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tv   The Papers  BBC News  August 24, 2019 11:30pm-11:46pm BST

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cove i’ cover at times. what extensive cloud cover at times. what about the temperatures? 28 in glasgow tomorrow. 3233 in parts of the south—east, rising levels of humidity as well. as that humidity builds we are likely to see some cloud, mr murdoch developing as we go into the start of monday. poor travelling conditions and poor visibility first time on monday. a lot of that murkiness should clear. spells of sunshine and the chances ofa spells of sunshine and the chances of a shower later in the day and some rain into the western isles. temperatures as you can see a little bit lower in the west by the stage but still high 20s or late 30s across eastern areas. during monday night is where the fund could bring a few showers. there is more meaningfulfrontal a few showers. there is more meaningful frontal system will be trying to push its way across northern ireland and scotland so we could see a bit of rain here as we go through tuesday. elsewhere, some spells of sunshine and increasing chance of catching a shower or thunderstorm as we go for the day. cooling off in the west, still the potential to get above 30 across east anglia and the south—east. but as we head deeper into the week, all
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of us will eventually see things turning cooler. rain at times but not all the time and most of that will be found towards the north the west. that is all from me. goodbye for now. hello. this is bbc news with samantha simmons. we'll be taking a look at tomorrow morning's papers in a moment — but first the headlines. prince andrew has said he did not "see, witness or suspect any behaviour of the sort" that subsequently led to the arrest and conviction of disgraced financier jeffrey epstein. borisjohnson has been warned against forever being known as "mr no—deal" over brexit by donald tusk — as world leaders gathered at the g7 summit in biarritz. meanwhile the prime minister will urge president trump not to escalate a trade war with china when they meet at the summit. in the last few minutes
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the white house has tweeted pictures from this evening's dinner at biarritz. brazil's president has bowed to international pressure and ordered the armed forces to tackle the record number of fires in the amazon forest. british airways apologises after admitting that some emails sent to passengers telling them theirflights had been hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me arejohn rentoul, the chief political commentator at the independent, and the broadcaster penny smith. many of tomorrow's front pages are already in. let's ta ke let's take a look. the g7 summit in biarritz is dominating the sunday front pages. the mail on sunday says borisjohnson is expected to tell eu leaders under an ideal brexit britain doesn't have to pay £30 billion of the so—called divorce bill. the sunday times said his threat puts britain on an election
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footing with a tough stance it intended to win over brexit party supporters. the telegraph says mr johnson has told donald trump any trade deal must be in the interests of british business. he has admitted that striking a post brexit trade deal with the us will not be plain sailing according to the independent. the prime ministers asked the attorney general of parliament can be shut for five weeks says the observer, saying that it seems to be a concerted plan to stop mps forcing the government to seek an extension to brexit. let's get on with taking a look at those front pages. boris raises election sta kes front pages. boris raises election stakes implying that we could be headed for a general election before the october 31 deadline. yes. this has plans for a general election on 17th october. the first day the eu summit that is supposed to discuss
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oi’ summit that is supposed to discuss or settle brexit. whether we're going to leave with a deal, or without. that is quite a tight timetable. that would require boris johnson to ask parliament to vote foran johnson to ask parliament to vote for an election by the 10th of september, only one week after mps come back. that is a very interesting possibility. clearly, he's worried that parliament will try to block him, if he continues to go foran try to block him, if he continues to go for an ideal brexit. more on that ina go for an ideal brexit. more on that in a moment. tell us what the opinion polls are saying about whether this is a good idea. clearly, suggesting that it is for the tories. there is a new yougov poll in the sunday times giving the conservatives a 12 point lead, poll in the sunday times giving the conservatives a12 point lead, and if you look at the average of the perils, there is a new one in the 0bserver as well, the conservatives are heading for a majority of 58. do you think it is a good idea, penny? sorry! does anyone think it is a
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goodidea? sorry! does anyone think it is a good idea? does anybody want an election? john and i were just talking, and the observer headline isjohnson seeks talking, and the observer headline is johnson seeks legal advice talking, and the observer headline isjohnson seeks legal advice on five—week parliament closure, just a different way of looking at the same story? in other words. different way of looking at the same story? in otherwords. because different way of looking at the same story? in other words. because you have to corrode parliament, however you —— prorogue, have to corrode parliament, however you “ prorogue, so have to corrode parliament, however you —— prorogue, so maybe that is all it is. that would take it past the exit date. maybe that is a five—week election period. the exit date. maybe that is a five-week election period. tell is more about this idea of proroguing parliament, something we had about when borisjohnson parliament, something we had about when boris johnson became parliament, something we had about when borisjohnson became prime minister back it has been heavily discounted by the speaker of the house of commons john discounted by the speaker of the house of commonsjohn bercow, who said over my dead body, pretty much. there is a cross—party group of mps saying this is absolutely unconstitutional. what does it appearas
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unconstitutional. what does it appear as if he's looking around a way to get around this opposition? that is what is puzzling. if he was going to suspend parliament to get out without a deal he would need to do it for longer than five weeks, so i think he is much more likely to think about going for a five—week election campaign, which would give him the authority, before we leave, to go to the eu and say look i got the backing of the british people. give me the deal i want. that is if he does, of course, because there may did that and it did not work out too well for her. as she was far further ahead. so, would you genuinely want a risk like that? but we are getting closer and closer. and now we have got all of the rest of the story in here, about how we are not going to pay the full whack if we get no deal, and about how apparently angela merkel, according to borisjohnson apparently angela merkel, according to boris johnson supporters, apparently angela merkel, according
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to borisjohnson supporters, is saying that they might have sorted something out and looked favourably oi'i something out and looked favourably on some something out and looked favourably on some slight change to the backstop. who? the mail on sunday headline is boris there was the eu, you cannot have our £30 billion. if we do not leave with a deal. they are putting this figure at £9 billion. is he in any position to renegotiate the some? billion. is he in any position to renegotiate the some ?|j billion. is he in any position to renegotiate the some? i think that is almost impossible. we agreed 39 billion. or 36 million, is almost impossible. we agreed 39 billion. 0r36 million, the is almost impossible. we agreed 39 billion. or 36 million, the pens, what it is, because the euro keeps going up and down. if we have an ideal brexit, the first thing you know what to do is discuss with the eu what the terms of trade will be and they will say, well what about this money that you are asked? and then we say, not paying it! then they say we are not doing any deals, and then on it goes, and on it goes. emmanuel matt every and said you have to pay this. this is the sun. this is what it is. —— emmanuel
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macron. i'm also talking here about the trade deal that is going to be done, certainly boris johnson the trade deal that is going to be done, certainly borisjohnson hopes, we are hearing a tougher stance on the front of the sunday telegraph when borisjohnson actually the front of the sunday telegraph when boris johnson actually taking the negotiation to trump, trying to be on the front foot, i think these are our red lines, this is in some of the day's papers. more detail. it is essentially saying, you got to help us, and we cannot have all of these extra things that we keep have to keep going through for selling things, for example, who knew that shower trays were such an issue, until the papers cannot? shower trays were such an issue, untilthe papers cannot? why? i'm still thinking that it is the water pressure. our cemeteries are just... —— ourshower pressure. our cemeteries are just... —— our shower trays. pressure. our cemeteries are just... -- our shower trays. and cauliflowers. and melton mowbray
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pork pies, for goodness' sake. maybe they have to go through a special section, along with the wallpaper and the pillars, which have to have fire retardant something. it is about red isn't it? this is what borisjohnson about red isn't it? this is what boris johnson told about red isn't it? this is what borisjohnson told the press on the plane on the way to biarritz. he went through this loan slightly comic rant about all these regulations that stop us... considerable barriers. that stop selling things the united states, and how he's going to take it all up with donald trump. and between them they are going to sort it all out, which, i believe it when i see it, because the whole point about trade negotiations is that they take absolutely ages. you have got to argue for every line through both houses of congress. that is part of the problem. it isn'tjust a deal done by borisjohnson the problem. it isn'tjust a deal done by boris johnson and the problem. it isn'tjust a deal done by borisjohnson and donald trump overa done by borisjohnson and donald trump over a small glass of...
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welcome of course, donald trump doesn't drink. there has been something of a bromance between them and the papers are suggesting that came to an end with a fractious phone call on friday night. the papers say that they have spoken on the phone more times in the last few weeks than donald trump did with theresa may in her time as leader and apparently there was a tense phone call on friday night between the two. allegedly. we don't know, obviously. it is all coming out a briefing and pr. and they are doing stuff. and they get on, much more than donald trump did with theresa may. there is no question about that. the point about donald trump is that we know that he is capricious. he could turn out tomorrow and say, look, i don't like this boris guy. he's annoying. do you think there was a concerted effort now to portray borisjohnson as the strongman of this country who
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is fighting the case, which is what he's trying to portray himself as? it seems like it is notjust, he's actually putting his money where his mouth is, now. he does seem to be getting on with things. it certainly does feel like there's some kind of impetus, doesn't there? or oomph as he calls it. he wants to persuade people that he's getting things done on the international stage. he admits doubt over the trade deal with the us. but the other papers are saying, well, actually, maybe it is time that a speedy trade deal is not going to be that likely. we have seized on that phrase, the very considerable barriers to trade with the us that borisjohnson was talking about. and it has been pointed out that he is admitting that it will be difficult to sort this trade deal out. the sunday
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express says uk— us trade deal is done. ready to be signed next month, say american celsius! there is a contrast there —— say american sources. this story is about a countdown brexit clock in downing street. in the answer they were when dominic cummings came to live attention, i seem to remember there was a countdown clock to the referendum that was one of his things that he, certainly in the phone, portrait, and this suggestion is that it is his idea to put these countdown clocks on every computer in downing street, but the response hasn't been that positive. the civil services executive director of government communications says that it is too stressful. can you imagine
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having that on your computer every time you went in? that it was counting down. they do actually have a physical clock. that was carried in one boris' first day in downing street. yes, they are saying that this is about whether there should bea this is about whether there should be a clock on every computer. there isa be a clock on every computer. there is a comment. he says he is passionate about great communication work... passionate about great communication work. . . they passionate about great communication work... they have an awful lot of work... they have an awful lot of work to do, don't they, and it is down to the civil servants. they've got to physically make this happen. one of the no—deal planning. got to physically make this happen. one of the no-deal planning. this is the master plan of benedict cumberbatch. .. sorry, dominic cummings, to focus the whole government machine on this deadline and drive it to visit. and it has had a tremendous effect on galvanising the whole of whitehall. but it is still going to come up against resistance in parliament. it
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is going to be huge, over the next few weeks in september and october. what is your view of how boris johnson has come across in the past few days, as we have seen himself presenting himself on the world stage, meeting with angela merkel and emmanuel macron, and now at the g7, do you think he is adopting a statesman—like appeal and approach people expected? partly because angela merkel and emmanuel macron we re angela merkel and emmanuel macron were quite polite to him, they didn't treat him as any kind of pariah, they did not dismiss him as a clown, which is what many british people might have feared. because of that picture of him hanging, suspended... on the zip wire. frankly, he had an undistinguished career as foreign secretary. he did not earn the respect of other countries particularly. but he seemed to get on quite well with emmanuel macron. and there is a
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sense among these world leaders that he is somebody they can deal with. i think they did find theresa may quite hard work. some would say that she's not quite as personable, worm and charismatic as other people have been or perhaps borisjohnson might be. a couple of minutes left. let's talk about the weather. we may be in a lovely air condition studio in bbc hq. a lovely air condition studio in bbc h0, but a lovely air condition studio in bbc hq, but it a lovely air condition studio in bbc h0, but it is still gorgeously worm outside at the middle of the night. and it is not going anywhere, this weather. it is going to be hot until halloween, and it has pictures of a bear floating at whipsnade zoo, cooling down. they say that we are going to, what are the temperatures are? let's get this right. 30 degrees in september, 24 in october, more likely to have temperatures much hotter than average until the end of october. and for those
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climate change

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