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tv   BBC News at Nine  BBC News  August 28, 2019 9:00am-10:01am BST

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you're watching bbc news at 9 with me annita mcveigh. the headlines... one of england's oldest football clubs — bury — is expelled from the league, after more than 130 years. there after more than 130 years. were tears and a huge s for there were tears and a huge shock for the fans who had gathered here last night to wait and hear what was going to happen to their club. they are out of the league. as of today, bury football club does still exist, they just need to bury football club does still exist, theyjust need to work out whatever happens next. prince andrew is challenged by one ofjeffrey epstein‘s alleged victims to explain his connections to the american billionaire. he knows exactly what he's done. and i hope he comes clean about it. thank you. more money for schools, the nhs and police, the chancellor's promises fuel speculation of a possible
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general election. an advert promoting the government's eu settlement scheme after brexit is banned after being ruled misleading. 300 of the uk's most remote homes can now claim they're among the best connected — as their superfast broadband goes live game, set, match, 0liver. british number one kyle edmund has been knocked out of the first round of the us open for the second year in a row. good morning — and welcome to the bbc news at 9 bury football club has been expelled from the english football league, after a last—ditch takeover bid
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collapsed. the league one club had until 5pm yesterday to complete a deal — having been granted an extension to last friday's initial deadline. the shakers looked set to be taken over by c&n sporting risk, but the proposal fell apart. in a statement last night, the efl said it was to withdraw bury‘s membership "with enormous regret". the club was formed 134 years ago and has twice won the fa cup, making them the first cup winners to be expelled by the efl. the efl executive chair debbiejevans said the news "will be felt across the entire football family." well, earlier this morning, radio 4's today programme spoke to rory campbell and henry newman, the two men from c&n sporting risk who nearly took over the club but they backed out of the dealjust 90 minutes before the deadline. now is really not the time to be getting into sort of detailed commercial matters
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but there were various matters in relation to charges on the ground and leases in relation to car parks which had significant effects in terms of the asset value overall. and, ultimately, there was a web of problems that were unfolding hour by hour, which were escalating, as we mentioned in our statement, which ultimately just were insurmountable, in our opinion. and how did you find, rory campbell, how did you find the chairman of bury to deal with, steve dale? because he was quite optimistic about it but he said in the end you couldn't get anything done on the stadium and without the stadium, they couldn't continue. i think multiple parties were in the process of negotiating with the report and some things were allowed to say, some which we are not, but in the end, we were getting more and more information in the last 72 hours that were just forcing the situation...
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that was coming from him and from other people, thatjust ended up forcing, as we said, the situation to be insurmountable challenges that we weren't going to be able to deal with. bbc sport's sally nugent is at gigg lane for us this morning, sally. fans have been talking about this clu b fans have been talking about this club being at the heart and soul of the community. how big a blow is this for the community, and why, ultimately, did the people involved in trying to save this club are not managed to make that work?|j in trying to save this club are not managed to make that work? i think lots of fans this morning asking that the very same question. how did it not work? we know of three beds that were on the table last night that were on the table last night that seems to have the correct funding. —— bids. how did not get over the line past that five o'clock deadline, which was later extended. you mentioned the community, here in bury there is such competition from
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massive football club is not that far away, the two manchester clubs, the two liverpool clubs, this is a hotbed of football. if you choose to support bury football club, you really, really do support them, you are very loyal, you could quite rightly go up the road to one of the big, fancy stadiums. if you choose to come to gigg lane, so steeped in history, it is probably because your family has supported this for generations. simon, you are one of the loyal fans, this club has generations. simon, you are one of the loyalfans, this club has been pa rt the loyalfans, this club has been part of your life? yes, since i was a teenager. i came down, as you said, you choose a club like bury, you don't choose bury, you come here and it hooks you. you don't choose who you fall in love with. it's what most people here have done. it is addictive. have you heard, you might know more than us, what happened to the other bids, the other people
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trying to buy the club last night, but it didn't quite happen. what went wrong? we don't know, the efl had the information, the efl said they would do everything they could to try to save us. they had the information and we don't know what has happened. we would love to know where it has all gone wrong. the efl, it looks a joke, it is a division with 23 teams. we didn't have a game until saturday. the league could have given us 24 hours, 48 hours, to get a sense of who the other parties were. we want a foot ball clu b other parties were. we want a football club here. i think the other 23 teams in the division want a team here. i think football fans all around the country, you saw yesterday, we had people from huddersfield, leeds united, torquay, blackpool, bolton, our nemeses, nobody wants clubs to go out of the league. it's heartbreaking. we just
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had that glimmer of hope. we thought it had gone. three more bids with the funding that the owner, mr dale, had accepted. we need to know what we nt had accepted. we need to know what went wrong. sale, bury are out of the league, but bury football club is not finished. i mean, iam assuming there is potentially still on offer to buy this club, somebody still might take the club on? hopefully. forever bury are having a meeting as we speak with people who have more knowledge about where we go from here. we have not been liquidated, we are still a football club, we are still the team that won the fa cup twice, including a record 6-0. we the fa cup twice, including a record 6—0. we want to keep this club going. i don't know who would approve it now. the efl is now out of it. but whether or not we are is unattractive and proposition now that we are not only club, we don't
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know. hopefully we can get over the line and keep going. how angry other fans? there is a lot of anger. i think at the moment there is still a lot of shop. sort of that grieving process. we have lost our league status. anger... there is anger with the two previous owners, stuart dave, who is getting off lightly. he racked up {2.5 million of losses each year, he is a man who signed us up each year, he is a man who signed us up for mortgages at ridiculous interest rates. he is the man who sold cars — — interest rates. he is the man who sold cars —— car parking spaces with interest. there is a lot of frustration. simon giving a snapshot of the frustration and anger felt by many of the fans here late into last night, they continue to arrive
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today, to the historic patch of footballing history, which has been here for 134 years. breaking news coming in on the last few moments from our political editor laura kuenssberg, who says that the government is to hold the queen's speech on the 14th of 0ctober. queen's speech on the 14th of october. you can see laura's tweets on the screen, we are told this will be confirmed by the privy council today. number 10 saying that it is business as usual for a new government. but also saying that this has a useful political side—effect that denies mps time to try to stop no deal. you can look at laura's twitter account to get more detail on what she is saying this morning, the news she is bringing to us. morning, the news she is bringing to us. the government to hold the
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queen's speech on the 14th of 0ctober. today, we heard that there will be an emergency budget next week. this news came after it was announced that sajid javid's first expected speech as chancellor today had been cancelled, but there will be an emergency budget next week. let's talk to tom barton at westminster. let's talk about what laura is saying in the district. the queen's speech being held on the 14th of october, number 10 saying it has a useful political side—effect that denies mps time to prevent no—deal. what does this mean? that denies mps time to prevent no-deal. what does this mean? the useful political side—effect laura is referring to is that you cannot hold a queen's speech without doing what is known as proroguing parliament. that is suspending the sitting of parliament. that can be forjust a few days. but we expect that the suspension of parliament will happen on the 10th of september. so, more than a month
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ahead of that queen's speech. what that will do is it will deny those mps who are determined to try to use parliament to stop a no—deal brexit the time that they need in the parliamentary timetable to do that, to get the legislation through that would rock brexit. now, the government, as you observe, say there is nothing to see here, it is normal to prorogue parliament ahead ofa normal to prorogue parliament ahead of a queen's speech, in fact it is impossible to hold a queen's speech without doing so, because that suspension is the break between the old parliament that you are sitting m, old parliament that you are sitting in, and the new parliament which is kicked off with the queen's speech. and of course the government makes the point that it is normal for a new administration, boris johnson the point that it is normal for a new administration, borisjohnson as a new prime minister, to hold a queen's speech to set out its programme for government. but this is going to be hugely controversial. just yesterday, we hired opposition party m ps just yesterday, we hired opposition party mps coming together to say
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that they would work together to use parliamentary means, legislation, to stop a no—deal brexit. this appears likely to stop them from being able to do that. one can imagine the reaction which will be coming thick and fast to this. combined with that decision to cancel sajid javid's first major speech as chancellor and the emergency budget announcement for next week, how do you think this looks in totality? does it look like borisjohnson looks in totality? does it look like boris johnson and the looks in totality? does it look like borisjohnson and the team that he has around him very much trying to seize control of the agenda? because yesterday we heard from the mps opposed to no—deal saying that they wa nted opposed to no—deal saying that they wanted to take control of the legislative timetable.|j wanted to take control of the legislative timetable. i think what you've got is number 10 really exploring lots of different ways in which they can make sure that a no—deal budget remains on the table. of course, the government, boris
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johnson, say they want a deal, but they say the only way to achieve thatis they say the only way to achieve that is by keeping no—dealfirmly they say the only way to achieve that is by keeping no—deal firmly as an option. the announcement that the chancellor is going to hold a spending review much earlier than expected, next week, that had led to speculation that this was preparing the ground for an election. it is perfectly possible that we will get an election at some point this autumn. perhaps unlikely that it is before the brexit deadline in 0ctober. but still a possibility. you know, ithink 0ctober. but still a possibility. you know, i think what you've got at the moment is number 10 absolutely trying to ensure that they are driving everything they can towards that goal of keeping no deal on the table. they say, so that they can ensure they can force brussels into concessions that would give them a new deal. tom, thank you very much for that. tom barton with more on that breaking news. let's remind you of what our political editor laura
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kuenssberg has been tweeting in the last few moments. the government is to hold the queen's speech on the 14th of october, that is due to be confirmed by the privy council today. number 10 says it is all business as usual for a new government. but says it has the useful political side—effect that denies mps time to try to stop no deal. as tom was just explaining, parliament has to be prorogued to be for a queen's speech can take place. you will know yesterday that mps opposed to a no—deal brexit are trying to work out a plan, they said they were united in the plan to try to stop a no—deal brexit. that plan prioritises taking control of the legislative timetable. here you have borisjohnson doing legislative timetable. here you have boris johnson doing the legislative timetable. here you have borisjohnson doing the opposite. he is trying to seize the timetable back from them. laura has also tweeted that parliament is likely to
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meet, therefore, from next monday, until around the 11th of september. i understand downing street thinks they have some legal protection from court cases. you can see that on your screen, if they are suspending parliament to come back with a queen's speech. as laura very correctly says, there is going to be a huge row. we are going to bring you reaction to all of this as we get it. there is going to be lots of reaction to this, just wait and see. a woman who says she was a victim of the convicted us paedophile jeffrey epstein, and was forced into a sexual encounter with the duke of york, has urged the prince to "come clean" about what he knows. virginia roberts giuffre spoke to reporters outside a court in new york. it was after a hearing for alleged victims of epstein, who took his own life in prison earlier this month. prince andrew has strenuously denied the claims made against him. 0ur north america correspondent chris buckler was in court. jeffrey epstein's victims never had
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the chance to face him in court, but at a hearing in new york, they were given the opportunity to tell how he abused and exploited them, and they did so in graphic detail. before i knew what was happening, he grabbed onto my wrist and tugged me towards the bed. i tried to pull away, but he was unbuttoning my shorts and pulling my body onto his already naked body faster than i could think. i was searching for words but all i could say was a meek, "no, please, stop". inside court, many of the women asked for their real names not to be used but they became emotional and some broke down in tears as they talked about the crimes that they suffered at the hands ofjeffrey epstein. they talked about being abused, exploited and manipulated by a man who they described as a complex villain. the disgraced financier‘s death inside a prison cell has led to many questions and, in court, epstein's lawyers claimed the injuries he suffered were more consistent with an assault than a suicide. whether it was a suicide or murder does not end the case,
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does not end their fight forjustice. it does not end their feeling that they were manipulated and victimised. epstein had many famous and influentialfriends, including donald trump and the duke of york. prince andrew has categorically denied allegations he had sex with a teenager exploited by epstein. virginia roberts giuffre, who made those accusations against the prince, was among those at court. he knows exactly what he has done and i hope he comes clean about it. jeffrey epstein may be dead but his victims are determined to ensure that the questions about his crimes continue to be asked. chris buckler, bbc news, new york. join me from outside buckingham palace is our royal correspondent jonny dymond. what more have we heard from buckingham palace? what
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have they been saying about this all along? well, it is very much the same line, the same explanation, the same line, the same explanation, the same blanket denial from same line, the same explanation, the same blanket denialfrom buckingham palace that we have heard over the last few weeks since jeffrey epstein was first arrested and then took his own life in detention. that is that prince andrew had no sexual relationship or contact with the woman, virginia roberts, and that he does not condone the exportation of any human being. he issued under his own name a rather long and sometimes rather tortuous denial of any relationship, and also an admission that he made a mistake in seeing jeffrey epstein two years after he was convicted for child six offences in 2008. prince andrew met him again
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in 2010 and was seen inside his house in a video that was released about a week ago. what the statement does not say is what he was doing inside the house at all, in 2010, and what we do not know is what the relationship was between prince andrew and virginia roberts, a relationship that was made very clear ina relationship that was made very clear in a photograph dated around 2001, where prince andrew and virginia roberts is staring into the camera, and his arms around virginia roberts‘s their waste. there is no explanation as to that. however, the question as to whether there was any kind of sexual relationship, the palace is entirely clear and says there is no sexual relationship or contact between the duke of york and virginia roberts, who issued that challenge yesterday outside the courthouse in new york. how problematic is this for prince andrew and the royal family?”
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problematic is this for prince andrew and the royal family? i think it is pretty grim. it is grim because of the nature of the allegations, obviously. this terrible swirl of sleaze and sexual exploitation that swirled around a man with whom prince andrew was clearly pretty friendly, and prince andrew says now, i'm horrified that i was making such a terrible error ofjudgment i was making such a terrible error of judgment about what he i was making such a terrible error ofjudgment about what he called jeffrey epstein's lifestyle, and the error ofjudgment of getting back in touch with him afterwards. it is grim because of that, and because the revelations keep coming, or the allegations come at any rate, keep coming. they may yet go further. all of the people that stood up in court yesterday may want to bring actions againstjeffrey epstein's yesterday may want to bring actions against jeffrey epstein's estate, the money he left, about half a billion dollars. there might be further allegations to come, allegations that prince andrew will have to choose whether or not to
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a nswer have to choose whether or not to answer in more detail. jonny dymond at buckingham palace. let mejust remind you of the breaking news that the government is to hold the queen's speech on the 14th of 0ctober. that is going to be confirmed later today. number 10 is describing this as business as usual for a new government. but number 10 saying it has the useful political side—effect that denies mps trying to stop a no—deal brexit. you could certainly interpret this as the government on one side and mps trying to stop a no—deal brexit, and on the other side engaged in this almighty tussle to take control of the legislative timetable. we just had a reaction from scotland's first minister nicola sturgeon, who has treated, though it is on your screens, it seems borisjohnson may actually be about to shut down parliament to force through a
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no—deal brexit. she writes, unless mps come together to stop him next week, today will go down in history asa week, today will go down in history as a dark one indeed for uk democracy. when she talks about shutting down parliament, it is because in order to have a queen's speech, parliament must first be prorogue. that would, in effect, not give mps trying to stop a no—deal brexit the time, the space, the opportunity to do so, potentially. that is the first reaction coming into us to the news that the queen's speech will be happening on the 14th of october, and parliament will therefore be prorogue for a period before that. if ijust go back to some of laura's other tweets, she is saying... bear with me. some of laura's other tweets, she is saying... bearwith me. parliament is likely to meet, therefore, from
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next monday until the 11th of september. so that is the window that nicola sturgeon is saying that mps need to come together in to try to stop this. but laura says she understands downing street thinks they have some legal protection from court cases around this if they are suspending parliament in order to come back with a queen's speech. it's worth repeating what she said earlier, there is certainly going to bea earlier, there is certainly going to be a huge row about all of this. we will come back with more reaction and more developments on that breaking news. a government advert telling eu citizens what they need to do to stay in the uk after brexit has been banned, after the advertising standards authority ruled it was misleading. in the radio advert which aired in april, listeners were told they only needed their passport or id card, and to complete an online form in order to apply. but many applicants were required to submit further documents. the home office says it completely
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disagrees with the decision. at least 23 people have been killed. in a nightclub fire in southern mexico. the attack was at the caballo blanco bar in coatza coalcos, and there are reports that the club was attacked with a molatov cocktail — those reports unverified at the moment but we'll be brining you more in due course. a 16—year—old boy has been arrested on suspicion of murder, after the body of a teaching assistant was discovered at a graveyard in lancashire. lindsay birbeck was found at accrington cemetery on saturday. a postmortem examination concluded that she'd been strangled. the teenager is being held in custody. we all know how frustrating a poor internet connection can be, even more so in rural areas. but now two of the remotest parts of the uk can boast that they're among the best connected —
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as superfast broadband goes live to more than 300 homes. our technology correspondent rory cellan—jones reports from the outer hebrides well, it's very remote, it's very beautiful and it's quite damp at the moment. this is grimsay in the outer hebrides. a tiny three mile by one mile rock, with about 100 homes on it. and it has got something amazing. these homes, spread all over the landscape here, have got fast fibre broadband, a fibre cable has come under the sea and been piped to every home in the uk. it's the best that there is. it's what we are all being promised by boris johnson by the 2025. at its cost a lot to get it here. probably around £4000 per household to hook each house up. that is compared to about £400 to do it in the city. but the locals are saying it is fantastic,
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it is changing their lives. here is one of them. robin spratt, you have a little business year, you have a candles business, hebridean candles, you do so may airbnb. what was it like before the fibre broadband arrived? they system we had before fibre was satellite —based, very limited data packages. it was embarrassing, really. it was really limiting is in far as what we could do. e—mailing and things like that was fine, but anything that was data hungry was just impossible. was fine, but anything that was data hungry wasjust impossible. and your airbnb guests, they wanted to use it? that was certainly one of the issues when we started doing airbnb. we would have guests asking for a wi—fi password because we saw we had wi—fi password because we saw we had wi—fi in the house, and we couldn't give it to them because they would clear is out and leave us with no data. so we couldn't communicate after that point. what impact will it have on the wider community? there is a big problem here, depopulation, people leaving,
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frankly, because they feel so disconnected from the world? sure, i am nota disconnected from the world? sure, i am not a native of these islands, and living here without connection to the outside world would be very difficult. i wouldn't be able to stay here, without something like this. have your neighbours been celebrating this, or do they want more? it has cost a lot of money?m has cost an incredible amount of money and we know how fortunate we are. but everybody is hooking up to this and i am sure it is making a lot of difference to people on the island. that is the story i've been hearing from a lot of household here. full fibre, everyone says it is the future. it comes at a cost. it might take some time to get right across the uk. but they are very happy to have it here. rory cellan—jones in the beautiful 0uter rory cellan—jones in the beautiful outer hebrides. almost a quarter of a million children in the uk say they're unhappy with their lives as a whole — that's according to figures from the children's society. the charity's annual good childhood report says that children's happiness is at its lowest since 2009. it cites issues around boys' appearance, friendships,
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school and worries about the future as potential driving factors. the children's society is warning that the decline in happiness is a national scandal and exposes huge failings for the country's most vulnerable children. joining me now is the report's author, richard crellin from the children's society what constitutes a happy childhood, a good childhood? so, there's all sorts of things that contribute to a happy childhood. the research that we found suggests the most important thing is relationships, actually. so, how a child feels about their relationship with their parents or carers, how they feel about their friends, social interactions are the bedrock of having a good childhood. and whilst children seem to be similarly satisfied with their families as they were in 2009, there's been a really worrying decline in how they feel about their friends particularly. we think that is one of the driving factors behind the decline in well—being. is one of the driving factors behind the decline in well-being. what else do you look at when you study
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whether children are happy or not? we look at a range of factors. other ones include school and school work. although we have been reporting that is stable, there have been worrying deaths in the data. also looking at appearance. we have found that girls have been more concerned with their appearance, but is still the case. but the big gender gap we observed has really narrowed. boys have been telling us, particularly in consultations across the country, they are more worried about their appearance than they used to be. again, influence from social media? there are all sorts of factors they cite. we know there are some links between social media use and low well—being. but it is often more complicated. boys talked about pressures to go to the gym, looking at film stars, actors, social media definitely came up. certainly, all of these societal pressures seem to be having an effect on boys and girls. your findings talk about broad societal issues, crime, the environment, things like that? absolutely fascinating. many
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children and young people, two fifths, are very concerned about the environment, crime and online safety. and these concerns are mixed in with concerns about their own future. very worried about having a job, having enough money. what failings do you think the findings in your report expose? we are really concerned about the state of children's well—being. for us it really highlights some of the tensions going on at the moment. you have unprecedented investment in children's mental health services, on the one hand, the same time as huge cuts to children's social care. we are not thinking holistically about children and young people. that is why for us, the call to introduce a national measurement of well—being so we have informed policy, is so important. government spokeswoman says we want young people growing up in modern britain to feel confident tackling challenges life throws at them, that is why we are giving teachers the power to deal with bad behaviour and bullying, investing every year on mental health support for young people and providing quick access to
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mental health support when needed. do you think the national method is needed on top of that? has the gunmen said anything about that? —— has the government said anything about that? they are looking at well—being measurements, there will be guidance coming soon. they don't seem be guidance coming soon. they don't seem firm on it yet. the things they mentioned, exclusions from school, the mental health services, that is all one things reach crisis point, thatis all one things reach crisis point, that is too late. the thing about addressing well—being as it allows us addressing well—being as it allows us to get in early and stop these things from happening. we need to turn off the tap and make sure children are happy now so problems don't emerge later. really good to have you with us, thank you. a reminder of the breaking news that the government is to hold a queen's speech on the 14th of october. that will require parliament to be prorogued in advance of the queen speech. number ten, if prorogued in advance of the queen speech. numberten, if you prorogued in advance of the queen speech. number ten, if you look at the tweet from our political editor
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laura kuenssberg... it is not the one i am reading, but let me tell you first of all, number ten, according to laura, says it is all business as usual for the new government but it has number ten says, the useful political side effect that denies mps time to try to stop no deal. you will be aware that yesterday, various mps from opposition parties were meeting with the aim of doing exactly that. this isa the aim of doing exactly that. this is a treat first of all from the scottish first minister nicola sturgeon in reaction, saying it seems that borisjohnson may actually be about to shut down parliament to force through a no—deal brexit, unless mps come together to stop him next week, today will go down in history as a dark one for uk democracy and chris leslie, from the independent group for change, "if true, this undemocratic manoeuvre to try and shut down parliament must be fought every step of the way. how totally underhanded of boris johnson every step of the way. how totally underhanded of borisjohnson to make the queen sign off on this plot in a
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secret ceremony up and bow moral." that is the reaction from chris leslie —— in bow —— balmoral. there is the rest of the tweet. but potentially a very narrow window for mps opposed to a no—deal brexit to do this, because effectively, they could be meeting from next monday until around the 11th of september, which is when, we understand, the government may attempt to bring in this prorogation of parliament in advance of the queen speech. laura saying the government thinks it may
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have some legal protections are entering this because it is following the prorogation with a queen's speech, but there is going to bea queen's speech, but there is going to be a massive attempt to stop this, as you can already sense from the nature of the tweets coming in in response to this news. we are going to bring you much more on this developing story throughout the morning. ina developing story throughout the morning. in a moment, the weather forecast but first, joanna gosling with what is coming up on the victoria derbyshire programme at ten. good morning. ground—breaking research suggests men who kill their partners follow a homicide timeline. it is an eight—step pattern that could be monitored by police in order to prevent deaths. we will be speaking to the author herself and to a father whose daughter was murdered by a former boyfriend who had been stalking her. also on the programme, the metal detecting couple who found one of the biggest treasure hoards in british history. join us at ten on bbc two, the bbc news channel and online. now let's see carol, she has the
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weather, how are you? good morning, very well, thank you, i hope you are, too. today, we have a couple of bands of rain, still in the south—east and starting to clear with sunshine behind it, some rain in —— south—west wales and south—west england, pushing in the direction of dorset and hampshire and dry weather following on direction of dorset and hampshire and dry weatherfollowing on behind across northern ireland and across scotla nd across northern ireland and across scotland but in between, some sunshine. temperatures today, 15 in the north, 24 or 25 in the south. through this evening and overnight, there goes the band of rain through there goes the band of rain through the midlands into the south—east and it will clear as a weak feature. clear skies follow behind and more rain starts to come in across the west of scotland and north—west of northern ireland. not a particularly cold night but it will be in aberdeenshire, with temperatures falling to five or six. tomorrow, we start on a mostly dry node but rain coming in across northern ireland and scotland were very much be with us, turning more showery as it which
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is eased. some across northern england but for the rest of england and wales, dry with some sunny spells and highs tomorrow up to 24.
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hello, this is bbc news with annita mcveigh. the headlines... the government is expected to suspend parliament ahead of a queen's speech on 0ctober14th — which could deny mps the time to try and stop a no—deal brexit the english football league has called it a "dark day" as bury becomes the first club to be expelled from the league in almost 30 years. prince andrew is challenged by one ofjeffrey epstein's alleged victims to explain his connections to the american billionaire. more money for schools, the nhs and police — the chancellor's promises fuel speculation of a possible general election.
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a home office advert promoting the government's eu settlement scheme after brexit is banned after being ruled misleading. and 300 of the uk's most remote homes can now claim they're among the best connected — as their superfast broadband goes live so we are not going to do the morning briefing this morning because we are going to continue with this major piece of developing news coming in to us. let us just refresh ourselves on what our political editor laura kuenssberg is tweeting, that parliament is likely to be suspended, we are told the government is to hold a queen's speech on the 14th of october, that is due to be confirmed today and in order to do that, parliament has to be prorogued or suspended. number ten is saying it is all business as
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usual but that it has the useful political side effect that denies mps time to try to stop no deal and you will know yesterday, various mps from opposition parties were meeting, planning to do exactlyjust that by taking control of the legislative timetable, they said, and now it seems the government is trying to do exactly the same thing, to ta ke trying to do exactly the same thing, to take control of the legislative timetable for a different effect. just reading through a little bit more of what laura is saying, parliament likely to meet therefore from next monday until around the 11th of september. she understands downing street thinks they have some legal protection from court cases if they are suspending parliament to come back with a queen's speech. she says she understands only a tiny handful of cabinet ministers knew about this move in advance. a senior number ten source saying, laura
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quotes, "this is about the nhs and violent crime, not brexit, and the courts had no locus to interfere in what number ten is describing as a bog—standard queen's speech process. . . bog—standard queen's speech process... laura says this is the defence number ten are going to run against charges of carrying out a constitutional outrage. there will be nothing bog—standard about the arguments ahead. the pm as pitted himself against parliament before mps are back. let me bring you through some of the reaction now to all of this. the latest reaction from the lib dem brexit spokesman tom brake, who has treated...
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then we have a tweet from yvette cooper, the labour mp, former government minister, of course, tweeting. .. boris government minister, of course, tweeting... borisjohnson government minister, of course, tweeting. .. boris johnson is government minister, of course, tweeting... borisjohnson is trying to use the queen to concentrate power in his own hands. this is a deeply dangerous and irresponsible way to govern. there is the tweet from yvette cooper on your screens. and this reaction from john redwood, the conservative mp... i look forward to a fresh parliament with a queen's speech. so it seems quite a battle is being set up. we are hopefully going to talk to kathryn howden, seniorfellow are hopefully going to talk to kathryn howden, senior fellow for the institute for government in the next few minutes, to talk about how this process might work. let mejust bring your reaction we have had from
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scotland's first nicola sturgeon, who has tweeted, saying "it seems borisjohnson may who has tweeted, saying "it seems boris johnson may actually be who has tweeted, saying "it seems borisjohnson may actually be about to shut down parliament to force through a no—deal brexit. unless mps come together to stop him next week, today will go down in history as a dark one indeed for uk democracy." in those tweets, opposed to this plan from the government, you can certainly see the strength of feeling from mps who are opposed either to a no—deal brexit or two brexit on principle. as we wait to hopefully speak to catherine haddon, we will refresh you on the detail of what our political editor understands what is going to happen. she says that the johnson government, there is the tweet for you...
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so it is a very short period of time, potentially, for mps opposed toa time, potentially, for mps opposed to a no—deal brexit to try to bring a halt to that, to try to seize control of the legislative timetable. laura says she understands downing street thinks they have some legal protection from court cases if they are suspending parliament to come back with a queen's speech. and as laura correctly predicts, there is going to bea correctly predicts, there is going to be a huge row. you can see that from the tone and tenor of the tweets coming into us. and this is a tweets coming into us. and this is a tweet from andrew adonis. "if
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parliament is prorogued in this national crisis without an immediate election, the sovereign will not have acted so controversially since william iv." have acted so controversially since william iv. " let's have acted so controversially since william iv." let's continue with this developing news. we are welcoming viewers now on bbc world as well to this developing story today. the news that the government is planning to suspend parliament ahead of a queen's speech on october the 14th. 0ur political editor laura kuenssberg explaining this in a series of tweets this morning. there is bad news from laura, the government are to hold the queen's speech on the 14th of october. you can see in that tweet, she is quoted number ten as saying that this is business as usual for a new government, that this is the new normal! the normal order of things but number ten is recognising that, according to it, it has the useful
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political side effect that denies mps time to try to stop no deal. and this is certainly a riposte to those mps who met yesterday from opposition parties with the aim of coming up with a plan to stop a no—deal brexit. and we heard mps who we re no—deal brexit. and we heard mps who were attending that meeting who came out, they say they were very united ina plan out, they say they were very united in a plan to try to take control of parliament's legislative in a plan to try to take control of pa rliament‘s legislative timetable, of westminster‘s legislative timetable and now borisjohnson coming back sharply with a response to that. joining me is catherine haddon, seniorfellow at to that. joining me is catherine haddon, senior fellow at the institute for government. thank you for joining institute for government. thank you forjoining us here on the bbc news channel and bbc world today. just explain to us what borisjohnson is trying to do with this, what the process would be that would lead to the prorogation, or suspension, process would be that would lead to the prorogation, orsuspension, of
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parliament ahead of a queen's speech. well, we were due to have a break anyway for three weeks while the parties wait on conference, although there was some talk about whether they would remove that and avoid suspending parliament in that way. but they have obviously decided to do this particular one because it means they don't have to have the same kind of motion that mps could possibly use to try and get hold of time in parliament and to try and huack time in parliament and to try and hijack at the government's agenda. it also extends the amount of time. we were due to have a queen's speech a nyway we were due to have a queen's speech anyway and i have prorogation happening but to do it right now, giving everything that is going on and the emphasis that is going to be on parliament in the efforts of some mps to try and stop no—deal brexit, it does seem like a very obvious move to cut down time available to anti—no deal mps to be able to do
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something about it. on that point, do those mps, many of whom met yesterday to come up with their plan, do they actually have time now, if we are looking at this timetable the government seems to be working on, do those mps opposed to a no—deal brexit have time to stop this? it is very difficult to know. previously, back in the spring, when there were efforts to try and take hold of the order paper, control business and get legislation through, first of all it took a long time for mps to decide what they wa nted time for mps to decide what they wanted to do. it took them over two months to work out what kind of legislation. you would assume they would have that in mind now, we get this sense there is a great deal of better coordination amongst the opposition parties on what they want to do. they can get legislation through very quickly. 0ne to do. they can get legislation through very quickly. one of the key things might be the house of lords, where it is possible for government peers to try and slow down the process ,
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peers to try and slow down the process, try and use up time, because the rules their work differently and we are also hearing about a number of new appointments for the lords, so that could be an effort to slow that down further. they are really going to be struggling to be able to find time for the same is true for the government. if it did get a deal through, the time available to do anything about it is now extremely short and even for no deal preparation, the time there is very difficult for government as well. what is being set up here, and i think probably most people will agree on this, no matter what side of the political argument they are on, is an absolutely almighty parliamentary battle in the days and weeks ahead, isn't it? yes, i think what this makes clear is that that showdown is going to kick in properly next week. we heard in the last week or so a lot of noises about whether or not boris johnson would be able to find a deal, was making progress possibly with eu leaders on what he might be able to
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do there and there was some speculation that might stop conservative mps wanting to get into a showdown with their own government to early and they would actually give government time. i think that the changes that, i think there will bea the changes that, i think there will be a much greater showdown next week and we could see things move very quickly. catherine, thank you very much for your thoughts on this breaking story today. catherine haddon, seniorfellow at breaking story today. catherine haddon, senior fellow at the institute for government. looking at the tweets in reaction coming into this developing news, a number of those tweets mention the role of the queen. with me is our royal correspondentjonny dymond to talk more about this and let me refresh our viewers with some of those mentions of the queen. lord adonis saying if parliament is prorogued in this national crisis without an immediate election, the sovereign will not have acted so co ntroversially will not have acted so controversially since william iv dismissed lord melbourne in 1834,
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one for the historians there. also, let mejust one for the historians there. also, let me just referenced a tweet from the labour mp yvette cooper —— let mejust the labour mp yvette cooper —— let me just reference. the labour mp yvette cooper —— let mejust reference. she is the labour mp yvette cooper —— let me just reference. she is saying borisjohnson is trying to use the queen to concentrate power in his own hands. what is the role of the queen in normal circumstances, first of all, and let's compare that to what is happening now. the role of the queen in normal circumstances, i would say, is pretty much the same role as she has now, which is to do what she is asked to do by the prime minister of the day. you know, she is... if not a figurehead, then she is... if not a figurehead, then she isa is... if not a figurehead, then she is a symbolic role, almost. the prime minister acts in the queens's name, but he or she is also the person who effectively tells the queen what to do in these rather limited circumstances —— like the queen's name. there was a question
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about the queen's role being politicised when it was suggested that there might be a prorogation, a suspension, of parliament outside of the normal suspension of parliament. the argument, i suspect, will be made here that this is a normal suspension of parliament, albeit a rather long one, because, of course, as we have been hearing from westminster and other experts as we have got this news, parliament is prorogued before any queen's speech. it always is, there is a break in parliament. and therefore asking the queen to prorogued prior to the queen's speech announcement, while it may strike some as a tactic to get parliament out of the way, others will simply say this is what we have always done, albeit on a slightly shorter timetable. bluntly, has a monarch ever said no when a prime minister has gone to them and said, you know, requested a suspension of parliament?”
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said, you know, requested a suspension of parliament? i wouldn't wa nt to suspension of parliament? i wouldn't want to venture that deep into constitutional history and, even if you do, it sort of doesn't matter because the role of the monarch has changed so much. power has shifted so much between the different arms of government. remember, this is an executive right to prorogue parliament and that means it is a right drawn from the monarch. in the old days, it was the monarch who would prorogue parliament to stop it getting in the way, would call it back to try and get taxis, and gradually parliament clawed that power back —— taxes. power has shifted to the executive and it is an executive function, it asks the queen, tells the queen, what it wa nts to queen, tells the queen, what it wants to do with parliament and has very little redress. thank you very much. joining me on the line is the conservative mp dominic grieve, also a member of the privy council. he is opposed to a no—deal brexit. thank
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you forjoining us today. not a member of the privy council who was privy to this information in advance, i assume? no, and i think the prime minister's intentions are deeply questionable and pretty outrageous. you know pretty well we are in the midst of a national crisis and knows very well that parliament is extremely concerned about the possibility of a no—deal brexit and this has very little to do with starting a new session of parliament, it is a deliberate attempt to make sure parliament doesn't sit for a five week period. normally, when we prorogue parliament, it is for five or six days maximum between sessions, so this is pretty unprecedented. and the argument that it coincides with the argument that it coincides with the conference break, when we would normally not sit for three weeks, is pretty specious because the prime minister knew very well that in fact the commons was going to object to adjourning for the conference recess
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in the first place and was almost certainly going to refuse to pass the conference motion. so this is pretty unprecedented and i think the prime minister will come to regret it. what do you and like—minded —— what are you and like—minded mps going to do about it? we shall consult over the next few days, parliament comes back next week, it still has to come back on the third and will be sitting during the course of that week and indeed for some of the following week and that will provide us with opportunities, i suspect, both to register our opposition to what is being done and also to take steps to try and ensure that either the prorogation doesn't happen or, alternatively, i think we will probably move very quickly to a vote of no confidence in the government. i was going to ask you about that because yesterday, when mps opposed to a no—deal brexit met, they were very clear that their number one priority, their number one avenue to try and stop that was
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to ta ke one avenue to try and stop that was to take control of the legislative timetable, rather than go down the route of a vote of no confidence, but if the time is removed from them to ta ke but if the time is removed from them to take control of the legislative timetable, do you think that a vote of no confidence is now more likely? i think it is more likely, because if it is impossible to prevent prorogation, then i think it is going to be very difficult for people like myself to keep confidence in the government and i can well see why the leader of the 0pposition might wish to table a vote, an amendment, a motion for a vote, an amendment, a motion for a vote of no confidence. which is something you would support at this stage based on what you have heard? i have always been on the —— of the view that bringing down an administration which is made up of the party of which i am a member is something i would only do as a last resort, and that remains my position andi resort, and that remains my position and i don't wish to do it. if there is any other way of avoiding it. but if there is no other way of avoiding
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it, it may be the only thing i can do and whether or not the government falls at that stage is another matter. dominic grieve, thank you very much forjoining us on bbc news. joining us from central london is sebastien payne, whitehall correspondent at the financial times. hello to you. what is your reaction to this news coming thick and fast in the last 30 minutes or so? well, it is quite a bold move from boris johnson's government so? well, it is quite a bold move from borisjohnson's government to do this. there have been lots of rumours that the plan is to shut down parliament, or prorogue it to use the technical term and essentially, the way the government is seeing this is that parliament was always going to break up for conference season, they are just making it a little bit longer. that is how they are saying it is but, in reality, it is squeezing the rebels, people like dominic grieve who you just heard from, who want to pass legislation to stop a no—deal brexit and by ending the parliamentary session early next week, that means a five—week break when parliament
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won't be sitting and when it comes back on september... surrey, 0ctober the 14th for the queen's speech, thatis the 14th for the queen's speech, that is probably enough time to just about get a brexit deal through but not enough time for those rebel mps to pass legislation, to try and force boris johnson's to pass legislation, to try and force borisjohnson's hand, so i think the immediate impact of all of this is that mps are going to have to look at a no—confidence vote once again in boris johnson's to look at a no—confidence vote once again in borisjohnson's government. dominic grieve said just before that thatis dominic grieve said just before that that is something jeremy corbyn will have to look at but it is very difficult, we heard from mr corbyn yesterday, essentially they don't have the numbers to bring down the government, so once again it is a very tricky situation for those rebels and it looks like their bluff has been called by downing street. it seems like a face—off, certainly, between the two sides. do you think because of the time pressures, the squeezing of time, that those mps opposed to a no—deal brexit may have to try this no—confidence vote
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route? i think the chances of that have certainly increased a lot because mr corbyn, who said yesterday that he wasn't going to do that although personally i think he would quite like to pass a no—confidence vote in mrjohnson's government, the fact is if they are going to go ahead with this plan, which it sounds like they are, it is what senior people in the big ten are saying this morning, then their only option is to bring down the government because if they lead the government because if they lead the government go ahead, they won't have enough time to pass the bill forward. it is a very difficult situation for the rebels now and you will see a lot of people crying about constitutional outrage, this is unprecedented, but mrjohnson has a lwa ys is unprecedented, but mrjohnson has always been very clear. he has never ruled out pro—parliament and said politicians don't get to choose which public votes they respect and when he talks about public votes, he is talking about the referendum, not necessarily vote passed by mps. we are out of time but thank you very much for your thoughts today. we
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will have much more throughout the day on bbc news about this developing story. right now we are saying goodbye to viewers on bbc two and on bbc world.
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hello it's wednesday, it's ten o'clock, i'm joanna gosling... the government is to ask the queen to suspend parliamentjust days after mps return to work next week — and only a few weeks before the brexit deadline. borisjohnson is expected to make a statement in the about 15 minutes' time — we'll bring you that live when it happens. this means mps are unlikely to have time to pass any laws that could stop the prime minister taking the uk out of the eu without a deal on 31 october. preventing domestic homicide. the way in which a relationship develops to end in murder can be predicted, and perhaps even stopped, according to new research out today and we'll be speaking to a pair of metal detectorists who have made the discovery of a lifetime after unearthing a hoard of ancient

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