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tv   BBC News  BBC News  September 21, 2019 9:00am-10:01am BST

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it, as they say. it is a embraced it, as they say. it is a fascinating watch. ‘american factory‘ is available to watch now on netflix. stay with us, headlines coming up.
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good morning, welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and jon kay. our headlines today: labour's deputy leader, tom watson condemns an attempt to remove him as a "sectarian attack" on the party's "broad church". thomas cook asks for emergency government funding to stop it going bust and leaving thousands of holiday—makers stranded. are our national parks in national treasure which too few use? we are here in derbyshire talking about big, bold plan for the future. in sport... australia make a winning start on day two of the rugby world cup
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as they beat a talented fiji side, with the game of the day to come — holders new zealand against south africa later. it will be another dry, sunny day for the vast majority of the uk. a little warmer for most of us, but when there as well. there are changes afoot as the day progresses, particularly in the west and i will have more detailfor you in around a quarter of an hour. good morning. it's saturday the 21st of september. our top story. labour's tom watson has condemned an attempt to oust him as deputy leader as a "sectarian attack" on the party's "broad church". a motion put forward by allies of the labour leaderjeremy corbyn to scrap his position failed to get the majority it needed last night, but another attempt is expected this morning. in a stongly—worded interview on the bbc‘s today programme, mr watson hit out at moves to sideline him.
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he has increasingly been at odds with the mr corbyn over the party's stance on brexit. let's take a listen to what he said... it isa it is a straight sectarian attack on a broad church party and it is moving us into a different kind of institution. where pluralism isn't tolerated, where factional observance has to be adhered to, completely. and it is kind of completely, goes against the traditions that the labour party has had for 100 years. let's speak now to our political correspondent, susana mendonca, whojoins us from our london newsroom. the words that tom watson used in this, he compared it to a drive—by shooting and that these things happen and then as well and they should not happen in the uk. he is not pulling punches when it comes to this attack? —— these things happen
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in venezuela. he was not even told that this was going to be discussed at the meeting and he was with his son at the time and a language that he is using, plural is not tolerated in the party, a sectarian attack on a broad church, that this meeting was had and was not related to him beforehand it was the kind of thing that happened in venezuela and it was like a drive—by shooting and if they want to get out of him, they should let the members make that decision because he was democratically elected. in terms of jamming carbon‘s involvement, he said he does not know if he knew about it, and the news is that we heard that it was a surprise for him as welljeremy corbyn‘s involvement —— in terms of thejeremy corbyn‘s involvement, he said he does not know if he knew about it. he is appealing to jeremy corbyn
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know if he knew about it. he is appealing tojeremy corbyn and member clinic of momentum to take that approach. as a political correspondent, give me your view, him not being there at this meeting, him not being there at this meeting, him not being there at this meeting, him not being there yesterday, is interesting. he has cited childcare issues, but the fact that he has not had this phone call from jeremy corbyn, we spoke to dawn butler early on and it was almost as if she was trying to remove herself from this and said this was a part of the executive that is not part of the cabinet. what is the thing about the stability of the labour party? we know that there is division within the labour party, especially brexit and that tom watson has not seen eye to eye withjeremy corbyn on this and has been criticised by those close to jeremy corbyn and has been criticised by those close tojeremy corbyn and that and has been criticised by those close to jeremy corbyn and that they viewed tom watson as having undermined illegal. know that there are issues there and that the issue of what labour does in terms of an election proposal on brexit, what it says to voters, is something that is
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very much been discussed within the party. i think what this does, certainly, head of the party conference, as it distracts the message that labour wants to be talking about their election pledge, what their policies are, showing a united front and what this stars as it starts to conference any bad light. it shows that they are not united and that is something that could potentially hurt their chances if there is a general election in six weeks' time. thank you very much. i look at some of the other news this morning. thomas cook has asked the government for financial help as it tries to avoid collapse. britain's oldest package holiday firm could fall into administration this weekend unless it finds £200 million pounds to secure a rescue deal. katie prescott has more. it's a low season for thomas cook — in more ways than one. the weak pound makes it more expensive for it to buy the flights and hotels it pays for in euros and dollars. it is in a competitive market where profits are small and it has a lot of costs — hundreds of shops and 22,000 staff.
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now heading into the winter period, the debt—laden company has a cash flow crisis. if we book a holiday with thomas cook, we will pay for it before we go, obviously, but they actually do not pay the hotel until after we are back, so they pay 60 to 90 days later, which means that everybody that went on holiday through the summer, it is now that thomas cook is beginning to have to pay the hotels. they simply can't and if they can't pay the suppliers, then the company faces a pretty tough time. the company lenders say it needs an extra £200 million on top of the money it's already secured for a bailout. with a vote on that lifeline next friday, the company is hoping it can get over the next few days to reach that finish. it's a nervous time for customers. we just don't know what the situation is. we will either have a flight back and get back to manchester and be fortunate or things could collapse
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in the next couple of days or hours and we have nothing to go back on, so it's just a case of waiting, really. if the company goes into administration, their 150,000 uk package holiday customers will be brought home and those who've booked holidays will be refunded. katie prescott, bbc news. the us has said it will send military forces to saudi arabia after drone and missile attacks on the kingdom's oil facilities. washington has blamed iran for the attack, as david willis reports. having initially pronounced the united states "locked and loaded," president trump now favours defence of attack. the president has approved the deployment of us forces, which will be defensive in nature and primarily focused on air and missile defence. the number of additional troops being deployed to the middle east will be decided over the weekend in talks with the saudis.
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the attack on two of saudi arabia's largest oil installations last weekend forced the kingdom to shut down half of its production and prompted the largest rise in crude oil prices in a single day. the trump administration branded it an attack on the global economy. yet, although the saudis believe the wreckage recovered from those attacks is that of iranian drones and cruise missiles, they have yet to pinpoint precisely where the weapons were fired from. mr trump also announced sanctions on financial institutions, including iran's national bank which, he says, is fuelling money to iranian—backed terrorist organisations. the president and first lady played host to a state banquet tonight — a celebration of 100 years of mateship, so it was said, between the united states and australia. scott morrison said the us had no
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more sure and steadfast friend than australia. next week at the united nations, mr trump will attempt to harness friends and allies in a diplomatic coalition against iran. david willis, bbc news, washington. a masterplan to protect and improve england's national parks has called for every school child to spend a night "under the stars" to connect with nature. the major review, published today, sets out ways to to get more people to spend time in areas of outstanding natural beauty. 0ur correspondent phil mackie has more. the first national parks and areas of outstanding natural beauty in england were created 70 years ago. they include some of the nation's most beautiful landscapes, like the lake district. the problem, according to the review, is that too few people are enjoying them and when they do go, they don't spend enough time there. it says that every schoolchild in england should be given a chance to visit one of the ten parks and 3a
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aonbs and to spend a night there under the stars. it says it has a big, bold plan which includes 27 recommendations. among them, it says there should be a new national landscapes service to bring the national parks and areas of outstanding natural beauty together, programmes to increase the number of visitors from black and minority ethnic communities, and the creation of a housing association to build affordable homes within the parks. it also wants park rangers to be introduced, similar to those who patrol national parks in the united states. in addition, it says the forest of dean in gloucestershire should be designated as a national landscape, the cotswolds, in dorset, should be upgraded from aonbs to national parks, and a national forest should be created in nottinghamshire. its desire is that england's most cherished places should become more important parts of people's lives to help to make the nation greener, healthier and happier.
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phil mackie, bbc news. there were fears in the united states that area 51 was potentially going to be stormed by millions of people last night. i think 3 million on facebook said that they would be there and that the authorities were there and that the authorities were there in force and this is debate as it happened... dramatic in green costu mes. u nfortu nately, 3 it happened... dramatic in green costumes. unfortunately, 3 million did not turn up — around about 75 dead. many in costumes and no one actually attempted to enter the site. —— around about 75 turned up. maybe the 2 million plus were abducted by aliens? made vanished
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into the ether? we will never know. let's return to our top story now. thomas cook has asked the government for financial help as it races against time to avoid collapse. britain's oldest package holiday firm needs to find £200 million pounds to secure a rescue deal. the uncertainty is causing problems for many travellers. not necessarily actual problems right now, but in terms of what they will need to do over the next couple of weeks. let's speak to the travel editor of the independent, simon calder, who's here alongside heather and colin smith, who are due to fly to new york next week. this good morning. this time next week you should be flying off. we should be at the airport hope fully. so you hear all of the stories about an emergency bailout and thomas cook's future stop we have been feeling very uneasy for the last week and really trying to watch the news. we only paid in the last week
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or so. news. we only paid in the last week or so. air b and b, trips to new york, going over to boston. and we have spent around £3000 and at this stage we don't even know if we're or not. simon, you can answer if they are going to be able to go? the first thing to say is that thomas cook are going absolutely normally. there are about 300 people stuck who are due to fly to glasgow and they are due to fly to glasgow and they are sending apartheid from manchester this afternoon so that everyone will get back tonight rather than yesterday, but that is nothing to do with the financial problems. —— they are sending out a pa rt problems. —— they are sending out a part from manchester. their 20 get the £20 million in financing, on top of the rescue deal they already had and the company has £1.6 billion of debt. the company is trading absolutely normally, slight setting off from uk airports today. people
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enjoying the holidays. , off from uk airports today. people enjoying the holidays., but with the prospect that we could see the airline grounded if a meeting next friday, knowingly, does not find a solution where all the parties to this very complicated deal to save thomas could agree. it is quite inconvenient. the anxiety that you are feeling matters tens of thousands of other people have been looking forward to the whole day and you have the added excitement of having £3000 already in costs, which are separate from the flight. we have not put a package holiday. however, in the case of new york, i would relax as much as you possibly can. the reason is that i am very sadly over the years, covered many airline values, and what will happen is that immediately after an airline goes bust, and i'm not by any means saying that he would do so, other airlines with cumin. if you're flying from manchester to new york, you would probably find out that virgin atlantic, united delta, maybe
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others via london, with work. and unfortunately the ba pilot cabin strike —— and unfortunately the ba pilot strike has been called off. colin you're also arranged with friends to meet up? yes we have some friends to meet up? yes we have some friends flying in from florida and chicago to new york to meet us and they have made financial commitments. and you're going to an event? yes, we're going to an event in the catskills so other people are affected by this as well. so when simon says try to relax as much as you possibly can? a not fill much relaxation going on. what happens in terms of insurance? if you took your insurance before hand and terms of insurance? if you took your insurance beforehand and it's a good policy, it may cover the so consequential cost, but i do not think you're going to lose them. if people are thinking now to take out
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insurance, you will no sign that the insurer will say that they knew about this risk and does not cover, so about this risk and does not cover, so do check before you pay for expensive insurance. please do not think he likes, and by your site at the marketplace, because the marketplace might have gone up to 1500 p. much better for the airline to say, anyone bit to a thomas cook, dashing any booked with thomas cook, we will give you a deal? these can ta ke we will give you a deal? these can take time to take effect. as soon as eve ryo ne take time to take effect. as soon as everyone starts talking at this, it affects confidence, which affects future bookings, which affects the company's future bookings, which affects the compa ny‘s finances. future bookings, which affects the company's finances. we have had a lot of people in touch and michael said that he has a holiday booked with thomas cook nextjuly and it echoes this team. he has been paying off the balance monthly, he is in, where does he stand with the balance if it does collapse? and you must have a doubt about whether you'd
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continue paying the sounds of it is going to collapse? everyone should continue to turn up on their flights. the appointment tomorrow, thatis flights. the appointment tomorrow, that is great. you're almost certainly good to file as normal and anyone who is out on a holiday, you really can relax by the pool. order another drink. the airlift that would be organised, would make sure that you would come back. it is the vicious circle when it comes to thomas cook. sell for properties as the really big problem. it is a great time to pick thomas cook holidays and i have my eye on one in tunisia. willie? yes £200 for a holiday. of course. -- really? we know from previous occasions that people will get home. the monarchy left, which is a model for this, two years ago you had 100,000 people
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abroad who were brought back. 90% of them are brought back on the same day. you might be flown into bristol when your flight was originally from cardiff and put on a bus for 90 minutes, does not matter, but the la st minutes, does not matter, but the last thing that you should do is panic —— 98% of them were brought back on the same day. are you filling more reassured ? back on the same day. are you filling more reassured? slightly. we will have to wait until next saturday. when is your flight? it is 1055. you do not need to go on holiday today. it is glorious outside. and it is going to be like that at least all day today. good morning, helen. we had a little bit of morning fog around, not up in north yorkshire, but in eastern part of england it has been misty. any natural, sunny and warm, but windy today. that might temper if you outdoor events, of course. the strength of the wind gusting 30 to a0 mph, but it is a
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worm went because it is coming from africa and the mediterranean towards our shores. —— a warm wind. around the coast it will feel a bit cooler. low cloud drifting into the north—east of scotland and this is the fly in the ointment, risk of a scattering of showers and then later pembrokeshire and not land. the could well be thundery and some thunder and lightning risk there in western areas. look at the 23 or 25 in mind. it will be one. it could be the last warm day before spring next year. as i mentioned, it is windy and that will continue to blow through the evening. scherer are gradually meandering their way northwards and eastwards, followed bya northwards and eastwards, followed by a more persistent and have been. we're gradually winding things up to a change. it will be a lot milder than recent nights, especially the north—east of scotland. we have had single figures are to be, so warm. the temperatures american to the day
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this time of year. willing on into sunday, we've got that when a friend with us. they were in a southerly wind holding on. a little bit of morning fog in the glens of scotland. a little bit cooler here, low cloud. by the odd shower, nightly dry. the shares will be quite potent, little bit of hail and thunder in there and then this band of hailand thunder in there and then this band of hail and thunder in there and in this pandering, it will not stagnate, slow moving, perhaps for northern ireland and give us 20 millimetres of rain and then with a much brighter skies following. high teens, low 20s, above where they should be for this time of year. it is just cloudy, windy and with some rain. the rain is still with us matter sunday night and it starts to migrate into scotland. another one hot on its heels. this one is interesting because it has the re m na nts of interesting because it has the remnants of hurricane alberto. it has tropical air and will have a bit more tropical rain. —— had a keen
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humberto. then throwing its weather fronts in and we are due more rain as we go through the week ahead it will not be as one by day, but it will not be as one by day, but it will not be as one by day, but it will not be as chilly by night. thank you very much indeed. it's time for a look at this morning's newspapers. the daily telegraph leads on a leaked memo from brussels, which it says has "dismissed" the uk's new proposals for an alternative to the backstop. the main picture is of the duke and duchess of sussex who are attending the wedding of a friend in italy this weekend. the times reports that the government is "poised to reject" thomas cook's appeal for a state funded bailout. the photo there is of pupils in cambridge who joined yesterday's global march for climate change. the i weekend also leads with thomas cook, it says up to 150,000 british tourists would be stranded if the company falls into administration —
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with a potential repatriation cost of around £600 million pounds. of around £600 million. and finally, the sun leads with claims from an american woman who says she had sex with prince andrew as a 17—year—old. virginia giuffre, formerly roberts, has told nbc news that she was "trafficked" to the prince. the duke of york has denied any wrong doing. nancy fielder, editor of the sheffield star newspaper is here to tell us what's caught her eye. you have been taking a look at some other stories around. and you have also picked up on the front page of the mail. yesterday it was celebrating the career of john humphrys, a long serving presenter of the today programme and he has left and has a book. and he is saying what he thinks. two days on here certainly seeing he thinks. there are several pages on site
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devoted to —— this several pages inside devoted to this book. i am criticising brexit and the way the big bosses of the bbc are out of touch with ordinary people in the way they really think. not everybody... but people who have a certain view on the world and that has not challenged enough. but he loves the bbc, that is not... this isa loves the bbc, that is not... this is a front page that takes one angle and he does think it is an amazing institution and where would we be without it? all those kinds of things. but there are some interesting points. it does make me wonder why he did not kick off while he was here slightly more. he is well known for being confrontational and interviews. add that i can't wait to set? that is definitely true. but his point is that he can make something without getting it approved are ticked off. now he is no longer a staffjournalist, he can
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go public on what he thinks. absolutely. i think it is pretty balanced way, but i think it is interesting that he felt the need to speak out now. two days after he has gone, he has changed his opinions. an interesting piece here. lenny henry reports the times has said that television is failing on diversity. anyway these histories are tied together, john humphrys talking about recruitment within the bbc and that not enough diversity among staff in one way and lenny henry talking about television in general in another way and he is not aiming at one particular television station. but he is saying that overall, despite all the money that has been spent on this to correct it, it is still wrong. he thinks that all the money should be spent on actual commissioning programmes that properly represent people, rather than getting token gestures of making sure that you have examined of black people interviewed and then not appointing them. and he
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says that —— that you have x amount of black people interviewed. 20 minutes ago wejust of black people interviewed. 20 minutes ago we just spoke to the producers of the american factory and the other must have said that we need to see people on film look like everyday people —— obamas have said that we need to see people who look like everyday people. and if you do not see people who look like you, why would you think that has a careerfor you? why would you think that has a career for you? and you cannotjust drop them into productions that do not work. the stop and valley broadcasters, why on earth would you watch? we're talking about tracking your kids with gps to save them from cou nty your kids with gps to save them from county line gangs. this is something that we've been talking about. i cou nty that we've been talking about. i county lines, we mean that when children from urban areas are being used to traffic drugs and take drugs into county areas, hence crossing cou nty into county areas, hence crossing county lines and it's causing lots of problems in rural areas as well.
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this is advice, very interesting advice, which could open all sorts of debates. turn the gps tracking on, use whatever apps you need using a children's phones to see if they are suddenly ao a children's phones to see if they are suddenly 40 miles away and did not expect them to be there. there isa very not expect them to be there. there is a very good chance that they are there for reason that you do not understand and not wanting to be there. the problem is that kids can turnit there. the problem is that kids can turn it off. yes, that is very true. it's quite surprising how many don't and asa it's quite surprising how many don't and as a teenager i would have been horrified to know that —— to think that my parents knew where i was and know what i was doing it over time. but now on social media many kids can see where the fans are all the time and it is more socially accepted. but all children can be
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targeted not, notjust children from some able neighbourhoods. the sunday —— the saturday sun. this is pretty grim. you can buy edward viii's and wisdom tooth. for £10,000who would wa nt wisdom tooth. for £10,000who would want to bye— bye wisdom tooth. for £10,000who would want to bye—bye somebody's old... and ina want to bye—bye somebody's old... and in a very important person's old, brown tooth. it looks like a pig's trotter, does it not? clearly they are hoping someone out there will want edward viii's wisdom tooth. i still think that if you wa nt tooth. i still think that if you want something, i do not want to collection of primitive? to your? definitely not, no. it has been a i°y definitely not, no. it has been a joy talking to you this morning. -- isa joy talking to you this morning. -- is a collection of brown teeth. do you? one ofjohn lennon's teeth so
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for £19,000 eight years ago. was it a good tooth? which tooth was at? mulder, caning, incisor? leave it to the tooth fairy. get your teeth renders. we're on bbc one until 10am this morning, when glynn purnell takes over in the saturday kitchen. glynn, what's on the menu for us? we had a cracking set of teeth here, the qatar gnashers! —— look at our gnashers. we have lost our special guest and we should have tracked him before. he has on his way. so he will be in stirling and then he will be swapping long island for a kitchen island. he is an award—winning comedian and is on its way, apparently. with all his teeth! we have two great dishes for everyone and the amazing chefs. we have the awesome prince of wales with a full set of teeth. we are
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going to do sea bream, slow cooked in lettuce, a little bit different and then charts we come with a dressing of raisins and capers. very light. what are we cooking? we will kick some lamb chops with figs and to addressing of shallots and a sage and warm—ups and vinegar. to addressing of shallots and a sage and warm-ups and vinegar. they are going to soak up all the juices and flatbreads. we had the most hence a better buy this week. thank you very much. we do not have a badge for him. ian has gone to the shop to buy one. have you got some great drinks to go with his third?|j one. have you got some great drinks to go with his third? i have. both of these dishes are so sensational and so quick to do, you really do not want to miss them and i have two lines that a quite classical, but both have a really interesting modern twist. scrumptious stuff.“ you can get here before ian, you're
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more than welcome to join us in the kitchen. if i can more than welcome to join us in the kitchen. ifi can get more than welcome to join us in the kitchen. if i can get you what? if you can get hers before, you can stay. especially since there is some scrumptious boos on the show. good luck with the programme. thank you for the invite. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. still to come this morning. we're in the peak district, finding out about a ‘national mission' to shakeup england's areas of outstanding natural beauty. stay with us, headlines coming up.
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hello, this is breakfast with naga munchetty and jon kay. a summary of this morning's main news. labour's tom watson has condemned an attempt to oust him as deputy leader as a "sectarian attack" on the party's "broad church". a motion put forward by allies of the labour leaderjeremy corbyn to scrap his position failed last night, but another attempt is expected this morning. in a stongly worded interview
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on the bbc‘s today programme, mr watson hit out at moves to sideline him. he has increasingly been at odds with mr corbyn over the party's stance on brexit. jeremy can stop it if you want to this morning. i'm sure he has been reflecting on this overnight as well. has he called you? he has not called me although he would have found it hard to get me last night because i was playing games with a 1a—year—old for most of the evening but the point is to be serious, if we are serious about the election and mass of transformational change in this country that a labour government can deliver we cannot have this sectarianism. strong words there from the deputy leader.
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thomas cook has asked the government for financial help — as it tries to avoid collapse. britain's oldest package holiday firm could fall into administration this weekend unless it finds £200 million to secure a rescue deal. if the company fails, the cost of bringing home passengers thomas cook has asked the government for financial help — as it tries to avoid collapse. britain's oldest package holiday firm could fall into administration this weekend unless it finds £200 million to secure a rescue deal. if the company fails, the cost of bringing home passengers is estimated to be around £600 million. the us has said it will send military forces to saudi arabia after drone and missile attacks on the kingdom's oil facilities. washington has blamed iran for the strikes. secretary of defence mark esper told reporters the deployment would be "defensive in nature". total troop numbers have not yet been decided. the teenage activist greta thunberg has hailed the global day of protests she inspired as the ‘biggest climate strike in history‘. millions of people around the world have taken part in demonstrations over the last 2a hours, ahead of a summit in new york next week. the teenager addressed
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people in the city — praising them for taking part in what she called ‘a wave of change‘. we all live here, it affects all of us, and we will notjust stand aside and watch. we are united behind the science and we will do everything in our power to stop this crisis from getting worse. a masterplan for a ‘shakeup‘ of england‘s national parks has called for every school child to spend a night ‘under the stars‘ to connect with nature. the major review, published today, sets out ways to get more people to spend time in areas of outstanding natural beauty. suggestions include introducing park rangers similar to those who patrol national parks in the us. it isa it is a mad morning of sport already. two games of rugby and a
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third already in the can. breakfast needs to shift for the next couple of weeks! you could get up early to watch the rugby, it would be perfect. with all -- with all —— with already had one great match. stringer came through in the end. argentina against france ina in the end. argentina against france in a moment and then the big one which we will talk about later. australia up and running with a win, but they were given a scare against fiji who made a great start. they scored early, and were leading at half time. they capitalised on an austrlian error early in the second half and an upset looked on the cards, but australia made their experience count and finished really strongly, thanks to four second half tries
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that saw the two—time winners home. now fiji will feel aggrieved, they lost their opening try scorer peceili yato afterjust 25 minutes following a head injury in this tackle. many saying reece hodge should have been red carded but wasn‘t sanctioned. that incident may well be reviewed by the officials. well the biggest game of the day is coming up in yokohama later. the two favourites meeting with the all blacks taking on south africa. katie gornall is there. katie, the organisers will love this one. these two facing each other. these two favourites. yes, how exciting. we already have that curtain raiserfrom exciting. we already have that curtain raiser from japan but this is the game i think everyone had marked on their wall chart right from the start for the blockbuster game with giants of rugby facing a
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chador. five world cups between them, fierce rivals and it is a buzz around today for this game you see all blacks jerseys, south african jerseys, and an added layer of intrigue because they‘re used to the all blacks having the air of invincibility but they have looked a bit vulnerable lately. they lost to ireland last year and a string yet more recently and a series of results has seen them knocked from the top of the world rankings. they come into this match with maybe some questions around them even though there are still favourites. they will be tested by south africa who are resurgent under the new coach erasmus. unbeaten survivor season and they could be peaking atjust the right time. new zealand have a record of never having lost a world cup pool match but that record could be on the line here. it will be a
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great couple of days. and we‘ll see england and scotland in action tomorrow so an exciting couple of days? it is, you talk about england, they named a strong side to face tonga. the midfield pairing of fowler and forward. but in terms of the home nations of course ireland taking on scotla nd nations of course ireland taking on scotland in their opening game and ireland are the number one ranked tea m ireland are the number one ranked team in the world but their form has been patchy lately so maybe some questions of them and then scotland really have the capability to excite in attack. finn russell and stuart hogg at fly—half. they went down against england in the six nations but came back in brilliant style so you do not know exactly which
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scotla nd you do not know exactly which scotland side will turn up against ireland for the huge weekend for the home nations. and we will keep an eye on the weather as well. thank you for that. and wales head coach warren gatland has named his strongest side for their opener with georgia on monday. in what will be a special moment for alun wyn jones will equal the record for the most number of welsh caps — his 129th in his fourth world cup — equalling gethinjenkin‘s tally. this one doesn‘t get any better every time you see it, a defensive mix up gifting borunemouth a late goal at southampton. southampton were back in it at 2—1 only for angus gunn and jan bednarek to leave it for each other. allowing callum wilson to score as bournemouth won there for the first time. reporter: when the points were sealed with that third goal, it looks like it was a bit like pandemonium down on your bench — with delight. yeah, it was a nice moment. i think you very rarely get those
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moments in football. we've had, probably in my ten years of management, a handful where you have that pure emotion and joy for a few seconds, and then you start thinking about next week and west ham very quickly. danny willett showed signs of his best as he moved into a share of the lead at the halfway stage of the pga championship at wentworth in surrey. the former masters champion, saw a dip in form and fitness after that win. he‘s on 11 under par alongside spain‘s jon rahm after a second round of 65. i think it‘s my 10th straight year here. i‘ve had a couple of nice finishes. and the game is in good shape, it has been for a while, and it‘s just nice to come back, the crowds have been amazing for two days. you get the good weather, the golf course in great condition, so, um, you know, this week, you‘re gonna have — you‘re gonna have a have a real good leaderboa rd and fortunately, we‘ve put ourselves in a position to be right up there. super league champions wigan warriors beat salford red devils 18—12 in their qualifying final. they scored three tries including this one form george williams
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but it was in defence where they were most impressive. it means they are now just one win away from the grand final at old trafford. lewis hamilton‘s form was as hot as the weather during practice for the singapore grand prix. the championship leader said it felt like a sauna in his mercedes car as he clocked the quickest lap at the marina bay street circuit. the briton was just under two tenths of a second quicker than red bull‘s max verstappen, but almost a second ahead of the ferrari of sebastian vettel in third. qualifying gets underway at two o‘clock. new zealand and south africa getting under way at 10a5. we missed a trick, we should have some more screens for the know, we need to be up and about and getting
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exercise and fresh air! today we're talking about the national parks in england. from northumberland to snowdonia, from the broads to dartmoor. there are ten national parks in england and today we‘re being asked how we can make them greener and more open to everyone. jayne mccubbin is out in the glorious derbyshire countryside with the author of a new report. a magnificent backdrop! you do not mind missing all the sport on the telly when you get to be out there! not at all. good morning to the knowlton family, we have beenjoined by happy campers from the campsite around the corner. you mentioned the word accessible, come and meet yvonne, she is from sheffield and it is herjob to bring people here who would not ordinarily come here to enjoy the countryside. tell me about
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your taxi driver this morning? this morning a taxi driver said to me this place is for rich people and i would be scared to come here. and your taxi driver was asian heritage and just thought this place is not for me? he is from the same district as me in sheffield and just thought it is not somewhere for me. i said just call on me, you can always find a group to come with. and another chap from the caribbean, what happened? my lovely friend everton and his wife came on a walk with me and his wife came on a walk with me and he kept asking, how many miles! and then he got out his camera and he was hooked and we could not get him to move! he is coming to do a walk with me again in september 29 to take photographs. in this report is about trying to get more people
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especially those who think it is not for them, how to get them out here. this is the knowlton family. and maureen from the campsite. you are not posh, £1a a night for a tent! pamela and david, you come camping every year. we have always been camping ever since we were children with cub scouts and all of that. took of edinburgh. and this is like a third generation thing?|j took of edinburgh. and this is like a third generation thing? i think so, my mum and dad took me camping any times and last year we bought a camper any times and last year we bought a camper van any times and last year we bought a campervan to get any times and last year we bought a camper van to get back into this. any times and last year we bought a camper van to get back into thism is all about opening up the national parks to more people. maureen you bring the duke of edinburgh kids to a campsite. many of them come back and visit us with their wives or
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girlfriends, it is really good. come and meet the report author. julian, you wrote this report, tell us the big idea? the big idea is that 70 years after we founded the national parks and areas of outstanding national beauty we have to do a lot more to make sure they are available for everyone. we are proposing a night under the stars for every child to get to know the countryside and we also have a crisis of biodiversity and the challenge of climate change so we need to do more for nature and for people to make places greener and happier. we have a statement for the government, they welcomed the findings of the report and they agree with the spirit of ambition in it and they will now carefully considered the recommendations set out in the review. andrew, you are from the campaignfor review. andrew, you are from the
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campaign for national parks, if anything is going to happen? we certainly hope so, there are big ambitions being spelt out this morning and this isjust day one and the hard work really starts here. we look forward to looking to work with julian and other politicians to make sure we have national parks that are thriving for people and nature. we will keep across this story but for now i just leave you will keep across this story but for now ijust leave you with this magnificent view. isn‘t it gorgeous? and remember the campsite around the corner, £7 a night! back to you guys! it is absolutely stunning there. and of course i think many other people across the country to take can be enjoying views like that. we have glorious weather elsewhere and not just in we have glorious weather elsewhere and notjust in the peak district.
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most of us today will have a warm and dry day but it is when the cell it will be gusty at lower levels. the wind at least is warm because we are tapping into this flow across africa, the mediterranean and continental europe. we have some showers not too far away from parts of devon and cornwall. an increasing risk of some sharp showers across the south—west and later into northern ireland. but for the vast majority it is staying dry with plenty of warm sunshine. but as i say this strong gusty easterly wind for the overnight as the wind continues so does the shower at risk for the third towards wentworth
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later in the day for the gulf and overnight as well for the north. overnight that ensures a much milder night than we have been used to. temperatures overnight what they should be during the day with the exception of the north—east of scotland. across injapan for the by scotland. across injapan for the rugby we have a storm not too far away from the west of japan and close to tokyo for the ireland match against scotland. it could be pouring down for england against tonga by the north it should stay dry. back come on sunday we already touched on the fact that we have no showers but also a weather front following on behind. that is more persistent rain moving in, not a wash—out, it is moving through allowing brighter weather to come through. it may stagnate just a bit
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across northern ireland. the best pa rt across northern ireland. the best part ofan across northern ireland. the best part of an inch of rain possible. still rain because of that south easterly wind. but much more u nsettled. easterly wind. but much more unsettled. monday is the autumn equinox, there is the band of rain and the next band hot on its heels for accompanying that some strong and gusty when. still quite warm in between, but we have low pressure with us around that area of low pressure in some tropical air. and we will get some heavy rain and some strong wind. back to the studio. it was a daring but flawed plan — 75 years ago today, allied troops mounted what was the largest airborne assault of the second world war. the resulting battle of arnhem, in the netherlands, claimed the lives of more than 1,500
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british soldiers and saw 6,000 more captured. our defence correspondent, jonathan beale, is in arnhem where a mass parachute drop will be taking place later to commemorate the day. 75 years ago, it was his relative preparing tojump into arnhem. today, he‘ll be doing the same. major tim efstratiou is the link between the present and the past. carrying a photograph of his great uncle, leonard plant, along with his medal. he was killed in action atjust 22. he jumped in on the first wave into arnhem and the following day was killed. this is one of the last opportunities to do it whilst perhaps we still have veterans who would‘ve been there on the day, are still around to share that experience with us. this week, hundreds of british and nato troops have been preparing to mark the 75th anniversary of operation market garden. go!
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a bold but flawed plan to seize a series of bridges to break through to germany and bring an end to the war. this, a tiny fraction of what was on that september day in 19aa, one of the largest airborne assaults in history. file: and the red devils of the skies do not count the cost. they proudly offer life itself in their bold attempt to strike the short route to berlin. the british furthest north at arnhem soon ran into trouble. more than 1,500 were killed and 6,500 taken prisoner. among those captured wasjotheffries. he‘s now 97 but he returns each year to remember his band of brothers. every year, i come back, because i like to know, when i come back, that i go to the graves and it‘s memories that...
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so many men wiped out. i couldn‘t believe it. the goal of capturing the bridge here at arnhem ultimately failed. the british were outgunned and outnumbered. but it‘s their extraordinary bravery against the odds that‘s still remembered here, 75 years on. oh, thank you! the surviving veterans are fewer each year, but generations of dutch have never forgotten. schoolchildren still visit the graves, laying flowers to remember. the sacrifice of men like leonard plant means the past will always be present. jonathan beale, bbc news, arnhem. it will be a very emotional day. that parachute drop will be quite the occasion. a "first" is how you could
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describe our next guest. atjust 29, she became the youngest ever editor—in—chief of teen vogue — and the first black woman to hold the title. she refashioned the magazine to suit the current political climate, and now, in herfirst book, she‘s written about herjourney through the industry. elaine welteroth joins us now. good morning. looking bright even though you have been on an overnight flight! how are you? i'm doing great. what made you feel that you needed to write this book because you are now 32 and it is kind of in some ways a memoir, looking back at your progression into the workplace but also you make very clear about what women in particular women are not doing to support each other and themselves. yes, iwanted
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not doing to support each other and themselves. yes, i wanted to start conversations that i think we as a culture and as women are not necessarily having enough. a technique women in the workplace and women of colour. and ifound myself asi women of colour. and ifound myself as i was coming up through the ranks grappling with certain things that when i pulled a woman leader into a private conversation i found that these were universal challenges but we just these were universal challenges but wejust do not these were universal challenges but we just do not talk about them. i wa nted we just do not talk about them. i wanted to crack open some of those ha rd wanted to crack open some of those hard conversations about representation or lack thereof, micro—aggressions, how to negotiate for yourself in terms of salary. how to advocate for your ideas. and i think i basically wrote the book i needed to read when i was in my 20s. i wanted to start to shine a light also on larger themes around identity and grace and power and success and failure and love and all
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these things that make us who we are as women. i think some of those universal aspects of our stories get left out of our success stories as they told online in headlines and in they told online in headlines and in the highlight reel you see on instagram and social media. ijust have so much more to say and that‘s what i wrote the book. what is it about you and your story and personality that gives you the strength to address these with big bossesin strength to address these with big bosses in a way that maybe they and we have not talked about enough in the past? i think as someone who has been thrust into the headlines because of the opportunities i have had, opportunity comes with that and so this responsibility. i‘ve been called the first and with that i thought i have to make sure i represent truthfully what this path, what came with his path and how i got on this path because as someone
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who is the first of the youngest or one of the only people of colour to have done this particular thing and to have this particular seat in media in an influential role, i wa nted media in an influential role, i wanted to be able to kind of pass on some of the lessons and also some of the big time mistakes that i made. because we‘d just, i feel as women there‘s not much space to talk about this stuff when you are the first but now is the time to do it. you've been described as the first, the first black woman to head a conde nast publication. the problem is that when there are books written by women of colour, you are a mixed raced woman and do not represent all women of colour. and there is a consciousness and you make that very clear in your book that this is your story because there are all shades of brown as there are all shades of white and everything. so you can
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tell your story and just up as a woman in the world trying to make your way but it resonates with some people. because you had your own issues of how black are you how light are you? i came from a mixed—race family which is not so uncommon but representations of this family dynamics and that identity is so underrepresented. so cracking up and part of what that means to go through life wondering, not feeling black enough, not feeling quite enough but also i think there is this universal message in there because we all in some way i think i felt we are not enough of something. not successful enough, not smart enough, too fat or too skinny, all these messages ingrained in us because of the media. as someone who was young and a woman of colour who was young and a woman of colour who was able to chip away at some of that from my seat at vogue, i just wa nted that from my seat at vogue, i just wanted to take that further with this book and talk about it with more people. you said you end this
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at 20 old woman, i‘m aa and ifound it inspiring and uplifting so thank you so much. lovely to talk to you. it is an inspiring book and it is out now. claiming space for you are no matter what they say. that‘s all from us for today. breakfast will be back tomorrow morning from six. enjoy the rest of your day. goodbye.
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this is bbc news. the headlines at 10am: labour‘s deputy leader tom watson says the party‘s bid to oust him by abolishing his post is a "sectarian attack" on the party‘s "broad church" and sasteremy corbyn has the power to stop it. it completely goes against the sort of traditions that the labour party has had for 100 years. i mean, look at the days when tony blair and gordon brown were leader and there is room forjeremy and john mcdonald have dissenting voices. jeremy, like the rest of us, should not get involved in the governing body of the party and determining what they do and what they say. i mean, members of the labour party
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can say what they like in their

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