timeframe. but it certainly the case that some patients are very unwelcome
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information comes to the correcting very quickly and then we can put measures in place to try to make that patient south and to reverse the impact on the kidney function. the royal for as collaboration was criticised by the information commission over the use of patient data. the commission said the hospital had now completed all the required actions. the hope is that in the fast—paced world of a modern hospital, giving nurses and doctors patient information at their fingertips can make a big difference in the way patients are diagnosed and treated. let's go back to one of our main stories this morning. the new chancellor has announced more funding for no—deal brexit planning. we can get more detail from that from rishi sunak, the chief secretary to the treasury. good morning. thank you forjoining us.
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good morning. we have an extra 2.1 billion, taking the total to £63 billion, taking the total to £63 billion for no deal spending. it has got to be spent, it will be spent in the next 90 days on no deal preparation. what are you spending it on? well, you are absolutely right, that money is spent —— the money is there and it is going to be spent immediately, and that is because we want to make sure we are ready to leave the european union at the end of october. it is going on a range of things. border force preparations, news customs procedures, we want to make sure small businesses are prepared for the changes that are coming, we want to ensure security and continuity of supply for medicines for the nhs, for example, and also making sure that people are informed about what is happening whether they live here orare uk is happening whether they live here or are uk nationals living abroad. it is every combines a package. it demonstrates our commitment to turbo—charging the no deal preparations and making sure that people realise we are serious that we are leaving the european union at the end of october, now it'ss, no
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buts. the shadow chancellor has said this funding is an appalling waste of taxpayers cash towards a totally avoidable no deal. borisjohnson has said there is a vanishingly small chance of a no—deal brexit, yet it seems you are spending £6.3 billion to basically maintain a pokerface to basically maintain a pokerface to the eu? it is my job to make sure we spend taxpayers money wisely. the good news here is a lot of this money, a lot of this investment, is for things that we need to do in all cases because we are leaving the european union. that is going to mean leaving the single market and the customs union. whether we are investing in it infrastructure or border force officials, those are the kinds of investments we have to make anyway as we are leaving the european union. so it is not no deal planning then, is it? if you are going to spend it anyway, you are not using the extra money to prepare
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for a no deal? we are accelerating the urgency of when we spend that money and making sure to spend now and quickly and well so we are ready to by the end of october with no more delays. but i think the important thing to note, the reason we are able to spend his money today and also make those investments we have been talking about in our public services, more money for schools, 20,000 police officers on the street, the new leeds micra to manchester railway line we announced over the weekend, we can do all of that because the —— because of the careful stewardship of the economy in recent years. i pay tribute to the former chancellor. borrowing is atan the former chancellor. borrowing is at an all—time low, wages are rising at an all—time low, wages are rising at the fastest rate in a decade and we are growing faster than most european neighbours. it is a strong economy, a resilient economy, that is what gives us the ability to make these investments. money you would have spent anyway, it is not no deal planning. money you would have spent what you are shouting about it now because you want to make clear to the eu that you are prepared to
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leave the european union without a deal? there are a range of things we are spending money on. a lot of it is to get us ready right now for leaving the european union. not no deal. an information campaign will be part of that because people will have to see there are changes. please let me make this point because you are telling me all the things you are spending the money on but the fact is whether the uk leaves the eu with or without a deal, this money is going to be spent. so therefore this money is not no deal planning. that is how the conservative party is pitching it. no, that is not quite right. some of the money being spent his money we will need in all cases because we are going to have new customs and trading arrangements. some of the money, the majority of the money, is very specifically for things that will happen as a result of leaving the european union without any agreed deal. for example... 500 border staff, right? you are going to recruit 500 extra
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border staff in 90 days, are you? so the day after the 31st of october they will be 500 extra border staff at the border ready to work. how would you do that? that builds on an existing plan already in place. there are already 900 more border staff in place already. we have also streamlined the process is for recruiting, training and abetting border staff officials. so that over the course of this year we will be able to get an additional 500 in place as well. so the 500 border staff that are needed, when we leave the eu, will not be in place the day after october the 31st? they say is an additional 500. after october the 31st? they say is an additional500. in after october the 31st? they say is an additional 500. in addition you we re an additional 500. in addition you were promising us. we have already got 900 and place, previously. this year we have announced a 500. recruitment has already started. we are expanding that for an additional 500 so that over the course of the year there will be another thousand border force officials in place on top of the 900 already that are in place as a result of previous
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decisions. do we have enough border staff four november the 1st to cope with leaving? because of the decisions we have already made, we will be as prepared as we need to be for the border. there is also investment to date on operations around the port of dover, a plan that has been put in place to minimise disruption to traffic flows in and out of dover as a result of leaving without a deal. we have put in place a very robust plan that will get incremental funding ensure those plans are as robust as they can be, that we can minimise any disruption that might happen in that case. let me play you something. we spoke to the chief operating officer of the food and drink federation. this is what he thinks about how the government is helping farmers at the moment in the uk. the welsh and scottish governments have made available grants to small businesses to prepare for brexit. that is not happening in england. we got more money from the chancellor today but that is going to things like border force. the industry are spending millions of pounds preparing in the best case scenario
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is that that money is wasted. he was speaking to us earlier and we have been covering the devastation from a lot of the heavy rainfall that has been happening. farmers in england feel neglected by this conservative government already? he talked about business preparedness. a large part of the package announced today actually is for a very comprehensive business preparedness programme that will go above and beyond in making sure all our businesses are prepared for the changes that are coming. for example, many small traders will need new ways to trade and fill out forms. the investment we are putting in place today will enable us to reach out to those businesses, talk to them and make sure they are prepared. and more generally, this government has been a proud supporter of rural england, the countryside and the farming sector. i represent a rural constituency myself and see that first hand. the problem is businesses are preparing now. you are announcing this money
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with 90 days to go. businesses are already having to dig deep —— deep into their coffers to prepare for a no—deal brexit. you are not helping them. they are having to spend extra money because you can't guarantee we will leave the eu in an orderly fashion? we are leaving at the end of october. what is very harmful for businesses is all the uncertainty and repeated delays and not knowing what is happening. we are leaving the end of october. that is something we have said. as a result of the announcement today, there is a significant amount of incremental funding going into the system, specifically to help support businesses. a business preparedness programme is a key part of the announcement today. specifically around those businesses that will see changes to their trading relationships, advice for lots of other things. it is absolutely right we provide that support and that is why the support has been announced today. rishi sunak, thank you for your time this morning. here's carol with a look
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at this morning's weather. we are looking at those flooding pictures, some real problems in the north of england. but the picture is so mixed up at the moment. in a lot of places, not so much rain today? that is absolutely right, charlie. ifi that is absolutely right, charlie. if i can show you a picture from our weather watchers, if beautiful start to the day in devon with some blue skies. today and for the next few days there are some showers in the forecast but they will be fewer than we had yesterday or indeed the day before. you can see on the radar picture that we did have a lot of showers around. that led to the flooding yesterday. in the last 24 hours they have been about 5000 thunderstorms recorded across the uk. it is all because of this area of low pressure now pushing off into the north sea. the weather front around it is close enough to the
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east to give showers first thing. a lot of sunshine around first thing this morning. cloud here and there. as the sun gets to work and temperatures rise, that is when we are likely to see further showers develop. these showers this afternoon could be heavy and thundery and slow—moving. across north—west scotland, heading across northern england, potentially in areas where we had flooding yesterday. going all the way down towards east anglia. on either side of that line from north—west scotla nd of that line from north—west scotland to east anglia, there will be some showers but they will be fewer and further between and we will see drier conditions, brighter conditions and some sunny skies. mostly dry for northern ireland today. a high of 21 degrees in belfast. up to 25 in london. through this evening we have some potent showers. but by the end of the night many of them if not all of them will have faded. we will have one or two scattered around parts of northern scotland. patchy mist and fog
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forming and clear skies, with temperatures falling to similar values to the knight that has just gone. tomorrow starts in a bright note with some sunshine. pasty merchant fog burning away. —— patchy mist and fog. rather like today, you will see more showers. they will be hit and miss. will see more showers. they will be hitand miss. a will see more showers. they will be hit and miss. a ridge of high pressure a cross hit and miss. a ridge of high pressure across us. if you catch when it could be heavy. not much wind. it could be slow—moving. many of us could miss them. highs of up to 24. tomorrow morning we start with patchy mist and fog. a lot of dry weather. sunshine, cloud building. we have got a weather front towards the west. as it approaches it will throw in more cloud and some showers across western areas. it is a fairly weak affair. by the time we get to sunday it will be continuing its journey from the west towards the east. the rain turning or showering. parts of the south east could well stay dry.
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highs up to 26 at the weekend. thank you, carol. lots of people bracing themselves for more rain this afternoon. we can speak to the former douglas in reeth in yorkshire. thank you for inviting us to your farm this morning. we have a look had around at some of the damage. give us a sense of the problems today? well, obviously the floods two days ago took out huge amounts of wall, an awful lot of fencing. we lost roughly 80 sheep, possibly more. we also lost a lot of clap that was set in bales, somewhere between 203 and 50 bales went down the river. just
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as you are talking we are seeing some of the images of when it struck. apart from anything else it must be pretty scary seeing at first hand and knowing the damage that was being done? it was exceptionally frightening, exceptionally noisy with the boulders chopped down the rivers and streams, and very dangerous. yes, it was something you see ina dangerous. yes, it was something you see in a disaster movie. unbelievable, the power of water that came down these small streams and rivers. ben, the sort of damage happens to a farm, it causes ongoing problems, doesn't it? there is clearly a high cost? it does. when you have these freak weather events it is often farming that is on the front line of bearing the brunt. we have the situation in cumbria in
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2015, with storm desmond. the clean—up operation in parts of the la ke clean—up operation in parts of the lake district took months and even years to get over. this is what doug has been coping with this morning. the amount of rubble, the amount of storm that has watched through this farmyard, the impact it can have on farmyard, the impact it can have on farm business is absolutely huge. one of the things that defines the rural community is the fact that people come together. people run the phone from the local area to me at the farmers guardian yesterday morning asking how we can help. the community has really come together to support. that is what rural communities are all about. the clean—up operation will take months and months. douglas, pick up on that for us. i am sure your friends and colleagues rally around. what about in terms of government money? what happens about that? you get any kind of help? we are insured to a certain extent with certain items but there are a lot of items that are not insured and
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cannot be insured. as it stands at the moment we will have to bear the costs of those losses. it could run into many thousands of pounds. it is something we are going to have to look at in the very near future. fiona, who was having a look around earlier, was talking, among other things, about how a lot of your walls have been washed away, which presumably, that will take a long time to sort out? yes, the wolves have just kind of tumbled under the power of water. yes, they will take... it is a painstakingly slow job to build dry stone walls anyway. we have hundreds of yards if not miles of wall down. it will take yea rs miles of wall down. it will take years to get them put back up to a stock proof level. it will be a very long job. douglas, we wish you and your work as well. thank you very much. and ben,
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thank you. just getting a sense, you see these floods, possibly weeks, months, years to recover. time for the local news where you are. hello. there have been very heavy thundery downpours of late, over the next few days we see a gradually improvement with fewer showers day by day. this afternoon the potential for heavy thundery downpours particularly from north—west scotla nd particularly from north—west scotland across to east anglia. if you catch when they could be slow—moving, large amount of rain and a short space of time, elsewhere sunny spells with a small risk of showers, feeling pleasant in the
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sunshine, highs of 25 degrees in the south—east. overnight heavy thundery downpours tend to ease, we could see some lingering showers for parts of scotla nd some lingering showers for parts of scotland and in the east, temperature is quite similar to last night, low to mid teens, one or two patches of mist and fog. a mostly dry start the tomorrow, some sunshine first thing, a few areas of cloud, the day wears on the sunshine could trigger some showers and where they form they could be heavy but feeling pleasant in the sunshine, highs of 24 celsius.
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