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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  August 14, 2019 6:00am-8:31am BST

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good morning. welcome to breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. our headlines today: the family of nora quoirin pay tribute to their most precious girl as they desperately seek answers in malaysia over her death. former chancellor philip hammond launches an attack on the prime minister, accusing him of wrecking the uk's chances of getting a deal with the eu. a nervous wait for vocational students. nearly 80,000 find out their btec level 3 qualifications today, the biggest single results day for vocational courses.
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life after the troubles — how many people in northern ireland continue to deal with the trauma of the conflict. england send for their archer. 1—0 down in the ashes series, jofra archer is ready to play his first test match for england, but they're more likely to be dodging showers than bouncers at lord's. losing a wife and mum to cancer — two cricketing legends tell us how they tried to prepare their children. it doesn't mean they can't have a great life, and for ruth to hear that, the weight of the world came off her shoulders, and for me it was getting my head around the idea of looking after them going forward, and it was a huge source of comfort. more cloud and rain around today than yesterday. the best chance of staying driver the longest is in eastern scotland and north—east england. more details in 15 minutes.
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it's wednesday the 14th of august. our top story: the family of 15—year—old nora quoirin have said their hearts are broken after her body was discovered in the malaysian jungle yesterday. a post—mortem examination examination is under way, with the results expected later this morning. andy moore reports. nora's family released a new photo of the 15—year—old they called the most precious girl. they said their hearts were broken, the cruelty of her death was unbearable. a helicopter lifted her body out of the densejungle, helicopter lifted her body out of the dense jungle, where helicopter lifted her body out of the densejungle, where it was helicopter lifted her body out of the dense jungle, where it was found near a waterfall. it was winched up ina cage, near a waterfall. it was winched up in a cage, supported by a police officer. nora's family said her learning difficulties were so severe, she would never have left the bedroom through the window on her own. she was only wearing her nightclothes. they suspect foul play. police are keeping an open mind, saying they can't rule out a
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possible criminal enquiry. so much depends on the results of the postmortem examination, which started a few hours ago. nora's family have already identified her body in hospital. it is so difficult to describe, but they are really distraught in grief, and ifeel the same. to lose a child, yeah, it's terrible. the search that lasted ten daysis terrible. the search that lasted ten days is now over. the results of the postmortem examination will go to the attorney general, who will decide if the police need to investigate further. let's get the latest from our south—east asia correspondent howard johnson, who's in seramban. what's the latest? such a desperate time for the family. what more can you tell us? louise, a senior coroner travelled down from kuala lumpur today, to carry out the postmortem. we have heard we won't hear the results
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until about two hours time. we have also heard this morning from nora quoirin‘s family, they released a statement saying that she had brought together people from france, ireland, britain and malaysia, united in their love of her. they are truly touched. we are waiting to hear more, and we might find out more if these slightly dubious circumstances in which she was found, then it will go to criminal investigation. she was found yesterday by a group of hikers, unclothed, by a stream about a mile away from the resort that she meant missing from. —— went missing from. herfamily have missing from. —— went missing from. her family have always insisted they wa nted her family have always insisted they wanted it to be seen as an abduction case, but the malaysian police have been pursuing the line that this was a missing persons case. this postmortem should shed some light on what happened to nora in the window within which she went missing. what happened to nora in the window
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within which she went missinglj know within which she went missing.” know you have been following this closely and you will bring us up—to—date if needs be throughout the programme. the former chancellor, philip hammond, has accused boris johnson's government of trying to wreck the chance of a new brexit deal with the eu by making demands which brussels can never accept. in his first comments since stepping down last month, mr hammond said a no—deal brexit would be a betrayal of the 2016 referendum. writing in the times, he said it was a myth that a no—deal exit will be painless. he argues that rather than resulting in a powerful independent uk, the reality would be a diminished and inward—looking little england. 0ur political correspondent nick eardley is live in westminster for us this morning. very strong words, neck. philip hammond is still a big hitter, isn't he? yes, he is a big name for the simple reason that up until a month ago he was doing the second—biggest job for the government. what he is saying this morning is that boris johnson's change of tack to say that
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the controversial irish backstop, the controversial irish backstop, the thing that is supposed to stop physical checks on the border, that basically borisjohnson physical checks on the border, that basically boris johnson is physical checks on the border, that basically borisjohnson is asking too much when he tells europe to get rid of it. so far we have seen him saying it has to go to get through parliament, but the eu has said it is too much. mr hammond has said he increasingly thinks that the new pm's strategy is a wrecking one, that quite simply he is not going to get the new deal he is talking about because he is asking for too much. really interesting that philip hammond also doesn't just really interesting that philip hammond also doesn'tjust say it is the pm and politicians, but also that unelected officials in the background are making it more difficult as well. that is a jab at dominic cummings, who was boris johnson's senior adviser, a big man in the vote leave campaign back in 2016. number ten say, in the vote leave campaign back in 2016. numberten say, look, when philip hammond was chancellor he did everything he could to stop the uk
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leaving the eu. they are ready, no matter what we are leaving on the 31st of october. but a lot of mps are spending their summer holidays on the phone, on e—mails, chatting about what they can do to try to stop us leaving without a deal. it all means in another three weeks there will be an almighty battle in parliament. thank you, neck. -- nick. flights are resuming in hong kong, after the airport authority obtained a court order to prevent people from "unlawfully obstructing" operations. it comes after thousands of pro—democracy protestors disrupted flights for two days. demonstrators are angry about what they see as china's attempt to clamp down on the territory‘s special status. tens of thousands of people are getting their vocational qualification results today. steph's at a further education college in lincolnshire for us this morning. how are people feeling, steph? i don't envy them in many ways, how are they feeling? good morning. it
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is very exciting here this morning at boston college, because a lot of these people around me have done brilliantly. they will be getting some of the results a bit later. we are talking about vocational qualifications. so these guys have been training on everything from beauty, hairdressing, engineering, catering. health and social care, bricklaying, the list goes on. and by vocational, what we mean is they doa by vocational, what we mean is they do a lot of practical assessments as pa rt do a lot of practical assessments as part of their work, so notjust theory but getting out into the workplaces. they work with a lot of local employers to teach them skills. vocational qualifications, about 5 million people do them every year. if you look specifically at the 16-18 year. if you look specifically at the 16—18 —year—old range, when you think most people are doing a levels, if you compare the numbers, about 25,000 people dead vocational qualifications out of 300,000.
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300,000 people dead a level qualifications. they are taught in places like this, mainly. 0ne qualifications. they are taught in places like this, mainly. one of the big issues have been funding around these colleges. 0ver big issues have been funding around these colleges. over the past decade it has been cut by nearly a third. that puts a lot of pressure on places like this that are trying to be able to afford to teach the lessons they have. as you can imagine, it costs more to put on these types of levels than it does to do the a—levels, which more theory based. borisjohnson has said he wants to do more for the education sector, so throughout the morning we will be finding out what it would be that the government could do about this, and i will be chatting to these people. i love all the envelopes and people telling me how they did. you might love it, but it makes me intensely nervous! and a level results tomorrow, as well. she loves it, doesn't she! she shares the enthusiasm, the next
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step. rail passengers will find out today how much regulated fares will go up next year. it will be based on the retail prices index inflation figure forjuly. analysts expect the increase to be around 2.8%, which could lead to a rise of more than £100 in the annual cost of getting to work for many commuters. using social media isn't directly harming teenagers but it can reduce the time they spend on healthy activities, such as sleeping and exercising, according to a study in the lancet. to combat this, researchers suggest parents should ban phones from bedrooms after 10pm and encourage more physical activity. the study also found girls were particularly vulnerable to cyber—bullying, which could lead to psychological distress. for parents, we suggest a focus on sleep, physical activity, and preventing bullying and making sure what kids are watching is safe, and don't focus on worrying about how
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much time they are spending on social media or on their smartphones. labour has outlined proposals that would prevent universities from offering places based on predicted grades. it says the current system is deeply unfair and that students should only be allowed to apply when they've had their exam results, but universities say changes would be complex. if they haven't got parental support andi if they haven't got parental support and i making rash decisions in the summer, that isn't fair to them and might disadvantage those very people that we want to help. so it will require some really big change from secondary schools, from awarding bodies, and from higher education institutions. not insurmountable but those practical considerations need to be thought through. a video of a bin man from worcestershire delivering a birthday cake to one of the residents on his route on her 100th birthday has been viewed more than three million times on social media. 30—year—old ben bird has been emptying dorothy ballard's bins for the last eight years and the pair struck up a friendship after he would make regular stops
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for a chat. when ben found out that he would be collecting dorothy's bin on her 100th birthday, he decided to surprise her with a cake. she described the gesture as wonderful. # happy birthday to you! #. good old dorothy! it is always that embarrassing thing about what to do with your face when someone about what to do with your face when someone is singing happy birthday to you! that is a lovely gesture. absolutely lovely! that is a bin man going above and beyond! we have had a bit ofa bin above and beyond! we have had a bit of a bin theme this week. if you didn't see yesterday, steph was wondering whether summary recycling bins would smell. we brought them in
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and they didn't smell. they were very hygienic. i don't know if i have good or bad news today, and i don't want to rain on carol kirkwood's parade, but the weather might ruin the cricket. i think thunder and lightning are forecast later but we will check with carol. it looks like the splashes before the ashes at lord's today. it took me hours to write that. who wrote that? not me! heavy rain's forecast for the first day of the second test between england and australia. the aussies are one—up so england are hoping fast bowlerjofra archer can help them turn it around. celtic won't be playing in the champions league this season. they've been knocked out by romanian side cluj 5—4 on aggregate after losing the home leg at celtic park last night. there will be history in turkey
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tonight, as liverpool and chelsea play the first all—english super cup in istanbul. and there will be a female referee. stephanie frappart becomes the first woman to take charge of a major european match. and could this be your new favourite sport? this is climbing, and shauna coxsey has won britain's first world medal in it a year before itjoins the olympics. i watched them do this yesterday live, and i tell you what, you know when you go to a climbing wall and you see all the points where you can put your hands and feet and they are really close together? this just looked like origami, it was ridiculously challenging. really strong! i love the speed climbing. they are like spiders! i'm slightly addicted to that. i watched it once. i flicked the tv on, and two hours later i was still watching it.
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hypnotised! here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. we've already had a preview. sounds like it's going to be reigning? you're after myjob but you did a my define one! sally is quite right, in terms of the ashes, we're likely to interruptions today because there will be rain on and off through the day. form anyway start on a cloudy note and through the day there will be rain at times, but as a result of it being cloudy and wet, not as cold for most —— for many we start. —3 across aboyne. the cloud builds from the west, so any brightness will be short—lived. we already have rain from the west and south—west and through the day that will push across england and wales, some heavy bursts. somewhat that will be thundery, the east midlands and south south—eastern parts of england. in the north—west, more
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rain coming across western scotland and northern ireland and some of this will be heavy and thundery. some parts of eastern scotland and north—east england will stay dry until much later on and behind this band of rain, it will start to brighten up but still a lot of cloud around and still a few showers. again, attempts 111—20, a bit below par —— temperatures. into the evening and overnight, we lose the first band of rain. the second continues to advance across scotland, resting in the northern isles and a much milder night where it was cold last night. widely we are looking at double digits. we start tomorrow on a mostly dry note, and that's because we've got this ridge of high pressure across us. but we can't rest on our laurels because the next area of low pressure is coming our way. here's the remnants of a weather front still producing rain in the northern isles before that clears. behind it
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that dries up beneath the ridge of high pressure, but having said that it won't be bone dry because there are still some showers knocking around. temperatures in any sunshine, that bit higher, up to 23 in london. late in the day, what you'll notice is the cloud will start to thicken from the west. we'll see a few showers coming in, and that's ahead of our next area of low pressure. this when there's a belter, with us into friday and the weekend —— this one. there will be rain and look at the isobars, squeezed together. it won'tjust be wet but windy. friday morning starts dry and bright in the east but as the low pressure comes in it will bring in some rain. that rain will be heavy and there will be blustery winds around it as well. behind it, drier, a little bit brighter but still some showers. that leads us into a wet and windy weekend, dan and lou. thank you, we'll keep and i
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out for all of it. see you later. let's take a look at today's papers. these are the front pages. the times leads with an intervention from former chancellor philip hammond, who claims the uk risks being beyrayed by the government if it forces through a no—deal brexit. the paper also carries a picture of actor steve coogan, who has avoided a six—month driving ban. we'll get a bit more detail on that ina we'll get a bit more detail on that in a moment. hardship not for himself but those he'll be working with on a new series if he wasn't allowed to dry. —— drive. ‘commuters priced out by new hike in railfares' is the headline in the guardian. the paper says a 2.9% increase in railfairs is expected to be confirmed today and would come into force in january. the paper also carries a picture of nora quoirin, whose body was found in the malaysian jungle yesterday. the daily mail says the number of britons in work has soared by more than a million since the brexit vote thanks to a record 15.5 million women currently in employment.
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they also have a picture of the rooneys on the front page talking about his deal at derby. the mirror leads with a ‘furry—tail‘ ending for a cat owner, who won £1 million on a scratchcard, when he went to the shop to buy food for their cat shortcake. he also bought a ticket and he came back a week later or so with £1 million for the bank. wow! not bad, is it? good cat! not anything to do with the. are you can ashes related? talking about lucky charms and that kind of thing, this is in the telegraph this morning, steve smith, the england players have admitted australian batsman steve smith put them off last week and there's a reason. according to the australian broadcaster channel nine, he has 23 separate pre— ball takes. things he has to do like rafa nadal in the tennis. all of that. he touches in
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sequence tennis. all of that. he touches in sequence sometimes tennis. all of that. he touches in sequence sometimes more tennis. all of that. he touches in sequence sometimes more than once, they have worked on this, between each delivery his helmet, thigh pad, inner thigh pad, right flat, left—hand inner thigh pad, right flat, left— hand flap and inner thigh pad, right flat, left—hand flap and changes his gloves 20 to 30 minutes in his innings so he has 15 pairs in his kitbag. look at his feet, he hates seeing loose shoelaces when kitbag. look at his feet, he hates seeing loose shoelaces when he is batting. tucks them away? no, the physio tapes them down. batting. tucks them away? no, the physio tapes them down. attention to detail! he said seeing the laces would do his head in. i like that! interestingly there's a process... some people do lucky things... but thatis some people do lucky things... but that is a lot. it's the process, that is a lot. it's the process, that process he has to go through and here they have a picture of him using the bat and when he leaves the ball he turns his back like he's using a lightsaber like luke
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skywalker. interesting with the tennis players, they have little routines that they are used to. interesting habits. routines that they are used to. interesting habits. lots of interesting things in the papers today, what shall i talk about? you can talk about what you light! there's an advert to do with soft cheese —— what you like. it has been banned. an advert for soft cheese and the advertising standards authority has banned the advert because of stereotyping. they say it was deemed to cause harm, serious or widespread offence because it perpetuated the harmful stereotype that men are ineffective at childcare. i don't think! saw that men are ineffective at childcare. i don't think i saw the advert. they are eating cheese and they are distracted by the quality of the trees and the child they're looking after goes round on the carousel. you laugh, but monde elyse, who own the company, philadelphia, said it was meant to be funny and the father deliberately avoided the stereotype of being a
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new mother with the responsibility of childcare. one person was offended, one person complained. no children were hurt in the making of the advert. it was upheld. steve coogan has escaped a lengthy motoring band, he has a two—month ban, arguing in court he's about to film the new alan partridge series and its crucial his comedy character drives a car. in the new show he will be travelling around the countryside and his character can't go countryside and his character can't 9° by countryside and his character can't go by public transport because it is not who he is. the magistrates imposed only a two—month ban after hearing anything longer would make him cancel his latest bbc two series. i want to quickly talk about extravagance. alexis sanchez sanchez will have banked £41 million in wages from manchester united since he started. guess how much per goal? {8.2 he started. guess how much per goal? £8.2 million per goal. he has hardly
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played, has he? he has hardly played. its the money that completely... to quote steve smith, it does my head in a bit. completely... to quote steve smith, it does my head in a bit. thanks, sally! thank you! you're watching breakfast. this week marks 50 years since widespread violence broke out in northern ireland. the conflict, which became known as the troubles, lasted for three decades and more than 3,000 people died. one of the effects is that northern ireland now has a high rate of mental illness and researchers are warning that children are inheriting the problems of the older generation. 0ur ireland correspondent chris page has been speaking to some of those involved. half a century ago, life in northern ireland took on a grim new normality. shootings, bombings and riots became routine. the dreadful rhythm of murders and maiming is continued for 30 years. while the conflict can feel a long way in the
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past, the legacy of trauma is very much in the present. denise mullen is one of thousands living with it. loyalist gunmen attacked her parents at theirfamily loyalist gunmen attacked her parents at their family home loyalist gunmen attacked her parents at theirfamily home in 1975. her father, dennis, was killed. denise was just four. father, dennis, was killed. denise wasjust four. i can see my mother going out through the kitchen window. ican window. i can remember going back up the hallway and standing on the side of the cot and my brother, he was 13 months at the time. i then went back and sat with my father, which we now know was for over two hours, and i was covered... my nightdress was covered in his blood. she has a form of post—traumatic stress disorder, which means a certain smell brings back memories suddenly and terribly. once that smell comes over me it's like taking a panic attack, i take the shakes, my legs become weak, my mind...
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just everything becomes blank. and until that passes... and it can pass inafew until that passes... and it can pass in a few seconds or in a few minutes, but for the rest of the day, you just think you'd been beaten black and blue. mental health is a much more public issue now than it was during the decades of violence. members of the emergency services regularly witnessed appalling scenes and weren't offered official help. bob pollock remembers what happened after he and some fellow firefighters were caught up in a bomb. as we got to the station, one of the senior officers said, right, into the officer ‘s mess and he pulled a brandy up and he said drink that and home. the boys were back on duty within three or four days. the lack of support at the time partly explains why the psychological impact has only been revealed in recent years. researchers found 39% of people in northern ireland experienced a
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traumatic event during the troubles. at least 14% have mental health difficulties linked to the conflict. post—traumatic stress disorder is particularly common. almost 9% have definitive signs of the condition. and experts are concerned about what's called tra nsgenerational trauma, the effect on the children today. it's about the parents mental health and the community that child is raised in and the legacy of the conflict and communities. we have computer, communities affected by unemployment, drug use and low levels of educational attainment and all these things come together to create an environment that can be quite toxic for a child. northern ireland has the highest rate of mental—health problems and suicides in the uk, but it has proportionately lower levels of funding for mental health. the haunted history of this place is still holding huge challenges for its future. the survivors who've chosen to talk about their grief
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often didn't do so for a long time. many have just recently tried to seek out counselling, like denise mullen. it sometimes pains me to go andi mullen. it sometimes pains me to go and i think, gosh, i've got to go here again but i know i have to continue with it because i don't wa nt continue with it because i don't want in 20 or 30 years, or less even, to hit the wall. thank you to everybody for talking to us about all of those issues. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. we'll be here at 6:30pm with the major national headlines —— 6:30am. join us for that. see you in. good morning from bbc london, i'm tolu adeoye. a woman is in hospital after being hit by a marked police car in kensington. it happened on warwick road off the high street just before 10pm last night. her condition is not yet known. the police watchdog's has been informed.
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the cost of repairing potholes in the capital has more than doubled year on year. figures from the federation of small businesses show london councils have spent over £55 million fixing damage. southwark council received the largest number of pothole complaints, while kensington & chelsea had the least in the last financial year. hendon football club is offering free tickets to home games for anyone living with mental health issues. the seventh—tier club drew in their first home match of the season last night against the met police football team. the free ticket idea came after the death of dermot drummy, a former hendon fc player. this summer marks a century since the capital's first council housing. bbc london will be exploring the highs and lows with the help of residents. peter's been living on the becontree estate in dagenham for 75 years. he told us what it was like when he first moved there. it's like coming to the country. lovely parks and lots of places for
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the children to play. and, of course, as young children, we played out in the streets. there was no traffic. let's take a look at the travel situation now. minor the travel situation now. delays on the dlr and ba line. minor delays on the dlr and bakerloo line. 0therwise minor delays on the dlr and bakerloo line. otherwise a good service. 0n the roads — westminster bridge is closed nortbound to everything but buses, taxis and cyclists for security works. in bayswater, westbourne grove remains closed westbound from queensway to garway road following a fire at a restaurant. finally, in elmers end, croydon road is closed eastbound from elmers end road to clock house road for gas works. warwick road has now reopened following the accident i mentioned earlier. now the weather with kate kinsella. good morning. yesterday we saw temperatures in the sunshine reach 23 celsius. not so i'm afraid today. turning rather wet and rather windy. if you don't have the rain first thing, very quick to arrive. some
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heavy bursts, persistent and the wind will strengthen. a wet and windy wednesday. temperatures taking obviously a bit of a tumble compared to yesterday, between 16 and 18 celsius. there will still be a bit of rain around this evening but gradually it will start to clear away. dry overnight. still rather cloudy, limited clear spells but still rather humid, temperatures not dropping down to far, 14— 16 celsius. tomorrow some cloud around first thing, but they will clear, and similarto first thing, but they will clear, and similar to yesterday, a ridge of high pressure, drier and then warmer and then our next area of low pressure m oves and then our next area of low pressure moves in turning wet and windy for friday and into the weekend. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london in half—an—hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it's back to dan and louise. have to dan and louise. a lovely morning. bye for now.
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hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning: we'll hear from cricket stars andrew strauss and glenn mcgrath about the devastating effect cancer has had on their lives. also this morning, 16—year—old activist greta thunberg will leave the uk to cross the atlantic in a racing boat later. she's heading to a climate conference in new york. we'll speak to her captain just after 8am. and after 9am, we'll meet the contestants competing to design a bar at one of london's top hotels in new bbc show interior design masters. good morning. here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news: the family of 15—year—old nora quoirin have said their hearts are broken after her body was discovered in the malaysian jungle yesterday. a postmortem examination is under
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way, with the results expected later this morning. in a statement, her family thanked everyone involved in the large—scale operation to find her. they said nora had brought people together and had truly touched the whole world. the former chancellor, philip hammond, has accused boris johnson's government of trying to wreck the chance of a new brexit deal with the eu by making demands which brussels can never accept. speaking to the times newspaper in his first comments since stepping down last month, mr hammond said a no—deal brexit would be a betrayal of the 2016 referendum and would leave the uk diminished and inward—looking. a number 10 source said the uk will leave on 31st october despite mr hammond's "best efforts to the contra ry". flights are resuming in hong kong, after the airport authority obtained a court order to prevent people from "unlawfully obstructing" operations. it comes after thousands of pro—democracy protestors disrupted flights for two days. demonstrators are angry about what they see as china's attempt to clamp down
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on the territory‘s special status. rail passengers will find out today how much regulated fares will go up next year. it will be based on the retail prices index inflation figure forjuly. analysts expect the increase to be around 2.8%, which could lead to a rise of more than £100 in the annual cost of getting to work for many commuters. using social media isn't directly harming teenagers but it can reduce the time they spend on healthy activities, such as sleeping and exercising, according to a study in the lancet. to combat this, researchers suggest parents should ban phones from bedrooms after 10pm and encourage more physical activity. the study also found girls were particularly vulnerable to cyber—bullying, which could lead to psychological distress. for parents, we suggest a focus on sleep, physical activity, and preventing bullying and making sure what kids are watching is safe,
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and don't focus on worrying about how much time they are spending on social media or on their smartphones. labour has outlined proposals that would prevent universities from offering places based on predicted grades. it says the current system is "deeply unfair" and that students should only be allowed to apply when they've had their exam results. but universities say changes would be complex. if they haven't got parental support and are making rash decisions in the summer, that isn't fair to them and might disadvantage those very people that we want to help. so it will require some really big change from secondary schools, from awarding bodies, and from higher education institutions. not insurmountable but those practical considerations need to be thought through. four british men have been arrested in australia and new zealand following a drugs raid targeting a uk—based organised crime syndicate. queensland police say it's one of the region's largest—ever drug seizures of mdma and methamphetamine, which they say was of the highest purity,
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with an estimated street value of almost £60 million. three british men who helped restrain a man with a knife in central sydney have described their "scary" confrontation with the suspect. lee cuthbert, paul 0'shaughnessy and luke 0'shaughnessy, all from greater manchester, were working in an office nearby when they heard a commotion outside and ran out to help. the armed man had already stabbed a woman in the street and has since been linked to a second woman's body found nearby. the three men have been hailed as heroes — this is what they had to say to channel nine in australia this morning. we can tell you are quite exhausted by the past 2a hours. we can tell you are quite exhausted by the past 24 hours. you don't have to thank us. for us, being british people overseas, this is our second home. we love australia, it is an
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amazing place. and i tell you right now, we had this conversation in the car, if it happened again we would do it again. brave man, would you do that? yes, held them down with i think the chairand a milk yes, held them down with i think the chair and a milk crate. carol, what did she say about the weather? well, it won't be great for lord's, that's what it seems to be doing. one of the sporting occasions of the year is due to get started this morning, if it's dry enough. the lord's ashes test is scheduled to begin at 11am and england urgently need a win. australia won the first test and england have turned to this man, jofra archer, to get them back into it. he's a fast bowler who was the star of england's world cup victory last month. so can he turn it around? if you ask him, he will say yes. and that's what you want, young guys coming in full of confidence and belief in their own ability, and
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someone belief in their own ability, and someone who won't shy away from any challenge. it is great to have characters like that in the dressing room, it feeds off the rest of the quys room, it feeds off the rest of the guys as well. it was a terrible night for celtic. they won't play in the champions league this season after being beaten by romanian side cluj. it was 1—1 after the first leg and celtic led twice on the night, but cluj scored two goals late on to go through 5—4 on aggregate. celtic will now go into the play—offs for the europa league. first of all, there was a warning beforehand. the one in the beginning, he did the exact same thing again. at half time we got off them a little bit and got the right response. we shot ourselves in the foot. we had the lead twice. we'll see a bit of footballing history tonight, as a female referee
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takes charge of a major european men's match for the very first time. here's stephanie frappart refereeing the final of the women's world cup earlier this summer, and tonight she's in charge as liverpool play chelsea in istanbul. the assistant referees are both female too. i think there is not a lot of difference, because football is the same. 0nly teams play differently, but as a man or as a woman, that we cannot referee the same game between women and men, so for me it's the same because refereeing is the same. so football is the same, it is the same rules, so i will do the same as with the women's leagues. there's another first about that match in istanbul this evening: it's the first all—english european super cup. it pits champions league winners liverpool against chelsea, who won the europa league. it's important as a club like chelsea that we give everything to try and win it, because yes, it does mean something, it means something for us as another trophy, as a club, and for me it would be a really
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nice start for me personally. but more than that, a feeling for the players with the season coming up that we can compete against liverpool, win a cup in our name that goes down in our history and go on from there. everything is prepared for a final, obviously, so we have to make sure we're ready for a final. we have to make a few decisions about lineup and stuff like this that can be kind of a little bit unpredictable, probably for the opponent as well, because we don't know how they play, why should they know how we play? andy murray says he's had some second thoughts about turning down the opportunity to play singles at the us open. he lost his first match back in singles tennis at the cincinnati masters, and said no to a wildcard for flushing meadows because his body's not ready to play five set matches yet. but he forgot that the qualifying matches are over three sets.
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now he has missed his chance. but i think it is for the best, he is coming back quickly enough. climbing becomes an olympic sport next year at the tokyo games, so it's a pretty good time for britain to start winning medals in it. that's what shauna coxey did yesterday. her bronze in the women's bouldering was the first medal britain's ever won at climbing's world championships. if she can scramble to success in the combined event next week, she'll be sure of a place at the olympics. and finally, boxing announcer michael buffer has one of the most recognisable voices in sport. let's get this party started! he travels the world announcing fights and he's known for his "let's get ready to rumble" catchphrase. he could, though, have competition from someone who works at bank underground station.
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let's get ready to travel! i quite like that. anything to make your commute more fun. he gets up to $100,000 every time. and he has patented it as well, let's get ready to rumble. the second test of the ashes series gets under way at lord's later and tomorrow the famous cricket ground will turn red to mark ruth strauss foundation day. it's part of an initiative set up by former england captain andrew strauss, who lost his wife to lung cancer in december. a similar organisation was also set up in sydney by former australian fast bowler glenn mcgrath, who lost his wife to breast cancer. the bbc‘s cricket correspondent jonathan agnew has been speaking to both men for test match special.
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a tough seven months since ruth died and probably an even tougher 12 months leading up to her death. but, you know, i think one thing you realise when you've got young kids is that life doesn't stand still, it always moves forward. they're busy, they're at school and there is plenty ofjobs to do in and around the house. so, i've been very much on duty and just navigating our way through it one day at a time, really. it's definitely got a bit easier, but at the same time, that sort of grief doesn't leave you and you just have days where you remember, and that is part of the process, i suppose. yeah, hence why you've focused on bereavement counselling and preparation for the trust. yeah, well, you know, i think what ruth and i were both most petrified about was the effect this was going to have on the kids. and so, for us, in particular, going to our counsellor, jenny thomas, who is a child grief and loss counsellor,
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and just explaining the situation, and for her to actually say to us, "this won't be the end of them. it's going to change their life, but that doesn't mean they can't have a great life." and for ruth to hear that was just, like, the weight of the world came off her shoulders, and for me also, who, you know, getting my head around the idea of having to look after them going forward, it was a huge source of comfort for me as well. yeah. i don't have you down as a big crier, glenn, but i guess it would be pretty emotional. oh, i had my moments, i'm sure. i mean, did you have the same sort of experience as andrew with... 0h, very much. just listening to straussy there brought back so many memories. once we realised that was it, three days out to telljames and holly that mummy was going to pass away... and how old were they then? ..was easily the hardest thing i've ever had to do. and just hearing andrew there, just takes you right back there. and thenjane was at home, we had a nurse at home sort of looking after her, and she passed away there,
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and those memories are always going to be there. but, unfortunately, there's a lot of people that go through something very similar, and if we can make life a little bit easier in some way, the mcgrath foundation, it's about support and awareness. what straussy's doing, sort of similar, a little bit different, but, again, that support and making life just a little bit easier in a pretty...pretty terrible time. yeah, yeah. listen, to glenn, and an amazing success of the mcgrath foundation. i mean, does that sort of, again, give you more resolve as to what we're going to enjoy? i mean, you guys have paved the way. it makes us easier for those of us that follow in that sense. but i hope we can just be — you know, it's year one for us. we're not expecting to be all singing, all dancing year one. but if we can just, in some way, replicate what they've done, then i'll be very happy. and i know that ruth will be looking down, feeling very sort of honoured, a bit embarrassed and very proud as well that we've able to do something that really does make a difference.
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it was lovely because andrew strauss came in here and talked to us about all of that a few months ago. you can hear more of that conversation between glenn mcgrath, andrew strauss and jonathan agnew on test match special today, and you'll be able to download it as a podcast via bbc sounds. some of those interviews on test match special are brilliant with the brea ks match special are brilliant with the breaks in play. time to talk. 45 minutes to get a chance to talk about that. instead of 45 seconds! here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. not looking great? rain on the cards today and the next couple of days with a brief respite tomorrow. today we have a cloudy start and that means temperatures overnight have held up for most of the uk and today we're seeing rain at times. we started with clear skies in the sunshine yesterday. parts of the east held onto them overnight, so temperatures here dip, but as cloud and rain came from the west temperatures are still in
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double figures. not as cold a start to the day as it was yesterday in the west. you can see the rain in forecast today, coming in from the south—west, it will be heavy and thundery, especially in the afternoon in the east midlands, anywhere from lincolnshire, leicestershire, east anglia and the south—east and at the same time we have a band of rain coming in from north—east scotland and northern ireland and that will be sunday and heavyin ireland and that will be sunday and heavy in places. the driest weather will be in eastern scotland and north—east england for the longest. behind this band of rain in england and wales it will brighten up but there will be a lot of cloud around and still some showers. breezy and blustery around the showers. highs of 14-20, blustery around the showers. highs of 14—20, so temperatures a bit disappointing for this stage in august. through the evening and overnight we lose the first band of rain, the first moves out of northern ireland and scotland, resting in the northern isles, and thenit resting in the northern isles, and then it will be a mild night with temperatures staying in double
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figures. tomorrow we have the re m na nts of figures. tomorrow we have the remnants of the front clearing from the north and then we've got a ridge of high pressure across us before the next area of low pressure comes in from the atlantic. there the rain across 0rkney and shetland clearing away, it will brighten up here, but for much of the uk tomorrow under that ridge it's going to be dry and also quite sunny. there will be some showers around. it's not going to be bone dry. in the sunshine, temperatures could well get up to 23 degrees, 73 fahrenheit in old currency. in the west, the cloud will thicken in the afternoon with more showers coming and that's because the low pressure is approaching. here the low pressure comes, it will be with us notjust on friday but on the weekend and with its attendant fronts it will bring rain on friday. but look at the squeezed isobars, telling us it's also going to be pretty windy. we start on a dry note in the south—east and then the rain comes
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in quite smartly from the west, pushing steadily east across all areas through the course of friday. behind it, again, brightening up but still some showers around and temperatures 15—20. if you're in some rain or heavy showers, that will pull the temperature back. as we head into the weekend, our low pressure is still with us just a bit closer. you can see with the type squeeze on the isobars, especially on saturday in the north—west, there will be rain here, showery outbreaks, moving from west to east across england and wales. sunday will be particularly windy, worth noting if you have outdoor plans, this is what it looks like. dan and lou. carol, thanks so much, we'll look out what happens today and over the weekend. pretty miserable, it could spoil the cricket for the start of the second test at lord's. carol will more on that later with the weather and sally has more on the cricket later.
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secret weather! shut up! for thousands of students on vocational courses, today is results day. half of all qualifications awarded to16—, 17— and 18—year—olds last year were for this kind of training. steph's at a college in lincolnshire finding out more. morning, steph. i'm sure you're going to have guest after guest after gift today. good morning —— after guest. good morning. i've got loads this morning. i'm trying to get as many people getting their results on tv as possible today, because we're celebrating all their hard work today. i'm just outside boston college, they have thousands of stu d e nts college, they have thousands of students doing vocational courses and these guys are doing transport maintenance. look at your certificate in your hand, love it! how did you do? i did fabulous hopefully, i got really good help. look at you! i did get a lot of
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help. let's get your face on tv. he's done brilliantly, what did you get? level one diploma, a pass, the low end of maintenance on vehicles. what next for you? i'm going to go to diploma level two, maintenance and hopefully go to level three in the end. one day, you want this to be your full—time career?” the end. one day, you want this to be your full-time career? i love ca rs be your full-time career? i love cars and always wanted to be a mechanic. lots of fronts. cars and always wanted to be a mechanic. lots of fronts. thanks very much and i'll let you get back to it. quite a day with the excitement and then someone thrusts a camera in yourface! i'm going to do it to someone else, taylor! you have been doing plumbing, how did you do? i got four passes and six distinctions. distinction is top of the box, isn't it? what next? level two plumbing next year and after
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level two i'm going to hopefully become a self—employed plumber. level two i'm going to hopefully become a self-employed plumber. and then you can charge a fortune! good luck! this is basically a set up of some of the things they teach. we've gotjoinery over there, bricklaying, sport science, computing over there too and health and social care. this isa too and health and social care. this is a massive one. lauren has her certificate here what did you get? distinction distinction merit in health and social care. well done. you want to be a nurse. what's interesting about you is your placements, what did you do?” interesting about you is your placements, what did you do? i did one at a care home, and that was different, completely different to being ina different, completely different to being in a school and then i did one with a school with additional needs, completely different to the care home but all exciting and good to learn different skills. home but all exciting and good to learn different skills. is that how you learn best, practically? it is good to learn hands-on rather than ina book good to learn hands-on rather than in a book because you get to see what it is in real life.
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in a book because you get to see what it is in real life. did you a lwa ys what it is in real life. did you always know you wanted to be a nurse? i always wanted to work in health and social care but it took mea health and social care but it took me a while to work out where specifically i wanted to work. earlier we were talking about what it's like compared to your mates doing pure academia, how does it feel for you compared to your mates doing a—levels? feel for you compared to your mates doing a-levels? i feel less stressed because my friends are doing exams, but this is coursework based. i do it as it comes in, weekly assignments, rather than building up toa assignments, rather than building up to a big exam. lots of people think thatis to a big exam. lots of people think that is stressful, doing coursework every week! joe is the principal of boston college, you must be so proud of everyone? they have been amazing, they put in so much effort. look at all the work they're doing. this is all the work they're doing. this is a madagascan vanilla desert. looking at these guys... they are doing amazing placements. look, give us a
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hello! luke has been doing a michelin star restaurant placement —— luke. michelin star restaurant placement -- luke. he's been with raymonda plant at le manoir down south and after he finishes his level three he wants to get a trial shift —— raymond blanc. funding is an issue, tell us what it means for you. we've had ten years of a 30% cut in funding and we have staff cuts. we have world—class engineers. the equipment in there is £130,000 worth, but this is what the industry needs. employers want highly skilled young graduates and we are providing the practical skills for that but we have a shortfall of £1000 per student to catch up with other parts of the education sector. and you work closely with employers. what difference does that make? work closely with employers. what difference does that make?m work closely with employers. what difference does that make? it makes a huge difference because our work placements are required to work with
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employers. we work with 400 every year, from apprenticeships to study programmes, year, from apprenticeships to study programmes, and that means students are coming out of college notjust with a certificate but the skills to enter the workplace and deliver what we need for the economy. what lots of people might guys will go to university and higher education with the training they've done here. absolutely. 0f the training they've done here. absolutely. of our students, 93% go to higher education or straight into the workplace and in the sector, about 1 the workplace and in the sector, about! million students out of couege about! million students out of cohegeis about! million students out of college is go to university every year. there is talk at the moment about an overhaul to further education. there's been a report out saying that it's been neglected it's fair to say by successive governments, and now there's this talk of these t—levels. what are they? and now there's this talk of these t-levels. what are they? technical qualifications that require occupational competence as well as skills for the workplace but the
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major problem is the work basement and that could disadvantage young workers in the areas. getting the students out to work placement, we haven't got the bus transport infrastructure and it's very expensive for us as a college to get students to placement and to do 215 hours. if you're in a rural community you can double that because of the travel. we don't want to disadvantage anyone in those communities. still a lot to be worked out. we've had policy change after policy change and we need stability and the funding to back it up. thank you very much. it is lovely to show off all these different skills they've been learning because i tell you what, this place this morning was rammed at 5am and it's not often you see educational establishments with young people here at that time! i'm going to get my car serviced here, a facial and a pedicure, what else can
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i get? some beautiful desserts! fantastic, steph. thanks very much. really inspiring. those puddings looked magnificent. fantastic. if they could have done that —— i could have done that on masterchef, who knows? fantastic skills, the next levels for some of them, and jo was talking about the funding. andrea leadsom will be talking to us later from labour and if you've got people going to university, they want to change the way university works. you get through clearing and you apply for university once you get your results. for university once you get your results. very relevant because a—level results, as i'm sure you know, are tomorrow. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london, i'm tolu adeoye. a woman is in hospital
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after being hit by a marked police car in kensington. it happened on warwick road off the high street just before 10pm last night. her condition is not yet known. the police watchdog has been informed. the cost of repairing potholes in the capital has more than doubled year on year. figures from the federation of small businesses show london councils have spent over £55 million fixing damage. southwark council received the largest number of complaints, while kensington & chelsea had the fewest in the last financial year. hendon football club is offering free tickets to home games for anyone living with mental health issues. the seventh—tier club drew in their first home match of the season last night against the met police football team. the free ticket idea came after the death of dermot drummy, a former hendon fc player. this summer marks a century since the capital's first council housing. bbc london will be exploring the highs and lows with the help of residents. peter's been living on the becontree estate in dagenham
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for 75 years. he told us what it was like when he first moved there. it's like coming to the country. lovely parks and lots of places for the children to play. and, of course, as young children, we played out in the streets. there was no traffic. let's take a look at the travel situation now. the bakerloo line has minor delays after a signal failure at baker street. 0therwise otherwise it's a good service. 0n the roads, westminster bridge is closed nortbound to everything but buses, taxis and cyclists for security works. in bayswater, westbourne grove remains closed westbound from queensway to garway road following a fire at a restaurant. in elmers end, croydon road is closed eastbound from elmers end road to clock house road for gas works. finally, warwick road has now reopened following the accident i mentioed earlier. now the weather with kate kinsella. good morning. well, yesterday we saw temperatures
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in the sunshine reach 23 celsius. not so, i'm afraid, today. it's turning rather wet and rather windy. if you don't have the rain first thing, it's very quick to arrive. some heavy bursts, persistent, quite a lot of rain in a short space of time, and the wind is going to strengthen as well. a wet and windy wednesday. temperatures taking obviously a bit of a tumble compared to yesterday — between 16 and 18 celsius. now, there'll still be a bit of rain around this evening, but gradually it will start to clear away. drier overnight. still rather cloudy, limited clear spells, but quite humid. temperatures not dropping down to far, 14—16 celsius. for tomorrow, bit of cloud and showers around first thing, but they'll clear. and tomorrow, very similar to yesterday — a ridge of high pressure tries to build in. so a bit more sunshine. drier and a little but warmer again, and then our next area of low pressure feeds in, turning wet and windy for friday and into the weekend. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half—an—hour.
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plenty more on our website at the usual address. have at the usual address. a lovely morning until then. bye for now. at the usual address. good morning, welcome to breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. 0ur headlines today: the family of nora quoirin pay tribute to their "most precious girl" as her post mortem examination is held in malaysia.
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former chancellor philip hammond launches an attack on the prime minister, accusing him of wrecking the uk's chances of getting a deal with the eu. a nervous wait for vocational students. nearly 80,000 find out their btec level 3 qualifications today, the biggest single results day for vocational courses. england send for their archer. 1—0 down in the ashes series, jofra archer is ready to play his first test match for england. but they're more likely to be dodging showers than bouncers at lord's. losing a wife and mum to cancer — cricketing legend andrew strauss tells us how he tried to prepare their children. it doesn't mean they can't have a great life, and for ruth to hear that, the weight of the world came off her shoulders, and for me it was getting my head around the idea of looking after them going forward, and it was a huge source of comfort.
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a cloudy day and a wet one ahead. the driest conditions for the longest eastern scotland and north—east england. it's wednesday the 14th of august. our top story: the family of 15—year—old nora quoirin have said their hearts are broken after her body was discovered in the malaysian jungle yesterday. a postmortem examination is under way, with the results expected later this morning. andy moore reports. nora's family released a new photo of the 15—year—old they called their "most precious girl". ina in a statement, they said:.
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a helicopter lifted nora's body out of the dense jungle, where it was found near a waterfall. it was winched up in a cage, supported by a police officer. the volunteers who found nora's body said one of their volunteers had found her as they searched near a stream. they were careful not to touch the body so as to not disturb any potential evidence. nora's family said her learning difficulties were so severe, she would never have left the bedroom through the window on her own. she was only wearing her nightclothes. they suspect foul play. police are keeping an open mind, saying they can't rule out a possible criminal enquiry. so much depends on the results of the postmortem examination, which started a few hours ago. nora's family have already identified her body in hospital. it is so difficult to describe, but they are really
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distraught in grief, and i feel the same. to lose a child, yeah, it's terrible. the search that lasted ten days is now over. the results of the postmortem examination will go to the attorney general, who will decide if the police need to investigate further. let's get the latest from our south east asia correspondent, howard johnson, who's in seremban. thank you for coming 0n breakfast. we are expecting that postmortem result in just we are expecting that postmortem result injust a we are expecting that postmortem result in just a few hours, is that right? at the moment i think it will be in about an hour's time at the minimum, but we have been waiting here this morning for five hours. the pathologist arrived about five hours ago, and he began his postmortem examination of nora's body. we are expecting results later
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today and we will bring them to you when we get them. we also heard a bbc journalist has been when we get them. we also heard a bbcjournalist has been speaking with one of the hikers who went to find the body yesterday. he said the two groups went down towards the stream, two on each side, and you can't see the stream. they found her body in an l shape in the stream. they weren't sure if she was in the water or on the bank, the stream was shallow. we will find out hopefully more about whether this was a criminal act, if she was dumped there. and i have to say, this is speculation, or whether she could have been swept away by the water close to the resort. there is a river near there, but we don't know if this stream is connected to that river. we will find out more details later from the postmortem examination. it is expected that we
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might get that result within the next hour or the next few hours. we will bring you the news as soon as we get it. the former chancellor, phillip hammond, has accused boris johnson's government of trying to wreck the chance of a new brexit deal with the eu, by making demands which brussels can never accept. in his first comments since stepping down last month, mr hammond said a no—deal brexit would be a "betrayal of the 2016 referendum". writing in the times, he said it was a "myth that a no—deal exit will be painless". he argues that rather than resulting in a "powerful independent" uk, "the reality would be a diminished and inward—looking little england". 0ur political correspondent nick eardley is in westminster for us this morning — strong words from the former chancellor this morning. these are strong words. they are indeed. philip hammond left government because he didn't agree with boris johnson's government because he didn't agree with borisjohnson's strategy, but he is saying this morning that he thinks the new pm has gone too far in what he is calling for. saying that you have to get rid completely
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of parts of the deal that had already been agreed with europe by theresa may, he thinks that instead of just negotiating in theresa may, he thinks that instead ofjust negotiating in a hard way, borisjohnson is actually adopting a wrecking strategy now, which means europe cannot agree to the changes he wants. number ten say that the chancellor is somebody who put, sorry, the former chancellor, was putting up roadblocks when he was in government, and that he made it difficult for the uk to prepare. they are absolutely certain that no matter what happens the uk is leaving the eu on the 31st of 0ctober. it sets up this almighty parliamentary battle in a few weeks' time, and mps are spending their summer holidays on the phone, texting each other, e—mailing, trying to figure out what they can do to stop borisjohnson taking the uk out of the eu on the 31st of 0ctober without a deal. there is a
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big battle coming. tens of thousands of people are getting their vocational qualification results today. steph's at a further education college in lincolnshire for us this morning. good morning. good morning. you can see a flavour behind me of some of the types of vocational qualifications these guys have been doing. everything from transport maintenance over there. plumbing, joinery, health and social care. the list goes on. i vocational, what we mean isa list goes on. i vocational, what we mean is a big part of their assessment is practical. you can see here this morning that the bricklaying that is going on, he will be assessed on the practical side of it. also employers are worked with, to have work
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placements. if you look at how many people are doing these kinds of qualifications, there are about 5 million across all ages. if you look specifically at 16—18 —year—old, you think it is all about a—levels but in fact there are more people doing vocational qualifications between 16 and 18 in england, about 325,000, which compares to about 300,000 doing a—levels. it is a big business, places like this called further education colleges, and they have seen harsh funding cuts over the last ten years. a lot of pressure on them to be able to afford to bring in... you can see all of this expensive kit needed to be able to do that practical training, and it is a system the government is looking at overhauling. 0ne government is looking at overhauling. one of the pm's first speeches was talking about how it
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has been neglected and it needs more support and funding. they are thinking about bringing in something called t—levels next year. we have some of these guys telling us what they have been doing.” some of these guys telling us what they have been doing. i think steph is more excited than some of those getting the results today! rail passengers will find out today how much regulated fares will go up next year. it will be based on the retail prices index inflation figure forjuly. analysts expect the increase to be around two point 8%, which could lead to a rise of more than £100 in the annual cost of getting to work for many commuters. labour has outlined proposals that would prevent universities from offering places based on predicted grades. it says the current system is "deeply unfair" and that students should only be allowed to apply when they've had their exam results. but universities say changes would be complex. i think you are talking to someone
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about that later. lots of people tomorrow will be going through what is the system now, which is clearing, as well. lots of discussion about that. on the clearing issue as well, it can be very stressful, but if you look at some of the figures, i think 87% of stu d e nts some of the figures, i think 87% of students actually say clearing is what helps them get a place at university. changing it would involve a big change to the school year, as well. some of you will be watching, you will be getting your a—level results tomorrow, and pa rents a—level results tomorrow, and parents who are a bit anxious on behalf of their children, get in touch if you want to. in australia, they have a system where, the same system that angela was talking about, applying for further education after you have your results. but they have their exams in november, so you split
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should around later in the year and apply later. hundreds of parents who say their babies were effected by a pregnancy test drug called primodos in the 1960s and 70s are preparing to sue its makers and the government. primodos was launched in the uk in 1959 and used by thousands of women before concerns about its use became known. 0ne dose of primodos equates to 40 oral contraceptive pills. in 1975, a warning appeared on packets saying the drug may cause congenital abnormalities. in 1978, primodos was taken off the market amid fears of its effects on unborn children. ever since, parents have been campaigning to prove a suggested link between use of the drug, and a wide range of serious birth defects including cleft lip and palate, limb deformities and heart abnormalities. now they're preparing to take legal action. we're joined now by the claimants'
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solicitor, lisa lu nt, and one parent effected by this, marie lyon. you have only just you have onlyjust sat down, so who is who? marie, and lisa. thank you very much. tell us a bit about what happened to you, marie.” very much. tell us a bit about what happened to you, marie. i went to my doctor to check if i was pregnant, because it was my first pregnancy, andi because it was my first pregnancy, and i assumed it would be an examination or a urine test. i was instead given to tablets, as you said, the equivalent of 40 oral contraceptives, but i didn't know at the time. i took those tablets. 0ne that particular day, 112 —— the other 112 hours later. the doctor said, if you don't believe you are pregnant. it seemed so simple. i didn't ask what was in it, you don't
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generally. good pregnancy, and sarah was born, and her arm was missing from just below the elbow, with a tiny little pad and digits that should have been the rest of her arm and fingers. no explanation. what was said to me was, these things happen. i accepted that, that wasn't a problem. sarah was very determined, a very adventurous child, it didn't seem to hold her back. 0bviously child, it didn't seem to hold her back. obviously in ways it did but she was quite determined. and it was when she was eight years old, in 1978, i received a phone call from this lady who said to me, i believe you have a child who has some form of disability, and can i ask what ta blets of disability, and can i ask what tablets she took? i said, i didn't ta ke tablets she took? i said, i didn't take any, why would i take tablets? she did a bit of further questioning and then she said what happened when you went to the doctor, and then...
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did you remember? still didn't click. she said to me, do you realise what was in them? and i said no, ididn't realise what was in them? and i said no, i didn't ask, my doctor gave it to me. this is replicated by so many of our members, because there was no patient information leaflet, no explanation, we were never told it was a test, ever. so, i think with hindsight you think how stupid were we, but on the day and at that time, that was really the culture i think of your doctor. as marie says, many people have been through this. what is the scale of the problem? people have been through this. what is the scale of the problem?” people have been through this. what is the scale of the problem? i don't think we know the true scale, i think we know the true scale, i think we know the true scale, i think we have just scratched the surface. we have around 200 clients, over 200 clients, but i think you may have seen the recent publicity on the other news channels, and every time there is any publicity,
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we always get new clients, because people don't realise. like marie's story, mothers don't make the connection. it is only when they see a news article that they make that connection and then approach their child. how are they saying it's affected them? they are life changing injuries, they range from marie's abnormality, a learning one, to congenital heart defects, brain injury. many of these clients have required lifelong care. what has the response been from the drug companies who produce... ? you are smiling, have they shut the doors down and said not ask? it's a typical response and always will be, protect and deny —— not us. unfortunately that continues with the regulators because they're in the regulators because they're in the same position. they have many
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opportunities to take the drug off the market but they never did —— had. what they will do is, like you said, pullup had. what they will do is, like you said, pull up the drawbridge and hope it goes away. there have been studies into this. two of the pharmaceutical companies claim an expert working group concluded the new studies you highlighted don't show a causal association between these pregnancy tests a nd association between these pregnancy tests and birth defects. the problem in the past has always been the defendant can point to studies that support their case to say there is no causal connection, and the claimants equally have been able to point to studies that support their case that there is a causal connection between the drug and the birth abnormalities. but the difference recently has been professor karl heller going's meta—analysis, and that's the first time that's ever been done, and that show that there is a causal association between the pregnancy tests a nd association between the pregnancy tests and the birth abnormalities.
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marie, you're prepared for a fight and willing to take this as far as it can go? i've been fighting since 1978 and i'm not going to stop now! too many people's lives have been changed... i won't say ruined because they love their children, i won't say ruined because they love theirchildren, and i won't say ruined because they love their children, and there are benefits from different aspects of that, but nevertheless their lives have been changed and altered beyond recognition for some of them and in one instance we've had two parents who have never had a night together because one of them always has to sleep with a son, who is now in his 50s. and the reason is he fits consta ntly 50s. and the reason is he fits constantly through the night, so they can't afford to leave him. the father is now 8! and the mother is in her late 70s. this legal action is more about taking care of those people... life changing. good lord, yes. thank you for both coming into speak to us, appreciate your time.
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a couple of bits of information, bayer denies premadasa was responsible for causing any deformities in children and responding to the university of 0xford research, they say they will defend themselves vigorously in court. the fight continues. we will continue watching it on bbc brea kfast. we will continue watching it on bbc breakfast. thanks very much. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. if you're a big fan of the cricket and waiting to see if england can level up the ashes, i'm not sure carol has the best news for today. good morning carol. where looking at interruptions to play today with rain on and off through the day —— we're looking. for some, a stunning start and in parts of the highlands, 3.6 last night. —— sunny. this is a weather
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watcher photo from lossiemouth. fairly cloudy but some will start with a bright note but it won't last. we're looking at rain at times and some of will be heavy and thundery. we start with clear skies but the cloud has been romping in from the west during the early hours, introducing rain. quite a bit of rain in the forecast today. a band moving through wales, the midlands, into the south—east and that will continue to journey eastwards, heavy and thundery, particularly in the afternoon. another one sweeping through the north currently and another one in north—west scotland and northern ireland and that one will be heavy and thundery at times. light circles indicate the mean wind speeds and blustery around those showers. the driest conditions will be eastern scotla nd driest conditions will be eastern scotland and north—east england for the longest. behind this band of rain it will brighten up, but i use that term loosely because it will still be fairly cloudy with still
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showers. temperatures today, 14—20, but the temperature coming down in heavy bursts of rain or the heavy showers. through this evening and overnight, there goes the first and clearing off into the north sea and the second band leaves northern ireland and moved across scotland, resting in the northern ireland. behind it a few showers, not as cold as the nightjust gone but cold in the north and east and that's because there will be more cloud around and also looking at south—westerly winds. as we head on through thursday, we got the re m na nts of through thursday, we got the remnants of the weather front across the north—west and a ridge of high pressure before the next area of low pressure before the next area of low pressure comes our way. that means we start with rain in the northern ireland, that moves away, then a largely dry day with sunshine but not bone dry because we'll still have some showers knocking around. temperature—wise tomorrow in prolonged spells of sunshine, up to 23. but through the day, especially the latter part of the day, you'll notice in the west cloud will
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thicken and we'll see a few showers heralding the arrival of that area of low pressure i pointed out a geoff ago. here it comes, it's going to be with us through the weekend and it will bring heavy rain on friday. all the isobars are squeezed, indicating it will turn windy as well. friday, we start on a dry note in the south—east and then the rain comes in, marching in from the rain comes in, marching in from the west to the east. brighter skies behind it but there will still be hefty showers around and feeling cool in all of this. to wind strengthening, still windy on saturday but even windier on saturday. -- the wind. thank you for all that lovely rain, which the gardeners will like! did we cut carol off there? thanks for being with us on this wednesday morning on bbc breakfast. shall we call it when wednesday? climate change activist
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greta thunberg is about to set off from the uk to spend two weeks sailing over the north atlantic in a boat with no toilet, kitchen or privacy. the 16—year—old is due to attend a crucial climate conference in new york, but has stopped flying for environmental reasons. 0ur chief environment correspondent justin rowlatt is in plymouth, where the boat will depart from today. take us through the journey, what's it going to be like over the coming weeks and days? i've been out on the boat and it's an extraordinary boat. a really powerful sailing vote, but it's going to be very rough. it's a very fa st going to be very rough. it's a very fast boat. she will be leaving from the quay in plymouth. as you heard from carol, the rain is pretty rough, the rain coming from the west and we're right in the west of england it is windy and raining. the boat is at the end of the quay, they're getting everything ready with last—minute preparations and getting everything ready for a journey that will take two weeks and feel how they press conference later
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—— have a. i'm with two people inspired by greta thunberg, scarlet and frances. scarlet, what was it about greta's message that inspired you? you began co—ordinating school strikes like greta. idida strikes like greta. i did a level politics when i was !3 andl i did a level politics when i was !3 and i saw the apparent inaction from the government on the climate and the government on the climate and the need for a green new deal —— a level. because we're disenfranchised there's no way to show that through there's no way to show that through the government so when greta did the strikes it was a transformative way of showing that action needed to be taken, sol of showing that action needed to be taken, so i got behind it because that's how we make change. and what about you, frances. by doing these school strikes, that is what greta was famous for, she began doing it almost exactly a year ago today. you're sacrificing your own education to make this point. is that really a sacrifice worth making? aren't there other ways you
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can making? aren't there other ways you ca n protest? we've tried other ways, we've tried petitions, everything, but ultimately people in power aren't listening to us. we can catch up with our home work but we can't reverse the climate crisis. now we're notjust calling reverse the climate crisis. now we're not just calling for youth strikes, we call for workers tojoin with us on the 22nd of september. we know we've been heard, adults have heard our cries and we want them to cry with us and feel our fear for our futures and act with us and stand with us on the streets on the 20th of september. how many people do you think will rally with you?” million on the 20th of september.” million on the 20th of september.” million in the uk but worldwide? tens of millions. million in the uk but worldwide? tens of millions. that's what you're hoping for! one thing, you sale dinghies for team gb. what do you think of militsiya, the boat greta will be on, and what do you think of the boat? it is rapid, the forefront
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of boating technology. 60 foot, the fastest foiling monohulls and it will be incredibly daunting but incredible experience for her. very rough. it won't be the most comfortable, which is why she is such an inspiration for doing this to reduce using fossil fuels. such an inspiration for doing this to reduce using fossilfuels. thanks very much and we will be on the quay in plymouth watching greta leave later on today. thanks very much. watching pictures of the boat, it is a truly stunning piece of... i was going to say machinery but it's absolutely beautiful. thank you. we will be back there later. we'll be talking about the ashes and possible changes to applying to university with angela raynor from the labour party and loads coming your way between now and 9:15am. and we'll talk about a new interior design show, which is excellent stop you love it! -- which is excellent
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stop you love it! —— which is excellent. you love it! time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london, i'm tolu adeoye. a woman is in hospital after being hit by a marked police car in kensington. it happened on warwick road off the high street just before 10 last night. her condition is not yet known. the police watchdog has been informed. the cost of repairing potholes in the capital has gone up by more than 50% since last year. figures from the federation of small businesses show london councils have spent £55 million fixing damage. southwark council received the largest number of complaints, while kensington & chelsea had the fewest in the last financial year. hendon football club is offering free tickets to home games for anyone living with mental health issues. the seventh tier club drew in their first home match of the season last night against the met police football team. the free ticket idea came after the death of dermot drummy, a former hendon fc player. this summer marks a century since the capital's first council housing.
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bbc london will be exploring the highs and lows with the help of residents. peter's been living on the becontree estate in dagenham for 75 years. he told us what it was like when he first moved there. it's like coming to the country. lovely parks and lots of places for the children to play. and, of course, as young children, we played out in the streets. there was no traffic. let's take a look at the travel situation now. the bakerloo line has minor delays after a signalfailure at baker street. 0n the roads, westminster bridge is closed nortbound to everything but buses, taxis and cyclists for security works. in bayswater, westbourne grove remains closed westbound from queensway to garway road following a fire at a restaurant. in elmers end, croydon road is closed eastbound from elmers end road to clock house road for gas works. finally warwick road has now reopened following the accident i mentioned earlier.
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now the weather with kate kinsella. good morning. well, yesterday we saw temperatures in the sunshine reach 23 celsius. not so, i'm afraid, today. it's turning rather wet and rather windy. if you don't have the rain first thing, it's very quick to arrive. some heavy bursts, persistent, quite a lot of rain in a short space of time, and the wind is going to strengthen as well. a wet and windy wednesday. temperatures taking obviously a bit of a tumble compared to yesterday — between 16 and 18 celsius. now, there'll still be a bit of rain around this evening, but gradually it will start to clear away. drier overnight. still rather cloudy, limited clear spells, but quite humid. temperatures not dropping down to far, 14—16 celsius. for tomorrow, bit of cloud and showers around first thing, but they'll clear. and tomorrow, very similar to yesterday — a ridge of high pressure tries to build in. so a bit more sunshine.
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drier and a little but warmer again, and then our next area of low pressure feeds in, turning wet and windy for friday and into the weekend. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london in half—an—hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. and at the usual address. at bbc radio london. until ti have and at bbc radio london. until then, have a lovely morning. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. here's a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news. the family of 15—year—old nora quoirin have said their hearts are broken after her body was discovered in the malaysian jungle yesterday. a postmortem examination is under way, with the results expected later this morning. in a statement, her family thanked everyone involved in the large—scale operation to find her. they said nora had brought people together and had truly touched the whole world. the former chancellor, philip hammond, has accused boris johnson's government of trying
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to wreck the chance of a new brexit deal with the eu, by making demands which brussels can never accept. speaking to the times newspaper, in his first comments since stepping down last month, mr hammond said a no—deal brexit would be a "betrayal of the 2016 referendum" and would leave the uk diminished and inward—looking. a number 10 source said the uk will leave on 31st october despite mr hammond's "best efforts to the contra ry". rail passengers will find out today how much regulated fares will go up next year. it will be based on the retail prices index inflation figure forjuly. analysts expect the increase to be around 2.8%, which could lead to a rise of more than £100 in the annual cost of getting to work for many commuters. flights are resuming in hong kong, after the airport authority obtained a court order to prevent people from "unlawfully obstructing" operations. it comes after thousands of pro—democracy protestors disrupted flights for two days. demonstrators are angry about what they see as china's attempt to clamp down
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on the territory‘s special status. train italia has won the west coast transport contract. the government says it will provide passengers with new trains, more seats, simplified fa res new trains, more seats, simplified fares and more frequent services. three british men who helped restrain a man with a knife in central sydney have described their "scary" confrontation with the suspect. lee cuthbert, paul 0'shaughnessy and luke 0'shaughnessy, all from greater manchester, were working in an office nearby when they heard a commotion outside and ran out to help. the armed man had already stabbed a woman in the street and has since been linked to a second woman's body found nearby. the three men have been hailed as heroes — this is what they had to say to channel nine in australia this morning. we can tell you are quite exhausted by the past 24 hours. you don't have to thank us. for us, being british people
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overseas, this is our second home. we love australia, it is an amazing place. and i tell you right now, we had this conversation in the car, if it happened again we would do it again. good on them for doing that. coming up on the programme, carol will have the weather. the weather is also affecting the sport bulletin, isn't it? in a big way, is the cricket even going to happen today? i would say today is properly dodgy. what was it earlier, splashes before the ashes? properly dodgy. what was it earlier, splashes before the ashes?” properly dodgy. what was it earlier, splashes before the ashes? i was going to say it again! pretend it never happened, carry on! one of the sporting occasions of the year is due to get started this morning, if it's dry enough. the lord's ashes test is scheduled to begin at 11:00 and england urgently need a win. australia won the first test and england have turned to this man, jofra archer to get them back into it. he's a fast bowler who was the star of england's world cup victory last month. so can he turn it around?
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if you ask him, he will say yes. and that's what you want, young guys coming in full of confidence and belief in their own ability, and someone who won't shy away from any challenge. it is great to have characters like that in the dressing room, it feeds off the rest of the guys as well. we've actually faced him in australia, where conditions really suit fast bowling. i think we have seen him at his fastest, guys know what to expect, they know how skilful he is and how good he is. like most bowlers that play test cricket, there will be times he will bea cricket, there will be times he will be a real threat, and we will have to whether that. it was a terrible night for celtic. they won't play in the champions league this season after being beaten by romanian side cluj. it was 1—1 after the first leg and celtic led twice on the night, but cluj scored two goals late on to go through 5—4 on aggregate. celtic will now go into
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the play—offs for the europa league. we all want to play champions league football. we really believe we will never lose. we'll see a bit of footballing history tonight, as a female referee takes charge of a major european men's match for the very first time. here's stephanie frappart refereeing the final of the women's world cup earlier this summer, and tonight she's in charge as liverpool play chelsea in istanbul — the assistant referees are both female too. there's another first about that match in istanbul this evening. it's the first all—english european super cup. it pits the champions league winners, liverpool, against chelsea, who won the europa league. it's important as a club like chelsea that we give everything to try and win it, because yes, it does mean something, it means something for us as another trophy, as a club, and for me it would be a really nice start for me personally. but more than that, a feeling
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for the players with the season coming up that we can compete against liverpool, win a cup in our name that goes down in our history and go on from there. everything is prepared for a final, obviously, so we have to make sure we're ready for a final. we have to make a few decisions about lineup and stuff like this that can be kind of a little bit unpredictable, probably for the opponent as well, because we don't know how they play, why should they know how we play? andy murray says he's had some second thoughts about turning down the opportunity to play singles at the us open. he lost his first match back in singles tennis at the cincinnati masters this week, and said no to a wildcard for flushing meadows because his body's not ready to play five set matches yet. but he forgot that the qualifying matches are over three sets, but he's now missed his chance. climbing becomes an olympic sport next year at the tokyo games, so it's a pretty good time
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for britain to start winning medals in it. that's what shauna coxey did yesterday. her bronze in the women's bouldering was the first medal britain's ever won at climbing's world championships. if she can scramble to success in the combined event next week she'll be sure of a place at the olympics. let's return to cricket, because tomorrow, on the second day of the ashes test, lord's will turn red to mark ruth strauss foundation day. it's part of an initiative set up by former england captain andrew strauss, who lost his wife to lung cancer in december. a similar organisation was also set up in sydney by former australian fast bowler glenn mcgrath, who lost his wife to breast cancer. the bbc‘s cricket correspondent jonathan agnew has been speaking to both men for test match special.
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what we were both petrified about was the effect it would have on the kids. to go to the counsellor and for her to say, this won't be the end of them. it will be difficult but it doesn't mean they can't have a great life. and for me to get my head around the idea of having to look after them going forward it was a huge source of comfort. we've got more of that conversation for you after 8:30 this morning. you can hear it in full on test match special today, and you'll be able to download it as a podcast via bbc sounds. we talked a bit to andrew strauss about that recently. he was here very recently and he spoke in a similar way to how you hear him speak this morning, very calmly. very eloquent. yes, eloquent, about
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how he and his wife spoke to his children, and how he is speaking to the children now. really very open, given that it is also recent. not even nearly a year since she died. even though there's still a day to go until a—level results day, many students have already had offers from universities based on their predicted grades. this system has been in existence since the 1980s but is it up to scratch? the labour party thinks not, because today it's calling for "radical action", saying the party would scrap university offers based on predicted grades and implement a new "fairer" system. but universities and schools say that these proposals are not straightforward and could mean additional pressure for students. if they haven't got parental support and are making rash decisions in the summer, that isn't fair to them and might disadvantage those very people that we want to help. so it will require some really big change from secondary schools, from awarding bodies, and from higher education institutions. not insurmountable but those practical considerations need to be thought through.
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so could it mean an overhaul of the whole system? joining us now from westminster is shadow education secretary angela rayner. thank you for coming on and discussing this with us. tell us about how this new system might look. many people might be familiar with the fact that you apply for university based on predicted grades. how would you change things? at the moment, the predicted grades u nfa i rly at the moment, the predicted grades unfairly disadvantage the high achieving disadvantage students. we would make sure there is enough time and support within the system to go toa and support within the system to go to a post qualification admission system, so students actually get a fair access to what university they wa nt to fair access to what university they want to go to based on their actual system rather than a predicted grated system. that has gone from 3000 unconditional offers to 63,000 over a decade, so it is a considerable problem that we need to address. it is really unfair on
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students. this week, many students will get their results, and i wish them all the best, including the btec results today. i want their ha rd btec results today. i want their hard work to be recognised and for them to be able to go to the top universities based on their actual grades. one of the major criticisms of this potential plan is that the whole academic year would have to be shifted. how do you implement that? we would work with universities, schools and colleges to make sure the support is in place. if you do have to tweak the system, the current calendar, then we will do that. the important thing to recognise is that students need to have faith that their actual grades, the work they do, will be recognised, and they will have an opportunity to go to the university that they want. there is nothing more demoralising than overachieving to what you're predicted grades were and then finding out that there are no places at the universities you wa nt to no places at the universities you want to go because in the clearing system those places have already been taken. i think that is really unfair, and there is inbuilt in that
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unfairness for students from poorer backgrounds. we have to change the system so students have confidence in it. that means we have to put support in place and change the academic year to do it, then we can. it is done internationally, other countries to do this. i appreciate that, looking at the example of australia earlier. they have exams in november. i think it is a major change, but i understand from your perspective that changes necessary to bring about the change that you wa nt to bring about the change that you want from the system, the way it works. it is a radical change but i think we can do it. the office for students, the regulator, other bodies, they have already recognised there is a problem in the system. ucas has recognised there is a problem. i want to be part of the leadership of that and say enough is enough, we need to make sure the support is there, and make sure that
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stu d e nts support is there, and make sure that students achievements can be recognised. that is really soul destroying for our young people who have worked out. if you get your results this weekend you have done a great job, results this weekend you have done a greatjob, i results this weekend you have done a great job, i want results this weekend you have done a greatjob, i want you to be able to choose the university for you. at the moment, unfortunately, that is not the case. there is a mad panic on and the universities often push stu d e nts on and the universities often push students into concept —— accepting unconditional offers. if you look at a ucas survey from last year, it says 80% of students going through the clearing system were extremely happy with the process. if you are a high achieving disadvantage student, and you get a better than predicted grades, in the clearing system the opportunities for you to change and go to opportunities for you to change and gotoa opportunities for you to change and go to a better university that you believe suit your requirements, that is very limited in this current system. i want to turn that on its head to make sure that no students, regardless of their background, who
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work hard and get good grades, that they can go to the university they want. at the moment, the system creates a burden on the student to panic, and in the clearing system in summer students will be panicking, trying to get a university that works for them. i want a system that is much fairer, based on their results, and that puts them in the driving seat. students are getting shortchanged at the moment, whether it is through student loans for this current system of choosing which university they go to. i want to put stu d e nts university they go to. i want to put students at the heart of empowerment to make sure they get the best opportunity for them. we will get some comments about that a little later. another thing i want to talk to you about today is, what is it like at the top of the labour party today, especially in terms of a potential second referendum in scotland? potential second referendum in scotland ? there seems potential second referendum in scotland? there seems to be confusion about the policy. you have the deputy saying another referendum
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on independence is not the answer, and then the shadow chancellor saying that the labour party would not block a second independence it's clear, we don't believe a second referendum is a priority. that's not the issue facing scotland, the issues are those facing the rest of the union, a disastrous no—deal brexit and an appointed prime minister not tested by the public yet. i think everybody empowerment, and i welcome opportunities to work with other parties to deliver this, where the official opposition and we want to make sure we stop a no—deal brexit because we need a government like a labour government to produce a free education for all and look at the nhs and invest in public infrastructure to make sure our economy can grow and we can find our place in the world. at the moment this government is trashing our
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economy and risking future economic success economy and risking future economic su ccess sto p eve n economy and risking future economic success stop even their own conservatives are worried about this. with respect, i asked about the scottish independence referendum. you seem quite clear on labour party policy, so why is shadow chancellor john mcdonnell saying he wouldn't block a scottish referendum. that seems at complete odds with what you just said. whatjohn was saying is if he came to uk parliament he wouldn't use legislation to block a vote. we're not calling for a second referendum in scotland. we don't believe that is the issue for scottish people at the moment. the issue for scottish people is the same as ours, posterity and the hard right government wanting to tank the economy “— government wanting to tank the economy —— austerities. we need to work together to get a labour government implementing policies to help the poor and disadvantaged and help the poor and disadvantaged and help business get on. at the moment this government is riding roughshod over that and not looking at the
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implications of a no—deal brexit, andi implications of a no—deal brexit, and i think that's really reckless. 0ne and i think that's really reckless. one more question on that, because it's an important distinction. you say you're moving in the same direction but there's a big difference between saying we wouldn't block it and we don't agree it's the way forward. know, like i say, i can't make it any clearer, we don't believe that's what scotland needs. we don't believe a second referendum is the way forward. we need to hold firm. i've had enough of referendums, i wa nt i've had enough of referendums, i want us to move on with making sure the whole of the united kingdom can prosper and do well. we won't do that with a no—deal brexit and we need to invest in young people and businesses to make sure our economy can do well. this government will read our economy if we go through a no—deal brexit. read our economy if we go through a no-deal brexit. angela raynor, good to talk to you and thanks for coming on the programme. you are talking about a—levels, that is tomorrow, but today for vocational students it is their results day. steph is out and about
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talking to various young people at a couegein talking to various young people at a college in lincolnshire with all sorts of trades and eventual occupations in a few minutes. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. it looks like it might affect the cricket today stop a good morning. —— today. good morning. stop the rain on and off through the day for the ashes at lord's. you can see this lovely weather watchers picture from cornwall —— the rain on and off. the rain continuing to push north and east. for many parts of the uk today, cloudy with rain at times and the driest weather will be in parts of eastern scotland and north—east england for the longest. here's where we started with clear skies and temperatures in aboyne we re skies and temperatures in aboyne were 3.6 last night, but with all the cloud and rain coming from the west, most started today in double digits. two or three bands of rain,
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one moving through northern england and southern scotland will clear away and another coming from the south—west across wales, getting in across eastern parts of england, will be heavy and thundery at times and behind that, brighter with a fair bit of and showers and another band coming in across western scotla nd band coming in across western scotland and northern ireland. again, heavy and thundery through the course of the afternoon. eastern areas staying largely dry and bright. temperatures today ranging from 14—20, coming down in the heavy rain, and also its going to be quite noisy and blustery around those showers. through this evening and overnight, our band of rain across england clears off into the north sea and it also clears the rain in northern ireland, moving across scotland, resting across the northern ireland. not a cold night with most of us staying in double figures. as we head through tomorrow, still the remnants of the front producing rain in the far
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north of and. this rigid settle things down before the next area of low pressure comes our way “— things down before the next area of low pressure comes our way —— north of scotland. wet start in the northern isles, that rain clears and the bulk of the british isles will see some sunshine. just a few showers but in scotland and northern ireland, the cloud ills in the afternoon with showers arriving. feeling pleasant enough in the sunshine with highs of up to 23 —— builds. the low pressure coming our way on friday will be with us through the weekend. it's a huge area of low pressure with a lot of weather fronts attached, area of low pressure with a lot of weatherfronts attached, bringing rain in on friday, and you can see from the squeeze in the isobars, windy. after a dry and bright start in the south—east, the rain romps in from the west and progresses eastwards steadily, followed by brighter skies and shadows. into the weekend, the low pressure still with us and some will see rain in the north at times, some in the south at times, equally there will be
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sunshine but windy particularly on sunday —— showers. thank you so much for bringing us up to date on that. not even carol can sort out the weather for the ashes. she's got power but not that much power! for thousands of students on vocational courses, today is results day. we said that steph is out and about. she's at a college in lincolnshire finding out more. she is shoving her bbc breakfast microphone in the faces asking how they got on. morning, steph. i'm at boston college and we set up these different types of qualifications. taylor and josh got their plumbing results, both did brilliantly. with got joinery their plumbing results, both did brilliantly. with gotjoinery and bricklaying. all manner of things you can do vocationally, social care, computing, sport science, the list goes on. with vocational, you do practical work and you work with local employers and organisations to
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get hands—on experience. kirsty, let me grab you. you did computing, you've got your certificate. how did you've got your certificate. how did you do? triples that distinction double star, grade below the highest. what are you going to do next —— triple distinction. highest. what are you going to do next -- triple distinction. may be jobs in it and may be higher education. you might go to uni but you're looking atjobs as well? yeah. like with that. with got ryan, busy fixing stuff. how did you do? merit merit pass... busy fixing stuff. how did you do? merit merit pass... in computing as well? yes. what are you going to do next? h&d, the next level of computing and we'll be advancing our skills and knowledge. computing and we'll be advancing our skills and knowledge. what your big ambition? i'm looking at taking an apprenticeship in the college and becoming a lecturer and helping to teach the computing side.
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becoming a lecturer and helping to teach the computing side. good, we definitely need that. thanks, see you ina definitely need that. thanks, see you in a bit! we've got some health and social care and we heard lawrence earlier but let's get amy and amelia. busies doing some resuscitation, definitely not going to come back to life! tell me how you did, you've got your certificates as well. distinction star distinction star distinction. that is top class, isn't it? yellow one star and that is top class, isn't it? yellow one starandi that is top class, isn't it? yellow one star and i would have got highest possible. you're going to be a paramedic? i hopefully at university of the anglia. are you excited? yellow very. i would be nervous! how did you do? triple distinction star in social care. what are you going to do next? i'm going to study adult nursing. what are you going to do next? i'm going to study adult nursing. i'll let you get on. great to see the skills they've been developing. those loads more... the desserts
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have been served 21 and chris! . they did their qualifications a few yea rs they did their qualifications a few years ago and i want to get a sense about what you're doing now —— served to flex. you did civil engineering, why was it so important? an you're gaining qualifications as your earning and your earning muggy when you're doing an apprenticeship. it's getting me to doing what i want to do. you went back into education because you weren't a big fan of gcses and all that. i left school and didn't know what i wanted to do and i tried different trades and i thought i wa nted different trades and i thought i wanted to get a proper qualification and a real career. i ended up doing and a real career. i ended up doing a btec, started on level two in 2013 and since then i've worked my way up. for you, flex, people up. foryou, flex, people will up. for you, flex, people will recognise you because you are a youtuber and a blogger but it started with a btec for you. i started with a-levels and
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got through two to level and really struggled, i was doing as pe, about to do struggled, i was doing as pe, about todoa struggled, i was doing as pe, about to do a level pe, and when i did it 13 to do a level pe, and when i did it !3 or !4 years ago it wasn't championed in school and when i transitioned to college btec wasn't there and! transitioned to college btec wasn't there and i was the first year it was available. what attracted me as it wasn't one big exam at the end, small, continuous work was the way andl small, continuous work was the way and i did btec sport and i coach kids and did sport development and sport in media. so many aspects of a career before you do it. thanks very much and enjoy your desert, i'm well jealous! these desserts are being made by luke, he did his results and he did brilliantly and he did a placement with raymond blanc, michelin star chef. jo, you are so proud of these guys, you work with local employers and that's key? we
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work with around 404 and that number needs to grow particularly with t levels. its building what we need to invest in world—class resources and then the students need to be ready to go from this kind of training into the work lays. we've talked a lot about funding of this sector and the fact its been cut by nearly a third over the last decade. what impact has it had —— workplace. third over the last decade. what impact has it had -- workplace. it's usually challenging. it's about what we can pay our staff in the college sector versus a we can pay our staff in the college sector versus a secondary we can pay our staff in the college sector versus a secondary school, it's a gap of £7,000. 0n sector versus a secondary school, it's a gap of £7,000. on top of that, the resources, there's £100,000 of kit there and as you will have seen in the motor vehicle and equipment department. we need to invest in equipment but our staff are our greatest asset and we are short about £1000 per head. good to have a tour, jo, thanks very much. later i will talk to our vocational qualifications students who will
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compete in a world competition in russia next week for forestry and forensic science. we will talk to them later, i'll show you around and get more people to talk to us about their results. you've reported on that competition before and it's a really good one to know about. thanks very much, so inspiring! talking about inspiration, if you've been watching tv recently you might have seen an advert about a design programme that's new with fearne cotton. you love it. it's really intriguing. we've got one of the judges and two of the contestants coming in later. if you like thinking about your house, it's really fu n thinking about your house, it's really fun to watch! all that coming up really fun to watch! all that coming up later on. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. the major headlines coming up at 8am this morning.
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good morning from bbc london, i'm tolu adeoye. a woman is in hospital after being hit by a marked police car in kensington. it happened on warwick road off the high street just before 10pm last night. her condition is not yet known. she was treated at the scene before being taken to hospital. the police watchdog has been informed. the cost of repairing potholes in the capital has gone up by more than 50% since last year. figures from the federation of small businesses show london councils have spent £55 million fixing damage. southwark council received the largest number of complaints, while kensington & chelsea had the fewest in the last financial year. hendon football club is offering free tickets to home games for anyone living with mental health issues. the 7th—tier club drew in their first home match of the season last night against the met police football team. the free ticket idea came after the death of dermot drummy, a former hendon fc player. this summer marks a century since the capital's first council housing. bbc london will be exploring the highs and lows
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with the help of residents. peter's been living on the becontree estate in dagenham for 75 years. he told us what it was like when he first moved there. it's like coming to the country. lovely parks and lots of places for the children to play. and, of course, as young children, we played out in the streets. there was no traffic. let's take a look at the travel situation now. the bakerloo line has minor delays after a signalfailure at baker street. 0n the roads — westminster bridge is closed nortbound to everything but buses, taxis and cyclists for security works. in elmers end, croydon road is closed eastbound from elmers end road to clock house road for gas works. finally warwick road has now reopened following the accident i mentioed earlier. a look the weather now with kate
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kinsella. good morning. well, yesterday we saw temperatures in the sunshine reach 23 celsius. not so, i'm afraid, today. it's turning rather wet and rather windy. if you don't have the rain first thing, it's very quick to arrive. some heavy bursts, persistent, quite a lot of rain in a short space of time, and the wind is going to strengthen as well. a wet and windy wednesday. temperatures taking obviously a bit of a tumble compared to yesterday — between 16 and 18 celsius. now, there'll still be a bit of rain around this evening, but gradually it will start to clear away. drier overnight. still rather cloudy, limited clear spells, but quite humid. temperatures not dropping down to far, 14—16 celsius. for tomorrow, bit of cloud and showers around first thing, but they'll clear. and tomorrow, very similar to yesterday — a ridge of high pressure tries to build in. so a bit more sunshine. drier and a little but warmer again, and then our next area of low pressure feeds in, turning wet and windy for friday and into the weekend. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half—an—hour.
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plenty more on our website at the usual address. also facebook and on bbc radio london. now, though, it's back to dan and lou. bye for now. good morning. welcome to breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. 0ur headlines today: the family of nora quoirin pay tribute to their "most precious girl" as her postmortem examination is held in malaysia. former chancellor philip hammond launches an attack on the prime minister, accusing him of wrecking the uk's chances of getting a deal with the eu. a nervous wait for vocational students. nearly 80,000 find out their btec level 3 qualifications today — the biggest single results day for vocational courses. that includes these guys from boston college. i will be chatting to them about the skills they have been learning and finding out how they have done. england send for their archer. 1—0 down in the ashes series, jofra
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archer is ready to play his first test match for england, but they're more likely to be dodging showers than bouncers at lord's. losing a wife and mum to cancer — cricketing legend andrew strauss tells us how he tried to prepare their children. it doesn't mean they can't have a great life. and for ruth to hear that, it was like the weight of the world came off her shoulders, and i also got my head around the idea of looking after them going forward. it was a huge source of comfort. today will be fairly cloudy with some rain on and off throughout the day. the driest conditions will be across eastern scotland and north—east england for the longest. more in 15 minutes. it's wednesday the 14th of august. our top story. the family of 15—year—old nora quoirin have said their hearts are broken after her body was discovered in the malaysian jungle yesterday.
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a postmortem examination is under way, with the results expected later this morning. andy moore reports. nora's family released a new photo of the 15—year—old they called their "most precious girl". in a statement, they said: a helicopter lifted nora's body out of the dense jungle, about 2km from the resort where she was staying. it was winched up in a cage, supported by a police officer. the volunteers who found nora's body
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said one of their volunteers had found her as they searched near a stream. he shouted, they all stopped and then the police arrived to take of then the police arrived to take of the area. nora's family said her learning difficulties were so severe, she would never have left the bedroom through the window on her own. she was only wearing her nightclothes. they suspect foul play. norwegian police are keeping an open mind, saying they can't rule out a possible criminal enquiry. so much depends on the results of the postmortem examination, which started a few hours ago. nora's family have already identified her body in hospital. it is so difficult to describe, but they are really distraught in grief, and i feel the same. to lose a child, yeah, it's terrible. the search that lasted ten days is now over. the results of the postmortem examination will go to the attorney general, who will decide if the police need to investigate further. and we will have more on that in the
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next few minutes. the former chancellor, philip hammond, has accused boris johnson's government of trying to wreck the chance of a new brexit deal with the eu by making demands which brussels can never accept. in his first comments since stepping down last month, mr hammond said a no—deal brexit would be a "betrayal of the 2016 referendum". writing in the times, he said it was a "myth that a no—deal exit will be painless" he argues that rather than resulting in a "powerful, independent" uk, "the reality would be a diminished and inward—looking little england". 0ur political correspondent nick eardley is in westminster for us this morning — strong words from the former chancellor this morning, nick? and likely to cause significant ripples. i think so, and likely to cause significant ripples. ithink so, because and likely to cause significant ripples. i think so, because there isa ripples. i think so, because there is a big battle coming in politics over whether or not mps can stop borisjohnson over whether or not mps can stop boris johnson taking the over whether or not mps can stop borisjohnson taking the uk out of the eu without a deal on the 31st of 0ctober. what philip hammond is saying is that there isn't a mandate for that. he thinks it would be a betrayal of the referendum result.
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he is worried that the prime minister is asking europe for too much, and because he is saying the backstop, that insurance policy to stop checks on the irish border, because of that, he thinks that europe will say no because it goes too far. and as a result, that means that borisjohnson, instead of negotiating hard, has adopted a bit ofa negotiating hard, has adopted a bit of a wrecking strategy, as mr hammond sees it. number ten says philip hammond was someone who stopped the uk preparing properly for getting out of the eu and that he undermined negotiations. they are adamant that no matter what happens, the uk leaves at the end of october. but there is going to be a huge battle in parliament in the next few weeks, when mps come back from their summer break that they have been texting, calling, e—mailing, trying to figure out a strategy among those opposition mps, with conservative mps worried about no deal. boris
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johnson says it is happening. they will do whatever they can to try and stop it. big battle coming. thank you very much. tens of thousands of people are getting their vocational qualification results today. steph's at a further education college in lincolnshire for us this morning. how are people feeling, steph? it is quite an anxious time for anyone getting their results at the moment. these guys have been doing vocational qualifications. you can do them in any subject. we have got beauty, hair, floristry, forensic science. you have got bricklaying, transport maintenance, health and social care, the list goes on. they are called vocational because they are called vocational because they are focused on the job is these guys might do at the end of it. so they doa might do at the end of it. so they do a lot of work with local employers and they also do practical assessments, so it's not like the
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pure academic where you do big exams at the end of the studying. around 5 million people are doing these types of qualifications. but if we look at just 16 to 18—year—olds, you might think the majority of them are doing a levels but actually, more than 325,000 of the 16 to 18—year—olds in england are studying for vocational qualifications last year. if you compare that to a—levels, it is just under 300,000 young people studying for a—levels aged between 16 and 18 in england. the majority of them are provided with training by places like this. so along with private companies, you also have further education colleges. these guys do a lot of the training for them. they have seen their funding cut in the last decade by nearly a third. so it means it is expensive for them to put on these courses, because it involves a lot of kits. boris johnson, in one of his first speech as prime minister, talked about the need to bring more funding into
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further education. so i will be introducing you to some of the people who have been getting their results like these guys who are going off to be nurses and paramedics and have found out they have done brilliantly in health and social care. i will tell you have done brilliantly in health and social care. iwill tell you how they did and why these skills are so important. thank you very much. first trenitalia has won the west coast partnership rail contract and will operate services on the west coast main line from december, the department for transport has said. the government says it will provide passengers with new trains, more seats, simplified fares and more frequent services. there will be 263 extra train services every week, with destinations including llandudno getting direct trains to and from london. four british men have been arrested in australia and new zealand following a drugs raid targeting a uk—based organised crime syndicate. queensland police say it's one of the region's largest—ever drug seizures of mdma and methamphetamine — which they say was of "the highest purity" — with an estimated street
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value of almost £60 million. using social media isn't directly harming teenagers — but it can reduce the time they spend on healthy activities, such as sleeping and exercising, according to a study in the lancet. to combat this, researchers suggest parents should ban phones from bedrooms after 10pm and encourage more physical activity. the study also found girls were particularly vulnerable to cyber—bullying, which could lead to psychological distress. labour has outlined proposals that would prevent universities from offering places based on predicted grades. it says the current system is "deeply unfair" and that students should only be allowed to apply when they've had their exam results. but universities say changes would be complex. there is nothing more demoralising than overachieving what your predicted grades were and then finding out that there are no places at the universities that you want to go because in the clearing system, those places have already been
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taken. i think that is really unfair. there is an in—built unfairness for those disadvantaged stu d e nts unfairness for those disadvantaged students who are from poorer backgrounds. so we have to change the system so that the students have confidence in that. that means we have to put the support in place and change the academic year to help that. we can do it. three british men who helped restrain a man with a knife in central sydney have described their "scary" confrontation with the suspect. lee cuthbert, paul 0'shaughnessy and luke 0'shaughnessy, all from greater manchester, were working in an office nearby when they heard a commotion outside and ran out to help. the armed man had already stabbed a woman in the street and has since been linked to a second woman's body found nearby. the three men have been hailed as heroes — this is what they had to say to channel nine in australia this morning. you can tell you are exhausted by the past 24 hours. but you don't have to thank us. for us, being
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british, this is our second home. we love australia. it's an amazing place. i will tell you love australia. it's an amazing place. iwill tell you right love australia. it's an amazing place. i will tell you right now, we had this conversation in the car. if it happened again, we would do it again. let's return to our top story now. the family of 15—year—old nora quoirin have said their hearts are broken after her body was discovered in the malaysian jungle yesterday. let's speak to our south east asia correspondent, howard johnson, who's in seremban. what's the latest? the family have been paying tribute overnight to nora. yeah, a press statement was released by the lucie blackman trust, the charity that have been working with the family over the last sunday since she has been missing. nora has brought together people from france, ireland, malaysia and the uk in their love and support for her and their love and support for her and the family. they said she has truly touched the world. we can't thank
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all of ourfriends touched the world. we can't thank all of our friends and family enough for all of your love. this is obviously a very troubling time for the family. the media here are giving them space so that they can digest the awful news that happened yesterday afternoon, when they found the body of nora quoirin about a mile away from the result, in a hilly area next to a string. they said they found the body around 1.30 in the afternoon. a group of hikers found the body. we spoke to one of them this morning, who said they found the body close to a stream in an l—shaped area of the stream. he wasn't sure if it was in their water and they were not sure if it was connected to a river that flows past the resort. we are expecting the forensics results in the next couple of hours. it keeps getting pushed back, but at the moment, the police are going to give a press conference here in two hours' time. that will be around ten o'clock local time in the uk. and presumably her family
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are being looked after during all of this? yeah, the family are being looked after by different members of the embassy teams here, french and uk. we have seen them in the last 24 hours. we also know they have instructed a lawyer to work with them in case this becomes a criminal case. and all along, they have been supported by the lucie blackman trust, this charity set up to help british nationals in crisis abroad. they are also receiving lots of messages. the lucie blackman trust are forwarding them on where appropriate. and the family know the world has been supportive of them during this troubling time and will continue to receive those messages from the charity, which will surely give them some comfort during this difficult time. we saw the police getting ready for a news conference
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later. this was a widescale search and a difficult area to search as well? yeah, this started as a 12 square kilometre search and then narrowed down to four square kilometres. we saw somewhere between 250 and 350 search and rescue personnel fanning out around this area each day close to the resort, a thickjungle. we walked through it at times and it would trip us up. there was mud, vines, boulders and all sorts of nasty things. and a sta ke was all sorts of nasty things. and a stake was discovered as well. the area had been set before, so there area had been set before, so there are questions about why the body was only found later by this team of volunteer hikers. these are questions that will be asked during
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the press conference later today in two hours' time. if there is any more news before breakfast and aggregates of air, please bring us up aggregates of air, please bring us up to date. howard johnson inn malaysia, thank you. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. this morning, it is a cloudy and wet start to the day across many parts of the uk. as you can see from this weather watcher picture in wigan. the forecast remains like this, cloudy with rain at times. the dry conditions will be across eastern scotla nd conditions will be across eastern scotland and north—east england for the longest. here we also have clear skies by night, so some of us are seeing some 20 starts with, but temperatures have fallen to 3.6 in aboyne, for example. for the rest of
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us, temperatures are already in double figures. we have three bands of rain, one moving across england and wales. in the afternoon, that will turn heavy and sundry. behind it, cloudy with a few showers. another band of rain were clear and after a shower a start, we will see rain move in across northern ireland and western scotland. in the afternoon, some of that will be heavy and thundery. 0vernight, that band of rain pushes through scotland and lingers across the northern isles. across the south—east, we lose that band of rain and behind a lot of cloud and showers. as a result, it will not be a cold night, temperatures staying in double figures. tomorrow, we have the re m na nts of figures. tomorrow, we have the remnants of our front producing the rain in the northern isles to clear. behind it, a ridge of high pressure comes in before the next area of low pressure comes our way. so the rain does tend to move away from the
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northern ireland, drying up for you. but all of the uk will see giant sunny spells tomorrow, but there will be showers developing through the day here and there. there are —— they will be hit and miss. that will feel pleasant in any long spells of sunshine. in the afternoon, the club with second across western scotland and northern ireland, with a few showers coming ahead of that area of low pressure. it is a huge area of low pressure. it is a huge area of low pressure. it will bring rain with it on friday and the isobars are with it on friday and the isobars a re close with it on friday and the isobars are close together. after a dry start in the east, all this rain pales in from the west, moving steadily eastwards during the day. gusty winds around it. behind it, we see sunny or bright spells and also some showers. temperatures are down, particularly in the rainfall. into the weekend, the wind will be a
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feature, especially on sunday. so there are some bright spells if you look carefully. the second test of the ashes series gets under way at lord's later — and tomorrow the famous cricket ground will turn red to mark ruth strauss foundation day. it's part of an initiative set up by former england captain andrew strauss, who lost his wife to lung cancer in december. a similar organisation was also set up in sydney by former australian fast bowler glenn mcgrath, who lost his wife to breast cancer. the bbc‘s cricket correspondent jonathan agnew has been speaking to both men for test match special. going as well as can be expected. i mean, it's been a tough seven months since ruth died and probably an even tougher 12 months leading up to her death. but, you know, i think one thing you realise when you've got young kids is that life doesn't stand still — it always moves forward. they're busy, they're at school and there's plenty ofjobs to do
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in and around the house. so i've been very much on duty and just navigating our way through it one day at a time, really. it's definitely got a bit easier, but at the same time, that sort of grief doesn't leave you and you just have days where you remember, and that's part of the process, i suppose. yeah, hence why you've focused on bereavement counselling and preparation for the trust. yeah, well, you know, i think what ruth and i were both most petrified about was the effect this was going to have on the kids. and so for us, in particular, going to our counsellor, jenny thomas, who is a child grief and loss counsellor, and just explaining the situation, and for her to actually say to us, "this won't be the end of them. "it's going to change their life, but that doesn't mean they can't have a great life." and for ruth to hear that was just, like, the weight of the world came off her shoulders,
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and for me also, who, you know, getting my head around the idea of having to look after them going forward, it was a huge source of comfort for me as well. yeah. i don't have you down as a big crier, glenn, but i guess it would be pretty emotional. did that help the kids... oh, i had my moments, i'm sure. i mean, did you have the same sort of experience as andrew with... 0h, very much. just listening to straussy there brought back so many memories. once we realised that was it, you know, three days out to tell james and holly that mummy was going to pass away... and how old were they then? ..was easily the hardest thing i've ever had to do. and just hearing andrew there, just takes you right back there. and thenjane was at home — we had a nurse at home sort of looking after her, and she passed away there, and those memories are always going to be there. but, unfortunately, there's a lot of people that go through something very similar, and if we can make life a little bit easier in some way, the mcgrath foundation, it's about support and awareness. what straussy's doing, sort of similar, a little bit different,
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but again, that support and making life just a little bit easier in a pretty...pretty terrible time. yeah, yeah. listening to glenn, and the amazing success of the mcgrath foundation, i mean, does that sort of, again, give you more resolve as to what we're going to enjoy? i mean, you guys have paved the way. it makes it easier for those of us that follow, in that sense. but i hope we can just be — you know, it's year one for us. we're not expecting to be all singing, all dancing year one. but if we can just, in some way, replicate what they've done, then i'll be very happy. and i know that ruth will be looking down, feeling very sort of honoured, a bit embarrassed, and very proud as well, that we've able to do something that really does make a difference. you can hear more of that conversation between glenn mcgrath, andrew strauss and jonathan agnew on test match special today and you'll be able to download it as a podcast via bbc sounds. they both speak powerfully on the
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subject. and if others are going through similar things, it's incredibly helpful to see people talking about the subject. hopefully, you have enjoyed listening to those two talking about it. climate change activist greta thunberg is about to set off from the uk, to spend two weeks sailing over the north atlantic in a boat with no loo, kitchen or privacy. the 16—year—old is due to attend a crucial climate conference in new york, but has stopped flying for environmental reasons. 0ur chief environment correspondentjustin rowlatt is in plymouth, where the boat will depart from today. justin, what is this journey going to be like for greta? the boat is behind me now. she is a magnificent, state—of—the—art sailing yacht. she is basicallyjust a huge sale attached to a superlight hull and she powers through the
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water. amazing boat, but very uncomfortable. we have a strong wind, what sailors would say is a fairwind. you wind, what sailors would say is a fair wind. you saw from carol, this wet and windy weather coming in from the west. we are in the west country in plymouth now. this is what she has got to look forward to. i said to her, are you worried about what you will experience on the boat? this is what she said. i might feel a bit seasick, and it's not going to be comfortable but that i can live with. i mean, the point, ithink, is to sort of create opinion. by stopping flying, you don't only reduce your own carbon footprint but also that sends a signal to other people around you that, i mean, the climate crisis is a real thing, and that also pushes a political movement. it's actually very windy here! i guess that is what you want if you're going to sell across the
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atlantic. i am joined you're going to sell across the atlantic. iam joined by you're going to sell across the atlantic. i am joined by the skipper of the boat, boris. is this the weather you would want to make this journey? definitely not. we are going to wait till this weather passes. this is a cold front at the moment, arriving on the westside of england. it will pass over in the next couple hours with the rain showers. then we can start. next couple hours with the rain showers. then we can start. how tough is it to sail a boat like this across the atlantic with the world's most celebrated climate campaigner on board? it is a very special challenge indeed. iwould on board? it is a very special challenge indeed. i would say this is unheard of. it has never happened that someone who has never sailed before it goes on a racing yacht across before it goes on a racing yacht across the atlantic. before it goes on a racing yacht across the atlantic. we have sailed on airand it across the atlantic. we have sailed on air and it really does bang and crash through the waves. it is not co mforta ble crash through the waves. it is not comfortable at all. yeah. so greta is accepting to make a big leap into the unknown. she can't know what it is going to be. we tried sailing here together. she was fine with it in good conditions. but there will
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also be a couple of days that are not easy. are you anxious? i am both anxious and unhappy at the same time. if she is all right on board, this can be a great trip with a great purpose. but i am also a bit worried about her, of course. great purpose. but i am also a bit worried about her, of course] great purpose. but i am also a bit worried about her, of course. , best of luck. back to you in the studio! the weather is blowing!! we have all seen the weather change quickly, but thatis seen the weather change quickly, but that is something else! i don't think you can even hear me any more, but thank you. in fairness, carol but thank you. infairness, caroldid but thank you. in fairness, carol did say it was changeable. he is laughing. if you are trying to set yourself up for the ashes today, carol says the weather is not brilliant at lord's. but sally will be here in five to ten minutes to give us a full update on the start of the second test.
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we will also talk about an interiors programme. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. hi there. good morning. it's been a rather wet start to the day for many of us. we've got some heavy rain developing into the afternoon across wales, the midlands, eastern and through south—eastern areas of england. some thunderstorms mixed in with this area of rain. further west in wales and the south—west it will become a little drier this afternoon. drier too northern england, eastern and southern scotland, but further rain spreads into western scotland, west of northern ireland. feeling quite cool today. maximum temperatures in the mid to high teens. through the night, most of the rain will clear away but there are to be
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some showers in the north and the west. not as cold as cold as last night but temperatures for many of us getting up into double figures, 11—15dc. compare that to the 4 degrees we saw last night in the north—east of scotland. into thursday, a few showers around but on the whole it's going to be a dry day, and there will be some sunshine for most of us. a bit more cloud into western scotland. lighter winds, and it will feel a tad warmer than today with highs getting up to about 18—23dc. but then into friday we've got this area of low pressure, moving in across the uk. the white lines are the isobars getting close together. weather fronts stretching all the way out into the atlantic which means it will stay very unsettled on friday and into the weekend, and look at that rain as it moves its way in. strengthening winds with this area of wind as it pushes eastwards. gusts potentially up to 30—40 mph quite widely. there will be some sunny spells, though, in northern ireland, western scotland, late in the day.
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with that wind and rain, temperatures 18—20 celsius, it'll feel pretty cool again. then into the weekend — well, on saturday there will be some sunshine and heavy showers, the winds will strengthen up. and by sunday, just like last weekend really, for many of us we are looking at some very windy conditions with some gales. well worth staying tuned to the forecast.
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hello, this is business live from bbc news with sally bundock and ben thompson. germany's economy shrinks in the three months tojune — as weaker global demand and trade wars weigh on europe's manufacturing powerhouse. we're live from london, and that's our top story today, on wednesday 14th august. exports in germany have taken a major hit, so what will this mean for the economic health of europe as fears of a worldwide slowdown are mounting? we will talk you through what is at sta ke. also in the programme —

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