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tv   The Papers  BBC News  August 21, 2019 11:30pm-12:00am BST

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and damp in perhaps turning dull and damp in shetland for a time later, but otherwise with sunshine in england and wales, that's where temperatures will be rising, 27 in london, but better in northern ireland and scotla nd better in northern ireland and scotland with temperatures widely in the low 20s. on the weekend, we continue the dry weather and sunny spells theme in most areas but we could have showers pushing into the west. some of those could be quite heavy and perhaps the odd crack of thunder but otherwise with sunshine in england and wales, again we'll see temperatures climbing further with highs on saturday reaching 30 and generally the low 20s further north. the second half of the weekend, if you areas of low cloud affecting the north sea coast but other areas will be dry with lengthy spells of sunshine and again feeling warm in the sunshine with 23 in edinburgh, 23 in belfast and hitting 30 again in parts of eastern england. spot the difference on monday. perhaps more cloud, especially in the scottish islands,
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but otherwise a fine —looking day with prolonged sunshine. feeling warm in that summer sunshine with temperatures again hitting 30 in parts of eastern england. looking beyond that, next week we look at the jetstream, which will be taking this large wave pattern, a large amplitude of waves. whenever we get this kind of pattern we see slow changes in our weather but with this trough lurking to the west, when the weather changes ultimately the change will be two more unsettled conditions. what have we got beyond monday? looks like it will be a largely dry start with warm spells of sunshine on tuesday but then rain and thundery downpours developing probably from wednesday with temperatures easing. but the timing of that change is open to uncertainty at the moment. the driest weather holding on for the longest across eastern england. that's your weather. hello.
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this is bbc news. we'll be taking a look at tomorrow morning's papers in a moment. first, the headlines: borisjohnson meets germany's chancellor in berlin and says britain does want a brexit deal, but not the current one. we do need that backstop removed. but, if we can do that, then i'm absolutely certain that we can move forward together. the future of the hs2 rail line is endowed with a government review into whether it should go ahead. —— in doubt. a25—year—old man is arrested on suspicion of the murder of libby in february. more allegations about suspected links with prince andrew's links and convicted sex offenderjeffrey epstein. buckingham palace is the allegations are categorically untrue. president
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trump cancels a state visit to denmark after the danish prime minister says greenland is not for sale. hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are former trade minister lord jones and broadcaster, henry bonsu. many of tomorrow's front pages are already in, and the same story on most of the front pages. in the telegraph, 30 days to ditch the backstop, the german chancellor gives borisjohnson a month to find a workable solution. more of that visit to germany in the guardian, who call it the 30—day deadline to avoid a no—deal brexit. that same ultimatum leads the times, as merkel tells the prime minister a hard brexit can be averted. the mail has a different spin, ‘can we do it? ja we can‘ calling merkel‘s comments a brexit boost. in the financial times,
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the falling cost of debt putting pressure on the government to spend more — but it also carries the brexit story in all the papers on the front page. leading the sun, a tanning addict refused a mortgage because of his £500 a month sunbed. that's look at the papers in more detail. the financial times here, a story about greenland and the controversy over donald trump offering to buy greenland from denmark with the danish heading back saying this is an absurd idea. all is perhaps not quite as it seems, henry? people have gotte n quite as it seems, henry? people have gotten excited with donald trump cancelling his state visit over his insult, the danes daring to say, greenland is not for sale. the financial times says the insult
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hides a heart insult, the danes have had it in their position since —— position since 19 38. the apparently the population is less than 60,000, but they have it sort of not as a colony, but the relationship is a bit like the relationship between england and scotland. it's part of the union, but they don't know what to do with it. but what are they supposed to do with it? are they supposed to do with it? are they supposed to do with it? are they supposed to explore it? exploit it? it doesn't quite say what they are supposed to do with it. it gives you the impression that the americans, when they see something, i have to exploit it, i have two get something out of it. but they don't. why do you think it has sparked interest now? he is a machiavellian person. the endsjustify
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now? he is a machiavellian person. the ends justify the now? he is a machiavellian person. the endsjustify the means. he doesn't care about who he upsets and how he gets there as long as he achieves his objectives. that isn't clever in a world at the moment of so clever in a world at the moment of so many issues and worries around. there are far more important things for a president of the united states to worry about. what could be driving this? i don't know any more than you, but what could be is the enormous cold for rare earth metals “ enormous enormous cold for rare earth metals —— enormous call. china and russia are getting quite a monopoly on the by, what they do in their own countries and what they're doing in africa. greenland, it is thought, has a lot of this. so, i guess that america is beginning to say we need to balance this up. we need our own place to get it. let's go after it. now, what i don't understand, why wasn't denmark talking to that wonderful, constructed of, positive plays cold brussels, saying we are
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pa rt of plays cold brussels, saying we are part of the eu —— cold brussels —— called brussels. instead, they've been sitting around like lemons for years, typical brussels, doing nothing. blaming them for the fact that there is a relationship between denmark and greenland, yes. that there is a relationship between denmark and greenland, yeslj that there is a relationship between denmark and greenland, yes. i would have thought trump's frustrated same way you doing something with this place that they might be oil and gas under it? i bet there is some stuff that could help the 215t—century. he is going about it in completely the wrong way and stating more people than he'll ever please stop if there is something of sense in this, why oi'i is something of sense in this, why on earth aren't brussels or denmark for that matter, coming to the same conclusion and doing something about it? is there a question though, then as politicians are up in arms, they are very upset. as i greenland is. talking about them, is there an
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argument to be made that they could getan argument to be made that they could get an offer that they actually like the sound of? countries have historically bought other countries, america bought alaska. that was back when we bought and sold people, i think we've moved past that. greenland is probably the size of a continent, it probably performs a very important role for the biosphere. there are creatures, not just polar bears, that live there that don't live anywhere else stop why don't we leave this beautiful piece of this planet alone? haven't we learned something by now?|j piece of this planet alone? haven't we learned something by now? i get the merit of that, i'm not disagreeing. i am channelling greta thunberg for you. but there does need to be some challenges to the chinese and russian advances. it's not a zero—sum game, henry. it doesn't always have to come from the
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ground, you know? it's not about exploiting and destructing our beautiful earth in bolsonaro style. we are in the 2ist—century, we have invented ways and means of dealing with energy, not just invented ways and means of dealing with energy, notjust digging into the ground. in the short term there has to be some balancing. this might bea has to be some balancing. this might be a red herring, there may be no lithium in denmark. and it could also be that donald trump is just distracting from the precipitous us economy. that's move on to the guardian. this notion that a lot of the papers have gone with, angela merkel gives the pmo 30 day deadline
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—— pma merkel gives the pmo 30 day deadline -- pma30 merkel gives the pmo 30 day deadline —— pm a 30 day deadline, it wasn't really presented as that. it's. .. i saw it. i think at the end of the day, we've got to see what was done as well as how a newspaper picks it up. she actually said, she said, you know i'll work with you to get this backstop removed if you give me a solution. it make two years —— it might take two years, it might take 30 days, she didn't say i'll give you 30 days. and it is being portrayed in all of them like she only gave him 30 days. he needs a deadline because he has only 11 weeks, do or die, as he says. you have germany and angela merkel. he's gone straight to the capital of germany, berlin, and said we have two talk this out. there are people
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who make motorca rs two talk this out. there are people who make motorcars in germany they don't want no deal more than anybody else. yet they talking about maintaining the integrity of the single market. and they've also given their backing. the integrity of the single market the backstop is all about the border. this border, the brits have said we are going to put troops and police, the irish have said we are going to put troops and police, the only people who are going to put troops and police are brussels. brussels doesn't have an army. brussels doesn't want to be blamed for this and she is trained very ha rd to blamed for this and she is trained very hard to ensure that europe doesn't get blamed. —— trying very hard. what you're going to see when borisjohnson meets hard. what you're going to see when boris johnson meets emmanuel macron, macron has been playing a much more napoleonic game, he doesn't like us at the best of times. what he will says no, no, no, do or clear. it's going to be far less emollient, much more nasty. yes, much less
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touchy—feely. angela merkel has reinforced it is the uk's problem. they've spent three years trying to find a solution that would please brussels, they haven't managed. how will they do that in 30 days? what does he have up his sleeve? he doesn't have anything up his sleeve, it's all about the optics. i don't think he can achieve three years' work in 30 days. i'm talking about those brexiteer is, luke scarring, the borders of the world, of all these countries... they want to come up these countries... they want to come up witha these countries... they want to come up with a technological solution. in the end, boris johnson, up with a technological solution. in the end, borisjohnson, ithink, is heading for a no—deal brexit. i think he knows it and the people behind and the lever —— leavers want
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this. he's really going to try his best. as he said, we're going to do everything we can because we don't wa nt everything we can because we don't want no deal, but i think in the end, that is what is going to happen. brussels is terrified of being blamed for this. who is saying that? what indication do you have about? they are working very hard to shift the blame to britain. no, no. borisjohnson has shift the blame to britain. no, no. boris johnson has always... shift the blame to britain. no, no. borisjohnson has always... boris johnson has said is note the onus is on us. johnson has said is note the onus is on us. the onus is on us, but it is just as much of a problem for a car worker in germany than one in the uk. it is a problem for a farmer or fisherman in spain and advance. we've got to stop big supplicant about this. boris is on the front foot, his not being supplicant. ——
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he is not. so you're saying instead of as putting forward suggestions... ? no, so should they. let's work together on this. barnier and others keep talking about the good friday agreement, it's got nothing to do without, it's all got to do with the integrity of the single market. it's their problem, it's not our problem. isn't there two sides to the problem? in the end, we have said we wa nt problem? in the end, we have said we want to rip up this withdrawal agreement, we want to rip it up. know we haven't. virus has also said the withdrawal agreement is dad. know he hasn't! yes he has. he is talking about something completely different. the may strategy has
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failed, hasn't passed the house of commons after three votes, there are many people in the eag who say even if you get rid of the backstop we will still have problems. i'm not sure about at the death. i would vote for the deal, but not whether macron would consent that we leave or not. its him and the 27 other countries. he said that. he is one of the 27 leaders stop in the czech republic, hungary have as much power as france and germany. in the end when it comes to the votes, yes “ one end when it comes to the votes, yes —— one of the 27 leaders of. what about the telegraph —— one of the 27 leaders. . very emollient. quite statesmanlike today and i admire her for this. at home we don't see this
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on the news. she's not in the best of health. he/she is a little bit of the walking dead when it comes to politically because she's coming to the end and she has an economy going into recession —— she is a little bit. her economy runs europe. she is trying to steer this to something that helps europe. the contrast will be tomorrow macron will be doing this to help france. dougal said yea rs this to help france. dougal said years ago france doesn't have friends, it has interests. she has looked at this today and said how can we do this for europe. she had a good day. what makes me laugh, you have quoted her correctly, digby, but she said the same thing to theresa may on every occasion. she was warm and emollient. did you see a shift in the relationship between her and theresa may and her and borisjohnson? her and theresa may and her and
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boris johnson? it might be a male—female energy rather than a female female energy if you want to read into body language. may be frowned are called doesn't do small talk because theresa may doesn't do small talk. in the end i was very surprised borisjohnson pivoted once she had been emollient —— may be frau merkel. these may be famous la st frau merkel. these may be famous last words that could come back to haunt him. what about how boris johnson came across in his first foreign trip as prime minister?” wasn't keen on him being prime minister, i don't have a vote, as i presume you don't, but i worry today that it wasn't a domestic thing, i was pleased he was going to be someone that would give business certainty by saying i'll give you a date... certainty, and also to ensure we don't get a hard left
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britain —— government in britain. statesmanlike? was he going to behave himself and not commit himself to these off—the—cuff remarks and shoot from the hip, for which he is famous, because that's the not too be the leader of the fifth guest economy on earth on the global stage. today he proved me wrong because he had a good day. expectations are so low, like when trumper reads from a teleprompter without saying anything stupid. he is so intelligent! angela merkel smiled and laughed and the press room chuckled and they found it funny and hilarious. bother is very good at doing that —— borisjohnson. his hairdidn't look good at doing that —— borisjohnson. his hair didn't look too bad and his suit wasn't to crumpled. you could say he looked prime ministerial. he sounded eager and ready and like a candu person. —— too crumpled. a
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good day for him. on the front of the daily telegraph —— can do person. fears of millions of pensioners taking multiple drugs. we both have family interests. we do. with very grateful you have highlighted this one, thank you. there's three different strands in this article —— where area grateful. the old cliche, what kills you isn't the disease it's the drugs because of the side—effects —— where vary grateful. it is linked to side—effects of taking drugs. ea 53% rise over seven yea rs not taking drugs. ea 53% rise over seven years not for the disease you're taking the drugs for but the side—effects —— a 53% rise.
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especially in older people the article highlights age uk, the charity, fighting for older people, they are highlighting this, they're saying the worry is there's a degree of prescription overload with older people where you say take these, keep taking these, and eventually they either become addicted or they have enormous side—effects. they either become addicted or they have enormous side-effects. some of the commentators are calling it the holly pharmacy. this is overload. very large numbers, one in five of the 1.9 very large numbers, one in five of the1.97 very large numbers, one in five of the 1.9 7 million people over retirement age on at least seven different types of drugs and the side—effects include confusion, dizziness and delirium and they can result in elderly people being rushed to hospital or worse —— 1.97. the threshold is six, that seems to be one of the problems, and doctors
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being ever ready to give these drugs. by the time you get to 70 or 80, you will be very trusting and vulnerable and you will believe a doctor is always right and you're not going to research your own condition, as people of our age do online. not always correctly. this study in spain in 2015 found those taking six medicines or more a day we re taking six medicines or more a day were three times more likely to die prematurely than those on no drugs at all. it's the number six. we've both got relatives where this is happening. very concerning. there is side—effects for the people taking them but a huge financial cost as well. there's two costs, the cost of the drug and the cost of the treatment for the nhs to deal with the of the drug. a big worry. thank you, lord jones and harry bonsu. goodbye. we'll see you again soon. that's it for the papers tonight. don't forget you can see the front pages of the papers online
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on the bbc news website. it's all there for you seven days a week at bbc.co.uk/papers, and if you miss the programme any evening, you can watch it later on bbc iplayer. thank you very much to both of you. see you again soon. goodbye from me. hi, i'm eleanor roper with your latest from the bbc sports centre. the countdown is on as england prepare to take on australia in the third ashes test at headingley. with the aussies' star batsman steve smith out with concussion, attention has turned to england's jason roy, who's also in doubt after suffering a knock to the head in the nets. his surrey team—mate ollie pope is now on standby in case roy fails his concussion protocols. here's england test captain joe root. jason's been monitored quite
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closely, as you'd expect. he's undergone a couple of concussion tests so far and scored really well. so as it stands, fully expect him to be fit and ready to play tomorrow. i feeljason can be fit and ready to play tomorrow. i feel jason can have be fit and ready to play tomorrow. i feeljason can have a real big impact at the start of the game or start of an innings. it might not have happened just yet, but i fully expect him to go out and be able to dojust expect him to go out and be able to do just that. o nto onto football... there were seven games in the championship tonight, and it was one to forget for stoke goalkeeperjack butland. after conceding a soft opening goal against preston, he then couldn't deal with a long ball before allowing billy bowdin‘s shot to wriggle underneath him. the match finished 3—1 to preston. all the other championship results are on the bbc sport website. bolton wanderers manager phil parkinson has quit amid the club's financial worries. his assistant steve parkin has also gone. bolton were relegated to league one last season against the backdrop of those financial struggles and tonight's fixture against doncaster rovers was postponed because of concerns over the young players who've been
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left keeping the squad afloat. the club has been in administration since may. another club with money worries is league one bury. they're running out of time to secure their future after being unable to fulfill any of their fixtures so far this season. protestors are warning that the club could soon be dead and buried and have brought a coffin to the ground. former bury directorjoy hart also handcuffed herself to a drainpipe. the efl says the club has until friday to prove it can afford to keep going. dairy, asa dairy, as a town, would be far less richer than it would have been if bury hadn't have survived —— bury. i'm appealing to all the north—west clu bs i'm appealing to all the north—west clubs out there to please, please,
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please help us. we need you, we need you desperately before friday. we really do. we now know england will face world champions holland in the euro—hockey semi—finals. they narrowly managed a win over belarus thanks to this goal from hannah martin with just four minutes to go. it's a tough tie and follows holland's 14—0 win over russia. if england win the title then team gb will qualify for next year's olympics. rugby union now, and the international career of england centre ben teo is over after he signed for french club toulon tonight. teo was left out of eddiejones' world cup squad last week, but will now be ineligible for a call—up in the case of injury after the rugby football union confirmed their selection policy with regards foreign—based players. te'o was discarded shortly after being involved in an off—field incident on a training camp in italy. onto canoeing, where charlotte henshaw has secured
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britain's first medal of the 2019 canoe sprint and paracanoe world championships. she's won vl3 gold in hungary. henshaw won paralympic swimming medals at both the 2012 and 2016 olympics before switching sports. she finished in a new world lead time of 56.82 seconds. it's the second world title of her career. it's a brilliant start, and i think i've made a really nice progression. icame i've made a really nice progression. i came eighth in my first world championships, bronze last year. it shows how well we are kind of trained to combat any weather condition and be a good paddler in any boat. that's all the sport for now. hello there. as we go into the latter stages of august, it looks like summer is set to have one big
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old final push on the temperatures. up old final push on the temperatures. up to 30 quite widely in the south of the uk through the weekend and on into monday, which is a bank holiday for some. how are we going to manage that? high pressure is going to build from the continent. initially we pull in airfrom the build from the continent. initially we pull in air from the south—west and then isoba rs we pull in air from the south—west and then isobars will push us into a southerly. we also squeeze away the weather fronts and the areas of low pressure that have made things wet and windy. that said, this morning where under low pressure. to the north—west of the uk whirling away. a breezy start, especially in the north, showers and a remnant of a weather front in the north of england and more persistent rain in northern ireland in the latter half of the day. in the south, temperatures on the up, 2425 in the south. to the north of the weather front, mid—teens at best. pushing the rain further north on thursday evening and noticed it doesn't move in western scotland, so the totals
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in some spots will mount up and the showers further north are distinctly more scattered. look at these overnight temperatures, down in single figures, fives, sixs in england and wales earlier in the week and now low no lower than mid—teens because we've moved into lower air mid—teens because we've moved into lowerairand mid—teens because we've moved into lower air and with more sunshine around on friday and the high pressure's influence exerting further north, we get rid of the rain in scotland. a largely dry afternoon and up to 22 in aberdeen, 22 in the central belt of scotland and 28 in the south—east of england. on saturday the isobars orientate and plunge us into the southerly from the near continent. can't see the weather fronts getting in on the action, bringing more cloud into the west and more showers, but on the weekend a dry story with lots of fronts and notice how the heat pushes into scotland on sunday and
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perhaps the warmest day in northern ireland as well. temperatures slip back a bit in scotland and northern ireland on sunday, warmer than they have been through this week, but england and wales will hold onto the heat for much of the week ahead.
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if you get rid of the backstop we will still have problems. i'm ben bland in london. the headlines: warm words, but a warning too — angela merkel tells borisjohnson he's got 30 days to avoid a no—deal brexit. you've set a very blistering timetable there of 30 days, if i understood you correctly. i'm more than happy with that. "appalling and inhumane" — critics condemn white house plans which could see migrant children detained indefinitely. i'm sharanjit leyl in singapore. also in the programme:

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