Skip to main content

tv   Beyond 100 Days  BBC News  September 23, 2019 7:00pm-8:01pm BST

7:00 pm
you're watching beyond 100 days. "don't come with fine speeches, come with concrete plans." the un secretary general warns world leaders at a un climate summit in new york, they are facing apocalyptic climate change. the swedish campaigner greta thunberg told leaders they had betrayed her generation, and no prizes for guessing who she holds responsible. we are in the beginning of a mass extinction and all you can talk about is the money and fairy tales of eternal economic growth. how dare you? applause and cheers. after a show of hand at the labour party conference, the party has backed jeremy corbyn — deciding not to adopt a formal position on brexit ahead of a general election.
7:01 pm
also on the programme... president trump has admitted he repeatedly asked his ukrainian counterpart, who was seeking military aid from america, to investigate his political opponentjoe biden. so, what are democrats going to do about it? the uk launches its biggest peacetime repatriation in history, with hundreds of thousands stranded following the collapse of travel company thomas cook. hello and welcome. i'm michelle fleury in washington and christian fraser is in london. donald trump made an unexpected but fleeting visit to the un climate change summit in new york today. it's arguably the most important gathering on climate change since the paris agreement was signed in 2015 — a deal that donald trump walked away from. the short time the president spent in the conference hall reflects his obvious indifference and also the scale of the challenge ahead.
7:02 pm
had he been in the hall for the opening of the summit, he would have heard the un secretary general speak of the "apocalyptic" impact climate change will have on the planet. the swedish environmental campaigner, greta thunberg, told the leaders they had betrayed her generation. "all you talk about," she said, "is money....and fairy tales of eternal economic growth." nick bryant reports from the summit in new york. a sweltering september scorcher in new york city — not much sign of autumn here. and it hasn'tjust been a long summer, but north of the equator, the hottest ever on record. so, today at the riverside headquarters of the united nations, an urgent climate action summit. this global body, once more, sounding the alarm. the world is losing the race against climate change. applause. in this air—conditioned auditorium, the heat came from the 16—year—old swedish activist greta thunberg. the un hoping to harness what's been called the greta effect — her ability to mobilise the young
7:03 pm
and to shame the old. and my, how she did that today. this is all wrong. i shouldn't be up here. i should be back in school on the other side of the ocean. yet, you all come to us young people for hope. how dare you? you have stolen my dreams and my childhood with your empty words. and if you choose to fail us, i say, we will never forgive you. for the grown—ups in the room it was awkward. applause and cheers. but they applauded, nonetheless. mr president? the world's most powerful adult only briefly stopped by. greta thunberg watched from the side, scowling, as he arrived. he didn't address the summit himself. he is withdrawing america from the paris climate change accord. and he took the chair of at rival event organised by the white house at the un on religious persecution.
7:04 pm
for once, donald trump was upstaged by a teenager with a furious speech that will echo down the generations. let's cross live to the un in new york. laura trevelyan is there for us. later, some very strong words there from greta thunberg, but of course, even as world leaders prepared to discuss how to address climate change, you have got the american president sitting on the sidelines. absolutely. and, in fact, the un special envoy for climate change, formerly the mayor of new york city michael bloomberg, rather aesthetically observed when he saw president trump sitting there and the whole, he said thanks for dropping by, perhaps the discussions will be useful for you when you come to formulate your policy on climate change. it is the elephant in the footti. change. it is the elephant in the room. the us is the second biggest polluter behind china and ahead of
7:05 pm
india and the us is rolling back environmental regulations and the president of the united states does not formally acknowledge that human activity may have a role to play climate change and here you have the teenagers are standing up to the world's biggest powers. so it is as one seasoned un diplomat said to me, greta thunberg has achieved more in three weeks for climate change than world leaders did in 30 years. you state that teenagers like greta are doing more for climate change, are we expecting anything to come out of this or is it going to be another talking shop in which you see politicians essentially bring in the hands of climate change, but not agreeing to match action? there were great hopes that china might go further than the paris agreement, but the chinese delegate who spoke this morning noted in his meeting that his emissions target, but did not go further. in the 's that his emissions target, but did not go further. in the '5 prime minister who was having a nice event
7:06 pm
with president trump there in the weekend —— india's by minister committed but did not say that india would reduce its reliance on coal. there are some momentum here, with some of the more less polluting countries promising to take radical steps. what will be remember to today will be greta thunberg accusing the older generation of this still in her childhood and destroying herjames. —— accusing the older generation of stealing her childhood and destroying her dreams. doctor michael we have the net zero target that the uk government that we have set in 2050, but on the other hand you have scott morrison of australia that follows a protocol
7:07 pm
agenda and jair bolsonaro who is allowing the rain forest and amazon ra i nfo rest allowing the rain forest and amazon rainforest to burn. we need to do something. the un would not allow leaders to speak. unless they had something to say, interestingly. so thatis something to say, interestingly. so that is the benchmark. one of the talking points of today is exactly why president trump dropped by. with various diplomats behind the scenes are speculating about why he did that. is it because president trump is always wanted to sense the political mood, he does not miss anything and he spends his time on social media, watching tv. he has seen this wave of youth activism. is he trying to nod in the direction of that by dropping by the climate summit, even though he deliberately scheduled a parallel event on the verge the same time? or was he stopping by because it had a decent relationship with the un secretary general? —— a parallel event on
7:08 pm
religious freedom at the same time. a clear split on the world stage, but at least you have the world's first and third biggest polluters, india and china attending this event. and underscoring their existing pledges, or in a case of india, saying that they will try to move forward on renewable energy we re move forward on renewable energy were not say much about coal. thank you very much. interesting was not i was about whether donald trump might be looking at the polls and, as he shifting? maybe not. they may be things that were concerned. let me show you this one. this shows attitudes back to 2005. on the top is attitude to the environment, etc. look out crossed in 2014. 74% of americans have real concerns about the quality of the impairment, versus 77% who are concerned about the availability of affordable energy —— versus 57%. this is the
7:09 pm
period in america it is an irony that they had done more fracking and drilling in recent years, particularly since president became the president that the pump prices have started to go down. and if it is going down, then you can be much more relaxed about the availability of energy and perhaps more concerned about the environment. or whether it's a reflection of changing policies going on. it is hard to know what is driving this. one thing that i would say that when you talk about the economics of it all is that behind some of this, when people are feeling a bit of a flash, they had time to care about the environment and the other factor that i would look at, though, is age. people who support climate change for most, her most concerned about it, you can see that it is the youngest, aged 18 to 29. that chart there, the third by chart, which shows that 45 to 64—year—olds and 65 plus, they are less concerned. yeah,
7:10 pm
the other interesting thing, actually, look at the cbso —— there are some republican scientists shifting to a territory now, which is perhaps why donald trump is concerned. he does not need to adjust his base, he needs those who are in the middle. there is any point well. —— those independent voters as well. britain's main opposition labour party is is agreed there should be another brexit referendum — pending a renegotiation. but they are deeply divided over what the party's position should be, in that referendum. and whether it should be spelled out, before the impending general election. the leader, jeremy corbyn says the decision should wait until the party knows what the deal is. but grassroots activists at have been pushing for an unambiguous stance, tabling a motion calling for labour to campaign "energetically" to remain. the shadow brexit secretary keir starmer, who spoke ahead of the vote, said that holding a second referendum would be a priority for a labour government. an incoming labour government will legislate for a referendum immediately on taking power and hold
7:11 pm
that referendum within six months. applause. that is our commitment. and i have a simple message. if you want a referendum, vote labour. well in the last hour members have endorsed mr corbyns stance to stay neutral while negotiating a new deal. that is clearly candid. applause. -- that is that is clearly candid. applause. —— that is clearly candid. but the motion was only put to a show of hands in the hall, not an official card vote, and some are crying foul. lets speak to the labour mp jonathan reynolds, who is from the brexit supporting constituency of staylybridge and hyde. good to have you with us. you are a real based party and you follow the rules, but today it looked very much
7:12 pm
like a fudge. no, i think it is not. the policies get the public a final say. it is now more complicated than that. there are clearly different views here, but you would expect that. look how polarised this country is. i do not think you get as many people together and not have different views on brexit. getting the public the final say, is i think, now, the only reasonable way that this country can possibly move on. it is if you have come to myself. i wanted to see a deal, but there's simply no agreement and we have seen a more polarisation and getting the public back together to getting the public back together to get a final say on the backs ideal asi get a final say on the backs ideal as i think, frankly, the only way forward. except, —— ifinal say on the brexit deal. except it wasn't all conclusive, said when i put it toa all conclusive, said when i put it to a card valid. why did that not happen? i was not in the conference floor, but conference is chaired by extremely competent and experienced people. i think wendy nichols, in this case, i have absolute faith
7:13 pm
that they know how to encompass properly and does know where those delegates would allow you to get away with anything other than fop following the proper process. there we re following the proper process. there were big range of years and this issue but if that is a decision the co nfe re nce issue but if that is a decision the conference floor has taken, that has the decision they had taken. conference floor has taken, that has the decision they had takenlj conference floor has taken, that has the decision they had taken. i would like to ask you about one ofjeremy corbyn‘s closest aides and official leaving the party at the end of the year. basically only way out, he had some pretty stinging, criticism by the party. he had no faith, he talked about a lack of professionalism, competence and live indecency. what is your response to those harsh words? —— human decency. it is not fair to talk about staff members because they're not politicians and do not have a decision to come talk and defend themselves. clearly, a lot of people put a lot into the party and that is why the 2017 election result was so much better for us than many people
7:14 pm
expected. i'm afraid i cannot comment on those individual relationships. i do not think it is better stuff to be the subject of discussion when they're not politicians and they cannot, the media themselves and defend themselves. back in february, you said yourself, my is that we should —— you said your conceptions that... i'm good to set in sections that we tried our best. i voted in those indicative votes in parliament. the thing that i had to stretch to get because i tried to compromise and find a way forward , tried to compromise and find a way forward, but if you go back to those discussions about theresa may's deal, people did not supported on either side. the leaflet that went to the door in 2016, on which your constituents voted, said we will implement your decision. and that was on the campaign literature in 2015. the literature themselves said this will be negotiated process and we will not lay before it now deals
7:15 pm
in place a —— a new deal is in place. i do not think you can use it like that adidas no deal in the basis of that. in 2070 we had —— in 2017 we said that we would not have fio 2017 we said that we would not have no deal. which are on the river as intimate as polarisation and i thought people become together but there was a way forward, that there would be enough early voters be satisfied. and enough are some remain people to come with it as well, but we just have to be on a sensor that has failed. people have become much more polarised between revocation one side and no deal on the other. do not think there is a mandate for either of those things and in that situation, i honestly believe the only way forward is to ask the people are going to vote, this time on a very specific already a great position, which we know with the implement straightaway or against the status quo that we have 110w. against the status quo that we have now. good of you to come in the programme tonight. thank you very much. thank you.
7:16 pm
we saw the's position about introducing a 32 arabic being drowned out by its position on brexit. —— introducing a 32 hour week. boris johnson does not speak at the un general assembly tomorrow until very late in the evening. it will be a long day. at 0530 eastern time, he will be sent news of a ruling at the supreme court in london. was his decision to suspend parliament for five weeks lawful, or did he do it to stymie the brexit debate and in doing so mislead the queen? the feeling among informed observers idid say i did say that he will be up early in the morning. the feeling among informed observers is that the government is on the ropes and is going to lose, which in the words of senior legal figure would be constitutional eruption of volcanic proportions. what would happen then? our political editorjohn pienaar asked the prime minister what he would do if the uk's highest court found he misled the queen. let us see what the justices say. let us see what the justices say. but i repeat my point that i think there are very good reasons for wanting to have a queen's speech... do you rule out resigning in those circumstances?
7:17 pm
i'm going to wait and see what the judgment is, but i want to stress that this is a government that fully respects the law and fully respects the judiciary. but we also think that it is sensible for parliament to have its say, absolutely, and that is why there is ample time at the end of october for them to do just that. lets speak to our colleague rob watson who is in brighton at the labour conference. there are days when you do not want to be away from the office. you need to be away from the office. you need to come down. we have the beach here, lots of nice little stores. to come down. we have the beach here, lots of nice little storeslj was not talking about you, i was talking up boris johnson was not talking about you, i was talking up borisjohnson all the way over there in new york! right. i was inviting you to come to these conferences. i would love to come to brighton, i would love a day out in writing, some of us have to work. la dee da! ! so what happens if it goes
7:18 pm
against him in the supreme court tomorrow and he has over there in new york. that is an easy one, i do not know. i have heard that there are several versions. in many ways, it depends on whether, first of all, whether the judges will unlawful and if they do, what would it be there so—called remedy, as it were. there are so—called remedy, as it were. there a re two so—called remedy, as it were. there are two bits to it. you could say, they have to find that this was a novel and then, are they going to say anything about what should be done? —— they have to find that this was unlawful. it could be incredibly awkward both politically and personally. politically it could meana personally. politically it could mean a rapid return of politicians to westminster doing what politicians do, which is to ask all sorts of awkward questions of the government. and personally, could be because effectively, mrjohnson will have been found to have, essentially, misled, lied to the
7:19 pm
queen and that is unprecedented. in normal that would lead to resignation. if it goes that way, the. however the court may say that this is not up to us, it is politics. i was going to ask you. and that scenario, you think it would be virtually impossible or ha rd would be virtually impossible or hard for borisjohnson not to resign? you may have noticed that i addedin resign? you may have noticed that i added in that little caveat there, normal times. brexit time added in that little caveat there, normaltimes. brexit time is added in that little caveat there, normal times. brexit time is not normal times. brexit time is not normal time, but look, you ask yourself the question. everybody would ask themselves this question. if the highest court in the land in normal times had found that the prime minister had misled the queen, imean, i'm prime minister had misled the queen, i mean, i'm pretty sure that pace in doing thisjob on and off i mean, i'm pretty sure that pace in doing this job on and off for 30 i mean, i'm pretty sure that pace in doing thisjob on and off for 30 odd years that the person involved would have to resign. good. what are you doing tonight in brighton? what am i doing tonight in brighton? what am i doing tonight? i'm doing more of this kind of thing with your little
7:20 pm
radio interview afterwards and the best thing about this party conferences is the hard—working journalists. it is a chance to go to all these fringe meetings, where party activists go a long and assertive here blue sky thinking what should we do about poverty, what should we do about poverty, what should we do about the european union, what should be's pay place in the world and others kind of thing and you're eithera the world and others kind of thing and you're either a junkie for that kind of thing you think, you're nuts, go to the pub, mate, good the pub and be normal! go to the pub and be normal. the uk government has set in motion a huge operation to repatriate holiday—makers who are stranded abroad following the collapse of the world's oldest package tour company thomas cook. the uk has chartered a fleet of planes to bring home more than 150,000 holiday—makers — it is britain's biggest ever peacetime repatriation. worldwide there are more than 600,000 thomas cook passengers now stranded after last—minute negotiations aimed at saving the 178—year—old holiday firm failed. our transport correspondent,
7:21 pm
tom burridge reports. the last thomas cook flight ever arriving into manchester, after the company went bust. passengers are lucky to be on board, the crew out of a job. as soon as we landed, all of them were crying. it's devastating, it's a legacy has gone. as i say, i worked for them for ten years and i've got loads of friends who, their livelihood... it's tragic. its aircraft now grounded and seized, after the firm collapsed. countless holidays ruined. we're gutted, disappointed. it meant a lot to us, it's our first holiday away together. i'm still angry. stephan and zoe were due to fly today to the canary islands to scatter her late father's ashes. with them on the trip, their children. they are devastated, they have cried. they are not themselves. they have looked forward to this for months and months.
7:22 pm
it's not as if we have just decided we are going to go, this has been planned, we've had to get paperwork for the ashes, we had to do everything. this the scene for customers pitching up in manchester and gatwick. look at this. yesterday, check—in here would have been very busy. but with the company collapsing overnight, its airline's effectively vanished. the civil aviation authority has now charted an entire fleet of more than 40 aircraft to start bringing people back. and this is one of the first flights today in from new york. the biggest repatriation in modern times, a fiendishly complicated two—week operation that could be a bumpy ride. but relief for those brought back croatia. we were a little bit nervous, we were going to book flights by ourselves, but trusted the authorities and it has been seamless. in majorca, uk officials shepherding tourists. on their way back but some
7:23 pm
into airports far from home. we understand now that we are flying to manchester at 20 to eight tonight and then there's a bus to newcastle. they have told us we are going to birmingham and then a coach trip for six hours from birmingham up to glasgow. staff turned up to work in but only briefly. —— staff turned up to work in nottingham, but only briefly. an emblematic name on our high streets gone and they are gutted at thomas cook headquarters in peterborough. i've been here since i was 19 so it's very sad. everybody has given their heart and soul to this company and is kind of sad that we don't exist any more. martin and gemma booked their wedding on a greek island via thomas cook. tiny details are in place but their plans are now in disarray. itjust broke my heart, i couldn't believe it, i was gutted. i don't want it to be true. now it just all seems for nothing. a bit confused and empty.
7:24 pm
we don't really know what to do. all that planning and it's all gone. but the focus for the government is getting tens of thousands of british holiday—makers home. 16,000 brits were booked on thomas cook flight today before it went bust. the hope is that by tonight most of them will be back. others will return in the coming days. tom burridge, bbc news. best of luck to everybody who is trying to get home. the annual octoberfest hasjust opened in munich — a two week festival in which they will drink over 7 million litres of beer. but there is good news for those who may be feeling a little under the weather. a court in frankfurt has just published its ruling today that classifies hangovers as a bonafide "illness". the plaintiffs had argued that a company selling anti—hangover drinks was making illegal health claims and that in fact there was nothing to cure. the court disagreed — a decision applauded by anyone who has ever suffered a hangover — ruling that an illness is anything that disrupts the normal
7:25 pm
activity of the body. obviously, if you're feeling sick because a hangover, now you can call your employer and claim sickness. it is not anywhere this court decision in favour of employers. there is one in france recently, i don't know if you remember this, where a man died having sex with a women only work trip and it was ruled that he was the victim of an employment accident and his employer was held responsible. —— with a woman on a work trip. you can call them now with a hangover, it would seem, in germany and say that you're ill. it isa germany and say that you're ill. it is a bona fide illness. get drinking! this is beyond 100 days the bbc. coming up for viewers on the bbc news channel and bbc world news, donald trump defends raising the subject of former vice—presidentjoe biden and his son on a phone call with the
7:26 pm
ukrainian president. and harry and meghan arrive in south africa at the start of a ten—day visit to the continent to celebrate its people and culture. that's still to come. hello there. if you remember the weather last week, you would have remembered high pressure and sunshine, fairly chilly nights. this week, it's looking decidedly autumnal. we've got low pressure dominating the scene, so spells of wet and windy weather followed by sunshine and showers, but on the plus side, nights will be quite mild, thanks to these south—westerly winds. but low pressure will be nearby again to end monday, into the start of tuesday, plenty of isobars on the map, weather fronts too, so there's going to be a pretty wet night to come, fairly windy as well. that rain pepping up to become heavy, maybe thundery across parts of wales and the south—west of england towards the end of the night but, on the plus side, like i mentioned, those temperatures not falling below 12 to 15 celsius, so a mild night for all. now, as we head on into tuesday, we've still got low
7:27 pm
pressure with us, early rain will tend early rain will tend to clear north eastwards, but this next little feature, which contains the remnants of what was hurricane humberto, is going to bring a spell of very windy weather, particularly across southern parts of the british isles. so, for tuesday, we will have that heavy rain for many of us, but then the strong and gusty winds come into play later on in the day, particularly southern england and on towards wales. so that rain moves northwards and eastwards through the morning. you can see the brighter echoes indicate some thunderstorms, in fact. perhaps lightning too, eastern scotland and central and eastern england, the most favoured of these. and then perhaps some thundery showers pushing on to the south—west as the winds pick up your. temperature was, well, we're looking to the mid to upper teens celsius for most of us, but i willjust zoom in to show you where the strongest of the winds will be, likely gusting to 40 to 50 miles per across south—west england and along the south coast too as that feature
7:28 pm
moves in later on tuesday and during tuesday night. eventually, clearing off into the continent, but wednesday allowing this brief ridge of high pressure to build in before the next low pressure comes in for thursday and friday to bring yet more unsettled weather. so it starts off fairly windy with outbreaks of rain across southern and south—eastern areas for wednesday. that will eventually clear away the winds slowly ease down. we will see quite a bit of cloud across northern areas, perhaps a few showers here. perhaps the best of the sunny spells in england and wales, but with the lighter wind and made a summer sunshine. it might feel a touch warmer. like i mentioned, mid week onwards it says unsettled thanks to low pressure. it could turn a bit cooler for a time as well across the north of the uk into the weekend.
7:29 pm
7:30 pm
this is beyond 100 days, with me, michelle fleury, in washington. christian fraser is in london. our top stories. the climate change activist greta thunberg tells world leaders they've stolen her childhood and dreams by failing to do more to protect the environment. getting behind the leader. labour's conference vote to back jeremy corbyn at the next election. the party won't campaign to remain in the eu. coming up in the next half hour. elizabeth warren moves ahead ofjoe biden in a new poll, making her the candidate to beat four months before the iowa caucus. dancing to their own tune. prince harry and meghan arrive in africa with baby archie, for their first official overseas tour as a family.
7:31 pm
unlike the endless, complex, russian investigation, the latest charge facing donald trump is very simple to understand. the president asked a foreign leader to investigate his political opponent. think about that. an american president freelancing an investigation to a foreign government on a political adversary. and on a call that was recorded. what's more, the president has admitted it. he has admitted that when he spoke to the ukranian president volodymyr zelensky earlier this summer, he urged him to investigate what remain unsubstantiated corruption allegations against former vice presidentjoe biden and his son hunter, who in 2014 had become the director of a ukranian gas company. and today, mr trump made no apology. he doubled down. i had a phone call with the president of ukraine.
7:32 pm
everybody knows it. it's just a democrat witchhunt. here we go again. they failed with russia. they failed with recession. they failed with everything. and now they are bringing this up. the one who's got the problem is biden because you look at biden did, biden did what they would like to have me do, except for one problem, i didn't do it. the admission comes after the administration refused to release transcripts of the conversation to congress and denied holding up aid to ukraine. the reports are fueling democratic calls for his impeachment. on saturday, alexandria ocasio—cortez tweeted that "the democratic party's refusal to impeach" trump is a "national scandal". and while house speaker nancy pelosi has been hesitant to embrace that call, this incident may be opening the door, with her calling it a grave new chapter of lawlessness. on wednesday, president trump and his ukranian counterpart are scheduled to meet on the sidelines of the un. we can go to new york now and speak with ron christie, former advisor to george w bush.
7:33 pm
if the president is convinced about these unsubstantiated rumours about hunter, why wouldn't you just call in the fbi? good evening, christian. i think this is a case where the president of the united states made a mistake by going to the ukrainian president and making, allegedly, these calls for the president to look into a political opponent's son. why wouldn't you go to the fbi? this should have been handled candidly at the national security council level rather that the presidential level. the fact he has elevated it to this point is going to make it a very difficult week for him in the un general assembly in new york. we await the transcript and he says it's a private conversation and he won't release it, not yet come anyway, if the president was threatening to withhold military aid from the ukrainians, unless the ukrainian
7:34 pm
president investigated his political rival, would that be an impeachable offence? i don't think so, i think the president, as the chief executive of the executive branch, has the ability to withhold military assistance and money for any reason or no reason at all to another country. countries are not automatically entitled to american taxpayer dollars. that being said, of course, the political optics of this, if that comes out to be substantially true, would be a very politically damaging one for the president. we will have to wait to see what is in the transcript. sooner or later, it is going to come out. we heard earlier from aoc, calling for impeachment. republicans are starting to speak out. you have got mitt romney tweeting earlier, that if the president had pressured the ukrainian president to investigate abel edgar rival, it would be troubling in the extreme. "critical for the fax to come out".
7:35 pm
is effectively endorsing a congressional enquiry? where do the rest of the republicans stand on this? good afternoon, michelle. i must admit, every time we turn on the news, it is another democrat calling to impeach the president. impeachment in our constitution is a high crime or misdemeanour. this has only happened twice, andrewjohnson and of course bill clinton. the notion we are going to take this very significant tool in our constitution and wave it around every time people get upset with the president is troubling. that being said, the republicans, like all responsible americans, should wait back and see what the facts are. if there are facts that there has been a high crime or misdemeanour which of course is not a legal standard, then we should take it from there but otherwise, cooler heads should and must prevail in the united states. so you don't necessarily agree with mitt romney? perhaps he isjumping agree with mitt romney? perhaps he is jumping the agree with mitt romney? perhaps he isjumping the gun at agree with mitt romney? perhaps he is jumping the gun at this stage? look, i used to work with him and i have great respect for him but this is also a political rival of donald
7:36 pm
trump who did not get the nomination and did not get a post as secretary of state. listening to mitt romney at thisjuncture, of state. listening to mitt romney at this juncture, it of state. listening to mitt romney at thisjuncture, it might of state. listening to mitt romney at this juncture, it might sound a bit more like sour grapes than somebody who is actually calling for a responsible investigation. isn't there in the enormous hypocrisy here, though? his campaign manager was jailed for what he was doing in the ukraine. his two sons are working overseas, in overseas territories, pushing the trump name, while he has been the president and yet he is picking on hunter biden who to all intents and purposes may be doing the same thing, i don't know but isn't it huge hypocrisy?” don't think any politicians‘ children don‘t think any politicians‘ children should benefit on the politician‘s i have is. sure, hunter biden got $50,000 a month allegedly from ukraine and was on air force two with his dad when he went there and got $1.5 billion in private equity from the chinese, i don‘t
7:37 pm
think any son or daughter of any politician should gain financially from that parent‘s position. i don‘t ca re from that parent‘s position. i don‘t care whether it is a trump child or a biden child, it isjust improper in our politics. we are going to have to leave it there but we will pick up the topic in washington, where i am joined by a former cia officer, evan mcmullen. i wanted to start with this idea of quid pro quo. we don‘t know yet, could this will be put to bed if the trump administration would release the transcripts? well, we certainly need to see the transcripts. we need more information. the president is not denying what happened. in fact, he is now admitting that he raised the issue ofjoe biden, his primary political rival in the us right now, and joe biden‘s sun, with the ukrainian leadership and president. we don‘t know exactly what was said and how. we need that. the american people need that information. there
7:38 pm
isa people need that information. there is a whistle—blower complaint that by law has to be turned over to the people‘s representatives in congress and that has not been done yet. the person making that decision, the director of national intelligence, is due to appear before congress this week so we will hear from him what his justification is. this week so we will hear from him what hisjustification is. there this week so we will hear from him what his justification is. there are reports that there has been enormous pressure put on him from the white house not to turn over that whistle—blower complaint. we need more information and mitt romney, the only republican really speaking strongly so far, from congress on the matter, he is not calling for impeachment. he is simply calling for the facts to be known. that seems to me to be a very prudent next step. you heard in the sound bite from donald trump, basically pointing the finger, saying people should be looking atjoe biden and his son. we also heard from ron christie, saying this is a political conversation that is happening at the moment and that when you are talking about donald trump, and that conversation with the ukrainian
7:39 pm
leader, it is a political issue, not a legal one, yet. i was curious, should we be looking at the two things side by side? do they carry different weight? i will say that what we know now is there is a whistle—blower complaint from an intelligence of a seller that went to the inspector general of the us intelligence community, who made a judgment that this is something urgent national security importance. —— from an intelligence officer. they think it needs to go to congress and by the way, the inspector general is a trump appointees. this is not a partisan person, somebody acting out of democratic loyalties or something. trump himself appointed him. he is saying this is an urgent national security interest and therefore needs to go to congress. that is what we know. we know their description and trump‘s description and a bit from the ukrainians but i think that is enough for us to say that this has gone beyond simply political. what we know already, people who don‘t have a political axe to grind with the president are
7:40 pm
telling us that this is an important national security issue, so let‘s see the facts. but the thing is, aren‘t we fast approaching a constitutional equilibria come here? whereby the president can do practically anything he wants as long as he has 34 votes in the senate. i think that is a very important question and observation. essentially, what we have is foreign interference in the 2016 election. there was a department ofjustice investigation into that and the trump campaign. there was wrongdoing, evidence of wrongdoing found. but the president, especially on obstruction, also that the president welcomed and planned to benefit from foreign, russian interference, but the president and our country can‘t be indicted while he or she is in office. so he escaped and he was very involved in attem pts escaped and he was very involved in atte m pts to escaped and he was very involved in attempts to obstruct that investigation. he escaped accountability on that front. then it went to congress and the
7:41 pm
president very shrewdly understood that congress did not have the will to ta ke that congress did not have the will to take action against him, to impeach him. the republicans still stand closely by his side and the democrats think that their best shot was to simply beat him in the polls in 2020. what i believe is the democrats and congress are viewing this situation far too conventionally, while the president is saying to himself, "i have escaped legal accountability. i have escaped legal accountability. i have escaped accountability at the hands of congress. they are not going to act against me. therefore, the only people who can hold me accountable are the american people and i have shown that i can, with foreign interference, win elections and ove rco m e interference, win elections and overcome their ability to hold me accountable". so that is what is going to do. if congress does not act, he has all the incentives in the world to go out and now, using the world to go out and now, using the powers of the presidency, come hell, even if he can, foreign interference again on his behalf so he can overcome that last check on his power which really comes from
7:42 pm
the people through elections, if we have free and fair elections in 2020. evan, thank you, talking us through the situation. we are still over four months away from the first democratic caucus in iowa. but there is movement, significant movement, in the democratic presidential field. for the first time, elizabeth warren has overtaken her 2020 rivaljoe biden, in a poll of iowa democratic voters. here it is. 22% of those polled say the senator from massuchussets is their first choice for president. joe biden is at 20%. bernie sanders, the us senatorfrom vermont, has fallen to third place with 11%. no other candidate reaches double digits. we are still over a year away, let‘s remind ourselves of that. maybe a bit early to call it a two horse race at this stage. but there is no sign as yet that the others are closing the gap. let‘s talk to anna palmer, the senior washington correspondent for politico.
7:43 pm
thank you forjoining us. i have been studying these figures today. i wa nt to been studying these figures today. i want to have a look at this graph, which i have pulled out. these are the numbers behind the numbers. they explain a bit why elizabeth warren is starting to close the gap. they asked people where there they call quest for hillary clinton or bernie sanders in 2016. look at bernie sanders, he is pulling no voters from those who voted for hillary clinton in 2016. elizabeth warren is pulling 22%, bridging the gap, bringing the two side of the party together. what we see in those numbers is what we have anecdotally seen numbers is what we have anecdotally seen all summer, where you have seen bigger crowds for elizabeth warren. she is connecting beyond just the plans, that is one of her strong suits, she is selling the opposite of donald trump. for every problem, she has a plan. it shows how strong her ground game is in iowa, which,
7:44 pm
you know, they go there frequently and they have a lot of starters on the ground. she spends hours and hours doing selfies with people who come to her rallies. i think what the number shows is that there is some momentum, thatjoe biden does and should be concerned. one of the concerns has always been with elizabeth warren that she would not beat donald trump but this is another set of figures that look at her electability and unity that actually, people are now starting be convinced that she can do this, that she can pull it off. 22% think she can beat trump and 22% think biden can beat trump and 22% think biden can beat trump and 22% think biden can beat trump. what do you make of that? i think one of the big assets that? i think one of the big assets thatjoe biden had going into this primary race was that in all the polls, people said he was the most likely candidate to be able to beat donald trump, and when you are talking about the democratic base voters, that is all they care about.
7:45 pm
they just want to beat trump. they don‘t want this to necessarily find the perfect candidate. he was not necessarily the most energetic —— energising candidate for a lot of primary voters. this is a real shift for elizabeth warren but the question marta medley be beyond these numbers, will she also be a major motivating factor for republicans? republicans don‘t like her, so if they don‘t like donald trump, they will still potentially go out in droves to make sure elizabeth warren is also not president. does this mean we will start to see republicans talking more about her? they have been focused on joe biden, more about her? they have been focused onjoe biden, you can start to see the contours of how they will paint him, currently, with the scandal over ukraine. are we going to hear them start talking about elizabeth warren more? certainly, the president has attacked elizabeth warren on the trail time and again but clearly, his campaign has been most focused on joe but clearly, his campaign has been most focused onjoe biden, and as you mentioned, the ukraine issue is something they have gone on and on about for the last couple of weeks
7:46 pm
in terms of allies and others. but he has, as soon as she, if she continues to rise and becomes a more viable force in iowa, new hampshire and other states, you will see the president and his allies attacking her, i‘m sure, the same kind of calls of pocahontas and other derogatory nicknames will come forward. they will with very broad brush strokes try to damage as much as possible. i'm going to have to leave it there. we will see in the next few months how much this was a pivotal moment or not in the democratic primary race. this is beyond 100 days. still to come — who won and who lost? we‘ll look at the best of the ceremony, red carpet and fashion from last night‘s emmy awards. this week, as part of a special project the bbc is taking a close look at one city, stoke—on—trent, and talking to people there about the issues that matter to them. on wednesday, i will be there, but first, here‘s a look
7:47 pm
at the charities having a big impact on people‘s lives. rebecca wood reports. hey, mummy! it‘s really nice to be in this family because i get to help mummy a lot with her tablets. for six—year—old bethany and her twin sisters... is that three? ..looking after mum is part of everyday life. when mummy bangs her head, that normally sets off her seizures. we just have to leave mummy. when she‘s on the stairs and she falls, i always hold her so she doesn‘t. get changed, get her tablets, help with a lot of things that a normal nine—year—old wouldn't have to do. anneka suffers from multiple sclerosis and epilepsy. help from dad and daughters is life—saving. i'm so proud every day of my daughters. i'm their mum. i'm meant to be the one that cares for them, not them caring for me. are we going to make some sandwiches, then? caring for mum on top of busy school days means the girls need a break,
7:48 pm
and that‘s where a local charity comes in. it gives my children time to not worry about mummy. they can go, they can play, they can do art. north staffs carers helped 6,000 people last year. four years ago, the charity lost a bid for council funding but support from volunteers and other grants keep the doors open. across my home city of stoke—on—trent, there are more than 350 registered charities. many of them are small and they don‘t have many staff. they don‘t often make the national headlines and they have to fight for funding. but the work that they do in the local community does make a difference. regardless of where the money comes from, charities say they have to keep going for families like anneka‘s. without them, my children wouldn't be who they are. we love you to the moon and back. rebecca wood, bbc news, stoke—on—trent.
7:49 pm
the duke and duchess of sussex have arrived in south africa for their first overseas royal visit since their son archie was born in may. it is their first official tour as a family. the couple spent their first day visiting a township outside cape town, with meghan telling crowds she was with them both as a woman of colour, and as their sister. we‘re joined now from cape town by vanity fair royal editor katie nichol. it isa it is a more low—key affair than normal, no state dinners, no tiaras, or very low key. you are quite right, no state dinners or tiaras, in fact, we did not even get what we are relatively used to when it comes to royal tours, which is the traditional welcome, the red carpet rolled out at the airport. you know, i think with the fact they are travelling with archie, i think you are seeing that reflected in the itinerary, they did not want to do the official welcome ceremony at the airport. they got straight to work. they literally got off the plane and
7:50 pm
went to freshen up at the official residence where they are staying and within two hours of landing, they we re within two hours of landing, they were at the nyanga township. this is one of the most dangerous townships in south africa. the couple were welcomed with open arms. it was a wonderful atmosphere down there with singing and dancing. they both seemed genuinely delighted to be there. i get the impression this trip is about rolling up their sleeves, getting to work, forgetting the tiaras and the state dinners, they want to meet the people of south africa and see the challenges that are facing particularly young people but also women. there is a real focus on people but also women. there is a realfocus on women people but also women. there is a real focus on women and empowering women and young girls over here. it isa women and young girls over here. it is a really eclectic programme. you can see the couple are going for less of the things that we perhaps associated with the traditional royal tour but very much reflective of what they do. briefly, how important is this for them? they‘ve had some pretty bad press lately, a
7:51 pm
lot of it centring on travel and hypocrisy to do with climate change and emissions. i think it is hugely important and they are aware of the importance of the tour. it really needs to go well. i was told by sources close to the couple that they want it to go well, they are going to work hard. they really want to claw back some of the popularity they enjoyed after the royal wedding. i think in south africa, they can probably do just that. they we re they can probably do just that. they were certainly welcomed with open arms today. thank you forjoining us. arms today. thank you forjoining us. i wasjust arms today. thank you forjoining us. i was just reading today, you know when the queen came to the throne in 1953, she undertook an official commonwealth tour and visited 13 countries over six months, leaving prince charles and princess anne behind with her mother and the nannies. so it was very different back then if you were a royal child. you got left behind. but archie is on the trip. very different. all of that was captured in the
7:52 pm
round. yes, poor old charles left behind, looking through the window! what‘s an award show without some shocks and surprises? last night was the 2019 emmy awards, and following in the footsteps of this year‘s oscars, there was no host. there was the game of thrones victory lap, the unexpected performance of flea bag, some touching speeches, and of course, some awkward red carpet moments. for more on last night‘s ceremony we arejoined now by elahe izad, pop culture writer from the washington post. what were some of the biggest shocks for you last night? i think fleabag cleaning up as it did was a huge surprise. it was considered kind of a dark horse. phoebe waller—bridge took the acting prize, over julia—louise dreyfus and if she had won that for the final season of vee, she would have made history,
7:53 pm
she has won that award six times before so phoebe waller—bridge was i surprised as anybody in the audience that she had won but she also won the writing award and the top comedy prize which was to the delight of the critics and fans of that show, the critics and fans of that show, the first season of fleabag came out in 2016 and a second season was a very beloved. i am going to resign and become sandra oh‘s agent. i reckon i could do a betterjob. she is an 8—0 loose at the emmy awards, she lost out last it and she loves tojodie comer she lost out last it and she loves to jodie comer her colleague she lost out last it and she loves tojodie comer her colleague on telling eve last night he probably was better in the second series? yes, her co—star won and i think that show has really put sandra oh on the mat in a different way. she has hosted saturday night live, and kind of become a cultural icon in a new way. even though she has not won for the role quite yet, she is definitely back on the map and people are talking about her, and new roles are opening up for her.
7:54 pm
just because you don‘t walk away with an emmy award, it does not mean you have lost necessarily.” with an emmy award, it does not mean you have lost necessarily. i am glad you have lost necessarily. i am glad you mention saturday night live because that and this week with john oliver, the two comedy shows continuing to clear up. yes, saturday night live consistently wins in that category, for the sketch comedy series, it is a really ha rd sketch comedy series, it is a really hard for any other show to compete against it. it‘s been on the air for so long and it is almost like you can predict that show will win. last week tonight with john oliver can predict that show will win. last week tonight withjohn oliver is more interesting is because it has only been on since 2014 but it consistently wins, it has pioneered the in—depth analysis it does through comedy and other shows are trying to replicate it. you have the patriot act on netflix and other shows doing something similar but the depth of the writing and research that happens onjohn oliver‘s show consistently wins and it is no surprise. very quickly, can
7:55 pm
you tell us, for those of us who will be sitting in front of the tv this winter, what box sets should we be looking out for? >> which accepts? —— which box sets question up from last night?m which accepts? —— which box sets question up from last night? it will steer me through the winter. chernobyl cleaned up as well as flea bag, chernobyl cleaned up as well as fleabag, so those two and another dead surprisingly well was ozark on netflix so those are shows that you can takea netflix so those are shows that you can take a chance to binge and they are not going anywhere, they are on the platform and you can watch them. i will take your advice, very good, i have seen chernobyl and it is dark. you need to go out and play on the flowers after you have watched it. sandra oh and i have had a thing. she was on a train...” didn‘t know! thing. she was on a train...” didn't know! i got on a train at putney and i did a double take and so did she! so she‘s obviously into beyond 100 days and i kind of like
7:56 pm
great‘s anatomy so i‘m sticking up for her, she deserves an emmy and i will tell her next time i see her on the train. we will see you tomorrow. hello. if you remember the weather last week, you would have remembered high pressure and sunshine, fairly chilly nights. this week it is looking decidedly autumnal with low pressure dominating the scene. spells of wet and windy weather followed by sunshine and showers but on the plus side, the knights will be quite mild thanks to these south—westerly winds. low pressure nearby to end monday and into tuesday, plenty of isobars on the map and weather fronts so a pretty wet night to come and fairly windy. the rain tapping up to become heavy, may be thundery, across parts of wales and the south—west towards the end of the night. —— popping up. on the plus side, though, temperatures not falling below 12—15 so a mild night for all. as we head into
7:57 pm
tuesday, low pressure with us still, early rain tending to clear north—eastwards but the next little feature which contains the remnants of what was hurricane humberto will bring a spell of windy weather especially across southern parts of the british isles. tuesday, heavy rainfor many the british isles. tuesday, heavy rain for many but then strong and gusty wind coming into play later in the day, particularly in southern england and towards wales. the rain moves northwards and eastwards through the morning. you can see the brighter echoes which indicate some embedded thunderstorms, perhaps some lightning for it in scotland and central or eastern england most favourably, and heavy and thundery showers pushing into the south—west as the wind picks up. temperatures, looking at the mid to upper teens celsius for most. i will zoom in to show you where the strongest wind will be, likely gusting 40—50 mph across south—western england and along the south coast, too, is that feature moves in later on tuesday, and during tuesday night. eventually
7:58 pm
it clears into the near continent and wednesday will have a brief ridge of high pressure building in before the next low pressure moves in on thursday and friday, bringing yet more unsettled weather. it sta rts yet more unsettled weather. it starts off fairly windy with outbreaks of rain across southern and south—eastern areas on wednesday. that will eventually clear away, the wind slowly easing down, quite a bit of cloud across northern areas with perhaps a few showers, probably the best of the sunny spells for england and wales but with a lighter wind, and may be a bit more sunshine, it might feel a touch warmer. but like i mentioned the mid week onwards staying u nsettled the mid week onwards staying unsettled thanks to low pressure and it could turn cooler for a time across the north of the uk is well into the weekend.
7:59 pm
8:00 pm
hundreds of thousands are stranded and trips have been ruined. we have looked forward to this for a long time, had the wedding injuly, and we have spent months waiting for this. absolutely totally gutted. after a brexit showdown at the labour party conference, jeremy corbyn‘s policy on staying neutral triumphs over those who wanted to back remain. teenage climate campaigner greta thunberg delivers an angry address at the un climate summit in new york.

79 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on