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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  September 8, 2019 8:00am-9:00am BST

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good morning welcome to breakfast with ben thompson and victoria fritz. our headlines today: amber rudd resigns from the cabinet and the conservative party in another major blow for boris johnson's government. the conservative party which is such a force for good in government in this country no longer has a place for people who have different views on the european union — and i can't stand by that. the former work and pensions secretary also raises concerns about the government's commitment to getting a new deal with the eu. at the moment there's a lot of work going on into no deal and not enough
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going into getting a deal. the business secretary, andrea leadsom accuses the speaker, john bercow of breaking parliamentary rules by allowing mps to take control of the commons agenda. serena williams loses the us open final in straight sets to a teenager. in a gripping match, 19—year—old bianca andreescu beat williams, who's now lost four major finals in a row. and i'm here in newcastle where around 60,000 people will be swapping their sunday lie in to take part in the great north run later. good morning. a largely dry day today with plenty of sunshine in england and wales. more clout in northern ireland and scotland later on with some showers. all of the details in 15 minutes. it's sunday september the 8th. our top story... the prime minister borisjohnson
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has suffered a new blow to his authority after his work and pensions secretary, amber rudd, resigned last night. ms rudd said she no longer believed the government's main objective was to leave the eu with a deal — and she described the sacking of 21 rebel tory mps as an act of political vandalism. 0ur political correspondent, jonathan blake, reports. 0nce tipped as a future pm, amber rudd's time in this government is over. she backed jeremy hunt in the tory leadership contest, but found herself reappointed as work and pensions secretary, surviving the clear—out of other former remain supporters in cabinet when the new pm came to power. in her resignation letter, amber rudd pulls no punches, laying into borisjohnson‘s brexit plan. "the government is expending a lot of energy," she wrote, "to prepare for no deal, but i have not seen the same level
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of intensity going into talks with the eu, who have asked us to present alternative arrangements to the backstop." she was also highly critical of the expulsion of her fellow tory mps that voted against the government. i have seen 21 of my colleagues — good, strong conservative mps, with true, moderate progressive values, excluded from the party, indicating that the conservative party, which is such a force for good in government in this country, no longer has a place for people who have different views on the european union. amber rudd was first elected in 2010. if she stands in the next election it will be as an independent, defending a slim majority. downing street said it was disappointed at the resignation, but her reasons reflect concerns that others in the government share. jonathan blake, bbc news. mps from across the political
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spectrum have been reacting on social media to the news of amber rudd's resignation. health secretary matt hancock said he was "gutted to see amber leave" but he hopes that other one nation tories will "stay and fight for the values we share". shadow brexit secretary keir starmer said the "johnson government is falling apart — he is being totally found out". lib—dem leaderjo swinson said ms rudd had made "the right decision" because — in her words — borisjohnson is not serious about negotiating with the eu and plans to force through a "disastrous" no—deal brexit. and rory stewart — who was one of the 21 tory rebels thrown out of the party on tuesday — said he was "proud" of amber rudd and that it's now time to unite behind a brexit deal. let's speak to our political correspondent, helen catt. it is interesting, because boris has lost 21 of his and people—mac this
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week. will another, amber rudd, make a difference? she is an influence among the moderate and the one nation conservatives. having her onside was a boost for borisjohnson personally and for his brexit strategy. that he has been attacked so strategy. that he has been attacked so critically on both fronts will have an impact. well it tipped the balance for unhappy tories so more of them follow suit? and will it have the same impact outside westminster? a senior government source said that resignations to chase headlines will not change the fa ct chase headlines will not change the fact that people want brexit done. 0ur leave voting areas like hastings and rye, that constituency, will it raise concerns 01’ and rye, that constituency, will it raise concerns or will it be boris johnson being serious about brexit and the remainer impediment has gone? it is a bumpy start to a big week in politics when we expect to see a bill to see a no—deal brexit
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blocked tomorrow. borisjohnson will try and call an early general election and we expect the opposition will say no. and how many times have we said it will be another big week in westminster, and it is! amber rudd is on the andrew marr show this morning. that is at 8:30am on bbc one. meanwhile, the business secretary, andrea leadsom, has said the conservatives will break convention by fielding a candidate against the commons speaker, john bercow, at the next general election. traditionally, the major parties don't contest the speaker's seat — but mr bercow‘s handling of recent brexit debates has angered ministers. simonjones reports. 0rder! 0rder. in the seat for the crucial vote... the ayes to the right, 327. noes to the left, 299. ..when mps backed the bill aimed
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at blocking a no—deal brexit at the end of october. butjohn bercow is now underfire from the business secretary. andrea leadsom says that by allowing mps to use a procedure to trigger emergency debate as a means of taking over the timetable, he has permitted a flagrant abuse of parliamentary process. in the mail on sunday, she writes... the speaker is an mp who stands in general elections but is usually unopposed by the major political parties. mrs leadsom is warning that the conservatives will defy convention and field a candidate in his constituency of buckingham in the next vote. there is no love lost between mrs leadsom and mr bercow. last year, he was alleged to have
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labelled her "stupid" last year, although he said he muttered the word to describe how he felt about the way the government had scheduled commons business. he is yet to comment on the latest developments. simonjones, bbc simon jones, bbc news. the former labour mp angela smith has joined the liberal democrats, calling them ‘the strongest party to stop brexit‘. she was among seven mps to quit the labour party in february overjeremy corbyn‘s approach to brexit, and his handling of anti—semitism. she's the third mp to join the lib—dems in a week, bringing their total number in the house of commons to 17. conditions in the bahamas are "rapidly deteriorating", six days after hurricane dorian ripped through the islands — according to the un's world food programme. tens of thousands of people are homeless — and many are now desperate to flee the destruction in the abaco islands and grand bahama. cruise liners, private planes and helicopters are being used to help the evacuation effort. the official death toll stands at 43, but is expected to rise significantly.
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president trump says he has cancelled a peace deal with the taliban after it admitted to carrying out a recent attack in kabul that killed a us soldier. mr trump was due to meet senior taliban leaders at his camp david retreat today, but said in a tweet that he had cancelled the talks. the proposed deal, which was struck last week, would have seen the us withdraw more than a third of its 111,000 troops from afghanistan. british airways pilots are to begin a two day strike at midnight in their ongoing dispute about pay and conditions. passengers are being told not to go to airports and ba. says most have made alternative arrangements. here's our business correspondent, katie prescott. for the first time in the company's history, british airways pilots are refusing to fly.
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the pilots' union say after working with ba through lean times, they now want a greater share of the company profits. it made £2 billion last year. they have rejected an offer of an 11.5% payrise over the next few years, and british airways says it is a generous offer and that their pilots already get world—class salaries. of course, in the middle of all of this are the customers. they were warned about these strikes weeks ago, and the company says most have been rebooked, but for many that journey has not been smooth. i got a text message out of the blue stating that my flight was cancelled, and it didn't give any explanation whatsoever. itjust gave a telephone number to call, which i did do. i couldn't get through on the phone, spent basically all evening, didn't sleep very well because i thought my holiday was in ruins. any passengers affected by the strike are entitled to a refund or a rebooking with ba or another airline.
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the company is advising them not to turn up at the airport tomorrow. if the two sides don't come to an agreement, a further day of strikes are planned for the seventh of september. katie prescott, bbc news. pope francis has warned that the future of the planet is under threat from deforestation. he was speaking on the island of madagascar, as part of his african tour. 0ur religion editor, martin bashir, reports. pope francis was greeted with a military guard of honour as he landed in madagascar, the second stop on his visit to three african nations. in a country where 40% of forests have disappeared in the last 60 years, he warned against rampant exploitation, some of which he said was illegal. translation: the deterioration of that biodiversity compromises the future of the country and of the earth, our common home.
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as you know, the last forests are menaced by fire, poaching, and the unrestricted cutting down of valuable woodlands. it is endangered by contraband and illegal exportation. at a youth vigil on saturday evening, he focused his attention on the human capital of the country, encouraging young catholics to turn away from apathy and towards service. the pope's visit here will conclude later this morning as he presides at a special open air mass, which is expected to attract more than 800,000 people. martin bashir, bbc news, madagascar. the former emmerdale actor, kelvin fletcher, has been announced as the replacement for the injured made in chelsea starjamie laing on strictly come dancing.
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he's most famous for playing andy sugden in the itv soap for 20 years. not for that delectable shirt! kelvin will make his first appearance on strictly in the first live show later this month. mike bushell has been paired up with his partner last night, we will speak more about that and what will be known as the bushell bounce. they are known as bush— cat! when james o'brien was attacked with acid more than 25 years ago, he lost the sight in one eye — and assumed he would never get it back. but now his vision has been restored thanks to a pioneering stem cell treatment which is being offered on the nhs. james is here along the surgeon who restored his vision, sajjad ahmad. it's nice to see both of you,
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welcome to the programme. you have both been on the programme earlier this year. welcome back. can you explain to us what happened?‘ years ago, when i was 18, i was randomly attacked in the street, somebody tapped me on the shoulder and sprayed a chemical in my face. they blinded me in my right eye. luckily it was only my right eye that was damaged. i was in hospital for weeks. i then had treatment for 25 years, and for a very long time there wasn't much they could do except try and keep my eye comfortable. then, in late 2017, i met my surgeon at moorfields, and he told me about a new treatment that they were trialling where they would ta ke they were trialling where they would take stem cells from the healthy eye, and cultivate them and put them into the unhealthy eye to make it healthy enough that they could then
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doa healthy enough that they could then do a corneal transplant. what an awful thing to happen to you. com pletely awful thing to happen to you. completely unprovoked. it is amazing that you can do something like this and restore vision to a man who has not seen out of this eye for 25 yea rs ? not seen out of this eye for 25 years? yes, we've been working on this treatment for 15—20 years. it took him that long to get to the clinic and clinical trials, where james has benefited from it. we were lucky that james almost pioneered it, he is one of our first patients on it and it takes courage to be one of the first to have a new treatment but as we expect, james has almost got his vision back. what did the treatment involve? james explained it was taking stem cells from his healthy eye, talk us through the process. we take a very small piece of tissue from his healthy eye. it
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goes off to italy, where the laboratory is, and they grow stem cells there. the cells then come back to us six months later, after they have been tested and grown. then, we remove the scar tissue from the eye that has had the injury, and put the stem cells back. it enables us put the stem cells back. it enables us to provide an environment on the eye that allows a subsequent corneal transplant which is the second procedure that james had. what does this mean for you, you have got married and had children, it must be huge for you to have your site back? yes, a real mix of emotions when i had the bandage off and could see out that eye again. it was very emotional when i saw my wife and our children. we have a clip of that moment, let's show the viewer is the
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moment, let's show the viewer is the moment use or moment, let's show the viewer is the moment use 01’ your moment, let's show the viewer is the moment use or your wife, lisa, properly for the first moment. yeah, imeanl properly for the first moment. yeah, i mean i can see everyone in the i’ooiti. i mean i can see everyone in the room. ican i mean i can see everyone in the room. i can say. can you see the top letter on that chart? yes. it is almost the driving standard with one eye. ican almost the driving standard with one eye. i can see everything! did you assume that you would get your site back? no, because it had been such a long time, i made peace with it. i thought i probably wouldn't. when sajjad told me about the procedure i did not want to get my hopes up. it sounded like a good and positive thing to do, even if it was to get some comfort back in that eye. so even up until i had the operation i did not want to believe that we would get vision back. it was amazing when i opened it and saw
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through that eye for the first time. this was on the nhs, and we understand asset attacks are on the rise and these are happening more frequently. how important is it that people have access to these treatments through the nhs?m people have access to these treatments through the nhs? it is important, a lot of the patients that i see, i have a few new patients every week, it is very important for them. they are often young people, young men, mostly. like most of us, we are going about oui’ like most of us, we are going about our daily lives and suddenly this event happens. that unfortunate event happens. that unfortunate event then results in a halt on their lives temporarily. it affects not only then that their family around them and their friends. it has not only the physical impact of injury but psychological aspects too. when we are doing all of this
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rehabilitation and treatment, it isn't one. it requires staged therapies. as you heard, james had stem cell treatments. he would have had a biopsy taken, and then another procedure done on his diseased i to put the stem cells back. and a corneal transplant. those will not be the only proceduresjames has had in 20 years. it is a long haul for oui’ in 20 years. it is a long haul for our patients. it is incredible work, good luck. it can change a lot for a lot of people. it is really nice to see you both. thank you. amazing. viewers in london can see that full story on inside out tomorrow night at 7.30pm on bbc one. viewers elsewhere can catch it on the iplayer. here's sarah with a look at this morning's weather. a mixed picture. good morning. it is
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a mixed picture through the week ahead but today, it is a dry and fine day today. this is the picture this morning. in norfolk, blue skies, some fair weather cloud here and there. through the day, we expect things to stay mostly dry. chilly today, temperatures dipping below freezing in a couple of places. for any runners taking part in the great north run, or if you are spectating, it will be a fine day. 15 degrees temperatures, light winds and sunshine. weather fronts moving in from the north—west, low pressure in the south—west so mostly dry. in england, wales and eastern scotland, sunshine through the day. in western scotland and northern ireland it pouts over as the warm front ireland it pouts over as the warm fro nt m oves ireland it pouts over as the warm front moves in. patches of rain heading in from the north—west later in the day. that builds through the day, sunshine turns hazy, not
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wall—to—wall blues skies but 1a—18d, some might be hoping for rain in old trafford but i don't think we will see it. it should stay dry. sunshine and temperatures of 17 degrees. for most, the weather stays dry through the evening. 0vernight, cloud and rain moves in from the west. in northern ireland and scotland and the western half of england and wales too. clear skies, this is where we see the lowest temperatures but it will not be as cold as last night. whether dominated by this weather front, stalling as night. whether dominated by this weatherfront, stalling as it night. whether dominated by this weather front, stalling as it moves across the uk. wet weather in parts of wales and south—west england, and parts of northern ireland and scotland. the rain should clearfrom northern ireland later in the day, and in eastern parts of england, it looks and in eastern parts of england, it loo ks m ostly and in eastern parts of england, it looks mostly dry through the day.
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0utbreaks looks mostly dry through the day. outbreaks of rain, but it will not feel particularly warm. autumnal temperatures, and looking at the rest of the week, a fairly unsettled and mixed picture. remnants of x hurricane dorian. up close to iceland, to the north of the uk, trailing weather fronts bring a speu trailing weather fronts bring a spell of breezy and wet weather. those temperatures will be on the rise as we head through the week. i think autumn is the best season.|j don't like that winter comes after it. that is my problem!|j don't like that winter comes after it. that is my problem! i like it, all of the mist and the mellow fruitfulness! it is pretty decent weather for the great north run. sort of cool, good news if you are nearly one of the 60,000 runners
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gathering in newcastle for the 38th great north run. sirmo farah will be among them — he's hoping to become the first athlete to win the half—marathon six times in a row. the bbc‘s alison freeman is at the start line for us this morning. alison, there are plenty of races across the uk every year. you aren'tjoining in today? you aren't joining in today?” you aren't joining in today? i get the privileged position watching eve ryo ne the privileged position watching everyone else do it! that is my excuse, but these guys behind me are running. how are you feeling? cheering excited! there is some energy! this is the 38th great north run, these quys is the 38th great north run, these guys will be heading down the newcastle central motorway over the tyne bridge, into gateshead and into south shields. 13.1 miles, many are doing it to raise money for charities that have helped them or
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their friends charities that have helped them or theirfriends and charities that have helped them or their friends and others are doing it for a personal challenge. what we do know is at the front of the pack we will have sir mo farah there, hoping to get a six when for the race, a record. but this will be thronging with people. the legendary mo farah leading out the elite men come hoping to win this half marathon for a record sixth time. my training has been going well and i'm here to test myself, and enjoy the quayside. go over the bridge, and i know better than anyone else the course. that helps even more. behind the wheelchair races and the elite runners will become agriculture come the hordes of ordinary people, many running for extraordinary reasons.
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some raising money for charity and others, like darren mcclintock from middlesbrough, taking on a very personal challenge. this is his first great north run after losing 20 stone. i know for a fact i will do it. it is in my heart and determination. everything is put in place, it's about enjoying the day and raising money for local charities. one of thousands of stories of determination that will be played out over the run's13.1 miles this morning. talking of determination, i'm joined by some of the people taking part in the race. we have kirsty, a local lady, first time doing it, and nell mcandrew, a celebrity runner who has done it a few times. what is your motivation? i'm passionate about mental health and the most important thing for me personally was spreading the message of mental health. so i decided last year that
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i would do the challenge, starting with the pouch to five k app, —— couch to 5k. i have lost some weight, and my mental health has improved massively. getting behind the team, and raising money for mind, they often deal with people with mental health problems in the area and getting the message out that it area and getting the message out thatitis area and getting the message out that it is ok not to be ok. we need to spread the word and create that awareness. and raise as much money as we can for that charity. it sounds like you will have a great time today. i have heard you giving some advice to kirsty, why do you keep coming back? what do you love about it? everything, the people are so about it? everything, the people are so supportive. everyone cheering each other on. it isjust a fantastic atmosphere. this is my eighth great north run. i always run
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it for charity and now i am running it for charity and now i am running it for charity and now i am running it for a foundation that supports families bereaved they child at any age. we are promoting organ donation, next year the law changes so donation, next year the law changes so people can opt out, we need to start a discussion and ask our members what they would wish. it is a special charity. i want to enjoy the run, and have a smile on my face. i'm running in memory of my godson, josh, who was sadly killed injuly ina godson, josh, who was sadly killed injuly in a car crash. there are a lot of reasons for people running. and some advice for kirsty? enjoy it, get to mile ten, and then it is a park run! what is your aim today? 2.5 hours, i would be amazed, but if i cross the finish line and spread awareness, then i am pleased. thank you both so much. the wheelchair race will after ten o'clock. the
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rest of the gang will be going at 10:a0am behind sir mo farah. that's on bbc one across the morning. thank you so much, that is deeply moving. almost 60,000 people doing that. and people doing it with a personal and individual story. one of our producers kate is running this morning. good luck to her. and all of the other runners taking to the streets for the great north run. coverage begins at 9:30am on bbc one after the andrew marr show. that is atan after the andrew marr show. that is at an earlier time of 8:30am. and still to come this morning... after a turbulent week in westminster, laura trott, a former special adviser to david cameron during his time in downing street, joins me for a look at the papers. and the new series of strictly come dancing got under way on bbc one last night. entertainment journalist emma bullimore will talk us through the gossip and take a look at those all—important pairings.
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and all important to look at the pairings, mike bushell there with his partner. this is where we say goodbye to viewers on bbc one.
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good morning. it is 8:30am. here is a summary good morning. it is 8:30am. here is a summary of the main news. the prime minister boris johnson has suffered a new blow to his authority after his work and pensions secretary, amber rudd, resigned last night. ms rudd said she no longer believed the government's main objective was to leave the eu with a deal and she described the sacking of 21 rebel tory mps as an act of political vandalism. number 10 said it was disappointed by the resignation of
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a talented minister. earlier on breakfast we spoke to the political journalist katy balls, who had interviewed amber rudd a few days ago. it was clear she was uncomfortable about some of the things coming out of number 10 about some of the things coming out of number10 and about some of the things coming out of number 10 and borisjohnson and his top team, and particularly the 21 mp5 his top team, and particularly the 21 mps who are going to rebel over the brexit vote. i think the fact that there is dance and then went ahead with that, you could see how that might lead to something like a resignation. i think with amber rudd, it was clear to me that she was someone rudd, it was clear to me that she was someone who did have serious concerns about the tone coming from number 10 on brexit. concerns about the tone coming from number10 on brexit. there is concerns about the tone coming from number 10 on brexit. there is a lot of reaction, as we would expect this morning, from politicians right across the political spectrum. but her critics would say she knew what she was signing up for when she joined the cabinet with boris johnson. why now leave it until the 11th hour to resign? yes, and i
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think if you look at all the people in borisjohnson's think if you look at all the people in boris johnson's cabinet, think if you look at all the people in borisjohnson's cabinet, the people who would be on that resignation watch list, amber rudd was always going to be near the top of that list. some of boris johnson's allies and supporters never thought amber rudd should be brought back to cabinet in the first place because of her previous comments on a no—deal brexit. they thought she was the type of person who might quit at a time that would cause him damage. that appears to have happened. what i think was the last straw for amber rudd here was not so much the fact that no—deal was on the table, but it was the group she is close to losing the whip, and there were not enough details on how borisjohnson planned to get a deal. you are up-to-date with the main stories. the andrew marr show will be talking to amber
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rudd on bbc one, so more to come on that. and now we have all the sport. quite an upset in the final of the us open. serena williams made it all the way to the final and then lost toa the way to the final and then lost to a teenager, said a huge upset. history was made at the us open but not in the way many expected. serena williams failed in her bid for a record—equalling 24th grand slam title, losing in the final to bianca andreescu, who became the first canadian to win a grand slam. adam wild was watching. it's been 20 years since serena williams first won the us open. back then, bianca andreescu hadn't even been born. yet here they were, together, opponents on the game's biggest stage. andreescu chasing williams, and williams now chasing history. that is what the new york crowd had all gathered to see. what they actually saw was history of a different sort. andreescu still a teenager, but with an icy calmness belying her years.
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while she was still finding her way, williams, it seems, was losing hers. mistakes, frustration. andreescu suddenly on the brink. but having saved a championship point, williams suddenly regained her composure as the us crowd lost theirs. but the fightback as spectacular as it was short—lived. andreescu champion at her first attempt. williams' wait for another grand slam goes on. but the game now has a new superstar. adam wild, bbc news. incredible victory. great britain has a champion at the us open. jamie murray and bethanie mattek—sands retained their mixed doubles title, beating the top seeds chan hao—ching and michael venus in straight sets. murray is the first man in the open era to win three successive mixed doubles titles at flushing meadows. it looks as though england
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now have little hope of saving the ashes. they need 365 to win the fourth test and they'll start the final day at old trafford on 18 for 2. england did manage to stop australia's run machine steve smith from scoring another century but he still made 82. incredibly, that's his lowest score of the series. australia declared on 186—6 and then england made the worst possible start, losing two quick wickets. captain joe root out for a golden duck. they're in for a tough day. at wembley, england captain harry kane scored a hat—trick as they cruised to a 4—0 win over bulgaria, maintaining their 100% record in euro 2020 qualifying. kane was set up by raheem sterling for his first goal, before adding two penalties. and kane returned the favour, getting sterling's name on the scoresheet too, as the pair showed off their deadly partnership. a record—breaking crowd watched manchester city beat rivals manchester united in the first
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women's super league derby in the city. it comes ahead of another big match between chelsea women and tottenham at stamford bridge this afternoon. joining us now is england lionesses' assistant manager bev priestman. you are at the etihad yesterday and you have worked for a long time in women's football, playing and coaching. did you ever think you would see 31,000 people at a club match? yes, i mean, it was fantastic. it is a credit to the women's game and the product on the pitch. people now want to turn up and watch that. it was a fantastic occasion. a great day. we saw so much momentum after the women's world cup. 11.7 million people watched england play usa in the semifinal. how was it that the fa we re semifinal. how was it that the fa were able to harness that momentum and make sure it carried on into clu b and make sure it carried on into club football? that was a worry, wasn't it? yes, it is putting the right games on at the right time.
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the opening derby with manchester united newly promoted, fantastic occasion. i have heard people talking about whether you feel smaller stadiums and have an atmosphere. i think if you don't do moments like yesterday, you have a chance to catch a hardcore football fa ns chance to catch a hardcore football fans he will wear that club shirt, whether it is men or women, and yesterday it captured an audience with a great product on the pitch. when you see these sorts of audiences, what difference does that make to the players? i imagine it brings pressures that the atmosphere is incredible at a match like that. yes. if i wear my england hat, those players have got to do that at major tournaments, play in front of packed stadiums. but my point of view you get to see how players deal with pressure and itjust gives that professionalism to the sport, which it deserves. that platform yesterday, those players were quick in and week out to be professional, andi in and week out to be professional, and i thought they did the game proud. we have this game coming up at sta mford proud. we have this game coming up
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at stamford bridge. what difference if any does it make playing in these big stadiums that are more known for men playing in those stadiums than women? is it more significant in any way? does it get into your head at all? yes, the players are football fa ns all? yes, the players are football fans themselves, men or women. i think to play in a ground where you wa nt think to play in a ground where you want your heroes score goals, i have now seen young want your heroes score goals, i have now seen young players yesterday getting to watch caroline score an absolute blinder. you are developing heroes for young kids and the players in those stadiums what people do exactly the same. players in those stadiums what people do exactly the samem players in those stadiums what people do exactly the same. it takes a very different type of player, to watch women's football rather than men's. it is a family focused atmosphere and the ticket prices we re atmosphere and the ticket prices were £7 for an adult yesterday and it was free for children to get in. perfect forfamilies. it was free for children to get in. perfect for families. i think you look around and you see young boys and young girls, with ellen white, steph houghton, addy mcmanus, on the
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back of their ships. that is where the game is at. yesterday captured some men's football fans and ourjob now is to transfer that across to them week in and week out. jane talked about the momentum that we have seen being built. and so much has changed within the last couple of years in such a short space of time. what else needs to change for this to really have the same clout, and we're probably talking about wages here as well because i know thatis wages here as well because i know that is a big row? what needs to change to make this work properly? moments like yesterday, i think people are being bowled. manchester city, the fa, they took the risk and will be the same at chelsea. taking risks and moving forward. baroness sue campbell for the fa, she drives a lot of change. a great leader and she understands development. i think as coaches and players we have the job to put on a great product on the
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pitch and in the summer we did that and we felt a little bit short. yesterday it was end to end. and we felt a little bit short. yesterday it was end to endm and we felt a little bit short. yesterday it was end to end. it was a great goalfrom caroline, who is scottish! thank you so much for taking the time to talk to us this morning. thank you. thanks, jane. nice to see you as well. it is just approaching 8:40am. good morning. this is an interesting one. in theatre—land they call it the half, those precious 30 minutes before a performance begins. it's normally a private time but one photographer has spent years capturing the moment as some of the country's biggest stars get into character. now he's put his work on display. the bbc‘s nicola rees went to take a look. big stars captured moments before the curtain goes up.
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a new exhibition at the lawrence batley theatre in huddersfield, called simply the half. the half is the period in a theatre as the actor gets him or herself ready to go on stage. tannoy: this is your half—hour call. the half—hour before an actor goes on stage is precious. these are the minutes for concentration and composure. it is a period that has long fascinated photographer simon annand. i'm trying to show the actors as workers who have a serious job to do and they need a lot of discipline to do it. i'm not particularly interested in the ephemera of the rooms. it is really what is in their head that i'm interested in, and their relationship to themselves, not the camera. i have andrew in the foreground. can you just look at him and not move too much? paul in the background, it's just amazing. for 35 years, simon has had backstage access at theatres across the world.
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here we have david suchet, which is interesting, i think, for a number of reasons. people might think that is a pose, but actually he is performing to himself in the mirror as lady bracknell. a man as a woman, can he get away with it today? that face, so disapproving! well, that's lady bracknell. the exhibition has been organised to celebrate 25 years of the lawrence batley theatre. it's such an amazing opportunity to have an exhibition that maybe would have had a life in london or internationally, and we get to bring it to huddersfield, into the centre of yorkshire, where it is starting its life, and it is such an amazing thing to celebrate our 25th with. ian mckellen and patrick stewart, almost 97% in the character they are going to play. the two leads in waiting for godot. they were ready to go. they are ready to go. they are not really interested
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in me, they are trying to get a sense of the journey they are about to go on. the photographs are a celebration of everything theatre. what better place to showcase them? nicola rees, bbc news, huddersfield. that is a fascinating story. that really important 30 minutes. you do not want to see the 30 minutes before we come in here! not even 30 seconds! it is 8:43am and time to look at the papers for you this morning. and one story is dominating the front pages today. the resignation of amber rudd from the conservative party. that news came in last night. the sunday times at with it, with an exclusive interview with it, with an exclusive interview with the former work and pensions secretary, saying she denounces boris johnson's secretary, saying she denounces borisjohnson's page secretary, saying she denounces boris johnson's page of secretary, saying she denounces borisjohnson's page of rebel mps.
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the observer says ms rudd's departure plunges the prime minister into a "fresh crisis" as she condemns him in what the paper describes as a "devastating resignation letter". the sunday express says mrjohnson is threatening to paralyse the european union if mps do not back an election to settle brexit. the paper says he will use the eu's own rules to bring it to a standstill. and the sunday telegraph reports that mrjohnson is preparing for a supreme court showdown over mps' plans to delay brexit, as his aides also draw up plans to sabotage the eu if brussels grants an extension against his will. laura trott, former special advisor to david cameron, is here. we have a look inside the papers in just a moment that you have been there, you have been an adviser to david cameron. you know what these negotiations are like. it is a huge question, but what would you be telling boris johnson? it is incredibly tricky for the guys in there right now. you cannot underestimate the pressure they are under. what they have got to do is
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look at the options and look at the easiest and most straight forward way out. if you look at them, they are not very palatable. he either resigns, because burrows, the prime minister, feels like he cannot delay brexit, which is properly where he will end up. they try to do a high court bid, where they say we are not going to block brexit, we are going to allow us to crash out on the sist. to allow us to crash out on the 31st. they try and force an election, which is looking tricky, or they try and get a deal. and i is the is way forwards in terms of parliamentary arithmetic and taking the country with you. it comes to something when getting a deal is the easiest option! it is all unpalatable and nothing is easy. let's have a look at some of the stories you have picked out in the papers. this one caught our eye as well. this is in the sunday telegraph. email us out of hours is harassment. offices have been warned about this. there is a general trend
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of university campuses struggling with a number of harassment complaints they have been receiving. in this particular piece, 35% of email respondents felt they were harassed at work at oxford. they are trying to step in to do something. this is quite a drastic step but i think it is something that will be repeated on other campuses as they try to cope with the deluge of problems they have been having in this area. there are wide implications of this. when is your free time your free time and when are you at work and when aren't you? we all have that device in our pocket that is basically connecting us with our office 2a hours a day. if this catches on, it might be quite pleasant. there was a case in france when a guy said actually it was harassment and he was given damages as a result. he managed to win. he said he was being harassed at work. you can't do it. and he got money. i don't think that would work in our department! we don't exactly
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do 95. let's look at this story in the mirror. the sugar hidden in a lot of foods, which we think is healthy food. yes, it singles out three individual outlets here. yo sushi and itsu. you are getting your daily amount of sugar in one meal, which is disappointing if you think you are being good and having a healthy lunch. is it in the source? it is in the rice as well, having read that but they don't give exact details. this is the issue. we have very little idea what is in our food. and we are so bamboozled with marketing which tells us something is healthy because it is low—fat but it might be very high sugar or vice ve rsa . it might be very high sugar or vice versa. and we need to read the label isa versa. and we need to read the label is a bit more. yes, and i think there is more the government could do in terms of looking at this and giving more advice to consumers.
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when we eventually get past brexit this is the kind of thing we could turn our minds to as a government. there are other stories? who knew? and this is an interesting story all over the us. health experts here in the uk have had to reassure people who vape in the wake of this severe illness that killed at least five people and hospitalised many more in the united states. yes, there were five deaths last week reported from vaping in the us, and public health england have felt the need to step in. there will be lots and lots of worried people who have taken up vaping and seemingly the healthy option, moving away from cigarettes, who are now concerned it has health implications for them. public health england have said they think it is a particular compound which is illegal in the uk. it is causing the deaths in the uk. it is causing the deaths in the us, and they are trying to reassure the public. it is interesting how much work goes into the industry as well, propping up a
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big industry. thank you for that. let's talk about the week ahead before you go. clearly a very big week for politics. you have touched on what your advice might be. dominic cummings and a lot of the papers today about how much power he has. what do we know about that role and where he goes next? we have talked about whether there is a plan b. does he have one? what will he do next? i have worked with dominic cummings beforehand and he is a very smart guy. with all the stories about advisers, it is true that advisers advise and politicians decide. borisjohnson advisers advise and politicians decide. boris johnson is advisers advise and politicians decide. borisjohnson is by minister and he is making decisions. dominic isa and he is making decisions. dominic is a fighter behind the scenes and he cannot account for himself in public. —— dominic is advising behind the scenes. it is important to focus on the prime minister.m there any truth in the suggestion that he has too much power? he is not elected but he is about to be chief of staff. yes but the chief of staff is not an elected position and
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you do have a lot of advisers.” staff is not an elected position and you do have a lot of advisers. i was an adviser in number 10 and your role is to provide the prime minister with information and provide strategic advice on various bits of policy, but ultimately it is up bits of policy, but ultimately it is up to him or her to make those decisions and they are accountable for them. pointing the finger at dominic is likely a distraction when actually we should be focusing on what the strategy is. and he is a very smart, very intelligent, very driven guy. big week for everyone. really nice to see you and thank you for talking through the stories. a big week as far as politics is concerned and we will keep you up—to—date with the twists and turns on bbc breakfast. before we go let's checkin on bbc breakfast. before we go let's check in with the weather to see what is going on. sarah has got the weather and it is looking all right for people about to the great north run. yes. and we have got some fine conditions for the great north run. not too hot and it should stay dry
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and a similar story across most parts of the country this morning. spells of sunshine, largely dry, but quite chilly to start the day. for the great north run in the afternoon, temperatures up to 15 or 16, to pretty decent running conditions and its should state dry. we have this warm front moving into the north west introducing more cloud to northern ireland and the western half of scotland through the day with some spots of light rain later on. just the chance of an isolated shower across the east coast of anglia. most of us should state dry with eastern england, wales and scotland seeing the best of it. some cloud bubbling up with temperatures of 1a to 19. it should also state dry at old trafford today. if you are hoping for some rain as the ashes continue. through the evening, dry for most of us but
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the evening, dry for most of us but the cloud works in from the north west with rain across northern ireland and into the west of scotland, northern england, wales and the south—west of england. a 5°99y and the south—west of england. a soggy start to your monday morning with clearer skies towards the east and that is where we will see the lowest temperatures, and that is not as cold as it was last night. through the day, this weather front dominates tomorrow, so a soggy picture on monday. the heaviest rain will be for the western half of england and wales and it should clear through northern ireland through the day with a soggy day for scotla nd through the day with a soggy day for scotland and the far east of england likely to stay mostly dry. under the cloud, with outbreaks of rain, feeling distinctly autumnal, 1a to 17. and things will stay fairly and settled into this week as well. the re m na nts of settled into this week as well. the remnants of hurricane dorian moving into the uk bringing breezy and showery weather before the end of the week. i really mixed picture. thank you. but good autumn weather
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which victoria likes. this might give the game away. it is that time of year again. this is why we shouldn't be on the programme! we are better off on the sofa, static. you are right. it is that time of year again. glitter makers and spray tanners are about to get a huge spike in business after strictly come dancing jived back on to our screens last night. it was the big launch show. in a moment we'll take a look at the pro—celebrity parings. first let's see some of the highlights from the show. this is the launch of strictly come dancing 2019. the lights are on, the stage is set, this is showbusiness. this is strictly.
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all: five, four, three, two, one! i'm mike bushell. i present the sport on bbc breakfast and other sports news outlets for the bbc. congratulations. i am here to stand up for all those dad and parent dancers who may be too embarrassed to dance. let's meet your dance partner. this is it. it's katya! oh, my goodness. we are going to have such fun! my my word! apparently he felt that the paso doublet was a pudding! —— paso doble. we're joined now by entertainment
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journalist emma bullimore, who is in our london newsroom. what did you make of the launch? what did you make of the launch7m was everything you would want the strictly launch to be. glitzy and exciting. i always find the years where politics is intense and tedious, strictly comes as a welcome change and a breath of fresh air. it was so glamorous and all of the co ntesta nts was so glamorous and all of the contestants were so excited, especially mike, possibly the most excited contestant on strictly ever. certainly not lacking in enthusiasm, our might. talking about the line—up, any standouts for you at this very early stage? there are 15 taking part. alex scott is the one to watch for me. her personality shone through yesterday but she is a sports person, so she will know how to train and be competitive. some really interesting pairings in there. look at someone like anton du beke, who usually get somebody who is not so gifted, he got emma barton who has west end experience, an
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actress. fans are really excited to see what he will do now with this opportunity. he made a big deal of it being anton du beke, and he said booked me until christmas. it will be interesting to see how they do. there is a newjudge in town this evening. how will she be different to darcy? they are from different backgrounds. she is more of a latin queen whereas darcy is ballet, posture and poise. i think she will bring some fun to the panel, not that there isn't enough with bruno! she will be a really positive energy. shirley was saying that with bruno on one side and her on the other, she will be ducking and diving from all of the posturing and excitement. motsi is familiar from the german shows. this show has been sold around the world. motsi is
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known around the world. yes, sometimes they appear on other shows, and motsi has been on the german show for some time and she knows when to be harsh and when to be encouraging. she might be new to our show but not to this business andi our show but not to this business and i think she will be good. our show but not to this business and i think she will be goodm our show but not to this business and i think she will be good. it is sad forjamie laing because he is out already before it has even got going because he has hurt his ankle. but we now have a replacement. how do we think his replacement from emmerdale will do? this is kelvin fletcher. he was in emmerdale for 20 odd years and we know that people with a big soap following have a head start in terms of people feeling like they know them and wanting them to do well. that he had come ina wanting them to do well. that he had come in a bit late and he has missed the launch but i think he will do really well. he is a big fan of strictly and he loves the show and he has got oti, who is a fantastic choreographer and she will train him hard. it is fantastic and it will do well but it is a shame forjamie,
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because he went through all the build—up and anticipation and now he can't do it but i suspect he will next year. we always have this debate at the start of the season about the calibre of the celebrities and who will do well and how quickly we forget as it gets closer and closer to christmas. we just embrace it, don't we? exactly. last year there was a lot of chat about ashley roberts being too good for the show. i don't think there is anybody at that level this year. it will be interesting to see who emerges and who is brilliant. but we like it when there is a big range of talent and we can get into it and enjoy the extravaganza. lovely to see you. thank you. we will talk again about this. i know we might be biased, but mike is brilliant, already. lots of enthusiasm. that's all from breakfast today. louise is back on this sofa from six o'clock tomorrow,
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and jon kay will be outside westminster for the start of what promises to be another lively week. bye for now.
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this is bbc news, i'm ben brown. the headlines at nine... amber rudd resigns from the cabinet and the conservative party in another major blow for boris johnson's government. it's the combination of the fact that there isn't enough work going into getting a deal, which i think is not what the prime minister signed up to try to do and secondly the expulsion of 21 of my colleagues who are good and moderate conservatives. business secretary, andrea leadsom, says the conservatives will break with precedent and field a candidate against the commons speaker, john bercow, at the next election. peace negotiations between the taliban and the united states have been called off.

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