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tv   BBC News  BBC News  August 19, 2019 8:00pm-9:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. borisjohnson says there may be bumps in the road but we will be ready for a no—deal brexit by the end of october. jeremy corbyn however thinks otherwise. brexit by the end of october. jeremy corbyn however thinks otherwisem you're serious about stopping a no—deal brexit then back my motion of no confidence to stop the government taking us over a cliff edge on the 31st of october. rules allowing eu nationals to live and work in the uk will end immediately says prime minister if we will have the latest from westminster. police say a bomb attack in northern ireland was a deliberate attempt to murder officers. dissident republicans are being blamed. prince andrew says he is appalled by the
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crimes of his former friend and convicted paedophilejeffrey epstein. three years after the measles virus is virtually wiped out, world health chiefs say it is back. good evening and welcome to bbc news. borisjohnson good evening and welcome to bbc news. boris johnson has good evening and welcome to bbc news. borisjohnson has insisted no—deal brexit preparations are on track despite a leaked report warning of food and medicine shortages in the event of a no—deal brexit. the labour leaderjeremy corbyn has accused the government of driving the country towards a cliff edge and called for a general election so voters can decide the countries future.
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exactly how bad will a no—deal brexit be? clutching their folders tight, ministers in charge of no—deal brexit planning brushed off questions about possible food, fuel and medicine shortages, travel disruption, and protests. are there going to be food shortages? no, not at all. it's entirely manageable. the details of secret whitehall documents leaked to a newspaper yesterday and presented at a government planning meeting just three weeks ago. an out—of—date worst—case scenario, claim ministers, but visiting a hospital in truro, borisjohnson was vague about the likely disruption. there may well be bumps in the road, but we will be ready to come out on october the 31st — with or without a deal. the prime minister will meet the leaders of france and germany this week. hoping they might yet bend and redo the existing brexit deal. our friends and partners on the other side of the channel are showing a little bit of reluctance, at the moment, to change their position. that's fine, i'm confident that they will, but in the meantime,
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we have to get ready for a no—deal outcome. but opposition parties say a no—deal brexit should be stopped. and to do that, jeremy corbyn wants mps to bring down the government and back him as an interim prime minister who would then delay brexit and call an election. we will do everything necessary to stop a disastrous no deal, for which this government has no mandate. applause. but the lib dems and a potential tory rebels have said they will not put mr corbyn in number 10. it is clear that you do not have the cross party support in parliament to be a caretaker prime minister, so would labour back somebody who can? all the constitutional precedents are, when he government collapses, it is the leader of the opposition that takes over. he made this uncompromising appeal to mps. if you are serious about stopping a no deal set, then back my motion of no confidence to stop this
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government taking us over a cliff edge on the 31st of october. applause. jeremy corbyn is talking today about trying to stop brexit by working cross—party, but make no mistake, this is a labour leader putting his party on a general election footing. the labour leader was in corby, a marginal midlands seat, setting out his plans for number 10, which is where he hopes the brexit turmoil might take him. ben wright, bbc news. rules allowing eu nationals to live and work freely in the considered extending freedom of movement temporarily but the home office said borisjohnson in the home secretary priti patel would pursue a tougher approach than predecessors. the government confirmed plans to introduce an australian style points based system which gives priority to
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people with the kinds of skills britain needs. the new system build impose tougher criminal checks. eu citizens already living in the uk would have the right to stay as previously agreed. they have until december 2020 to apply for settled status. speaking today the prime minister said ending freedom of movement doesn't mean britain would become a hostile place for migrants. we are going to leave the eu and that means that legally all those powers revert to the uk. i want to stress because people get a bit confused. or can be. that doesn't mean we are going to stop anybody coming into this country. it doesn't mean we are going to become remotely hostile to immigration or immigrants. i'm not at all. i used
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to run the most diverse city in the world and was very proud of it. what it does mean is that immigration into the uk will be democratically controlled and we will be producing an australian style points based system to do it. joining me now is madeleine sumption, from the migration observatory — they describe themselves as impartal good evening. on the basis of what the prime minister has said, what has changed 7 the prime minister has said, what has changed? we don't have a formal announcement and we certainly don't have much detail so it's very difficult to tell whether this is a big change that rips up previous plans the home office have made for a no—deal brexit or whether it's going to be minor tweaks. i think the key thing to understand about whatever the future system is that there are some real constraints on there are some real constraints on the government ability to bring in
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the government ability to bring in the new immigration system they want to post—brexit really quickly after a no—deal brexit. that is because of a no—deal brexit. that is because of a need to give secure immigration status to 3.5 million eu citizens already living here who will have until the end of december 2020 in order to apply. that date is still in place, we know that from what was said today. the australian style points based system is what the prime ministerfavours. how complicated is packed and how quickly could come into being?m complicated is packed and how quickly could come into being? it is a relatively complicated system but not dramatically more complicated than other future immigration system that might be produced. inaudible it's not something that could be developed and implemented in a matter of weeks. we are looking more at the 2021 timeline for the full new immigration system that the government wants to introduce after
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brexit. there has to be some sort of transition between the ultimate destination and the ending of free movement around the time of a no—deal brexit. movement around the time of a no-deal brexit. not least because they would be a group of people uncertain about where they stand. that's right. the eu citizens already living in the uk need apply for the settlement scheme in order to have their status secured. the key question when you're thinking about moving to a new system is what do employers have to ask people for? until the end of december 2020, the current government to's position has been that employers won't need to check whether someone has settled status because eu citizens won't have been required to apply for it yet so they would be able to hire someone yet so they would be able to hire someonejust on the yet so they would be able to hire someone just on the basis of their french passport. that makes it relatively difficult to enforce any
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new restrictions that you might be introducing on immigration, for example skills requirements, before the end of 2020. we don't know this but is it reasonable to assume that if there is a toughening up of the rules for eu citizens heading towards the uk, it's reasonable to assume there might be a toughening up assume there might be a toughening up of rules from the rest of europe towards people from the uk heading in their direction? yes, absolutely. i think when the uk leads the eu the expectation is we will end free movement and they will end it to. it is generally not the case that countries... countries don't really offer reciprocal immigration policies in every area, they tend to have a blanket policy for all non—eu citizens coming to the country. but certainly there is no reason to expect eu countries would continue to let british citizens come and work in anyjob like they can now. the bigger picture here is of a
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referendum vote which in part voted to leave because of immigration and now we have a government which is clearly trying to respond to that, they would say. does it mean in your mind that whatever we see by way of change, immigration numbers are going to fall? i think it is very likely we will see immigration being lower as a result inaudible. if not just for the fact free movement is a liberal policy, people can come here to work and there aren't restrictions on their occupation or the pay they are allowed to receive. that will become stricter. it would be very surprising if we didn't see some reduction in immigration as a result of this. despite the prime minister saying today he doesn't wa nt to minister saying today he doesn't want to give out hostile messages. no and the government position has generally been that they favour a skill selective immigration policy. they want to send out a liberal
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message on high skilled immigration and there have been various announcements about trying to facilitate scientists coming to the uk but at the same time they want to have a more restrictive approach towards lower wage jobs which are jobs that employ quite a lot of eu citizens at the moment. potentially that would mean retail, hospitality. thank you. and we'll find out how this story — and many others — are covered in tomorrow's front pages at 10:40 and 11:30 this evening in the papers — our guests joining me tonight are political strategist, jo tanner and broadcaster & authorjohn kampfner. police in northern ireland say a bomb which exploded near the irish border was a sinister attempt to lure officers and soldiers into the area, to murder them. it's believed that a dissident republican group was behind the attack in county fermanagh. the explosion happened
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during a security operation at wattle bridge near newtownbutler, close to the irish border. the operation had been launched after a warning was received, and it's understood a hoax device was found initially last night. our correspondent emma vardy sent us this update from the scene. police say they suspect it is either one of the two dissident groups, the new ira or the continuity ira behind this attack, a similar one happened a few weeks back. the continuity ira claimed they were behind that one, similar tactics in that police were brought in to a hoax device and found a booby—trapped device nearby soon found a booby—trapped device nearby soon after. on this occasion the second advice caught them unawares and it exploded with a number of officers narrowly escaping injury. a very clear warning of the ever present threat of still face in northern ireland. the police reaction has been particularly
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marked and particular frustration directed at the political situation in northern ireland because there has been no devolved government here ever since the power—sharing agreement collapsed two and a half yea rs agreement collapsed two and a half years ago. you might say that isn't directly linked to the attacks, police put out an appeal today for there to be political progress to help with the wider situation in northern ireland to tackle the threat they face and a very frustrated response from the deputy chief constable of the psni today. we've had two one half years of no devolved institutions. we have unresolved issues around legacy and we saw an aspect of that play out in londonderry derry last weekend. we had tensions on the ground in communities this year around bonfires. we have the uncertainty around eu exit. we've had five attempted attacks to murder police
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office rs attempted attacks to murder police officers this year and another mortar type device. one of those attacks tragically killed lyra mckee. when you add all that up, i believe there is a time of reflection and the time to question what type of society we want to live in here. his reaction after the fifth attempt to kill police officers by dissident republicans this year and there has been widespread condemnation from all sides of the political spectrum in northern ireland today. news just newsjust coming in news just coming in from the cps with regards to the death of a police constable andrew harper, there has been the announcement of a man having been charged with murder and the theft of a quad bike. this is an and the theft of a quad bike. this is an announcement and the theft of a quad bike. this is an announcement from the chief crown prosecutor who has said this. following the death of pc harper in
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berkshire the cps has today authorised thames valley police to charge 20—year—old jed foster with murder and theft of a quad bike. we will meet with pc harper's family to explain the basis of the decision following a lengthy review. may i remind all concerned that criminal proceedings against mr foster are now active and he has a right to a fair trial. it is extremely important they should be no reporting, commentary or sharing of information online which could prejudice these proceedings. just a line about what will happen in court asa line about what will happen in court as a result. mr foster will appear at reading magistrates‘ court tomorrow morning at 10am. that is charges with reference to the death
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of pc andrew harper in berkshire, 20—year—old jed foster charged with murder and theft of a quad bike. now the headlines. boris johnson murder and theft of a quad bike. now the headlines. borisjohnson said we will be ready for a no—deal brexit by the end of october butjeremy corbyn thinks otherwise. rules allowing eu nationals to live and work in the uk will end immediately says the prime minister if there is no deal. police say a bomb attack in northern ireland was a deliberate attempt to murder officers. dissident republicans are being blamed. now a full round—up of the sport. good evening. after a summer of speculation over his future, phillipe coutinho has found a way out of barcelona.
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just 16 minutes into that game, no goals so far. after a summer of speculation over his future, phillipe coutinho has found a way out of barcelona. he‘s moving to bayern munich, initially on a season—long loan, but bayern have the option to buy him forjust short of £110 million at the end of that loan spell. bolton wanderers have called off their league one match against doncaster tomorrow night. administrators say its because of welfare concerns for their young squad. bolton were relegated from the championship and started the season with a 12—0point deduction after going into administration. our correspondent katie gornall is here. katie — how did this happen? they released a statement saying after consultation with the clubs medical staff and other match without an adequate break would be detrimental to bait their welfare and development. this is the second time the club have been. postpone a fixture this year. at the end of
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last season they didn‘t play their match with brentford because of a player strike over unpaid wages. potentially they are facing sanctions on two counts for failing to fulfil a fixture. if you think thatis to fulfil a fixture. if you think that is bad you have to spare a thought also that bury who are yet to start their season. they‘ve had several games suspended over financial concerns and haven‘t yet been able to prove that they are financially viable. there is a degree of turmoil at the moment in league 1. cricket australia has defended the doctor, who allowed batsman steve smith to return to finish his innings in the second ashes test, with brain injury charity headway urging the sport to change its return—to—play protocols. cricket australia say they will monitor smith day by day, and if free from symptoms for 2h hours, then he can train and probably play in the third test that starts on thursday, but is that too soon, charity headway believes so.
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currently, the return to play protocols do not demand a set period of time where a player who has been diagnosed with concussion has to sit it out. football, rugby and hockey have these periods of at least six or seven days in the professional sport and for amateurs it‘s more like three weeks when a mandate once you‘ve been diagnosed you‘ve got to go through return to play protocols. cricket doesn‘t have that set time andi cricket doesn‘t have that set time and i think that is wrong and needs to be looked at very carefully. england‘s women were held to a 1—1 draw with germany in the hockey. germany managed to equalise just before the end of the third quarter but england will qualify for the semifinals if they beat belarus on wednesday. the winner will secure qualification for the 2020 olympics. ireland‘s women kept their hopes alive by beating belarus. victory
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for germany on wednesday will secure their place in the semifinals. jimmy white has finally won a title at the crucible. he lost six world championship finals, five in a row in the 90s, four against steven hendry but the whirlwind has won the world seniors title, it‘s the second time he‘s done it. but it‘s the first time that it was held in sheffield. white, who‘s now 57 said if felt "strange" to be named world champion at the crucible but clearly enjoyed the moment. that‘s all the sport for now. i‘ll have more for you in sportsday at 10:30pm. three years after the measles virus was virtually wiped out in the uk, the world health organisation says it‘s back, and has removed the country‘s "measles—free" status. last year there were almost a thousand cases in england
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and wales, three times as many as the previous year. take up rates for the mmr vaccine, have been falling, with one in ten children in england not fully protected. here‘s our health correspondent sophie hutchinson. well done. it‘s hard to believe now, but little alba was dangerously ill earlier this year with measles. her mum says that, at one point, she thought she might even lose her. alba had been too little to be vaccinated against the disease. there was a day where she got really, really sick and that was when it hit me then. i thought we might not be bringing her home. so, it went from being a very serious concern of losing sight, losing hearing, having brain damage because of it, to actually not having her here anymore. oh, my days! children are given the first mmr vaccination to protect against measles when they are 12 months old. the second dose comes just before going to primary school. but the latest figures suggest this autumn in england one in seven
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children will begin primary school without their second dose of mmr. that increases to one in four children in london and, even more worryingly, that 30,000 children in england have never had either dose and have no protection against the disease. if your child is completely unvaccinated against mmr, then the chances of them getting measles are very, very high. even though measles is now rare in this country because we have high uptake, when it comes, it spreads very quickly. it is the most infectious disease we know of, really. and so, it can get into a school and spread and pick out all those children who are unprotected very quickly. measles is highly infectious. it can lead to serious health complications such as deafness, learning disabilities, and cause fatal pneumonia. three years ago, there were so few cases in the uk it was classed as having been eliminated. this year there have been 231 cases.
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anti—vaccination campaigns on social media have been blamed. the prime minister is inviting companies to a summit to discuss it and asked gps to promote catch—up jabs. we are welcoming the government‘s announcement today, but what we have not seen from the government is how these efforts will be funded. we need adequate funding to make sure that parents and the general public are aware of the importance of vaccines. this year, cases of measles have trebled globally, with outbreaks rising in the us, france, germany and italy. many agree that urgent action is needed to protect children like alba. sophie hutchinson, bbc news. we will have more on that in the next half an hour. some developments with regards to brexit. the prime minister borisjohnson with regards to brexit. the prime minister boris johnson has with regards to brexit. the prime minister borisjohnson has written a letter to the president of the eu council donald tusk with particular reference to the backstop element of
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what is currently on the table from the eu. he says that is simply unviable. he said leaving the eu with an agreement is, our highest priority but the backstop is anti—democratic and risks weakening the delicate balance embodied in the belfast agreement. mrjohnson proposes alternative arrangements for the border on the island of ireland replaced the backstop adding, we are ready to constructively and flexibly at what commitments might help. he concludes, the uk is ready to move quickly and he is confident parliament would act rapidly if an agreement can be reached that didn‘t contain the backstop. that‘s the essence of a letter that boris johnson has sent to donald tusk. he‘s got meetings coming up this week with both emmanuel macron in france and angela merkel in germany. quite a lot of toing and froing between london and various european
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capitals to come in the coming days but that is what he says to donald tuskin but that is what he says to donald tusk in this letter that has just been released. officials on the spanish island of gran canaria say a wildfire which began on saturday is now out of control. 9000 people have been forced to leave their homes, as strong winds fan the flames up to heights of more than 150 feet. planes and helicopters are supporting around 700 firefighters on the ground. however, high temperatures and the windy conditions are making it difficult to tackle the flames. let‘s talk more on this now with matthew hirtes who‘s an author for going local in gran canaria and joins us from his home in the capital, las palmas de gran canaria, via webcam now. give us a sense of how bad this is turning out to be. this is actually the third fire, the first fire was on saturday the tenth and was on the
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island‘s bedrock. that is 60 kilometres away. so this is a problem affecting rural areas and is not really of concern to people coming to stay on the island as a tourist. today in the capital, the soundtrack to my working day has been planes flying overhead. there we re been planes flying overhead. there were 1a planes trying to put out the fire. the third one is proving the most resistant. obviously we are very concerned that it‘s affecting locals more than tourist. in terms of trying to control it, what effo rts of trying to control it, what efforts are being made? we are requesting help from the mainland. we are 1700 kilometres away from the spanish mainland. the military are
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helping, we have 700 firefighters on the ground trying to combat it. the fa ct the ground trying to combat it. the fact it‘s a caring and mountainous areas is proving very difficult to put it out and they are not giving a time, an estimate when they think it will be fully extinguished. we are showing some pictures of it and the extent of it and the amount of damage it has already done in environmental terms is enormous. yes. there are 60 endemic plant species that have been affected, over 6000 hectares of land. but the first fire was 60 kilometres away from the major resorts. this third more majorfire is even further. it is up towards the north—west of the island. no flights have been
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interrupted. there was a regular charter and scheduled flights coming into the island and i would urge people thinking of booking a holiday to gran canaria at the weather conditions. they can‘t be helping. i‘m presuming it is pretty dry and hot. yes. we are known as the island of eternal spring. our average temperature is 22 degrees by the strong winds are not helping the situation. thank you. let‘s return to that news i brought you that a 20—year—old man has been
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charged with murdering pc andrew harper. andy moorejoins charged with murdering pc andrew harper. andy moore joins us. charged with murdering pc andrew harper. andy moorejoins us. what charged with murdering pc andrew harper. andy moore joins us. what do we know? pc andrew harper was killed on thursday night, allegedly dragged underneath the wheels of a car and died of multiple injuries. ten people were arrested. thames valley police were given an additional 36 hours to question him and then an additional 2a hours and we now have this charging decision. we got an announcement from the chief crown prosecutor. a20—year—old man, jed foster, has been charged with murder and theft of a quad bike. mr foster will appear in court tomorrow morning at 10am. the nine other people arrested we understand have been released on police bail until friday september the 20th. we have a
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bit more from the cps. he goes on to remind people that all concerned the criminal proceedings are now active. that man has a right to a fair trial, which means it is extremely important he says there should be no reporting, commentary or sharing of information online which could in any way prejudice these proceedings. meanwhile, the fundraising page set up meanwhile, the fundraising page set upfor pc meanwhile, the fundraising page set up for pc harper by the thames valley police federation has reached a sum of £150,000, to help support the family. also a fundraising page for pc harper, who was due to carry out a 20 mile obstacle course, which has raised so far more than £19,000, and that is to help children with cancer. andy, thank you very much indeed for that. now let‘s catch up
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on the weather prospects. good evening. after ourjari weather to start the new week, things look drier and brighter for tomorrow. could be quite a cool start for some of us, definitely just could be quite a cool start for some of us, definitelyjust a faint whiff of us, definitelyjust a faint whiff of autumn in the air. this is where the front is sinking south overnight, not doing too much but it will bring some cloud and rain into northern ireland through the small hours, some showers for southern scotla nd hours, some showers for southern scotland and northern england and into the north of the front, as we pull in airfrom the into the north of the front, as we pull in air from the west, for rural scotla nd pull in air from the west, for rural scotland loads of four or 5 degrees but even further south we dip into single figures and it will feel autumnalfirst single figures and it will feel autumnal first thing on tuesday. but autumnal first thing on tuesday. but a lot of sunshine around to get the day under way. the showers sliding further south across northern england, perhaps the odd one reaching the midlands pulling way eastwards as the day goes on. if you
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for scotland, the art isolated shower as cloud arrived in western wales and northern ireland through the afternoon. the best of the south—east, 22 degrees. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines. a20—year—old man is charged with the murder of pc andrew harper who was killed on thursday night investigating a burglary in sulhamstead. boris johnson investigating a burglary in sulhamstead. borisjohnson writes to the eu council president donald tusk
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outlining his opposition to the irish back stop calling it anti—democratic and proposing an alternative arrangement is put in place by the end of the transition period. meantime, rules allowing eu nationals to live and work in the uk will end immediately says the prime minister if there is no deal. police say a bomb attack in northern ireland was a deliberate attempt to murder officers, dissident republicans are being blamed. three yea rs republicans are being blamed. three years after the measles virus is virtually wiped out in britain, world health chiefs say it is back. councils up and down the country, are figuring out how they‘re going to cope, if the uk leaves the european union on october 31st, without a deal. documents seen by the bbc, reveal that some authorities fear not being able to supply some foods to schools, care homes and food banks, because of possible shortages or higher prices. it comes after a government report was leaked this weekend,
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warning of potential supply problems, affecting fuel, medicine and food in the event of a no—deal brexit. our economics editor, faisal islam, reports now from hull. the fully—stocked shelves of one of the depots that helps feed britain. this warehouse in slough is one of the largest providers of food for care homes, schools, hospitals and prisons, and here they are now having to prepare yet again for no—deal brexit and not being sure of being able to obtain some of their staples. a lot of the stuff like your chopped tomatoes, your chickpeas, your baked beans, the majority of those products are manufactured in spain or italy so therefore you have to import them, otherwise you won‘t have the volume is that you need. britain‘s food supply takes for granted these complex international supply chains. for central government there is no specific problem in general about a no—deal brexit, even the worst—case scenario. but the internal deliberations of local councils, charged
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with delivering those services and seen by the bbc, show that there are very specific concerns and some extraordinary forms of planning to keep the wheels turning. the plans and registers of risk from around the country do echo the government assessment that higherfood prices and a restriction of choice will be the main impact, but some go further. including north tyneside, saying no deal means a high risk of increased use of tins and frozen goods and special dietary requirements being difficult to meet. north ayrshire council anticipating the government might need to amend school nutrition standards. in bedford, care homes advised to hold four—to—six weeks supply of nonperishable foodstuffs. and in hastings, there‘s a reference to "there might be the need for rationing." councils responsible for school and care home meals were told by government earlier this year to prepare for reasonable worst—case
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scenarios for no—deal brexit. these documents are the result of that exercise and one top representative of caterers say they are necessary. i don‘t believe they are going over the top, i really do believe they need to plan hard on this. so there will be an instant, i believe, where certain nutritional standards will have to be altered and adapted for a short period of time. if there is no deal? if there is no deal. schools and hospitals? i believe schools and hospitals. would care home stockpile? they will have to stockpile, yes, but is whether they‘ve got the space to do that. rationing, a bit over the top? yes, i think rationing is a bit over the top, unless it‘s long term. back at the depot, bidfood, one of the biggest suppliers, have meticulously gone through its 30,000 products and identified 400 at risk from no—deal brexit on a red, amber and green scale. they say they are ready. we have identified the key customers, the vulnerable customers, that we need to take care of. we‘ve got the plans in place to carry on providing a great service.
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there will be challenges around availability, there will be challenges around delays at ports, there will be challenges around currency fluctuations and the impact on price. we have been here before. they had to buy up refrigerated warehouse capacity in march that was basically a waste of money. they will prepare again in october, but these are the big boys of the food supply industry. the question is about the smaller links in the food supply chain. and local public services, for example the new wave of hospitals, are simply not built to hold stockpiles of food like this. the government yet to come knocking here. at the end of the day we are the people who deliver the product to the hospitals, the schools, the prisons, etc. i would have you on speed dial! are you getting that problem? no, we have had no direct engagement yet as the person who pulls the contracts with those end—users. the government reiterated it sees no impact on food supply
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from a no—deal brexit, but local councils at least are privately planning for scenarios that do affect schools, hospitals, prisons and food banks. the longer any no deal stand—off with the eu lasts, the more likely they will become. let‘s get more now on one of our top stories. the uk has lost its measles—free status three years after the disease was virtually eliminated. immunisation rates have been falling in the uk, with 231 cases of measles confirmed in the first quarter of this year. public health england have revealed new figures showing that one in seven five—year—olds are not fully protected against measles with that figure rising to one in four in london. with me is professor peter hotez, who‘s professor and dean at the baylor college of medicine in houston, texas. professor hotez is an expert in the fields of vaccinology and paediatric medicine, and author of the book vaccines
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did not cause rachel‘s autism, which he wrote about his daughter. he joins me via webcam from houston. also, i‘m joined by shona ghosh, senior technology reporter at business insider. she joins me via webcam from north london. thank you both very much indeed for coming on. professor peter, this immunisation rate falling in the uk, based on your experience, what would be your way of addressing that? first of all, it is quite tragic. this is by the way not only happening in the uk, it is also happening in the uk, it is also happening across much of europe, especially france and italy, and it has happened in the united states, we‘ve had 1200 measles case this year, including a terrible epidemic in new york city. and a lot of it is due to very aggressive anti—vaccine movement is, that now is politically active and has a big presence on
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both social media and e—commerce platform so we need an approach to begin dismantling the anti—vaccination media or empire, while diffusing a lot of their political activities. it is doable but it‘ll take some work and it is important to do it because one of the things the anti—vaxxing lobby does as they tried to claim measles asa does as they tried to claim measles as a benign illness, nothing more than a rash and that can‘t be further from the truth. it‘s one of the great killers of children in the world. hundreds of thousands of children previously died of measles annually, we brought it down to around 100,000 but now it is coming back to europe and the us so i am very concerned. went that it might let me ask you about mandatory vaccination which happens in four states in the united states as it stands. are you in favour of that? it depends on the local situation but the problem is this, measles is one of the most highly contagious virus as we know about and unless we
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achieve more than 95% vaccine coverage in the community or a school, measles can come back easily so you have to do whatever is necessary to ensure you are getting more than 90—95% measles coverage and unfortunately that is no longer the case in london and in many states in the us so, in the us, compulsory vaccination seems to have a big impact on the problem. we had a big impact on the problem. we had a terrible measles epidemic in california, we close the non—medical exemption loophole in california, and that has solved the problem but we have many other states where this is still a big issue. shona ghosh, cani is still a big issue. shona ghosh, can i bring you in on the issue on what is happening online, because the prime minister, among others, has pointed to the fact people are perhaps too often misled by what they might read online. what could be done, do you say, to try to reverse that situation?|j be done, do you say, to try to reverse that situation? i think it
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is important to say that the issue of false information around vaccines being spread on social media is definitely a problem but it is one small part of a wider media literacy problem that is driving this issue, both in the uk and the us. you have messages spread both in the uk and the us. you have messages spread about by andrew wakefield, the discredited british one—time dr who spreads essentially fa ke one—time dr who spreads essentially fake news about measles and its alleged connection to autism. that is untrue. he has risen to prominence in the us. there is an issue with social media but there is a wider information problem of which social media is a part. in terms of what social media companies can do, they have already felt pressure from politicians in the us and are trying to take measures to make it difficult for certain groups, for example, to peddle anti—vaxxing messages, they're cracking down on things like anti—vaxxing hashtags but they ultimately have to tread a
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line on what qualifies as free speech. if parents want to express their views about vaccines, wrong and unscientific though they may be, it is difficult to say we will ban this content without getting into free speech issues as well. would there be a mechanism online where at least some of that could be more effectively policed? possibly although this is a new problem for social media companies. so we have seen over social media companies. so we have seen over the last four years clearly social media companies tackling big social issues, so terrorist content, hate speech, etc, they've been able to develop artificial intelligence algorithms that can recognise that content because it often falls into patterns, child abuse content is a good one. you can recognise the same images appearing over and over again and train ai images appearing over and over again and train alto recognise images appearing over and over again and train al to recognise that. it is tougher when you're expressing opinions about vaccines, that is much more nuanced, that is about people is particular speech, we're
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not talking about repeated patterns, which is why it is harder for social media companies to police which is why it feels they haven't done so much so far and it's why they're doing things like cracking down on hashtags, cracking down on private groups on facebook because it is to police. in terms of a big scale, getting rid of all this content, at the moment it seems impossible because there is no one cure they have. professor peter hotez, how much is that a factor in all this, do you think? a huge factor, by some estimates there are more than 500 misinformation websites about vaccines, all now actively promoted on social media, and there is more of these organisations can do. amazon is now the biggest purveyor of fa ke amazon is now the biggest purveyor of fake anti—vaxxing books that they actively promote. they‘ve done nothing to take down that anti—vaxxing content. the same with many social media problems. they‘ve done the minimum to show some optics
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or or some level of corporate responsibility but they‘ve done very little and in fact they haven‘t taken down these anti—vaccine sides even though they can. it isn‘t a free speech issue. remember these are private entities. amazon is a large book store so you walk into waterstones, the owner of that store makes decisions about which books to promote, and which ones are not promoted and the same is true for amazon. there is a lot more they can do but they haven‘t had the political will to do something and the prime minister has voiced the fa ct the prime minister has voiced the fact that he is planning on meeting with the leaders of the social media platforms and e—commerce platforms, andi platforms and e—commerce platforms, and i welcome those efforts, i think they are very important. final but you, shona ghosh, about freedom of speech, clearly there are other areas where that is relegated because of the seriousness of the issue. can this not fall into that
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category? i think to some extent it can. part of this attitude towards free speech comes from the fact of where these companies were born, which was silicon valley which takes a very, very, historically, pro—free speech stance and they are having to rethink the subtleties around that because we live in a complicated world and just being very extremely pro—free speech doesn't really work when you're cracking down on things like misinformation, fake news, terrorist content, etc. slowly these companies are learning to change their attitudes but they also have to answer to shareholders so they naturally act in a cautious manner, not that that is a defence but they move not that that is a defence but they m ove very not that that is a defence but they move very slowly and it takes a lot of government prompting an government pressure for them to change their ways. ok, we must leave it there but thank you both for coming on, professor peter hotez in houston, texas, shona ghosh in north london, thank you both. i mentioned the breaking news in the last half hour or so that a 20—year—old man has been charged with the murder of
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pc andrew harper, he will appear in court tomorrow morning. in the light of that development, pc harper‘s widow, lissie, has issued a lengthy and poignant tribute to her late husband. and i can read you some of the words she has written about him. "my best friend, the kindest, loveliest, most selfless person you‘ll ever meet, you are brave, funny and always there for anyone who needed it. there is not enough paper in the world to even begin to write a tribute for you but no one deserves it more. we had so many plans for the future, you wanted to do it all. my darling boy, i do not know how i will be able to survive without you". she goes on do to make anyone who was lucky enough to meet you, whether you knew you as andrew, andy, uncle andy all pc harper, to everyone, you are a hero. you had
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the best sense of humour and never took life too seriously, your treasured every moment and always had a smile on your face. treasured every moment and always had a smile on yourface. i want to be angry that yourjob took had a smile on yourface. i want to be angry that your job took you away from us but i know you loved it and a lwa ys from us but i know you loved it and always wanted to keep everyone safe, especially me. you went the extra mile whenever you could and genuinely cared for everyone. the lights have dimmed on all of our lives now that you are no longer here. but it is no surprise that even when you‘re gone, you are still keeping us all going, knowing you‘ll tell us to carry on and stay strong. i can‘t begin to imagine a life without your silly jokes, size 1a feet, large appetites, big hugs, sunday roasts, and neverfaltering positive attitude. you kept me going ifi positive attitude. you kept me going if i was down and took care of us all until the last. even now, i can still hear you nagging me to brush
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my teeth, get dressed and eat something. we are feeling lost without you but we are trying to be as brave as you were. you have so, so many friends, my love, and eve ryo ne so many friends, my love, and everyone loves you. the messages, support and kind words about you have been overwhelming and i can‘t thank everyone enough for that. you loved music, movies, travel, every animal in the world, messing around with our brothers and chilling out with our brothers and chilling out with our brothers and chilling out with our sisters, you loved our families every single one. you loves to go on adventures and find new places to explore. if there was a mountain to climb, you‘d be there at the top, bike rides and long walks, you loved at all, never still never down, so full of life. you could fix absolutely anything and always took time to offer help to family, friends and neighbours, a pillar of strength to everyone you met. she concludes, "my heart is broken without you, my sweetheart but, my
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god, ifeel so without you, my sweetheart but, my god, i feel so lucky it was me you chose to share your amazing life with. you can print it much love and laughter to all of our lives and we are honoured for that. although we we re are honoured for that. although we were married for only 28 days before you are cruelly taken away from me, my husband, you are perfect and i‘ll never, ever stop loving you and i feel so grateful for the happiest 13 yea rs of feel so grateful for the happiest 13 years of my life. our superman, our bodyguard, our light in the dark, my god, we will miss you forever. you‘ll be remembered as the best of us andi you‘ll be remembered as the best of us and i will carry your love with me always, signed your loving wife, lissie". a tribute written by the widow of pc andrew harper. and that news in the last half an hour that a 20—year—old man has been charged with his murder.
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prince andrew has attempted to distance himself from his formerfriend, jeffrey epstein, as further questions are raised about his association, with the convicted paedophile. buckingham palace says the prince is "appalled" by new allegations epstein faced, of sexual abuse and trafficking in young girls. the statement was issued after a video emerged of the prince at epstein‘s home, shortly after the financier served a prison sentence, for a sex offence with a minor. our royal correspondent, nicholas witchell, has the latest. they are images that will haunt him — prince andrew at the home of a convicted paedophile. caught on camera as young women come and go, despite andrew‘s apparent efforts to be as discreet as possible. the video was taken outside the new york home of andrew‘s friend jeffrey epstein in 2010, two years after epstein‘s conviction. and there at the door, amid the comings and goings, the queen‘s second son.
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epstein was an associate of andrew‘s for a number of years. it is even suggested andrew took him once to balmoral. this photograph was taken in 2001. andrew at one of epstein‘s parties with a then—17—year—old girl called virginia roberts. her claim to have had sex with andrew was dismissed by a us court. 2008, jeffrey epstein faced court in the united states, charged with having sex with a minor and procuring an underage girl for prostitution. he was sentenced to 18 months in prison. soon after his release in 2010, andrew was photographed with him walking in central park, new york. last month, epstein was arrested on federal charges of sex trafficking minors. he was found dead in his prison cell on the 10th of august. prince andrew has always denied that he has been involved in any impropriety with underage girls. last night, buckingham
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palace added to this... the denials of impropriety are emphatic, but what the palace cannot do is explain why prince andrew chose to continue his friendship with epstein or why he was at his home in new york. it all raises questions about the judgment demonstrated by the queen‘s second son. nicholas witchell, bbc news, buckingham palace. sir eltonjohn has said he provided the duke and duchess of sussex with a flight on a private jet to his home in nice to give the royal couple a "high level of much—needed protection". writing on twitter, sir elton said...
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he went on to say that he had ensured the flight was carbon neutral. prince harry and his wife meghan markle have faced mounting criticism after reportedly taking four private jetjourneys in 11 days, despite often speaking out on environmental issues. the new york police department has sacked a white officer whose use of an illegal choke hold contributed to the death of a black man in 2014. eric garner‘s repeated cries of "i can‘t breathe" while he was dying, triggered widespread outrage and helped fuel the rise of the black lives matter movement. this is how police in new york made their announcement. in this case, the unintended consequence of mr garner‘s death must have a consequence of its own. therefore, i agree with the deputy commissioner of trials, legal findings and recommendations. it is clear that daniel pantaleo can no longer effectively serve
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as a new york city police officer. a british woman accused of killing a patient by giving her botched bum enhancement injections has been extradited to the us to face trial. donna francis from loughton in essex, is charged with criminally negligent homicide, and unauthorised practice of a profession. kelly mayhew died in 2015 after silicone was injected into her buttocks in the basement of a house in new york. a french couple could face up to six years in jail after being found with a0 kilograms of sardinian sand in theircar. police discovered the sand crammed into 1a plastic bottles in the boot of an suv belonging to the couple who say they wanted to take it home as a "souvenir". but sardinia‘s famed white sand is considered a public good and it is strictly forbidden to remove it from the island.
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now it‘s time for a look at the weather with susan powell. good evening. our week may have got off toa good evening. our week may have got off to a rather showery start with the prospects of tomorrow looking considerably drier and brighter on the hull. as the week pans out, we have some warmer weather eventually to look forward to as well. that said, quitea to look forward to as well. that said, quite a chilly into the night with chilly spots, a front sinking its way down, bringing rain into northern ireland and come to rest across northern england by the end of the night, bringing some patchy light rain and to hear while the shower is not clear in northern ireland. the clear skies across scotla nd ireland. the clear skies across scotland and the north—westerly breeze bringing chilly weather, with those of three or 4 degrees and nine or ten elsewhere. starting to feel a little autumnal first thing on tuesday. but the day itself will look pretty summery. that north—westerly breeze keeps things cooler across northern scotland but
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further south in the sunshine, and as we lose the breeze on monday, it should feel warmer. some patchy cloud ran for wales in the south—west of england and northern ireland later on in the day as the warm weather front starts to approach. a few showers pushing into the north—east of england but as you can see a lot of fine weather. there is the front i was talking about, doesn‘t do very much but it is tied in with this area of low pressure which will be a more noticeable arrival to our shores. wednesday dawn is fine, the biggest difference is going to be kicking the wind direction into a south—westerly introducing warm air, some wet weather can do to make content within northern ireland and scotland. and she ahead of that front for wales and northern england but temperatures already getting a boost in the south—east, 23 degrees perhaps on thursday, then notice how the warmth spread northwards right across the uk by the time we get to saturday. our temperatures getting into the low 20s for scotland to northern ireland because this hire
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is trying to build and squeeze away those weather fronts. but also feed us that warmer airfrom those weather fronts. but also feed us that warmer air from the south—west further north across the uk. always a little more unsettled for scotland and northern ireland with some showers in the equation but to the south looks like things won‘t just become driver but to the south looks like things won‘tjust become driver england and wales but warmer as well, potentially up to 27 in the south—east of england at the start of the weekend.
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hello, i‘m ros atkins, this is outside source. in the last hour we‘ve seen the text of a letterfrom borisjohnson to the eu council president donald tusk. in it he makes a proposal to replace the irish backstop, suggesting the eu and the uk commit to alternative arrangements by the end of a transition period. queen elizabeth‘s son prince andrew has been defending his actions after a video emerged of him at the mansion of the financier jeffrey epstein, two years after epstein was convicted of sex offences. sudan‘s former president omar al—bashir appears in a cage in court, facing corruption charges.

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